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Bradford , Vermont
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January 13, 1982     Journal Opinion
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January 13, 1982
 

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January 13, 1982-The Journal Opinion-Page 5 =---=-= ..... Jib Thoughts on the Oxbow downs Out-of-Doors OXgO'0000f Ne0000S Hartford 6845 Ltl by Gary W. Moor. ..... .::... , ....................................... cBuRrAaDFoRrDu:s The 0xml tq?mtne?r tSaT?d Owf;hl thtid i FISHING DERBIES ML;LTIPLY i Not too long ago most people had never heard of a fishing Late tha[erby or tournament. Today, they have become very popular ,stal thad occur throughout the region. What often started very he mosall, frequently has grown to become a major undertaking :y showith thousands of dollars in prizes. creat'wThe first derby in the area will be the Great Winnipesaukee ems aishing Derby held February 6 and 7 at Meredith, N.H. The ction tlnnual event is sponsored by the Rotary Club and $25,000 in i izes will be awarded. rermon[ For more information write to the derby at Box 1210 a du[eredith, N.H. 03253. ervativ The following weekend, February 13 and 14 the Great :ial co enson Fishing Derby will be held on Lake Champlain at the Lctant t enson Landing. The Rotary Club and the Fire Department , as Ion[ re the sponsors and the prize money totals $30,000. asonabl 'Pickets and information are available from the Fairhaven he red :Otary Club and from the Benson Fire Department. mmitte Warm weather will bring a second Winnipesaukee derby to 's to th eheld on May 7 and 8 at Wiers Beach in Laconia. m to th May 21 and 22 will see a new tournament on the Connecticut eturnind'iver at the Moore Reservoir in Littleton. This tournament the mos ronlises the biggest purse of any of the derbies so far. mbly i a Second Champlain derby will he held on Father's Day as frod eekend June 18-20. The fishing will be done in a 25-mile entirel ldius of Burlington. . ...... lly afte The derby is a joint effort by the take unamplaln Regional ting and rmmber of Commerce and the Vermont Sport Fishing -- .,l Ilianee augm u, desigOther derbies for whmh I do not have the dates yet include pose on the Connecticut at Bradford and Bellows Falls, the that arnual event at Lake Memphremagog and the tournament at the mlo lburg-Swanton. oughtfU!Tbe weather has been cold, but there were warm rainy hen'taYs and in many places the ice is not very thick. The sub- anothential amount of snow that fell in December prevented the ld from forming thick ice in many areas. Remember that the la hw is a-natural insulator. Fishermen should be careful as laws fme areas that had the snow blown clear have'little ice. the be#nuary is no time for a swim in a northern New England 3e that'e or pond '[1 , " Vermont s season for ice fishing for trout, salmon and bass h selected waters opens Saturday. Sportsmen should check page 28 of the Digest of Fish and lame Laws for the list of lakes. ! DEER YARD MAPPING The project begufl in the mild 60's to map the state's deer Irds is now using the latest technology. The job of mapping deer yards was undertaken nearly 20 years ago as a 'erequisite to management and protection efforts. So far 0,000 acres of winter deer range have been mapped. The aps have proven to be important in Act 250 cases and in rest management The Fish and Game Department is now using the latest mote sensing technology to update and make ,more ac- rate the maps of the deer yards The University of Ver- 2nt Remote Sensing Program "has provided technical tance. tch of the technology has been developed by the military nd provides vital intelligence. In recent years civilian in-  erests have found the methods a boon in managing forests as i:. ell as countless other activities such as road building i i. The initial mannin will be done b color infrar aerial ..... _ , Y -,qaei,hotography. The results will then be used to make accurate v se maps which will be distributed to regional planners, hom tlresters, and other interested parties. symttcoThe program is funded by the Wildlife Habitat Program hich receives its funding from the antlerless program. Four .... porary employees have been hired to do the mapping !ider the direction of John Hood, a University of Vermont !Idlife biology graduate. WHERE IS YOUR DOG tl:s::lldT::t analr?s:twehoearch wintrmMT/o% : to sleep on the rug. deep snow makes the job easy for the dog as it travels crust while the deer is bogged down and can hardly ' law officer can shoot a dog found to be chasing deer. If due your pet, keep it home. In addition you are liable Lg the dog to run deer. SELDOM SEEN WEASEL Saturday I was patrolling by snowmobile in West for the Vermont State Police. I stopped on the top of hill to wait for my partner when a weasel came out hemlock clump and started toward me. I a bit unusual as the snowmachine was running, but imal hin about 30 feet before running my partner approached. Was a bit excited as weasels are not often seen. They are nocturnal creatures with acute senses that let them man. When I returned home I looked up weasels and hat my encounter had been with a long-tailed weasel identified by the black-tipped tail. weasel is a very effective killer and feeds on hats, rabbits, birds, frogs, snakes, worms, insects and They have a huge appetite and eat about a third of own weight each day. The young eat even more as they only the second live weasel I had seen and the first occurred some,.25 years ago. That weasel was an old stone foundation. irony of the sighting came when I read George Gor- column in the Monday edition of the Brattleboro rmer. He wrote about the weasels he had known during career as an observer of wildlife. Mr. Gordan said they are seldom seen and he is correct. I am happy that I privilege tosee two "live" ones. WILD BOAR SHOT IN NEW HAMPSHIRE month long chase culminated in the shooting of a wild in the Mt. Gardner range of Woodsville and Bath, N.H. Joy, a farmer and the Chief of Police of Bath had the wild pig after he had evidence of the animal his farm. About a week ago, according to Joy, the was spotted on the Paul Bedeli Farm. Joy and retired of the New Hampshire State Police Miekey followed the trail of the ammal using snowshoes to densely wooded and mountain area. went out again after the elusive boar. could in on the hunt this day, so Joy recruited nephew, Kenneth Twitchell. The pair had found tracks of animal :and decided to separate. Twitchell spooked the and the animal charged toward Joy. He let off a shot I00 yards away. Just before the shot, the boar smelled and tried to swing the other way. The wild boar fell dead tracxs. t !ield-dressed at 183 pounds He intends to ne animal for future eating An avid hunter, Joy aj Eastern Coyote on his nrouert,,'h,t tWO da s before le boar is not eem .... ,-.  