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Bradford , Vermont
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January 13, 1982     Journal Opinion
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January 13, 1982
 

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Page 4-The Journal Opinion-Jannary 13, 1981 ii I iiiii i I Weokl v mnmper plhkod le 8redford, Voruem. Selripm res • Vermomud Neu Nempobi - $v.ee t et yeew; $6.00 (or sJu moeJl oe! of stut)e. $1|.00 por ymw md $7.00 for sh neltbs; Senkw cJlhoa heent $L00. SecHd chin poelelle paid at Orodford, VermH4t 01055. Peldhdmd by NortflkHit Pebltsbio 0 Comlmly, IRe., P.0. Jolt 178, |mdfonJ. i |1 mill u IIIIIII I III I II I I Ill MM II • WORTHEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. I , Publisher of Journal II1 Opinion Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher ;,t s 5 o ,¢ Bradford / '  Woodsville 802-222-5201  ;  .  603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper : i i i i C Ed,tor,al ,,, J i I _ __....z Keeping the lines open district junior high and high school. The teachers charge that the principal has avoided communication with them over the issue. However, on the other hand, the teachers at the meeting exhibited a remarkable degree of naivete in their perception of the accessability of the school board at their regular school board meetings. Whatever amount of effort is required by either the school's ad- ministration or its teachers, com- munication over the issue remains the key to the problem. The teachers are asking for a relatively short, concise list of rules on paper and for those rules to be enforced on a more consistant basis. When the rules committee gets together to decide on punishments for those who break the rules they should be cautioned not to rush into the folly of needs happened to the Haverhill school board and a handful of young soccer players when their school enacted on athletic alcohol policy. Severity is not the answer. The teachers at Oxbow say that con- sistency is. The point that 30 frustrated teachers were trying to make at last week's Oxbow school board meeting was not that today's Oxbow students as a group are any worse in terms of behavior than students have been in the past. What they were saying was that the policies and programs that were originally meant to control student behavior have eroded over the years and that it is time to update those policies. When the teachers had finished the presentation of their case to the school board, they left the meeting feeling a little better for having aired their feelings to the board, bringing them into the open. But they also left the room without any concrete assurances other than a tentative date in February that the school board had promised to discuss the matter. The other side of the isSUe is that the teachers seem more than wilfig to direct the final responsibility for student discipline toward the prin- cipal and vice principal of the school -- who though not infallible -- have demonstrated themselves to he at the same time, both caring individuals and two men busy with the many duties that come with running a I Letters to the Editor Former publisher stays touch' read these pieces even though I do wish to you, the Opinion I no longer lived there, and all of Bradford a very Recently I read of Rev. Happy New Year with many Terry Fullam, a Darien, Ct., good news events to come minister who studied music in throughout 1982. Bradford with KaWina Munn a Gardner Boyd few years after ! left there. I Rowayton. Ct. was happy to see the picture of the "Messiah" printed on the front page. "The chorus was To the FAiitor/ It was quite a surprise to open the Christmas issue of the Opinion and find that "Fire in Bradford Wipes Out 6 Business Establishments." Oh. no. not again, I said. Then I saw the date. Dec. 17, 1947. It has been a long time, After 34 years, spent mostly m California. Arizona and accompanied by church Washington I got a longing for organist Katrina Munn and New England and returned to harpsicordist Bruce Stevens, Connecticut where my sister both of Bradford." It is nice to lives. While lhaveroamedthe know that Bradford people west coast following my have made themselves and printing, newspaper and their town well known. photographic trades, she. who As a newspaper man and was born in East Topsham, photobrapher I do want to has been the Yankee citizen compliment you on your and stayed in one place for 40 makeup and photo reproduction. Photographs were the one thing I had looked forward to bringing to the Opinion when I went to Bradford. I truly say I'm sure 1 could not have done it any better. years. Periodically I received clippings from Yankee magazine or other publications telling of the progress of Bradford. It always has been a joy tome to Wednesday, Jan. 13 " BRADFORD: Elementary School Board, 7: 30 p.m. BRADFORD: Village Trustees, 7:00 p.m. ORFORD: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. LYME: Selectmen, 7:00p.m. Thursday, Jan. 14 BRADFORD: Selectmen, 4:00 p.m. CORINTH: School Board,7:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. IS WOODSVILLE: Haverhill District Court, 2:00 p.m. Monday, Jan. 18 WOODSVILLE: Haverhill Selectmen. 7:00 p.m, FAIRLEE: Selectmen, $:00p.m. N. HAVERHILL: Grafton County Commissioners, 10:30a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 19 GROTON: Selectmen, 7:00p.m. WOODSVILLE: Precinct Commissioners, 7:00 p.m. BRADFORD: Oxbow School Board, 7:00 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 20 ORFORD: Selectmen, 8:00p.m. LYME: Selectmen. 