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January 13, 1982     Journal Opinion
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January 13, 1982
 

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Volume 117, Number 2 Serwng Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont '4 l  SP 3!|(3 I0 January 13, 1982 l Oxbow settles out of court School gets $675,000 for leakin00 BRADFORD-- Lawyers Tuesday, Jan. 5inMontpelier, specifically voted to approve representing two sides in a three-way law suit involving the installation of a leaking roof at Oxbow High School have settled out of court with the manufacturer of the leaking roof materials agreeing to pay Oxbow High School $675,000 in com- pensation. The settlement was reached after two days of consultation between lawyers for GAF and Sten Lium, a St. Johnsbury GAF has 15 days to complete payment of the $675,000 to the school. If the 15-day deadline is not met, the company is required under the terms of the settlement to pay an ad- ditional 16 percent interest charge on the amount of compensation, according to Orange East Supervisory Union Superintendent John Fontana. The Oxbow District no. 30 School Board convened in an attorney representing Oxbow emergency session Monday, High School. Under the Jan. 4 to approve the agreement, reached on agreement with GAF and Contractor found for " Thetford pitched roof I : :;;;i :): : : L LOCAL HUNTER SHOOTS WILD BOAR-- Arthur Joy of West Bath stands next IS to the 183 pound wild boar he shot. Inset shows the huge fangs protruding from the -- boar's mouth. See Gary Moore's column inside for story. TIIETFORD-The The(ford school board has found a hidder for their long awaited contract In replace the leaking flat roof with a drier more energy efficient pitched roof. At their school board meeting, last w the school boa rd accepted a bid of $90,763 for the project from Nathan llill Construction Company of Thetford Center. Work on the roof is expected in begin this summer. After voters had first ap- proved an $85,000 bond issued for the project at a special town meeting held last Oct. 15, a deadline for the project had been set for Febrtmry. But after monlhs of receiving bids from construction companies that ranged anywhere from $I0,(H)0 Io $IS.(X)0 higher than what they had availabk', the school board decided to modify some of the specificalions for the project and at a l)eeember meeting decided In extend the com- plelion deadline to August, i 982. Last week, the school board also awarded a $3200 contract h) Sorell Construction of ('oncord. VI. to build a sup- porting frost wall under the front eat ra nee of t he school. The pilched roof was designed by Pantel:l'hrall Associal( of E. Thetford to eliminale problems with the present roof and In increase the roof's insulation. Sch,ml officials are said to t, planning on making up the difference between the cost of the Io l)rojects and the $85.1)00 they have available \\; ilhm lhe school's budget. the terms of the settlement at their Thursday, Jan. 7 ' : meeting. Little Effect on Taxes Fontana told the Journal Opinion at the school board's Thursday meeting that he did not expect the settlement to have much noticeable effect on the school tax for next year. "We will be able to leave out some cost for roof repair when we prepare next year's budget," said Fontana, "but not enough for a decrease in taxes." However, increasers in the school's tax rate in order to compensate for replacement of most of the roof, which the school has already begun paying for by borrowing the money, now may be avoided because of the settlement with GAF. Fontana said that the result of the settlement is a new roof for the school with no cost to the taxpayers. Taxpayers at a school meeting in May had approved a $295,000 bond levy to cover replacement of the roof, a project that has, for the most part, been completed this fall. The school board has already approved approximately $175,000 in payments for the project. Case Not Over At Thursday's meeting, Fontana told the school board that he would be testifying in court that Friday in the suit between the third party of the suit, Rodd Roofing Inc., and G AF. Rodd Roofing is the roofing contractor that in- stalled the roof 12 years ago at Oxbow and installed another Treatment plant begins operation New system workin00 smoothly WOODSVILLE--The new Woodsville sewage treatment facility that has been under construction since last spring is now operating and running quite well, according to the plant's supervisor who will operate the plant for the precinct of Woodsville. "Sometimes when they turn these things on you find out you've got water flowing through the wrong pipes; but not here," said plant super- visor Brian Carroll at last week's Woodsville Precinct Commissioners' meeting. "Everything here is working good." Carroll called the work on the project, performed by Mid-State Construction Company of Pittsfield, NH., "a very professional job--top shelf." He also praised the ROOF REPLACEMENT-- Workers are shown system's designers, replacing the leaking roof on the Oxbow High School Environmental Engineers building earlier this year. Inc., of Concord. N.H., for a system he expects he will have GAF roof at the Blue Moun- million