a J Y . of the herd __:--,..,n to this area and is thought to be a in the New-^ffa-,P- .eJ.. about 20 years ago from Corbin's vm,-umty area of New Hammpshainremal:wlwlw k private game preserve and many of th from Europe. HAVERHILl, DISTRICT NO. 36 There will SCHOOL BOARD the Haverhill CORINTH-- There will be a School Board on meeting of the Unified District Jan. 13 at 7:30 no. 36 School Board on The meeting will be held Thursday, Jan. 14 at 7: p.m. Woodsville Elementary The meeting will be held atthe Elementary School. Progress is being made on the newly established Oxbow News. Since the start of the column six weeks ago, the staff has increased from four members to seven. Judy Augustine has been chosen as the editor; Marisa Fatherley has joined as a reporter, and Kristin Herman has taken on the job of staff photographer. The Oxbow News column is designed to inform the public of events taking place at Oxbow High Sehool. Con- tributions to the column should be submitted to S. Arnold Shields, the staff ad- visor, one week prior to desired publication. Student Council The Oxbow High School student council is presently involved in two projects. These projects include punk rock day and the winter carnival. Punk rock day took place on January 8. This was a dress up day which was followed by a dance on the same night. Reduced admission to the dance was offered to those who "Punked out" for the occasion. The winter carnival com- mittee of the student council is presently involved in planning events for the carnival. The carnival is to take place in mid-February before mid- winter vacation. Visiting Scholar Oxbow High School library recently had a scholar visiting. The scholar, Nancy Smith, from Rochester, New York, was at Oxbow for about a week. She was researching some manuscripts that belonged to the Bradford Public library. Smith worked at Oxbow library because it is open more hours. The Oxbow library has always cooperated with the Bradford library. Sheri Morgan Named CO-ED Correspondent Sheri Morgan, 17, of Bradford, Vt., has been named CO-ED Correspondent for the 1981-82 school year, according to an an- nouncement by Kathy Gugiek, Editorial Director of CO- ED--FORECAST Magazines. CO-ED, published nationally by Scholastic, Inc., for home economics students, contains features on personal development, careers, and consumer awareness as well as the latest trends in fashion, food, beauty and home fur- nighings. Morgan, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Donald Morgan, is a senior at Oxbow High School. She was appointed Correspondent at Oxbow High School. She was appointed Correspondent by Irene Croteau, home economics teacher at Oxbow High School. Selected for her qualities of leadership and enthusiasm for home economics, Morgan will serve as junior advisor to CO- ED editors. Like the other CO- ED Correspondents throughout the United States and Canada, she will keep the editors informed of activities at her school. Boys Varsity Basketball The Oxbow High School Boys Varsity Basketball team has been successful so far this year. The team's record currently stands at four wins and two losses. James Kelly, coach of the Oxbow varsity squad, says that the team is "looking good" so far and is "playing up to potential". Coach Kelly is quick to point out however, that his team still has work to do. Kelly says that although he is pleased with his team's overall per- formance he feels that they are still making "mental errors" which he feels will become less frequent as the season progresses. Kelly is anxious to begin inter-conference play because he feels that it will be a true indicator of how good his team really is. Co-Captain Ron Huntington Ron tluntington, co-captain of the. boys varsity basketball team, has played varsity basketball four years. As a co- captain, Huntington mentions long and short-term goals for the, primarily, new and inexperienced team. He feels that as the season progresses the big men will get the ex- perience needed to develop consistency. Huntington says, "When the big men arehaving year's class is excellent because the kids have a lot of spirit. "Forestry is an indoor- outdoor class that takes in 16 students a year and involves 50 percent lecture and 50 percent activities. Some of the activities that are accomplished in this class are" surveying, logging, planting Christmas trees and helping wildlife. This is all done on 77 acres of land owned by the Bradford Elementary School, located on Goshen Road. Jones also runs an activity that takes the students out of school for two weeks. They work outdoors from 8:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. logging on the 77 acres. At the conclusion of the two weeks, they advertise and sell the logs. All this is done to help buy the equipment needed for the forestry class at Oxbow. Oxbow Fencing The Oxbow Fencing Team starts off its season fencing St. John's Prep School in Dan- vers, Mass. on Saturday, Jan. 23. The team will take the vocational bus for tran- sportation. The Oxbow team will also fence an Ivy League team from Concord, Mass. this year. Also the team will fence against the Dartmouth Community Fencing team in Hanover, N.H. sometime this year. The team will be fencing Concord-Carlyle prep school from Concord, Mass., a team that fences in the Ivy League. Coach of the Oxbow team, Nessa Flax, said that the team is . . . "moving into the big- time fencing a prep school". Martin Smit Teacher Profile "Education is a quality experience, not one of quantity. It should be an o V portunity for everyone to have the chance to practice doing his or her best, not the most that he or she can do." Martin Smit believes firmly in this principle, and in his 10 years as Head of the Humanities Department at Oxbow High School, he has sought to guide the Social Studies and English curricula toward this goal. He said, "Too often everyone connected with education, teachers, administration, parents, even students, get caught up in believing that learning is like making money, 'more is better' ". He said, "Because Oxbow is committed to children and optimistic about the future of the school, and the students." Smit, who has a Bachelor of Science degree from LaSalle College in Philadelphia, Pa., and a Master of Arts from Florida State University, has taught in this area for 16 years. He has been a keen observer of the trends in education during this time. He said, "The 1980's and early 70's were a time of upheaval, creativity, innovation, and experimentation. For the past five years or more the educational community has been retrenching. It has been