7:00 p.m. sawmill at Groton Pond were collected at the log pile at the "head of the pond camp," to which I,s were brought in during the winter from other camps at various locations in the woods, especially the // - Vermont Secretary of State -/," ".i.'[€-. '': .... '... - .. ",,I " . /:- , .*. , _ " - , ,,, " .,%,, .,,. , , ,,......., , : James H. ouglas iNot tc ..... we are not, by any means, a state tharby o] • places precedent on so high a pedestal tha. occ R b Miller's logg'ng weareunwillingt°c°nsiderthem°s"all'f o I camps ' innovative of proposals, and history show*ith the we have been a leader in creativ.lefi • , • , • . l,ogs for ROb Miller's happened to meet Rob Miller. toeat later. Another time she diverse aslegislat've environm nta s°lutl°nSe t°! protectioPr°blemsn atlnualaishing, Rob remarked about their light loads and said to Her- bert, "What's the matter? Aren't the boys eating? Aren't you feeding them all they want?" When tterbert explained "French camp" on Cold Brook about three miles from the pond. Apparently the loggers did retest of their cutting in early winter, from November to January. then as the snow got deeper they concentrated on hauling the logs down Cold Brook to the log pile• This was done mostly with horses, allhough around 1918-20, teamster Frank Jones was using two to three pair of oxen to bring logs down to the log pile. The camp on Cold Brook was always known as the "French camp" because most of the workers were French- Canadians. They used to arrive by train with their belongings in mid-November and Mr. Taplin would take them by steamer to the head of the pond, from where they would be carted by team to the French camp and would immediately Start cutting. Recollections of Peggy Beamis Mrs. Peggy Beamis, now of Woodsville, tells about her experiences as cook in the French camp and the head of the pond camp during the winler of 1923-24. She and her husband lterbert were in their early twenties at that time, and their three-year-old son Slul) came to the camps with them. Ilerbert had served in World War I and was partially disabled, but was able to help Peggy with her work and Iogether they earned $18 a week plus room and board for the three of them -- not too had for those times. Peggy had as many as 26 men to cook for at a time. When she was first offered the job she hesitated, knowing that in many logging camps l of drd t on eu was baked beans -- but Rob Miller promised hcr that there would be no drinking and that she would have everything she asked for in the line of cooking supplies, lie was as good as his word. generously providing nice food such as ham. beef. pork roasts and chops, and eggs. They had a cow in the camp for milk. for whom Mr. Miller supplied all the grain she could eat. They also had a pig. On Sundays, early in the season before the pond was frozen hard enough to support a tm and sleigh, some of the men used to walk down to the main hoarding house at the mill to bring back groceries, mail. etc.. - a round trip of about five to six miles• They had already brought in large supplit,,s of non-perishable gr'eries by boat, st) there wasn't much more that they nt'(led Io carry hack on these wt,kly trips. One Sunday, llerbert went down with the men and that they had gotten in a lot of food by boat before freezeup; Rob laughed and said, "Smart boy, smart boy?" Each day Peggy baked a large cake and ten loaves of bread, then on alternate days she baked doughnuts and pies. For breakfast the men had warmed-up potatoes, boiled salt pork, coffee, etc. They always had baked beans for dinner on Sunday, so the cook could get a little rest. l,ater in the winter, after the loggers and the Beamises had moved down to the head of the pond camp, the men carried their lunch for their noon meal, using a ten quart pail for each four men -- six pails in all. The lunches in- cluded sandwiches, doughnuts, and cake. They also had pies -- each one cut inl o only four pieces. One thing the men liked in their lunch was salt pork, as they felt that it kept them warm -- and it didn't freeze so hard by noontime that they couldn't get their teeth into it. Peggy used to boil a big kettle of salt pork every day. The men would eat it in thick slices along with bread and butter. The loggers worked hard and put in a full nine-hour day in the woods. They were well fed and had a good warm place to sleep. For the average worker, the pay was from $25 to $35 per month and keep t food and lodging). They had Sundays off and would use some of the time for doing their washing and for cutting up their tobacco, as they had brought their own leaf with them from Canada. French loggers At the French camp there were only two of the men who Dener as the woods boss. and Denerie Bergeron. Peggy says that she used to hear the men talking among themselves in French. telling stories and singing songs none of which she could understand• although son)el imes the men would look over their shoulders and accuse her of understanding more than she would admit. Aft er supper, the Beamises used to invite I)enerie Vigneauit to play cards with them in the kit- chen. lie would bring a dif- ferent man with him each timc. so that eventually most all of the men had a chance to play. l)enerie used to tran- slate for them and they all had an enjoyable lime. AI ('hristmaslime. Peggy made popcorn balls for the men. which they really ap- preciated, llowever, one time she fixed boiled onions for them as a treat - but they had never had them before and w(mhln'l eat them so she had to freeze theni UD for someone ...u,,.. C.unc,,.. Raymond S. Burton ' An