in damages against no problems with. lain Union school in Wells GAF--also the most awarded The pumps were turned on River. in a lawsuit in Vermont and tnks began to fill at the Both schools have filed suit history. $1 million in damages plant.on Tuesday, Dec. 29, but against GAF and Rodd went to the Blue Mountain Carroll said it would take six Roofing regarding theleaking Union School and Rodd to 12 weeks for the plant "to be roofs. After the longest trialin Roofing was awarded $1.3 operating where it should be" Vermont history (seven and million. That decision is now because of time needed to let one-half weeks) Rodd Roofing being appealed by GAF. the bacterial and chemical admitted liability for the roof Attorneys for GAF had won processes of the system "set and joined the plaintiff last a change of venue for court in." year in Blue Mountain's proceedings in Oxbow's Earlier this fall, engineers lawsuit, lawsuit on Sept. 10, 1981. The When the Blue Mountain trial was moved to suit was over, a jury presided Washington County Superior over by .Judge Stephen D. Court in Montpelier but Judge Martin in Orange County Martin was still presiding Superior Court. awarded $2.3 (pleaseturntopage4) 00roup asks for "coasbamt" policy Teachers seek changes in Oxbow discipline Bar admissions public hearings to be hem $ ' RADFORD-- Present because of pressures of berg. mittee meeting in two years." between the two sides, but he Oxbow. % OFFethods used in the discipline professionalism, teachers at ClearutRules The school board had warned. "Communication Coffin said that, however, IHIIII,INGTON- Philip H. tinuing legal education for Oxbow high school and Oxbow have been "reluctant However, the teachers were debated earlier this fall between administration and the students' eonsensus for the lh)ff. Chairman of the Ver- practicing lawyers. To this ,-Unior high students are said to talk with the community after "a more concrete whether or not to discontinue teachers isa two-way street." most favored solution to nmnl Supremc Court's Special on(t. the committee has ilri[UlltO be ineffective and in need of about what really goes on policy." At least two teachers the printing of the large Social studies teacher discipline problems did not Sludv ('ommilh'e on Bar, scheduled public hearings in .... reform according to a con- here." overseeing the project had predicted that the treatment plant would be in operation "hopefully by the end of September." Itowever, ac- cording to spokesmen for Environment Engineers Inc., delays in completing the project by November were due to what they saw as a relatively slow start this summer by Mid-State Con- struction and due to personnel shake-ups that Mid-State along with librarian Shirley ensus of over 30 members of Several teachers listed Beresford called for "a set of , __ ,She Oxbow Teachers' examples of discipline clear-cut rules on paper that [l[IHH[ASsociation. problems associated with will be enforced." Beresford The large group voiced what various areas of the school pressed the administration .___.__avas.. termed as frustration building--with most of the and schooiboardmembersfor " . . . .ltthheCU;r?ot?lIcPc t pol.ly blame for the school's an explanation of the status of 4 problems directed towards the the school's student handbook #e hooimeeting held Thursday school's administration. Imliey and of the school Sfternoon Jan.7. Principal Richard Rothenberg board's Student Rules i According to an opening and Vice principal Charles Committee. The answer that tatement by teachers' Ottina remained mostly silent she received was that both the . Issoeiation representative throughout the period in which committee and strict en- rene Croteau, teachers at t he teachers were in the room- forcement of the handbook bXhow feel that their efforts to Rothenberg spoke only once rules have fallen by the eai with students who defending students' rights in wayside over the past couple lisbehave at the school are the event that they are of years. r RS&i handbooks for distribution to every student for cost reasons and because, as Rothenborg had said at the time, "most of the books just get thrown away." Teachers at the meeting slressed that what they wanted was basically a list of concrete rules, "a kind of ten comnmndments on a sheet of paper" and for "the rules to be enforced at the front office." ()range East Supervisory tlnion Superintendent John Fontana strongly defended Oxbow's principals Rothen- lwrence Coffin offered some insight into the depth of the discipline problem by citing a recent survey of students by Oxbow's student council on what students feel the main problems regarding discipline are at the school. Coffin said the problems that the teachers felt were paramount--abusive language, excessive free time and "making out in the halls" were not consistant with sluden! concerns. According to the survey, students rated damage lo school property, differ in substance from what the leachers were asking from t he administration. What teachers and students seemed In agree on, according to the survey, was not that the school needed more rules hut regular deterrents to those who break them. BRADFOIH) The Union lligh School District No. 30 IOxbow lligh School) Board will hold special meetings on: Wedn(day. Jan. 13, 1982 from 2:00-6:1H1 pall. Tuesday, Jan. 19. 