solidifying the good, creative things that happened, and has begun to make rational, mindful decisions about the entire educational process." Smit, who would like to see more money and prestige given to drama and the fine arts, said, "In recent years, the students have made great strides in writing." He at- tributes this to the number of electives available to students which allow them to select from a variety of courses in composition, journalism, literary analysis, media analysis, etc., all of which are geared to the academic ability and interests of the students. Smit said, "A school is only as good as its community. A school can act as a leader, but it must be careful to-be sen- sitive to the needs of its community." He feels that Newbury, Bradford, and the area which Oxbow serves has a stable economic base with a population interested in and supportive of the educational objectives of the school. He believes that Oxbow is for- tunate to have such a broad- based curriculum With of- ferings in the Humanities, Agriculture, Forestry, Vocational Services, Mathematics, Science, and Business, as well as a well developed sports program. He said, "The key to our future success is keeping everything in perspective and in balan- ce," aowmoblllng Snowmobiling is an activity enjoyed by many students at Oxbow High School. There are some snowmobiling clubs in the area to which these students belong. Some of the clubs are The Baldt0ppers iti 'IFairlee, The Sno-Suakes in Bradford, The Boarder Riders in Newbury and the Ridge Runners in Corinth. The clubs are formed so that snowmobilers can ride the trails. The clubs get permission from the lan- downers so that each in- dividual snowmobiler doesn't have to get permission him- self. Unless a person belongs to a club or have permission we can't legally ride on other people's property. The club also maintains the trails. Some clubs hold weekly rides around this area. Some even hold a field day for all basketball continued this week as the Olympian boys demolished a game Hartford team 68-45, but then lost to an equally up and down team, the Woadsville Engineers in the last seconds of play, 62-60. Against Hartford, Oxbow came out gunning, built up a 16-0 lead in the first six minutes, and except for some anxious moments in the second half, had the game under control. A fired up Oxbow team took the opening tap and weren't about to be stopped. Two quick Ron Huntington jumpers, followed by a Dave Stever basket underneath at 6:25 put the score at 6-0. Charlie Grant then hit for two ten-footers and Gary Hayward popped in one from the key. Oxbow now ahead 12-0 at 5:24. Huntington stung the nets for another two points and with Dave Stever's second basket at 4:00, Oxbow had swept to a 16-0 lead. At quarter's end, Oxbow held a 21-8 lead. The winless Hurricanes (0- 7) showed some spark during the second quarter as the Oxbow guns were somewhat silenced. Two scoring spurts, both of five unanswered points brought Hartford within 6, 33- 27 with 1:36 remaining. A field goal by Dave Steever and two foul shots by Bruce Jacobs guarded the lead, 37-29 at the half. The team name Hurricanes more fit the Hartford coach Stretch Gillam, than their frustration of a so-far winless season, add to it officials calls that aren't going your way during the entire game, sprinkle a bit of referee baiting, and you have a volatile situation. With but 26 seconds left in the third quarter, the Hurricane coach let loose. Debating a close call with a bit too much enthusiasm, Gillam was called for a technical foul. It was a situation that was building from the opening moments. Before Gillam could cool off from the first technical, he was hit with another. The crowd went wild, Bruce Jacobs sunk three of four foul shots for the in- fractions, and Oxbow went into the fourth quarter leading by 13, 50-37. Gillam was ejected. The fourth quarter was academic. Holding leads by as much as 24 points, the Olympians chalked up their fifth win of the season, 68-45. As usual, Ron Huntington lead all scorers with 26 points, all field goals. Dave Stever played another strong game, adding 15 points, on five field goals and five foul shots. Gary Hayward played a good floor game and collected seven points. Bruce Jacobs, coming off the bench scored nine points, Charlie Grant and Brian Page four each, Greg Garone sunk a field goal and Todd Oliver canned a foul shot. Oxbow girb00 team has to00h week BRADFORD-- Last week was to ttanover 57-44, evening a week to be forgotten for the their record at 4-4. girls' varsity basketball team The Thetford Panthers at Oxbow as they dropped an started Oxbow's week off embarrassing game to poorly by outplaying the Thetford 35-31, defeated taller, more experienced league rival U-32 58-30, but Olympians from buzzer to t hen losing again, on Saturday (please turn to page 3) Sports TOURNEY WINNERS--- Conway Racquetball win- ners were (left to right) Noweli Brown, Jeanette Enderson, Sarah Davis and Scott Davis. Racquetball news N. tIAVERIlILL--OnSunday, traveling 'to the Racquets Jan. 10 the Racquet Shack Edge in Burlington for a Junior Racquetball Team tournament. The group hosted the Wedgewood Club players are Holly Lefebvre, from Barre. Vt. In a close Susanne Smith, RiehSaffoJr., battle both teams ended in a John Saffo, Brad Farr, Ken tie at 61 each. Kinder. Gregg Goldstein, The scores at the end of the Francis Stoddard Jr., Bruce battlewere: Enderson Jr., and Chris Racquet Shack Finlay. We wish them all good Susanne Smith 12 luck. John Saffo 10 Wallyball News Brad Farr 10 Standings: Russ's Francis Stoddard Jr. 8 Hideaway Losunge in First Ken Kinder 8 Place with 25 points; Brads- T.J. Jacobs 5 Guarantee Savings, 21: The GreggGoldstein 40.S.A., 20; The Racquet BrueeEndersonJr. 