impor{a--nt phase in my serving and representing you in public office is knowing ' what your thinking is on various issues here in District One and the State of New Hampshire. Though the end result may not be exactly as you and I wish, I want you to knew that you are a part of my Councilorship. Please return this questionnaire to me signed or unsigned. OPINION POLL Doyou consider acid rain a problem? Do you favor nuclear waste being buried in District One? Do you favor casino gambling in District One? Do you favor a returnable bottle bill law,'? Do you favor electricity being brought to New Hampshire from Canada over tran- smission lines? Do you favor a sales tax to finance needed services for the 8tote? Do you favor an income tax to finance needed services for the State? In the Demncratic Primary for 1982, as of today, I would be leaning toward voting for: ( please check) Hugh Gailen Frances Shaine Maurice Arel John Durkin Robert Preston In the Republican Primary for 1982, as of today, ! would be leaning toward voting for: ( please chec k) Leigh Bosse Louis D'Ailesandro Robert Monler Jofm Sununu Meldrim 'lomson John Zeras My pet peeve with New ilampshire state government is: New Hampshire state government does a good job with: I would like to be considered for a volunteer State board or commission. Yes No OPTIoNAl, Name Address Zip Phone gave them canned peas, but these also were unfamiliar to the men and they passed them by although one of them went running around with a pea in a spoon, asking the others, "What is that thing?'" One little fellow" in his late twenties had a violin, but he seemed to know just one tune. The Beamises used to get pretty tired of hearing that same tune over and over, but he generally didn't play much except on Sundays, and the men enjoyed it and would keep timewith their feet. Towards the end of the season some of the men had left. so there was some extra room. and Denerie Vigneault asked if his brothers from Winooski could visit them over a weekend and bring something to drink• The men had worked hard all winter with nothing to drink, for Rob Miller had said at the beginning of the season that there would be no drinking. Anyway, Peggy says Herbert told them that as long as they behaved themselves he wouldn't tell Rob. The brothers brought four pints of whiskey and, outside of Denerie's younger brother who was only lfi) getting drunk and passing out and finally being revived by numerous doses of black coffee, there were no incidents of note all hough some of the men got to feeling pretty good and whooped it up a bit. About 3 o'clock Sunday morning, lterhert told them it was time for bed One of them woke up in the morning and asked, "Do I have to go to work today?" Herbert told him, "No, it's Sunday," so he went hack to sleep, and they all slept for most of the day. On Sunday, someone was playing a sad song on the gramophone and Denerie got to crying and saying he wanted to go home to his wife and famil so Herbert m up. On Monday, Denerie's brothers went on snowshoes down across the pond and took the train back to Winooski. Peggy says that if she had known how far back in the woods the logging camps would be, she probably wouldn't have taken the job. She never saw another woman all winter. Of course little Stub didn't have any other children to play with, and his mother was busy, so he reed to ride around on his tricycle in the morning in his nightie until she got time to dress him. t continued next week) Plutarch wrote of Solon, the law-giver, that "(w)henever he approved of the existing arrangement, he made no attempt to remedy or meddle with it, for he feared that if he turned everything upside down and thoroughly disorganized the state, he might not have the power enough to restore order and reconstitute it for the best." This week 180 Solons return to Mont- pelter to review and rewrite the laws of Vermont. No one doubts it will be an awesome session, with issues as critical as state aid and new taxes to be advanced. But will it be an inspiring, or a memorable session? The answer to that question may well depend on what Plutarch said of Solon, on whether the legislature determines that the problem to be addressed is serious enough to risk the consequences of even the best untried 'solution.' No amount of computerized print-outs or summer study can foretell for certain what good or harm will result from even incremental changes in the law. That's why the most difficult part of serving as a legislator is weighing the alternatives of adopting a new law or sticking with what we already know, even if it doesn't xork perfectly. And that's why most of the bills that become law each year are mirror adjustments in existing law. The wisest advice nearly every governor in the history of Vermont has given new legislature is not to gauge the quality of a session by the quantity of laws adopted. In a state that has made such a large in- vestment in tradition, precedent and limited government, that advice has, gratefully, seldom gone unheeded. election law reform, rizes Tradition proves that Vermor For r legislatures have been guided by a dut [credit philosophy of government -- cop.servativ Thef in fiscal matters, liberal in social cot mson cerns. We have never been reluctant t cnson make good laws out of good ideas, as Ion rethe: as the ideas themselves are reasonabl Tiekel and prudent responses to the re_z otary problems of Vermont. We have committe Warm ourselves to conforming the laws to th eheid situation, rather than the situation to th May2 laws. Make no mistake about it: returnin hver a legislators