1982 al 7:{10 p.m. experienced this fall including a change in construction superiors. Connections Completed Admissions and ('ontinuing thre,, different areas of the According to precinct I,egal Educalion for Attorneys Stale to hear public testimony commissioners, the site hook- annonnced today three public I rom interested persons said ups for connection to the new hem'ings h) be held by the iloff system are completed and comnfillee during the month The committee encourages ol.lanuary 1982. indivi,luals interested in Ih)t'f said the committee is canmmntingonthesematlers. anxious In hear from at- 1o do so in writing, if possible, lorneys and olhT interested ('olnnlents should be mailed citizens concerning the In: Study ('omnfitlee, P.O. n]alldale of the committee I;ox 567. "lurlington, VI' 0.5402 hich encompasses the or can b( brought to a public most of Woodsville is now running on the new system. Commissioner Joseph Mac- cini said one remaining section of the system will be brought into operation after an alarm system has been installed. slantlards and procedures for session. Each hearing will Carroll said it would be "a admission to thc practice of Ix,gin at fnur o'clock p.m. with few" weeks before the law in Vermont. including but a (linner break, if necessary, precinct of Woodsviile takes nol limited to the bar and continuing lhereafler as over controlof the system and exanmmlion, and the six- r,,quired, that the plant is still operating | andermined at the front brought into the front office "To my knowledge," said berg and Otlina and their drugs and alcohol, litter and The meetings were 'rice." Croteau and others after being accused of com- school board and committee performance as ad- debris generated in the scheduled to work on the 1982- larged that programs such mitti0g an offense. "They member Judith Forward at ministrators. Fontana agreed school's smoking area, and 83 school budget. Meetings s detention and study hall have the right to tell their side Thursday's meeting, "there with the teachers that more general litter around the halls will be held at Oxbow ttigh are not working" and=that of the story," said Rothen- hasn't been a (rules) corn- comnmnication is needed as the major problems at School. Uncensored mail from Poland Ten days into Martial Law Editor's Note" The following is a second first-hand account of life in Poland m, ader Martin[Law written by Bruce MacLean. force in Warsaw was Thur- heads with riot sticks, the reports that some army units to their dormitory the other stricken crowd fled the have refused to use force on night found their entrances lIa cLean s first letter, describing the events in Warsaw on sday, Dec. 17. Fearing panic demonstrations on the ltth area. Bystanders watching workers, blocked by security forces. he first day of Martial Law, appeared on page one of the anniversary of the 1970 this, started cailing the militia "Friends that are connected The security forces blamed }ec. 30 issue of the Journal Opinion. MacLean is an Oxbow tigh School social studies teacher currently living in War- Gdansk Riots, the security 'Gestapo' and "Fascist Pigs.' with Solidarity have given us the students for all the i( aw on a two-year leave of absenee from Oxbow. Both letters forces launched a show of Some of the demonstrators their books that deal with {roubles and said if they ere written during the recent period in which all outdoing force. In Victory Square sought sanctuary in the Solidarity, Eastern Europe, wanted to go inside that they where the demonstration was church, but the militia went in Soviet Union, etc. They are would have to crawl by them mail and news reports from Poland were subject to cen- to have taken place, the after them and dragged them afraid that the secret police on their knees. orship. However, because of the content of MacLeans ac- Diplomat Searched :ounts and the small notes that have come attached to them, security forces were there in out, healing them with their will storm in and arrest them mass. Armored Personal riot sticks as they went along, for possessing 'Counter "A member of the American tn e have no reason to believe that either account has been Carriers, trucks, and light Later on that night there was a Revolutionary Literature '. Embassy was stopped at one ;r asred" vehicles "A friend who works in a of the road blocks the other tanks sealed off the square at parade of military up  , all points. I went to the square and down the main streets of hospital said that manypeople night and told to open his [iU 'After ten days of Martial Comparisons are being made to see what was going on and Warsaw in an obvious attempt are dying because of a drastic trunk. The diplomat told them ,XER aw m Pmand the thing that with the Stalinist days of the found many more army and to intimidate the people. They shortage of blood in the that he refused and that the ticks in my mm 'LtEti "e/:ih/s :dt l i" mate fe'nl!herostas early 50's and many Poles will militia men- all equipped were successful, hospitals. The director of Geneva and Helsinki accords L -'(IOver thisland Upunitl hangs tell you that what's happening t'ith automatic rifles and riot Militia Does