4 Shack, 16; Dud's Areo, 13; Ryegate Corner, ll; Lavoies Total 61 Sales and Service, 8; and the Wedgewood I 11 Club, 3. Jeb Coates Lewis Martin Mark Garand Blake Mackay Paul Garand Brian Garand Total t)n Saturday, Jan. 16, the Racquet Shack Juniors are 14 Last week's results: Dud's 11 won three points from the Ill 10 Club, Russ's Hideaway three 9 fron; the Racquet Shack; 9 Brads-Guarantee Savings 8 three over Ryegate Corher and The O.S.A. three points 61 over Lavoies Sales and Ser- vice. Engineers over Oxbow in rival round ball WOODSVILLE A ten year rivalry was continued, and strengthened at Oxbow last Friday evening as the Woodsville Engineers huffed and puffed their way to an exciting 62-60 win over the Olympians. The difference in the game was two foul shots by Mike Aldrich with but 18 seconds left in the game. The Engineers started the quarter down by 5, 51-46 but managed to hit important hoops down to the end of the game in not- ching their third victory their learning process, I am members of the club. against five losses. During the rNt by MARY HANSON and KIM NICKLES Announcements half by a score of 21 to 17 and capture First place Wood- Marks close on Friday, Jan. also led at the end of the third . sville "All Tourney" player 15. Report cards will he issued period by 6 points, was Mike Aldrich. Wednesday, Jan. 20th. Starting Monday, Jan. 18 these coarses will be offered at W.H.S.: -- Human Physiology taught by Mr. B; -- Driver Ed by Mr. Hall; -- Modern European History, Jr. Robinson; -- Canadian Studies by Mr. White Mtn. VS WHS White Mtn. came tc Woodsville to face the Engineers at the Community Building last Wednesday night. White Mtn. took the lead and was up by 16 at the half. The Engineers battled back and was ahead by 1 at the end of 3 periods. The Woodsville squad just didn't have enough energy left and the Spartan's took the game by 10, 79-69. High Scorer for the night was J.M. with 35 points. Literary Magazine scene, the Varsity boys held The l,iterary Magazine staff their annual Christmas is collecting work from Tournament. In the first anyone from Junior ttigh and game, Connval defeated White High School. All contributions Mr. by one point. In the second will he due Feb. 19. The next But, in the 4th quarter, the Spartans came back, stuck it to the Engineers and took control. The score, again, Woodsville, 40, White Mt., 44. High scores for Woodsville were Maria Trombley with 14 and Sandy Boyce find Lisa Strickland, both chipped in 7. Woodsville's next game is Riach: on Saturday,Jan. 9. The -- Advanced Biology by Mr. Engineers will travel to Cobb; Alexander Gault. - C.P.R. by Mr. Walker. WHS boys Congratulations basketball The staff of WHS on the Air This week, on the Wood- would like to offer their svillc Engineer Basketball congratulations to the following students: - Jon Mellin -- was ac- copted at Boston; - Michele Roy -- was ac- cepted at Biscayne College; - Shirley Fournier -- was accepted al Mount Ida College; --: Brenda Smith and Kim Gaulhier -- were accepted al the same college; - Lisa tlall -- won the local and district "Voice of a good game--we win!" Huntington mentions a major Democracy" contest and her short-term goal of the team., speech was submitted to the "to beat Woodsville." stalefinals: lluntington, the team's leading scorer, averaged 21 points in his first six games and was the "Most Valuable Player" (MVP) at the Blue Mountain Christmas tour- naments. Forestry Bob Jones, vocational teacher of forestry, at Oxbow High School, said that ,'this game, Woodsville had to issue will be out March 19. contend with the Pelham l,mk for it around town ! Panthers. They battled back and forth for the whole game and the Engineers ended up winning by one. The first night had proved to- Ill}NOR Rill,i, be a close evening of STUDENT basketball. The second night, NEW HAMPTON, N.H. Peter F. Pike, son of Mr. and Mrs. William T. Pike of New I,mdon, N.11., and grandson of Mr. Louis T. Pike of Haverhill, is on the fall term honors list released by headmaster LoUis Gncrre. Jr. of The New Hampton School. Peter is a postgraduate at the 161-year- old independent coeducational secondary school located in the Lakes Region in the foothills of the White Moun. lains. - Shirley Fournier -- was awarded the DAR Good Citizen Award. WIIS girls basketball they faced the Spartan's and Panthers for the 3rd place spot. Pelham took the early lead but White Mtn. took over and won quite easily to take 3rd place. Connval faced Woodsville for the championship and The Woodsville Girls Connval took the early lead. Basketball team traveled to The lead went back and forth, White Mr. on Wednesday, Jan. with Connval starting to open 6 and was defeated by the up a lead. The Engineers just scoreof40to44, couldn't battle back and the The Engineers lead at the ('ougars won by l0 points to entire game you could almost nearly at will during the first foul shots by Jim Kinder put hear the chant, 'I think I can, I eight minutes, the Engineers ahead by two think I can, I think I can,' and they did it. A 12 for 28 per- formance from the foul line didn't help the Oxbow cause. The game was a matter of short scoring bursts by each team. Oxbow jumped in front at the end of the first quarter, 17 to 12 on the inside offensive strength of Dave Stever and Brian Page. Ron Huntington and Gary llayward were able to feed the ball into the inside Cohase Lions Club news WOODSVILLE-- The Cobase Lion's Club of Woodsville will hold their 42nd Annual Nor- them Amateur Basketball Tournament Feb. 24 through Feb. 28 at the Woodsville Community Building. There will be A & B divisions as in Field goals by Ron Magoon, 57-55. Huntington tied the Mike Slayton and Dave Patten score at 57. but three foul shots in the first 36 seconds of the by Mullen and Patten gave the quarter brought Woodsville lead back to Woodsville with within 1. 17-16. Charlie Grant 2:381eft. and Brian Page matched two A clutch field goal off the pointers with Patten and John glass by Dave Stayer pulling Muilen before a Slayton Oxbow within one, 60-59, and jumper from the side gave the then with only 24 seconds left, Engineers their first lead. 22- Stever hit the first end of a 1 21. Two field goals by Page and 1 foul situation, tying the and a single point by Bruce score at 60-60. The stage was Jacobs were matched by then set for Mike Aldrich to fielders by Aldrich and Mellin, sink both foul shots in the knotting the score at 28 with midst of a partisan Oxbow 3:29 left. A four point lead by crowd yelling and banging the Woodsville at the hands of bleachers, hoping to cheer Patten and Slayton was cut in their team to victory. half by two foul shots by Oxbow took the ball out of Huntington as time ran out in bounds but couldn't get off a the half. good shot. Ron Huntington Charlie Grant, having a trying desperately to drop in a hard time on the court for two pointer, saw it bounce off Oxbow hit two important foul the front of the rim, and with it shots near the end of the third any hopes of an Oxbow win in period to put Oxbow up by overtime. five, 51-46 going into the final Mike Aldrich. scoring nine eight minutes, of his 15 points in the final past years.. Five early period turnover quarter lead the Engineers, Applications are available through Jim Walker. 41 King by Oxbow helped give with Mullen chipping in 14, St.. Woodsville, N.H., 03785or Woodsville the momentum and Kinder with 12. Brian by calling 1-603-747-3,9or603- they needed to get back into Page, Ron Huntington and the haiigame Aldrich hit to Dave Stever hit for 20. 14 and 747-28.56. Applications will not inside jumpers, John Mullen a 11 respectively for the 5-3 be accepted after Jan. 20. 