will be facing some of the met romis¢ difficult choices any general assembly i A sec our history has had to face. The news frot 'eekem Washington has not been entireldiuso reassuring to Vermont, especially aft¢ The d the shifts of human services funding an hamb lax revenues. The economy has taught llianc¢ to be even more cautious about the desig Other of the budget, toe or t h "'ar mual We must pray tha t e decisions ma . made this year in Montpelier are the met burg-: .'sa tn/ea !! :h feaUd:e /:!e tht oW°agh: it!! .... W ow is When Solon was asked whether me ta he had written were the best laws R nm m Athens, he admitted they were the be ar laws Athens would accept " Maybe that' e or • •  Verm, not such a bad idea for Vermom. h selecl Sport ..... .. ame L •  " baton, r; PAYING HOMAGE-- American Ex-Prisoners of War at Fort Bragg, N.C. placis e % miniature flags in memorial wreath and naming the fallen comrade for whom tlrester: flag is placed in the wreath, mOTO Y ett cotThe p hich .. ,por !!dlife I * Oxbow settles FORT BRAG'S Operation Ex-POW brought over 400 American Ex. and their wives to the Fort for the annual Convention. The group was by Lieutenant General Jack V. Mackmull, Commander of the 18th Corps. Shown above is one of the demonstrations wherein parachutists within 50 feet of the guests, after jumping from planes at 20,000 feet, free-falling 5,000 feet, then opening their chutes and guiding them to land in front of gathering. A few local ex-POW's attended the ceremonies including Bill Coon! Pike. mOTO t (continued from page 1) over the case because the suit had been designated a * Treatment Sens/n00 the news u00th... "complex action." According (continued from page 1) to an Orange County Court treatment plant itself. Besides ANTHONY spokesman, when a series of the Woodsviile connections a cases are designated a section of Court St. leading "complex action, the same towards N. Haverhill and the Glorication of Reds judge usually presides over Grafton County building each case." complex are also connected to II is ironical that the film political agitator who Attorneys for Oxbow and the treatmentplant. "Reds," Warren Beatty's the Bolsheviks, the polU Rodd Roofing are said to The conversion to the new magnum opus, should be gangsters who captured agree that the Blue Mountain system on Dec. 29 marks the released to the nation's motion Russian revolution and and Oxbow cases have first time. since the need for a picture theaters as communist posed marked similarities, although sewage system arose in riot police use guns and sticks on all the peoples of the attorneys for GAF have Woodsviile. that the town will to overwhelm Polish workers Czarist empire. This argued otherwise, not be dumping its untreated and obliterate the first salughtered or im sewage into the Connecticut glimmerings of freedom in scores of millions since River. thai country• The .l| Many Americans will be only the latest me[' .Bo.,roj[angry a[ this filmed communist oppression. glorification communism. It is Mn W FAIRLEE-- The W. (contlnned from page l) a timely propaganda tool for "Reed is a hero in l Fait'leeSchoolBoardwiilhoid Tuesday, Jan. 19 the Soviets. In the words of Union. He is the a special meeting on Monday, 4:(N) p.m. Monlpelier. Pavilion Barron's Financial Weekly, it American buried in Jan. tt.1982at7:00p.m, atthe Office Building Auditorium, is a communist propaganda Kremlin wall. You West Fairlee School. Agenda l{.) Slate Street. epic. have to be a items will be: Negotiations Tuesday, Jan. 26 One of those who refuses to American patriot to (executive session) and 1982- 4:00 pro. Rutland. VermOnt view the film with a blase fended by the fact that 83schooibudgeL I)istrictCourt.92SlateStreet. attitude is Scott Cain, film is three hours and 19 Area school lunch ,.,.,, for theAtlantaJournal, of conm, unist 1 1 llis conmmnts deserve to be "The United choo/S noled aroundthecountry, portrayedg°vernmentas is, of Orford In his review of this motion monstrous picture, Mr. Cain made these insensitive." Forthe week of Jan.-la to 20: observations: For a number of Wedncsday--Ravioli, green beans, applecrisp. "Detente has gone too far ttollywood has been Thursday--Turkey-rice, peas, cookies, when tlollywood makes a $:33.5 criticized for Friday--Pizza, salad, gelatin, million movie extolling the to the American people, Monday-- Hamburgers, lettuce and tomatoes, fruit, virtues of communism, t hat damage the Tuesday-- Baked luncheon meat, potato, spinach, fruit. 'Beds' contains the most of the nat ion. Wednesday-- Sloppy Jnes, whole kernal corn, eake. shocking politics of any nmking and liollywood film in nearly 40 "l{eds" by Blue Mountain Union Scho I years. It is a paenn of praise to lures, which is Fortheweek of Jan. 13to20: Bolshevism.' They'll love it & Western Industries, ma Wednesday-- Baked Beans and hot dog, cole slaw, rolls, from Minsk to Pinsk. 