Hospitals appealed to gave him the right as a now is much worse. People slicks - than potential Dirty Work Jaruzelski to open up phones diplomat to refuse car and | :ago, the '" ml0aays that have absolutely no demonstrators. "It is important to realize between llospitals so that body searches. The security iweenPo ngg-est difference connection with Solidarity are "Fifteen minutes after I had the distinction between the transfer of medicineand blood forces said that this was war 'astern anr and the rest of being arrested or havesimply left the square there was Army which is mainly made could be made, thereby and they didn't give a damn ,* ence of fe;r.Pepeo, the disappeared -- members of trouble at the church of the up of young conscrip and the sparing patients lives, about theGenevaandHelsinki ', were the intellectual community: Holy Cross, a mere quarter of hated militia. For the most General Jaruzelski was said to accords, tie was forced to ,-,re!t  much free to say doctors, lawyers, actors, etc. a mile from Victory square. A part, it has been the militia reply: 'this is war and openlhetrunkofhiscar. IIImy "rig they wanted. The tension is wearing on large group of people had met and the secret police which sacrifices must be made.' "One Middle School prin- ;:7l[nre. Go to Polish frienl, people's nerves and is visible at the church -- mostly young has been doing the dirty "Children of parents who cipal said that members of the - ,apartments and they will  . talk people the security forces work-- breaking up demon- hdve been taken by the leaching staff have been . !to you m whispers. The rad everywhere. ' ,,v=.-- i "Although the Armyandthe arrived and announced over strations and breaking in aulhorilies are being put into authorized by the Military u[ televlsio,, ...m ,-_ . 0 .... u Will [J DU[ on V i ' - SO P e. won t be able to hear Militia-Police are still in the loudspeakers to clear the area apartments in the middle of stale orphanages and cannot Regime to submit a list of all " 'natmeyaresa,,i,, streets, stopping ears, opening at once. When the crowd night and dragging people be seen or looked after by children who wore Solidarity rl" -' "n,.__b__ 7g'Z nr uptrunks, asking for idea- didn't, the militia moved in on away. The Army has been grandparents or any other pins or badges before the "They talk of not tification, and rerouting them. Using tear gas and used primarily for back up relatives, installment of Martial Law. PIERI o trust their traffic, the biggest show of bashing people over their support and there have been. "Music students returning Once schools reopen in the month and four-year Monday, Jan. II clerkships. 4:q) p.m. White River Jun- Th,, conndttec is also cti,,n. Vermont l)istrict Court, charged t'ith reviewing the Soulh Main Street, f[,asil)ilily ,1t' re(luiring con- (pleaseturntopage4) net' year, they will be made to there have been reports of wear Red Scarvesasa form of frost bite and gan-grene at punishment. Red scarves are these detention centers. The a symbol of the Communist response has been over- Pioneer Youth Organization whelming. Donations of food and clothing have been which is so prominent in the Sovkl Union and the rest of pauringin. the Eastern Bloc countries. Foreigners llave Left Appeal for Donations "With the exception of "At Mass Sunday, there was Embassy personnel most an urgent appeal throughout foreigners have left Poland by churches in the Warsaw area now. Lot, the Polish Airline, for socks, underwear, has operated charters for chocolates, and vitamin-rich foreigners leaving Poland. Lot fea)ds to be donated to the has also been employed to fly church. Its destination was to prisoners to prison in neigh- the thousands of arrested horing countries--the Soviet people  including, many say, Ilnion and Czechoslovakia. priests themselves--who are Anyone leaving Poland has being detained in appalling every piece of luggage conditions. The past week has examined and must undergo a seen very (,old weather and (pleaseturntopage8) on a test basis. New Commissioner The precinct com- missioners--Maccini, Conrad Fournier and newly appointed commissioner William Cowell will be preparing a budget for the precinct for 1982 including the treatment plant, during the next few weeks. William Cowell of Highland St. in Woodsville, was ap- pointed commissioner after longlime Haverhill and Woodsville area public ser- vant Winthrop Klark moved to Florida. Klark became a commissioner after stepping down as a town selectmen, a post he held for many years. Klark is said to have been instrumental in overseeing the beginning phases of the treatment plant project. Cowell will complete the present term as an appointed commissioner until the annual Wontsville Precinct meeting in March. The cost of the project, covered mostly by federal funds, will total over $4 million on the Net' Hampshire side of the river. Wells River's new sewage pipe system is ex- pected to connect to the Woodsville Treatment Plant within the next two years. Officials in Woodsviile say they are anxious for Wells River to make the connection because until they do, Woodsviile is likely to bear the brunt of the plant's operat tonal costs. The Woodsville system includes 22,000 feet of mainline pipe, 320 house and pipe connections and two underground pumping stations besides those at the (please turn to page 4) ,/i ? ,,( Volume 117, Number 2 Serwng Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont '4 l  SP 3!