1982, shot from the corner and two Olympians. PASSING OFF-- Ran Huntington, driving towards the basket, passes off at the last minute during acUon against Wlsvllle last Friday at the Oxbow gym. January 13, 1982-The Journal Opinion-Page 5 =---=-= ..... Jib Thoughts on the Oxbow downs Out-of-Doors OXgO'0000f Ne0000S Hartford 6845 Ltl by Gary W. Moor. ..... .::... , ....................................... cBuRrAaDFoRrDu:s The 0xml tq?mtne?r tSaT?d Owf;hl thtid i FISHING DERBIES ML;LTIPLY i Not too long ago most people had never heard of a fishing Late tha[erby or tournament. Today, they have become very popular ,stal thad occur throughout the region. What often started very he mosall, frequently has grown to become a major undertaking :y showith thousands of dollars in prizes. creat'wThe first derby in the area will be the Great Winnipesaukee ems aishing Derby held February 6 and 7 at Meredith, N.H. The ction tlnnual event is sponsored by the Rotary Club and $25,000 in i izes will be awarded. rermon[ For more information write to the derby at Box 1210 a du[eredith, N.H. 03253. ervativ The following weekend, February 13 and 14 the Great :ial co enson Fishing Derby will be held on Lake Champlain at the Lctant t enson Landing. The Rotary Club and the Fire Department , as Ion[ re the sponsors and the prize money totals $30,000. asonabl 'Pickets and information are available from the Fairhaven he red :Otary Club and from the Benson Fire Department. mmitte Warm weather will bring a second Winnipesaukee derby to 's to th eheld on May 7 and 8 at Wiers Beach in Laconia. m to th May 21 and 22 will see a new tournament on the Connecticut eturnind'iver at the Moore Reservoir in Littleton. This tournament the mos ronlises the biggest purse of any of the derbies so far. mbly i a Second Champlain derby will he held on Father's Day as frod eekend June 18-20. The fishing will be done in a 25-mile entirel ldius of Burlington. . ...... lly afte The derby is a joint effort by the take unamplaln Regional ting and rmmber of Commerce and the Vermont Sport Fishing -- .,l Ilianee augm u, desigOther derbies for whmh I do not have the dates yet include pose on the Connecticut at Bradford and Bellows Falls, the that arnual event at Lake Memphremagog and the tournament at the mlo lburg-Swanton. oughtfU!Tbe weather has been cold, but there were warm rainy hen'taYs and in many places the ice is not very thick. The sub- anothential amount of snow that fell in December prevented the ld from forming thick ice in many areas. Remember that the la hw is a-natural insulator. Fishermen should be careful as laws fme areas that had the snow blown clear have'little ice. the be#nuary is no time for a swim in a northern New England 3e that'e or pond '[1 , " Vermont s season for ice fishing for trout, salmon and bass h selected waters opens Saturday. Sportsmen should check page 28 of the Digest of Fish and lame Laws for the list of lakes. ! DEER YARD MAPPING The project begufl in the mild 60's to map the state's deer Irds is now using the latest technology. The job of mapping deer yards was undertaken nearly 20 years ago as a 'erequisite to management and protection efforts. So far 0,000 acres of winter deer range have been mapped. The aps have proven to be important in Act 250 cases and in rest management The Fish and Game Department is now using the latest mote sensing technology to update and make ,more ac- rate the maps of the deer yards The University of Ver- 2nt Remote Sensing Program "has provided technical tance. tch of the technology has been developed by the military nd provides vital intelligence. In recent years civilian in-  erests have found the methods a boon in managing forests as i:. ell as countless other activities such as road building i i. The initial mannin will be done b color infrar aerial ..... _ , Y -,qaei,hotography. The results will then be used to make accurate v se maps which will be distributed to regional planners, hom tlresters, and other interested parties. symttcoThe program is funded by the Wildlife Habitat Program hich receives its funding from the antlerless program. Four .... porary employees have been hired to do the mapping !ider the direction of John Hood, a University of Vermont !Idlife biology graduate. WHERE IS YOUR DOG tl:s::lldT::t analr?s:twehoearch wintrmMT/o% : to sleep on the rug. deep snow makes the job easy for the dog as it travels crust while the deer is bogged down and can hardly ' law officer can shoot a dog found to be chasing deer. If due your pet, keep it home. In addition you are liable Lg the dog to run deer. SELDOM SEEN WEASEL Saturday I was patrolling by snowmobile in West for the Vermont State Police. I stopped on the top of hill to wait for my partner when a weasel came out hemlock clump and started toward me. I a bit unusual as the snowmachine was running, but imal hin about 30 feet before running my partner approached. Was a bit excited as weasels are not often seen. They are nocturnal creatures with acute senses that let them man. When I returned home I looked up weasels and hat my encounter had been with a long-tailed weasel identified by the black-tipped tail. weasel is a very effective killer and feeds on hats, rabbits, birds, frogs, snakes, worms, insects and They have a huge appetite and eat about a third of own weight each day. The young eat even more as they only the second live weasel I had seen and the first occurred some,.25 years ago. That weasel was an old stone foundation. irony of the sighting came when I read George Gor- column in the Monday edition of the Brattleboro rmer. He wrote about the weasels he had known during career as an observer of wildlife. Mr. Gordan said they are seldom seen and he is correct. I am happy that I privilege tosee two "live" ones. WILD BOAR SHOT IN NEW HAMPSHIRE month long chase culminated in the shooting of a wild in the Mt. Gardner range of Woodsville and Bath, N.H. Joy, a farmer and the Chief of Police of Bath had the wild pig after he had evidence of the animal his farm. About a week ago, according to Joy, the was spotted on the Paul Bedeli Farm. Joy and retired of the New Hampshire State Police Miekey followed the trail of the ammal using snowshoes to densely wooded and mountain area. went out again after the elusive boar. could in on the hunt this day, so Joy recruited nephew, Kenneth Twitchell. The pair had found tracks of animal :and decided to separate. Twitchell spooked the and the animal charged toward Joy. He let off a shot I00 yards away. Just before the shot, the boar smelled and tried to swing the other way. The wild boar fell dead tracxs. t !ield-dressed at 183 pounds He intends to ne animal for future eating An avid hunter, Joy aj Eastern Coyote on his nrouert,,'h,t tWO da s before le boar is not eem .... ,-.  