'Reds' the worst offense applesauce, milk. seems certain to win American movie-goin Thursday--- Spaghetti, Italian bread, toss salad, fruit, numerous awards at the next The glorification milk. Moscow film festival, munism should offend Friday-- Fishwich, french fries, peas, Jello and topping, "Only in America would a American who is milk. studio, built and operated at a for the tragic Monday-- Hot Turkey Sandwich, milk, beets, cherry vast profit for 70 years under men, women and cobbler, the capitalist system, finance Poland who are suffering Tuesday-- Oven Baked Chicken, mashed potato, corn, a picture that admires a cruel, oppressive fruit, milk. socialism." that is without humanit Wednesday-- Kangaroos, potato stix, Pineapple The fihnisaboutJohnReed, communist system Upsidedewn Cake, milk. an American journalist and Bolsheviks created. Page 4-The Journal Opinion-Jannary 13, 1981 ii I iiiii i I Weokl v mnmper plhkod le 8redford, Voruem. Selripm res • Vermomud Neu Nempobi - $v.ee t et yeew; $6.00 (or sJu moeJl oe! of stut)e. $1|.00 por ymw md $7.00 for sh neltbs; Senkw cJlhoa heent $L00. SecHd chin poelelle paid at Orodford, VermH4t 01055. Peldhdmd by NortflkHit Pebltsbio 0 Comlmly, IRe., P.0. Jolt 178, |mdfonJ. i |1 mill u IIIIIII I III I II I I Ill MM II • WORTHEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. I , Publisher of Journal II1 Opinion Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher ;,t s 5 o ,¢ Bradford / '  Woodsville 802-222-5201  ;  .  603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper : i i i i C Ed,tor,al ,,, J i I _ __....z Keeping the lines open district junior high and high school. The teachers charge that the principal has avoided communication with them over the issue. However, on the other hand, the teachers at the meeting exhibited a remarkable degree of naivete in their perception of the accessability of the school board at their regular school board meetings. Whatever amount of effort is required by either the school's ad- ministration or its teachers, com- munication over the issue remains the key to the problem. The teachers are asking for a relatively short, concise list of rules on paper and for those rules to be enforced on a more consistant basis. When the rules committee gets together to decide on punishments for those who break the rules they should be cautioned not to rush into the folly of needs happened to the Haverhill school board and a handful of young soccer players when their school enacted on athletic alcohol policy. Severity is not the answer. The teachers at Oxbow say that con- sistency is. The point that 30 frustrated teachers were trying to make at last week's Oxbow school board meeting was not that today's Oxbow students as a group are any worse in terms of behavior than students have been in the past. What they were saying was that the policies and programs that were originally meant to control student behavior have eroded over the years and that it is time to update those policies. When the teachers had finished the presentation of their case to the school board, they left the meeting feeling a little better for having aired their feelings to the board, bringing them into the open. But they also left the room without any concrete assurances other than a tentative date in February that the school board had promised to discuss the matter. The other side of the isSUe is that the teachers seem more than wilfig to direct the final responsibility for student discipline toward the prin- cipal and vice principal of the school -- who though not infallible -- have demonstrated themselves to he at the same time, both caring individuals and two men busy with the many duties that come with running a I Letters to the Editor Former publisher stays touch' read these pieces even though I do wish to you, the Opinion I no longer lived there, and all of Bradford a very Recently I read of Rev. Happy New Year with many Terry Fullam, a Darien, Ct., good news events to come minister who studied music in throughout 1982. Bradford with KaWina Munn a Gardner Boyd few years after ! left there. I Rowayton. Ct. was happy to see the picture of the "Messiah" printed on the front page. "The chorus was To the FAiitor/ It was quite a surprise to open the Christmas issue of the Opinion and find that "Fire in Bradford Wipes Out 6 Business Establishments." Oh. no. not again, I said. Then I saw the date. Dec. 17, 1947. It has been a long time, After 34 years, spent mostly m California. Arizona and accompanied by church Washington I got a longing for organist Katrina Munn and New England and returned to harpsicordist Bruce Stevens, Connecticut where my sister both of Bradford." It is nice to lives. While lhaveroamedthe know that Bradford people west coast following my have made themselves and printing, newspaper and their town well known. photographic trades, she. who As a newspaper man and was born in East Topsham, photobrapher I do want to has been the Yankee citizen compliment you on your and stayed in one place for 40 makeup and photo reproduction. Photographs were the one thing I had looked forward to bringing to the Opinion when I went to Bradford. I truly say I'm sure 1 could not have done it any better. years. Periodically I received clippings from Yankee magazine or other publications telling of the progress of Bradford. It always has been a joy tome to Wednesday, Jan. 13 " BRADFORD: Elementary School Board, 7: 30 p.m. BRADFORD: Village Trustees, 7:00 p.m. ORFORD: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. LYME: Selectmen, 7:00p.m. Thursday, Jan. 14 BRADFORD: Selectmen, 4:00 p.m. CORINTH: School Board,7:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. IS WOODSVILLE: Haverhill District Court, 2:00 p.m. Monday, Jan. 18 WOODSVILLE: Haverhill Selectmen. 7:00 p.m, FAIRLEE: Selectmen, $:00p.m. N. HAVERHILL: Grafton County Commissioners, 10:30a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 19 GROTON: Selectmen, 7:00p.m. WOODSVILLE: Precinct Commissioners, 7:00 p.m. BRADFORD: Oxbow School Board, 7:00 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 20 ORFORD: Selectmen, 8:00p.m. LYME: Selectmen. 7:00 p.m. sawmill at Groton Pond were collected at the log pile at the "head of the pond camp," to which I,s were brought in during the winter from other camps at various locations in the woods, especially the // - Vermont Secretary of State -/," ".i.'