|(3 I0 January 13, 1982 l Oxbow settles out of court School gets $675,000 for leakin00 BRADFORD-- Lawyers Tuesday, Jan. 5inMontpelier, specifically voted to approve representing two sides in a three-way law suit involving the installation of a leaking roof at Oxbow High School have settled out of court with the manufacturer of the leaking roof materials agreeing to pay Oxbow High School $675,000 in com- pensation. The settlement was reached after two days of consultation between lawyers for GAF and Sten Lium, a St. Johnsbury GAF has 15 days to complete payment of the $675,000 to the school. If the 15-day deadline is not met, the company is required under the terms of the settlement to pay an ad- ditional 16 percent interest charge on the amount of compensation, according to Orange East Supervisory Union Superintendent John Fontana. The Oxbow District no. 30 School Board convened in an attorney representing Oxbow emergency session Monday, High School. Under the Jan. 4 to approve the agreement, reached on agreement with GAF and Contractor found for " Thetford pitched roof I : :;;;i :): : : L LOCAL HUNTER SHOOTS WILD BOAR-- Arthur Joy of West Bath stands next IS to the 183 pound wild boar he shot. Inset shows the huge fangs protruding from the -- boar's mouth. See Gary Moore's column inside for story. TIIETFORD-The The(ford school board has found a hidder for their long awaited contract In replace the leaking flat roof with a drier more energy efficient pitched roof. At their school board meeting, last w the school boa rd accepted a bid of $90,763 for the project from Nathan llill Construction Company of Thetford Center. Work on the roof is expected in begin this summer. After voters had first ap- proved an $85,000 bond issued for the project at a special town meeting held last Oct. 15, a deadline for the project had been set for Febrtmry. But after monlhs of receiving bids from construction companies that ranged anywhere from $I0,(H)0 Io $IS.(X)0 higher than what they had availabk', the school board decided to modify some of the specificalions for the project and at a l)eeember meeting decided In extend the com- plelion deadline to August, i 982. Last week, the school board also awarded a $3200 contract h) Sorell Construction of ('oncord. VI. to build a sup- porting frost wall under the front eat ra nee of t he school. The pilched roof was designed by Pantel:l'hrall Associal( of E. Thetford to eliminale problems with the present roof and In increase the roof's insulation. Sch,ml officials are said to t, planning on making up the difference between the cost of the Io l)rojects and the $85.1)00 they have available \\; ilhm lhe school's budget. the terms of the settlement at their Thursday, Jan. 7 ' : meeting. Little Effect on Taxes Fontana told the Journal Opinion at the school board's Thursday meeting that he did not expect the settlement to have much noticeable effect on the school tax for next year. "We will be able to leave out some cost for roof repair when we prepare next year's budget," said Fontana, "but not enough for a decrease in taxes." However, increasers in the school's tax rate in order to compensate for replacement of most of the roof, which the school has already begun paying for by borrowing the money, now may be avoided because of the settlement with GAF. Fontana said that the result of the settlement is a new roof for the school with no cost to the taxpayers. Taxpayers at a school meeting in May had approved a $295,000 bond levy to cover replacement of the roof, a project that has, for the most part, been completed this fall. The school board has already approved approximately $175,000 in payments for the project. Case Not Over At Thursday's meeting, Fontana told the school board that he would be testifying in court that Friday in the suit between the third party of the suit, Rodd Roofing Inc., and G AF. Rodd Roofing is the roofing contractor that in- stalled the roof 12 years ago at Oxbow and installed another Treatment plant begins operation New system workin00 smoothly WOODSVILLE--The new Woodsville sewage treatment facility that has been under construction since last spring is now operating and running quite well, according to the plant's supervisor who will operate the plant for the precinct of Woodsville. "Sometimes when they turn these things on you find out you've got water flowing through the wrong pipes; but not here," said plant super- visor Brian Carroll at last week's Woodsville Precinct Commissioners' meeting. "Everything here is working good." Carroll called the work on the project, performed by Mid-State Construction Company of Pittsfield, NH., "a very professional job--top shelf." He also praised the ROOF REPLACEMENT-- Workers are shown system's designers, replacing the leaking roof on the Oxbow High School Environmental Engineers building earlier this year. Inc., of Concord. N.H., for a system he expects he will have GAF roof at the Blue Moun- million in damages against no problems with. lain Union school in Wells GAF--also the most awarded The pumps were