a J Y . of the herd __:--,..,n to this area and is thought to be a in the New-^ffa-,P- .eJ.. about 20 years ago from Corbin's vm,-umty area of New Hammpshainremal:wlwlw k private game preserve and many of th from Europe. HAVERHILl, DISTRICT NO. 36 There will SCHOOL BOARD the Haverhill CORINTH-- There will be a School Board on meeting of the Unified District Jan. 13 at 7:30 no. 36 School Board on The meeting will be held Thursday, Jan. 14 at 7: p.m. Woodsville Elementary The meeting will be held atthe Elementary School. Progress is being made on the newly established Oxbow News. Since the start of the column six weeks ago, the staff has increased from four members to seven. Judy Augustine has been chosen as the editor; Marisa Fatherley has joined as a reporter, and Kristin Herman has taken on the job of staff photographer. The Oxbow News column is designed to inform the public of events taking place at Oxbow High Sehool. Con- tributions to the column should be submitted to S. Arnold Shields, the staff ad- visor, one week prior to desired publication. Student Council The Oxbow High School student council is presently involved in two projects. These projects include punk rock day and the winter carnival. Punk rock day took place on January 8. This was a dress up day which was followed by a dance on the same night. Reduced admission to the dance was offered to those who "Punked out" for the occasion. The winter carnival com- mittee of the student council is presently involved in planning events for the carnival. The carnival is to take place in mid-February before mid- winter vacation. Visiting Scholar Oxbow High School library recently had a scholar visiting. The scholar, Nancy Smith, from Rochester, New York, was at Oxbow for about a week. She was researching some manuscripts that belonged to the Bradford Public library. Smith worked at Oxbow library because it is open more hours. The Oxbow library has always cooperated with the Bradford library. Sheri Morgan Named CO-ED Correspondent Sheri Morgan, 17, of Bradford, Vt., has been named CO-ED Correspondent for the 1981-82 school year, according to an an- nouncement by Kathy Gugiek, Editorial Director of CO- ED--FORECAST Magazines. CO-ED, published nationally by Scholastic, Inc., for home economics students, contains features on personal development, careers, and consumer awareness as well as the latest trends in fashion, food, beauty and home fur- nighings. Morgan, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Donald Morgan, is a senior at Oxbow High School. She was appointed Correspondent at Oxbow High School. She was appointed Correspondent by Irene Croteau, home economics teacher at Oxbow High School. Selected for her qualities of leadership and enthusiasm for home economics, Morgan will serve as junior advisor to CO- ED editors. Like the other CO- ED Correspondents throughout the United States and Canada, she will keep the editors informed of activities at her school. Boys Varsity Basketball The Oxbow High School Boys Varsity Basketball team has been successful so far this year. The team's record currently stands at four wins and two losses. James Kelly, coach of the Oxbow varsity squad, says that the team is "looking good" so far and is "playing up to potential". Coach Kelly is quick to point out however, that his team still has work to do. Kelly says that although he is pleased with his team's overall per- formance he feels that they are still making "mental errors" which he feels will become less frequent as the season progresses. Kelly is anxious to begin inter-conference play because he feels that it will be a true indicator of how good his team really is. Co-Captain Ron Huntington Ron tluntington, co-captain of the. boys varsity basketball team, has played varsity basketball four years. As a co- captain, Huntington mentions long and short-term goals for the, primarily, new and inexperienced team. He feels that as the season progresses the big men will get the ex- perience needed to develop consistency. Huntington says, "When the big men arehaving year's class is excellent because the kids have a lot of spirit. "Forestry is an indoor- outdoor class that takes in 16 students a year and involves 50 percent lecture and 50 percent activities. Some of the activities that are accomplished in this class are" surveying, logging, planting Christmas trees and helping wildlife. This is all done on 77 acres of land owned by the Bradford Elementary School, located on Goshen Road. Jones also runs an activity that takes the students out of school for two weeks. They work outdoors from 8:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. logging on the 77 acres. At the conclusion of the two weeks, they advertise and sell the logs. All this is done to help buy the equipment needed for the forestry class at Oxbow. Oxbow Fencing The Oxbow Fencing Team starts off its season fencing St. John's Prep School in Dan- vers, Mass. on Saturday, Jan. 23. The team will take the vocational bus for tran- sportation. The Oxbow team will also fence an Ivy League team from Concord, Mass. this year. Also the team will fence against the Dartmouth Community Fencing team in Hanover, N.H. sometime this year. The team will be fencing Concord-Carlyle prep school from Concord, Mass., a team that fences in the Ivy League. Coach of the Oxbow team, Nessa Flax, said that the team is . . . "moving into the big- time fencing a prep school". Martin Smit Teacher Profile "Education is a quality experience, not one of quantity. It should be an o V portunity for everyone to have the chance to practice doing his or her best, not the most that he or she can do." Martin Smit believes firmly in this principle, and in his 10 years as Head of the Humanities Department at Oxbow High School, he has sought to guide the Social Studies and English curricula toward this goal. He said, "Too often everyone connected with education, teachers, administration, parents, even students, get caught up in believing that learning is like making money, 'more is better' ". He said, "Because Oxbow is committed to children and optimistic about the future of the school, and the students." Smit, who has a Bachelor of Science degree from LaSalle College in Philadelphia, Pa., and a Master of Arts from Florida State University, has taught in this area for 16 years. He has been a keen observer of the trends in education during this time. He said, "The 1980's and early 70's were a time of upheaval, creativity, innovation, and experimentation. For the past five years or more the educational community has been retrenching. It has been solidifying the good, creative things that happened, and has begun to make rational, mindful decisions about the entire educational process." Smit, who