[€-. '': .... '... - .. ",,I " . /:- , .*. , _ " - , ,,, " .,%,, .,,. , , ,,......., , : James H. ouglas iNot tc ..... we are not, by any means, a state tharby o] • places precedent on so high a pedestal tha. occ R b Miller's logg'ng weareunwillingt°c°nsiderthem°s"all'f o I camps ' innovative of proposals, and history show*ith the we have been a leader in creativ.lefi • , • , • . l,ogs for ROb Miller's happened to meet Rob Miller. toeat later. Another time she diverse aslegislat've environm nta s°lutl°nSe t°! protectioPr°blemsn atlnualaishing, Rob remarked about their light loads and said to Her- bert, "What's the matter? Aren't the boys eating? Aren't you feeding them all they want?" When tterbert explained "French camp" on Cold Brook about three miles from the pond. Apparently the loggers did retest of their cutting in early winter, from November to January. then as the snow got deeper they concentrated on hauling the logs down Cold Brook to the log pile• This was done mostly with horses, allhough around 1918-20, teamster Frank Jones was using two to three pair of oxen to bring logs down to the log pile. The camp on Cold Brook was always known as the "French camp" because most of the workers were French- Canadians. They used to arrive by train with their belongings in mid-November and Mr. Taplin would take them by steamer to the head of the pond, from where they would be carted by team to the French camp and would immediately Start cutting. Recollections of Peggy Beamis Mrs. Peggy Beamis, now of Woodsville, tells about her experiences as cook in the French camp and the head of the pond camp during the winler of 1923-24. She and her husband lterbert were in their early twenties at that time, and their three-year-old son Slul) came to the camps with them. Ilerbert had served in World War I and was partially disabled, but was able to help Peggy with her work and Iogether they earned $18 a week plus room and board for the three of them -- not too had for those times. Peggy had as many as 26 men to cook for at a time. When she was first offered the job she hesitated, knowing that in many logging camps l of drd t on eu was baked beans -- but Rob Miller promised hcr that there would be no drinking and that she would have everything she asked for in the line of cooking supplies, lie was as good as his word. generously providing nice food such as ham. beef. pork roasts and chops, and eggs. They had a cow in the camp for milk. for whom Mr. Miller supplied all the grain she could eat. They also had a pig. On Sundays, early in the season before the pond was frozen hard enough to support a tm and sleigh, some of the men used to walk down to the main hoarding house at the mill to bring back groceries, mail. etc.. - a round trip of about five to six miles• They had already brought in large supplit,,s of non-perishable gr'eries by boat, st) there wasn't much more that they nt'(led Io carry hack on these wt,kly trips. One Sunday, llerbert went down with the men and that they had gotten in a lot of food by boat before freezeup; Rob laughed and said, "Smart boy, smart boy?" Each day Peggy baked a large cake and ten loaves of bread, then on alternate days she baked doughnuts and pies. For breakfast the men had warmed-up potatoes, boiled salt pork, coffee, etc. They always had baked beans for dinner on Sunday, so the cook could get a little rest. l,ater in the winter, after the loggers and the Beamises had moved down to the head of the pond camp, the men carried their lunch for their noon meal, using a ten quart pail for each four men -- six pails in all. The lunches in- cluded sandwiches, doughnuts, and cake. They also had pies -- each one cut inl o only four pieces. One thing the men liked in their lunch was salt pork, as they felt that it kept them warm -- and it didn't freeze so hard by noontime that they couldn't get their teeth into it. Peggy used to boil a big kettle of salt pork every day. The men would eat it in thick slices along with bread and butter. The loggers worked hard and put in a full nine-hour day in the woods. They were well fed and had a good warm place to sleep. For the average worker, the pay was from $25 to $35 per month and keep t food and lodging). They had Sundays off and would use some of the time for doing their washing and for cutting up their tobacco, as they had brought their own leaf with them from Canada. French loggers At the French camp there were only two of the men who Dener as the woods boss. and Denerie Bergeron. Peggy says that she used to hear the men talking among themselves in French. telling stories and singing songs none of which she could understand• although son)el imes the men would look over their shoulders and accuse her of understanding more than she would admit. Aft er supper, the Beamises used to invite I)enerie Vigneauit to play cards with them in the kit- chen. lie would bring a dif- ferent man with him each timc. so that eventually most all of the men had a chance to play. l)enerie used to tran- slate for them and they all had an enjoyable lime. AI ('hristmaslime. Peggy made popcorn balls for the men. which they really ap- preciated, llowever, one time she fixed boiled onions for them as a treat - but they had never had them before and w(mhln'l eat them so she had to freeze theni UD for someone ...u,,.. C.unc,,.. Raymond S. Burton ' An impor{a--nt phase in my serving and representing you in public office is knowing ' what your thinking is on various issues here in District One and