turned on River. in a lawsuit in Vermont and tnks began to fill at the Both schools have filed suit history. $1 million in damages plant.on Tuesday, Dec. 29, but against GAF and Rodd went to the Blue Mountain Carroll said it would take six Roofing regarding theleaking Union School and Rodd to 12 weeks for the plant "to be roofs. After the longest trialin Roofing was awarded $1.3 operating where it should be" Vermont history (seven and million. That decision is now because of time needed to let one-half weeks) Rodd Roofing being appealed by GAF. the bacterial and chemical admitted liability for the roof Attorneys for GAF had won processes of the system "set and joined the plaintiff last a change of venue for court in." year in Blue Mountain's proceedings in Oxbow's Earlier this fall, engineers lawsuit, lawsuit on Sept. 10, 1981. The When the Blue Mountain trial was moved to suit was over, a jury presided Washington County Superior over by .Judge Stephen D. Court in Montpelier but Judge Martin in Orange County Martin was still presiding Superior Court. awarded $2.3 (pleaseturntopage4) 00roup asks for "coasbamt" policy Teachers seek changes in Oxbow discipline Bar admissions public hearings to be hem $ ' RADFORD-- Present because of pressures of berg. mittee meeting in two years." between the two sides, but he Oxbow. % OFFethods used in the discipline professionalism, teachers at ClearutRules The school board had warned. "Communication Coffin said that, however, IHIIII,INGTON- Philip H. tinuing legal education for Oxbow high school and Oxbow have been "reluctant However, the teachers were debated earlier this fall between administration and the students' eonsensus for the lh)ff. Chairman of the Ver- practicing lawyers. To this ,-Unior high students are said to talk with the community after "a more concrete whether or not to discontinue teachers isa two-way street." most favored solution to nmnl Supremc Court's Special on(t. the committee has ilri[UlltO be ineffective and in need of about what really goes on policy." At least two teachers the printing of the large Social studies teacher discipline problems did not Sludv ('ommilh'e on Bar, scheduled public hearings in .... reform according to a con- here." overseeing the project had predicted that the treatment plant would be in operation "hopefully by the end of September." Itowever, ac- cording to spokesmen for Environment Engineers Inc., delays in completing the project by November were due to what they saw as a relatively slow start this summer by Mid-State Con- struction and due to personnel shake-ups that Mid-State along with librarian Shirley ensus of over 30 members of Several teachers listed Beresford called for "a set of , __ ,She Oxbow Teachers' examples of discipline clear-cut rules on paper that [l[IHH[ASsociation. problems associated with will be enforced." Beresford The large group voiced what various areas of the school pressed the administration .___.__avas.. termed as frustration building--with most of the and schooiboardmembersfor " . . . .ltthheCU;r?ot?lIcPc t pol.ly blame for the school's an explanation of the status of 4 problems directed towards the the school's student handbook #e hooimeeting held Thursday school's administration. Imliey and of the school Sfternoon Jan.7. Principal Richard Rothenberg board's Student Rules i According to an opening and Vice principal Charles Committee. The answer that tatement by teachers' Ottina remained mostly silent she received was that both the . Issoeiation representative throughout the period in which committee and strict en- rene Croteau, teachers at t he teachers were in the room- forcement of the handbook bXhow feel that their efforts to Rothenberg spoke only once rules have fallen by the eai with students who defending students' rights in wayside over the past couple lisbehave at the school are the event that they are of years. r RS&i handbooks for distribution to every student for cost reasons and because, as Rothenborg had said at the time, "most of the books just get thrown away." Teachers at the meeting slressed that what they wanted was basically a list of concrete rules, "a kind of ten comnmndments on a sheet of paper" and for "the rules to be enforced at the front office." ()range East Supervisory tlnion Superintendent John Fontana strongly defended Oxbow's principals Rothen- lwrence Coffin offered some insight into the depth of the discipline problem by citing a recent survey of students by Oxbow's student council on what students feel the main problems regarding discipline are at the school. Coffin said the problems that the teachers felt were paramount--abusive language, excessive free time and "making out in the halls" were not consistant with sluden! concerns. According to the survey, students rated damage lo school property, differ in substance from what the leachers were asking from t he administration. What teachers and students seemed In agree on, according to the survey, was not that the school needed more rules hut regular deterrents to those who break them. BRADFOIH) The Union lligh School District No. 30 IOxbow lligh School) Board will hold special meetings on: Wedn(day. Jan. 13, 1982 from 2:00-6:1H1 pall. Tuesday, Jan. 19. 