would like to see more money and prestige given to drama and the fine arts, said, "In recent years, the students have made great strides in writing." He at- tributes this to the number of electives available to students which allow them to select from a variety of courses in composition, journalism, literary analysis, media analysis, etc., all of which are geared to the academic ability and interests of the students. Smit said, "A school is only as good as its community. A school can act as a leader, but it must be careful to-be sen- sitive to the needs of its community." He feels that Newbury, Bradford, and the area which Oxbow serves has a stable economic base with a population interested in and supportive of the educational objectives of the school. He believes that Oxbow is for- tunate to have such a broad- based curriculum With of- ferings in the Humanities, Agriculture, Forestry, Vocational Services, Mathematics, Science, and Business, as well as a well developed sports program. He said, "The key to our future success is keeping everything in perspective and in balan- ce," aowmoblllng Snowmobiling is an activity enjoyed by many students at Oxbow High School. There are some snowmobiling clubs in the area to which these students belong. Some of the clubs are The Baldt0ppers iti 'IFairlee, The Sno-Suakes in Bradford, The Boarder Riders in Newbury and the Ridge Runners in Corinth. The clubs are formed so that snowmobilers can ride the trails. The clubs get permission from the lan- downers so that each in- dividual snowmobiler doesn't have to get permission him- self. Unless a person belongs to a club or have permission we can't legally ride on other people's property. The club also maintains the trails. Some clubs hold weekly rides around this area. Some even hold a field day for all basketball continued this week as the Olympian boys demolished a game Hartford team 68-45, but then lost to an equally up and down team, the Woadsville Engineers in the last seconds of play, 62-60. Against Hartford, Oxbow came out gunning, built up a 16-0 lead in the first six minutes, and except for some anxious moments in the second half, had the game under control. A fired up Oxbow team took the opening tap and weren't about to be stopped. Two quick Ron Huntington jumpers, followed by a Dave Stever basket underneath at 6:25 put the score at 6-0. Charlie Grant then hit for two ten-footers and Gary Hayward popped in one from the key. Oxbow now ahead 12-0 at 5:24. Huntington stung the nets for another two points and with Dave Stever's second basket at 4:00, Oxbow had swept to a 16-0 lead. At quarter's end, Oxbow held a 21-8 lead. The winless Hurricanes (0- 7) showed some spark during the second quarter as the Oxbow guns were somewhat silenced. Two scoring spurts, both of five unanswered points brought Hartford within 6, 33- 27 with 1:36 remaining. A field goal by Dave Steever and two foul shots by Bruce Jacobs guarded the lead, 37-29 at the half. The team name Hurricanes more fit the Hartford coach Stretch Gillam, than their frustration of a so-far winless season, add to it officials calls that aren't going your way during the entire game, sprinkle a bit of referee baiting, and you have a volatile situation. With but 26 seconds left in the third quarter, the Hurricane coach let loose. Debating a close call with a bit too much enthusiasm, Gillam was called for a technical foul. It was a situation that was building from the opening moments. Before Gillam could cool off from the first technical, he was hit with another. The crowd went wild, Bruce Jacobs sunk three of four foul shots for the in- fractions, and Oxbow went into the fourth quarter leading by 13, 50-37. Gillam was ejected. The fourth quarter was academic. Holding leads by as much as 24 points, the Olympians chalked up their fifth win of the season, 68-45. As usual, Ron Huntington lead all scorers with 26 points, all field goals. Dave Stever played another strong game, adding 15 points, on five field goals and five foul shots. Gary Hayward played a good floor game and collected seven points. Bruce Jacobs, coming off the bench scored nine points, Charlie Grant and Brian Page four each, Greg Garone sunk a field goal and Todd Oliver canned a foul shot. Oxbow girb00 team has to00h week BRADFORD-- Last week was to ttanover 57-44, evening a week to be forgotten for the their record at 4-4. girls' varsity basketball team The Thetford Panthers at Oxbow as they dropped an started Oxbow's week off embarrassing game to poorly by outplaying the Thetford 35-31, defeated taller, more experienced league rival U-32 58-30, but Olympians from buzzer to t hen losing again, on Saturday (please turn to page 3) Sports TOURNEY WINNERS--- Conway Racquetball win- ners were (left to right) Noweli Brown, Jeanette Enderson, Sarah Davis and Scott Davis. Racquetball news N. tIAVERIlILL--OnSunday, traveling 'to the Racquets Jan. 10 the Racquet Shack Edge in Burlington for a Junior Racquetball Team tournament. The group hosted the Wedgewood Club players are Holly Lefebvre, from Barre. Vt. In a close Susanne Smith, RiehSaffoJr., battle both teams ended in a John Saffo, Brad Farr, Ken tie at 61 each. Kinder. Gregg Goldstein, The scores at the end of the Francis Stoddard Jr., Bruce battlewere: Enderson Jr., and Chris Racquet Shack Finlay. We wish them all good Susanne Smith 12 luck. John Saffo 10 Wallyball News Brad Farr 10 Standings: Russ's Francis Stoddard Jr. 8 Hideaway Losunge in First Ken Kinder 8 Place with 25 points; Brads- T.J. Jacobs 5 Guarantee Savings, 21: The GreggGoldstein 40.S.A., 20; The Racquet BrueeEndersonJr. 4 Shack, 16; Dud's Areo, 13; Ryegate Corner, ll; Lavoies Total 61 Sales and Service, 8; and the Wedgewood I 11 Club, 3. Jeb Coates Lewis Martin Mark Garand Blake Mackay Paul Garand Brian Garand Total t)n Saturday, Jan. 16, the Racquet Shack Juniors are 14 Last week's results: Dud's 11 won three points from the Ill 10 Club, Russ's Hideaway three 9 fron; the Racquet Shack; 9 Brads-Guarantee Savings 8 three over Ryegate Corher and The O.S.A. three points 61 over Lavoies Sales and Ser- vice. Engineers over Oxbow in rival round ball WOODSVILLE A ten year rivalry was continued, and strengthened at Oxbow last Friday evening as the Woodsville Engineers huffed and puffed their way to an exciting 62-60 win over the Olympians. The difference in the game was two foul shots by Mike Aldrich with but 18 seconds left in the game. The Engineers started the quarter down by 5, 51-46 but managed to hit important hoops down to the end of the game in not- ching their third victory their learning process, I am members of the club. against five losses. During the rNt by MARY HANSON and KIM NICKLES Announcements half by a score of 21 to 