the State of New Hampshire. Though the end result may not be exactly as you and I wish, I want you to knew that you are a part of my Councilorship. Please return this questionnaire to me signed or unsigned. OPINION POLL Doyou consider acid rain a problem? Do you favor nuclear waste being buried in District One? Do you favor casino gambling in District One? Do you favor a returnable bottle bill law,'? Do you favor electricity being brought to New Hampshire from Canada over tran- smission lines? Do you favor a sales tax to finance needed services for the 8tote? Do you favor an income tax to finance needed services for the State? In the Demncratic Primary for 1982, as of today, I would be leaning toward voting for: ( please check) Hugh Gailen Frances Shaine Maurice Arel John Durkin Robert Preston In the Republican Primary for 1982, as of today, ! would be leaning toward voting for: ( please chec k) Leigh Bosse Louis D'Ailesandro Robert Monler Jofm Sununu Meldrim 'lomson John Zeras My pet peeve with New ilampshire state government is: New Hampshire state government does a good job with: I would like to be considered for a volunteer State board or commission. Yes No OPTIoNAl, Name Address Zip Phone gave them canned peas, but these also were unfamiliar to the men and they passed them by although one of them went running around with a pea in a spoon, asking the others, "What is that thing?'" One little fellow" in his late twenties had a violin, but he seemed to know just one tune. The Beamises used to get pretty tired of hearing that same tune over and over, but he generally didn't play much except on Sundays, and the men enjoyed it and would keep timewith their feet. Towards the end of the season some of the men had left. so there was some extra room. and Denerie Vigneault asked if his brothers from Winooski could visit them over a weekend and bring something to drink• The men had worked hard all winter with nothing to drink, for Rob Miller had said at the beginning of the season that there would be no drinking. Anyway, Peggy says Herbert told them that as long as they behaved themselves he wouldn't tell Rob. The brothers brought four pints of whiskey and, outside of Denerie's younger brother who was only lfi) getting drunk and passing out and finally being revived by numerous doses of black coffee, there were no incidents of note all hough some of the men got to feeling pretty good and whooped it up a bit. About 3 o'clock Sunday morning, lterhert told them it was time for bed One of them woke up in the morning and asked, "Do I have to go to work today?" Herbert told him, "No, it's Sunday," so he went hack to sleep, and they all slept for most of the day. On Sunday, someone was playing a sad song on the gramophone and Denerie got to crying and saying he wanted to go home to his wife and famil so Herbert m up. On Monday, Denerie's brothers went on snowshoes down across the pond and took the train back to Winooski. Peggy says that if she had known how far back in the woods the logging camps would be, she probably wouldn't have taken the job. She never saw another woman all winter. Of course little Stub didn't have any other children to play with, and his mother was busy, so he reed to ride around on his tricycle in the morning in his nightie until she got time to dress him. t continued next week) Plutarch wrote of Solon, the law-giver, that "(w)henever he approved of the existing arrangement, he made no attempt to remedy or meddle with it, for he feared that if he turned everything upside down and thoroughly disorganized the state, he might not have the power enough to restore order and reconstitute it for the best." This week 180 Solons return to Mont- pelter to review and rewrite the laws of Vermont. No one doubts it will be an awesome session, with issues as critical as state aid and new taxes to be advanced. But will it be an inspiring, or a memorable session? The answer to that question may well depend on what Plutarch said of Solon, on whether the legislature determines that the problem to be addressed is serious enough to risk the consequences of even the best untried 'solution.' No amount of computerized print-outs or summer study can foretell for certain what good or harm will result from even incremental changes in the law. That's why the most difficult part of serving as a legislator is weighing the alternatives of adopting a new law or sticking with what we already know, even if it doesn't xork perfectly. And that's why most of the bills that become law each year are mirror adjustments in existing law. The wisest advice nearly every governor in the history of Vermont has given new legislature is not to gauge the quality of a session by the quantity of laws adopted. In a state that has made such a large in- vestment in tradition, precedent and limited government, that advice has, gratefully, seldom gone unheeded. election law reform, rizes Tradition proves that Vermor For r legislatures have been guided by a dut [credit philosophy of government -- cop.servativ Thef in fiscal matters, liberal in social cot mson cerns. We have never been reluctant t cnson make good laws out of good ideas, as Ion rethe: as the ideas themselves are reasonabl Tiekel and prudent responses to the re_z otary problems of Vermont. We have committe Warm ourselves to conforming the laws to th eheid situation, rather than the situation to th May2 laws. Make no mistake about it: returnin hver a legislators will be facing some of the met romis¢ difficult choices any general assembly i A sec our history has had to face. The news frot 'eekem Washington