1982 al 7:{10 p.m. experienced this fall including a change in construction superiors. Connections Completed Admissions and ('ontinuing thre,, different areas of the According to precinct I,egal Educalion for Attorneys Stale to hear public testimony commissioners, the site hook- annonnced today three public I rom interested persons said ups for connection to the new hem'ings h) be held by the iloff system are completed and comnfillee during the month The committee encourages ol.lanuary 1982. indivi,luals interested in Ih)t'f said the committee is canmmntingonthesematlers. anxious In hear from at- 1o do so in writing, if possible, lorneys and olhT interested ('olnnlents should be mailed citizens concerning the In: Study ('omnfitlee, P.O. n]alldale of the committee I;ox 567. "lurlington, VI' 0.5402 hich encompasses the or can b( brought to a public most of Woodsville is now running on the new system. Commissioner Joseph Mac- cini said one remaining section of the system will be brought into operation after an alarm system has been installed. slantlards and procedures for session. Each hearing will Carroll said it would be "a admission to thc practice of Ix,gin at fnur o'clock p.m. with few" weeks before the law in Vermont. including but a (linner break, if necessary, precinct of Woodsviile takes nol limited to the bar and continuing lhereafler as over controlof the system and exanmmlion, and the six- r,,quired, that the plant is still operating | andermined at the front brought into the front office "To my knowledge," said berg and Otlina and their drugs and alcohol, litter and The meetings were 'rice." Croteau and others after being accused of com- school board and committee performance as ad- debris generated in the scheduled to work on the 1982- larged that programs such mitti0g an offense. "They member Judith Forward at ministrators. Fontana agreed school's smoking area, and 83 school budget. Meetings s detention and study hall have the right to tell their side Thursday's meeting, "there with the teachers that more general litter around the halls will be held at Oxbow ttigh are not working" and=that of the story," said Rothen- hasn't been a (rules) corn- comnmnication is needed as the major problems at School. Uncensored mail from Poland Ten days into Martial Law Editor's Note" The following is a second first-hand account of life in Poland m, ader Martin[Law written by Bruce MacLean. force in Warsaw was Thur- heads with riot sticks, the reports that some army units to their dormitory the other stricken crowd fled the have refused to use force on night found their entrances lIa cLean s first letter, describing the events in Warsaw on sday, Dec. 17. Fearing panic demonstrations on the ltth area. Bystanders watching workers, blocked by security forces. he first day of Martial Law, appeared on page one of the anniversary of the 1970 this, started cailing the militia "Friends that are connected The security forces blamed }ec. 30 issue of the Journal Opinion. MacLean is an Oxbow tigh School social studies teacher currently living in War- Gdansk Riots, the security 'Gestapo' and "Fascist Pigs.' with Solidarity have given us the students for all the i( aw on a two-year leave of absenee from Oxbow. Both letters forces launched a show of Some of the demonstrators their books that deal with {roubles and said if they ere written during the recent period in which all outdoing force. In Victory Square sought sanctuary in the Solidarity, Eastern Europe, wanted to go inside that they where the demonstration was church, but the militia went in Soviet Union, etc. They are would have to crawl by them mail and news reports from Poland were subject to cen- to have taken place, the after them and dragged them afraid that the secret police on their knees. orship. However, because of the content of MacLeans ac- Diplomat Searched :ounts and the small notes that have come attached to them, security forces were there in out, healing them with their will storm in and arrest them mass. Armored Personal riot sticks as they went along, for possessing 'Counter "A member of the American tn e have no reason to believe that either account has been Carriers, trucks, and light Later on that night there was a Revolutionary Literature '. Embassy was stopped at one ;r asred" vehicles "A friend who works in a of the road blocks the other tanks sealed off the square at parade of military up  , all points. I went to the square and down the main streets of hospital said that manypeople night and told to open his [iU 'After ten days of Martial Comparisons are being made to see what was going on and Warsaw in an obvious attempt are dying because of a drastic trunk. The diplomat told them ,XER aw m Pmand the thing that with the Stalinist days of the found many more army and to intimidate the people. They shortage of blood in the that he refused and that the ticks in my mm 'LtEti "e/:ih/s :dt l i" mate fe'nl!herostas early 50's and many Poles will militia men- all equipped were successful, hospitals. The director of Geneva and Helsinki accords L -'(IOver thisland Upunitl hangs tell you that what's happening t'ith automatic rifles and riot Militia Does Hospitals appealed to gave him the right as a now is much worse. People slicks - than potential Dirty Work