17 and capture First place Wood- Marks close on Friday, Jan. also led at the end of the third . sville "All Tourney" player 15. Report cards will he issued period by 6 points, was Mike Aldrich. Wednesday, Jan. 20th. Starting Monday, Jan. 18 these coarses will be offered at W.H.S.: -- Human Physiology taught by Mr. B; -- Driver Ed by Mr. Hall; -- Modern European History, Jr. Robinson; -- Canadian Studies by Mr. White Mtn. VS WHS White Mtn. came tc Woodsville to face the Engineers at the Community Building last Wednesday night. White Mtn. took the lead and was up by 16 at the half. The Engineers battled back and was ahead by 1 at the end of 3 periods. The Woodsville squad just didn't have enough energy left and the Spartan's took the game by 10, 79-69. High Scorer for the night was J.M. with 35 points. Literary Magazine scene, the Varsity boys held The l,iterary Magazine staff their annual Christmas is collecting work from Tournament. In the first anyone from Junior ttigh and game, Connval defeated White High School. All contributions Mr. by one point. In the second will he due Feb. 19. The next But, in the 4th quarter, the Spartans came back, stuck it to the Engineers and took control. The score, again, Woodsville, 40, White Mt., 44. High scores for Woodsville were Maria Trombley with 14 and Sandy Boyce find Lisa Strickland, both chipped in 7. Woodsville's next game is Riach: on Saturday,Jan. 9. The -- Advanced Biology by Mr. Engineers will travel to Cobb; Alexander Gault. - C.P.R. by Mr. Walker. WHS boys Congratulations basketball The staff of WHS on the Air This week, on the Wood- would like to offer their svillc Engineer Basketball congratulations to the following students: - Jon Mellin -- was ac- copted at Boston; - Michele Roy -- was ac- cepted at Biscayne College; - Shirley Fournier -- was accepted al Mount Ida College; --: Brenda Smith and Kim Gaulhier -- were accepted al the same college; - Lisa tlall -- won the local and district "Voice of a good game--we win!" Huntington mentions a major Democracy" contest and her short-term goal of the team., speech was submitted to the "to beat Woodsville." stalefinals: lluntington, the team's leading scorer, averaged 21 points in his first six games and was the "Most Valuable Player" (MVP) at the Blue Mountain Christmas tour- naments. Forestry Bob Jones, vocational teacher of forestry, at Oxbow High School, said that ,'this game, Woodsville had to issue will be out March 19. contend with the Pelham l,mk for it around town ! Panthers. They battled back and forth for the whole game and the Engineers ended up winning by one. The first night had proved to- Ill}NOR Rill,i, be a close evening of STUDENT basketball. The second night, NEW HAMPTON, N.H. Peter F. Pike, son of Mr. and Mrs. William T. Pike of New I,mdon, N.11., and grandson of Mr. Louis T. Pike of Haverhill, is on the fall term honors list released by headmaster LoUis Gncrre. Jr. of The New Hampton School. Peter is a postgraduate at the 161-year- old independent coeducational secondary school located in the Lakes Region in the foothills of the White Moun. lains. - Shirley Fournier -- was awarded the DAR Good Citizen Award. WIIS girls basketball they faced the Spartan's and Panthers for the 3rd place spot. Pelham took the early lead but White Mtn. took over and won quite easily to take 3rd place. Connval faced Woodsville for the championship and The Woodsville Girls Connval took the early lead. Basketball team traveled to The lead went back and forth, White Mr. on Wednesday, Jan. with Connval starting to open 6 and was defeated by the up a lead. The Engineers just scoreof40to44, couldn't battle back and the The Engineers lead at the ('ougars won by l0 points to entire game you could almost nearly at will during the first foul shots by Jim Kinder put hear the chant, 'I think I can, I eight minutes, the Engineers ahead by two think I can, I think I can,' and they did it. A 12 for 28 per- formance from the foul line didn't help the Oxbow cause. The game was a matter of short scoring bursts by each team. Oxbow jumped in front at the end of the first quarter, 17 to 12 on the inside offensive strength of Dave Stever and Brian Page. Ron Huntington and Gary llayward were able to feed the ball into the inside Cohase Lions Club news WOODSVILLE-- The Cobase Lion's Club of Woodsville will hold their 42nd Annual Nor- them Amateur Basketball Tournament Feb. 24 through Feb. 28 at the Woodsville Community Building. There will be A & B divisions as in Field goals by Ron Magoon, 57-55. Huntington tied the Mike Slayton and Dave Patten score at 57. but three foul shots in the first 36 seconds of the by Mullen and Patten gave the quarter brought Woodsville lead back to Woodsville with within 1. 17-16. Charlie Grant 2:381eft. and Brian Page matched two A clutch field goal off the pointers with Patten and John glass by Dave Stayer pulling Muilen before a Slayton Oxbow within one, 60-59, and jumper from the side gave the then with only 24 seconds left, Engineers their first lead. 22- Stever hit the first end of a 1 21. Two field goals by Page and 1 foul situation, tying the and a single point by Bruce score at 60-60. The stage was Jacobs were matched by then set for Mike Aldrich to fielders by Aldrich and Mellin, sink both foul shots in the knotting the score at 28 with midst of a partisan Oxbow 3:29 left. A four point lead by crowd yelling and banging the Woodsville at the hands of bleachers, hoping to cheer Patten and Slayton was cut in their team to victory. half by two foul shots by Oxbow took the ball out of Huntington as time ran out in bounds but couldn't get off a the half. good shot. Ron Huntington Charlie Grant, having a trying desperately to drop in a hard time on the court for two pointer, saw it bounce off Oxbow hit two important foul the front of the rim, and with it shots near the end of the third any hopes of an Oxbow win in period to put Oxbow up by overtime. five, 51-46 going into the final Mike Aldrich. scoring nine eight minutes, of his 15 points in the final past years.. Five early period turnover quarter lead the Engineers, Applications are available through Jim Walker. 41 King by Oxbow helped give with Mullen chipping in 14, St.. Woodsville, N.H., 03785or Woodsville the momentum and Kinder with 12. Brian by calling 1-603-747-3,9or603- they needed to get back into Page, Ron Huntington and the haiigame Aldrich hit to Dave Stever hit for 20. 14 and 747-28.56. Applications will not inside jumpers, John Mullen a 11 respectively for the 5-3 be accepted after Jan. 20. 1982, shot from the corner and two Olympians. PASSING OFF-- Ran Huntington, driving towards the basket, passes off at the last minute during acUon against Wlsvllle last Friday at the Oxbow gym.