has not been entireldiuso reassuring to Vermont, especially aft¢ The d the shifts of human services funding an hamb lax revenues. The economy has taught llianc¢ to be even more cautious about the desig Other of the budget, toe or t h "'ar mual We must pray tha t e decisions ma . made this year in Montpelier are the met burg-: .'sa tn/ea !! :h feaUd:e /:!e tht oW°agh: it!! .... W ow is When Solon was asked whether me ta he had written were the best laws R nm m Athens, he admitted they were the be ar laws Athens would accept " Maybe that' e or • •  Verm, not such a bad idea for Vermom. h selecl Sport ..... .. ame L •  " baton, r; PAYING HOMAGE-- American Ex-Prisoners of War at Fort Bragg, N.C. placis e % miniature flags in memorial wreath and naming the fallen comrade for whom tlrester: flag is placed in the wreath, mOTO Y ett cotThe p hich .. ,por !!dlife I * Oxbow settles FORT BRAG'S Operation Ex-POW brought over 400 American Ex. and their wives to the Fort for the annual Convention. The group was by Lieutenant General Jack V. Mackmull, Commander of the 18th Corps. Shown above is one of the demonstrations wherein parachutists within 50 feet of the guests, after jumping from planes at 20,000 feet, free-falling 5,000 feet, then opening their chutes and guiding them to land in front of gathering. A few local ex-POW's attended the ceremonies including Bill Coon! Pike. mOTO t (continued from page 1) over the case because the suit had been designated a * Treatment Sens/n00 the news u00th... "complex action." According (continued from page 1) to an Orange County Court treatment plant itself. Besides ANTHONY spokesman, when a series of the Woodsviile connections a cases are designated a section of Court St. leading "complex action, the same towards N. Haverhill and the Glorication of Reds judge usually presides over Grafton County building each case." complex are also connected to II is ironical that the film political agitator who Attorneys for Oxbow and the treatmentplant. "Reds," Warren Beatty's the Bolsheviks, the polU Rodd Roofing are said to The conversion to the new magnum opus, should be gangsters who captured agree that the Blue Mountain system on Dec. 29 marks the released to the nation's motion Russian revolution and and Oxbow cases have first time. since the need for a picture theaters as communist posed marked similarities, although sewage system arose in riot police use guns and sticks on all the peoples of the attorneys for GAF have Woodsviile. that the town will to overwhelm Polish workers Czarist empire. This argued otherwise, not be dumping its untreated and obliterate the first salughtered or im sewage into the Connecticut glimmerings of freedom in scores of millions since River. thai country• The .l| Many Americans will be only the latest me[' .Bo.,roj[angry a[ this filmed communist oppression. glorification communism. It is Mn W FAIRLEE-- The W. (contlnned from page l) a timely propaganda tool for "Reed is a hero in l Fait'leeSchoolBoardwiilhoid Tuesday, Jan. 19 the Soviets. In the words of Union. He is the a special meeting on Monday, 4:(N) p.m. Monlpelier. Pavilion Barron's Financial Weekly, it American buried in Jan. tt.1982at7:00p.m, atthe Office Building Auditorium, is a communist propaganda Kremlin wall. You West Fairlee School. Agenda l{.) Slate Street. epic. have to be a items will be: Negotiations Tuesday, Jan. 26 One of those who refuses to American patriot to (executive session) and 1982- 4:00 pro. Rutland. VermOnt view the film with a blase fended by the fact that 83schooibudgeL I)istrictCourt.92SlateStreet. attitude is Scott Cain, film is three hours and 19 Area school lunch ,.,.,, for theAtlantaJournal, of conm, unist 1 1 llis conmmnts deserve to be "The United choo/S noled aroundthecountry, portrayedg°vernmentas is, of Orford In his review of this motion monstrous picture, Mr. Cain made these insensitive." Forthe week of Jan.-la to 20: observations: For a number of Wedncsday--Ravioli, green beans, applecrisp. "Detente has gone too far ttollywood has been Thursday--Turkey-rice, peas, cookies, when tlollywood makes a $:33.5 criticized for Friday--Pizza, salad, gelatin, million movie extolling the to the American people, Monday-- Hamburgers, lettuce and tomatoes, fruit, virtues of communism, t hat damage the Tuesday-- Baked luncheon meat, potato, spinach, fruit. 'Beds' contains the most of the nat ion. Wednesday-- Sloppy Jnes, whole kernal corn, eake. shocking politics of any nmking and liollywood film in nearly 40 "l{eds" by Blue Mountain Union Scho I years. It is a paenn of praise to lures, which is Fortheweek of Jan. 13to20: Bolshevism.' They'll love it & Western Industries, ma Wednesday-- Baked Beans and hot dog, cole slaw, rolls, from Minsk to Pinsk. 'Reds' the worst offense applesauce, milk. seems certain to win American movie-goin Thursday--- Spaghetti, Italian bread, toss salad, fruit, numerous awards at the next The glorification milk. Moscow film festival, munism should offend Friday-- Fishwich, french fries, peas, Jello and topping, "Only in America would a American who is milk. studio, built and operated at a for the tragic Monday-- Hot Turkey Sandwich, milk, beets, cherry vast profit for 70 years under men, women and cobbler, the capitalist system, finance Poland who are suffering Tuesday-- Oven Baked Chicken, mashed potato, corn, a picture that admires a cruel, oppressive fruit, milk. socialism." that is without humanit Wednesday-- Kangaroos, potato stix, Pineapple The fihnisaboutJohnReed, communist system Upsidedewn Cake, milk. an American journalist and Bolsheviks created.