Jaruzelski to open up phones diplomat to refuse car and | :ago, the '" ml0aays that have absolutely no demonstrators. "It is important to realize between llospitals so that body searches. The security iweenPo ngg-est difference connection with Solidarity are "Fifteen minutes after I had the distinction between the transfer of medicineand blood forces said that this was war 'astern anr and the rest of being arrested or havesimply left the square there was Army which is mainly made could be made, thereby and they didn't give a damn ,* ence of fe;r.Pepeo, the disappeared -- members of trouble at the church of the up of young conscrip and the sparing patients lives, about theGenevaandHelsinki ', were the intellectual community: Holy Cross, a mere quarter of hated militia. For the most General Jaruzelski was said to accords, tie was forced to ,-,re!t  much free to say doctors, lawyers, actors, etc. a mile from Victory square. A part, it has been the militia reply: 'this is war and openlhetrunkofhiscar. IIImy "rig they wanted. The tension is wearing on large group of people had met and the secret police which sacrifices must be made.' "One Middle School prin- ;:7l[nre. Go to Polish frienl, people's nerves and is visible at the church -- mostly young has been doing the dirty "Children of parents who cipal said that members of the - ,apartments and they will  . talk people the security forces work-- breaking up demon- hdve been taken by the leaching staff have been . !to you m whispers. The rad everywhere. ' ,,v=.-- i "Although the Armyandthe arrived and announced over strations and breaking in aulhorilies are being put into authorized by the Military u[ televlsio,, ...m ,-_ . 0 .... u Will [J DU[ on V i ' - SO P e. wont be able to hear Militia-Police are still in the loudspeakers to clear the area apartments in the middle of stale orphanages and cannot Regime to submit a list of all " 'natmeyaresa,,i,, streets, stopping ears, opening at once. When the crowd night and dragging people be seen or looked after by children who wore Solidarity rl" -' "n,.__b__ 7g'Z nr uptrunks, asking for idea- didn't, the militia moved in on away. The Army has been grandparents or any other pins or badges before the "They talk of not tification, and rerouting them. Using tear gas and used primarily for back up relatives, installment of Martial Law. PIERI o trust their traffic, the biggest show of bashing people over their support and there have been. "Music students returning Once schools reopen in the month and four-year Monday, Jan. II clerkships. 4:q) p.m. White River Jun- Th,, conndttec is also cti,,n. Vermont l)istrict Court, charged t'ith reviewing the Soulh Main Street, f[,asil)ilily ,1t' re(luiring con- (pleaseturntopage4) net' year, they will be made to there have been reports of wear Red Scarvesasa form of frost bite and gan-grene at punishment. Red scarves are these detention centers. The a symbol of the Communist response has been over- Pioneer Youth Organization whelming. Donations of food and clothing have been which is so prominent in the Sovkl Union and the rest of pauringin. the Eastern Bloc countries. Foreigners llave Left Appeal for Donations "With the exception of "At Mass Sunday, there was Embassy personnel most an urgent appeal throughout foreigners have left Poland by churches in the Warsaw area now. Lot, the Polish Airline, for socks, underwear, has operated charters for chocolates, and vitamin-rich foreigners leaving Poland. Lot fea)ds to be donated to the has also been employed to fly church. Its destination was to prisoners to prison in neigh- the thousands of arrested horing countries--the Soviet people  including, many say, Ilnion and Czechoslovakia. priests themselves--who are Anyone leaving Poland has being detained in appalling every piece of luggage conditions. The past week has examined and must undergo a seen very (,old weather and (pleaseturntopage8) on a test basis. New Commissioner The precinct com- missioners--Maccini, Conrad Fournier and newly appointed commissioner William Cowell will be preparing a budget for the precinct for 1982 including the treatment plant, during the next few weeks. William Cowell of Highland St. in Woodsville, was ap- pointed commissioner after longlime Haverhill and Woodsville area public ser- vant Winthrop Klark moved to Florida. Klark became a commissioner after stepping down as a town selectmen, a post he held for many years. Klark is said to have been instrumental in overseeing the beginning phases of the treatment plant project. Cowell will complete the present term as an appointed commissioner until the annual Wontsville Precinct meeting in March. The cost of the project, covered mostly by federal funds, will total over $4 million on the Net' Hampshire side of the river. Wells River's new sewage pipe system is ex- pected to connect to the Woodsville Treatment Plant within the next two years. Officials in Woodsviile say they are anxious for Wells River to make the connection because until they do, Woodsviile is likely to bear the brunt of the plant's operat tonal costs. The Woodsville system includes 22,000 feet of mainline pipe, 320 house and pipe connections and two underground pumping stations besides those at the (please turn to page 4) ,/i ? ,,(