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January 13, 1982     Journal Opinion
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Smithsonian News Service Art 8 A new place .for everything tZictorian by MARY COMBS was best sununed up in the tuts a separate establishment The antipathy toxvat-d Smithsnnian News Service Metrol)olitan Muscum of Art's for 19th-cenlury furniture and Victorian styh' sometimes For ntost of the 20th con- (;uide to the Collections of htry, hish)rians, critics and 1931. which warned unwary designers treated the ar- visilors to its tiny lgth-century chih,clure and decorative arts (h,coralive arts gallery: of the Victorian era in ","qmte of the exhibits. ,. arc An|or)ca as if a kind of shmn not because they have aesthetic insanity had af- artistic meril, but because fliclcd the nation between 1841) lhey illustralc certain phases. an(t 191X). When the topic . . lhal cnuld not beam)tied." arosc, it was hastily covered, 'l'lay. the United States is the slyles ahnosl universally experiencing a major revival dismissed as an illogical and of inleresl in Victoriana. incmuprehensible jumble. Museums nationwide take Indeed, "Victorian" and "in nc pride in their collections, liad taste" became research on the era thrives synonynlous. Nineteenth aim reproductiottsof Victorian cenhlry archileclure was I'urnilure and accessories are relegal(t to the covers of I,eing produced by top Golhic novels. Victorian nlanufachlrers. Prices of fine furnishings, even bona fide pieees, no hmger relegated to anlitlues, were banished to jttnk sales, have soared in the second-hand furnitureslorcs, pasl few years, and one This anti-Victorian attilude prcsligions aitction house now The legend for this illustration in an 1854 edition of Gleason's Pictorial Drawing-Room Companion praises the elegant Rococo Revival decor as sumptuous yet graceful, "not vulgarly elaborate," each single article in perfect keeping with the whole-- a suitable setting for an eminent merchant and his family, surrounded by "all the elegancies and luxuries to which years of successful enterprise entitle him.., a fitting abode of a man of refinement.., where a lady of elegant manners and educated taste might appropriately receive her guests" and a demonstration that "a true and classic idea of the beautiful in decorative arts is beginning to prevail in our country," ol)jels d'art. Metnbership in preservation organizations and in the Viclorian Society in America conlinnes to grow; buildings that would have b(,n htrn down without a siwond thought 20 years ago are It, ing carefully restored. The rejeclion of all things Vk'tm'ian in favor of earlier Airier)can slylcs, and the current renaissance, can be traced in part to specific in- fluential events, according to historian Jantes Goodc, curalor of the Smithsonian lnslilulion's first building, the "Castle" on the National Mall in Washington. D.C, Goodc has been restoring that 1855 Nornlan Revival landmark and enriching its furniture collection, even finding some original Castle furniture sold at ariel)on for a few dollars in the l.140s. The glorification of the 18th century at the expensc of the Victorians--- "the Chippendale syndrome," as Goode calls it, dales from the 1976 Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia where an exhibit on early America was a huge success. Fvcntually. the Colonial and Federal periods became the only "excellent" periods in American design of the past. The restoration of Colonial Williamsburg in the 1920s sanclifict this trend. look extrcntc form. Washingt(in, I).C., for exantple, w as a swamp during the ('ohm)el era; nearly 70 percent of the residential city ,xas built at the height of the VichJrian period. Yet today ninny areas in the capital city present a spurious Colonial- Federal appearance. This goes back. Goode says, to the P.13(Is, when the now-elite (,eorgetown area was rul hlessly reworkcd--doors and windows of Victorian houses were altered and or- nanienlation torn off--to conhrnt to the demands of 18lh-ccnlury fever, (if cnurse, every city across the nation saw the destruction of old buihtings to make way for new. Ironically, some of the finest examples of Vie- t nrian neighborhoods survived sirnply because they had hecome neglected slums. Then, in the late '70s, came the rehabilitation boom;, tax breaks, soaring re-sale values and the high cost of new construct ion made restoration lucrative. Yet,.. more than economic benefit spurs the Victorian revival. Another factor is the cnntplex way in which taste changes and fluctuates within our culture. "Modern" (please turn to page 8A) TODAY'S CHUCKLE Actually I'm a born leader -- if 1 could only find some born followers. i €IKOUtTINa II1:11111 IIAMIIIIII| -- Lyme, Lyme Canter, Orford, Orfordvills, Piermont, Haverhill, Haverhill Center, Haverhill Comer, North Haverhill, East Haverhill, Pike, Woodsvllla, Bath, Monroe, Lisbon, Landaff, Benton Lymon, Warren, 61ancliff, Wentworth . . . YntMONT -- Thetford, Esst Thefford, Thetford Hill, Thetford Censer, North Thetford, "Pelt Mills, Foirlou, West Fairlae, Bradford, Bradford Village, C0r]nth, East Corlnth, i'opsharn, West Topsham, Newbury Village, South Newbury, Welt Newlry, Wells River, Grates, Ryse C,rt/, tstRy .tt, South IlynOte, -hom, Bemet. West hmet. . ..... . _ THIS WEEK'S PRESS RUN 10,220 tuber2 ,.Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont , , , January l3, i ,i i O ake safety a part f the season Asrieul00 Land Protection a • P. Redmond, The toltofVermontwinters teristically happen at this vegetable material. When It isessentialtorealizethat fresh air or oxygen, tFarmland retenuon technulue,00 M.D. is taken not only in the form of time of year. The recent tragic breathed in, the carbon there may be no warning that Combustion in or near an Medical Director high fuel bills but in kinds of deaths of two Vermont monoxide combined with carbon monoxide is being enclosed unventilated space is[ An overview Vermont Poison Center accidents which charac- teenagers from carbon hemoglobin in the blood and breathed. Carbon monoxide dangerous and mus! bel ThisseriesAgriuturoiLandPrtectinhasbeenPre.par/UVMxt|mslanServicCmemmihr¢mdRumlevepmentSpecidistto monoxide poisoning are a sad renders it unable to perform has no odor; the smell of avoided. A leaking exhaust I  citizens imrease thor kndedgo lout a¢tcelteml land mtlaa sechlues. Edited for publicofion by Lois M. Frey, RQkD reminder of the danger of its vital function of delivering exhaust fumes is due to other sy:emfgrT:y r:nexie Tth using the automobile as a oxygen to the tissues of the substances. When exposure is °me ] *'* e issue of agricultural land use and tended it) restrict the non-agricultural source of heat. An un- body. Although carbon gradual there may be poisoning to the passengers the techniques available to assist in uses or development of farmland; and WINTER GARDENING The wind may be howling the snow into drifts out- aide.., but it's already garden planning time in hun- dreds of thousands of American homes. And, whether out winter is snowy or mild, with the cost of store- ught produce as high as it is today, we thought You'd like to learn a few tips from Jack Roland Coggins of Raymond, Nebraska. Mr. Coggins claims, "I garden seriously.., so seriously that I've learned to grow ten times more vegetables in my organic produce plot than most other gardeners can raise on the same size patch." What is Jack's secret? Number one, he plants jumbo varieties of most of the vegetables he cultivates. "When you harvest 20-pound cabbages, 50-pound .squash, 40-pound watermelons, and 2-1/2-pound on- runs, ' says Jack, "your yield adds up fast!" Number two, Coggins concentrates on heavy produc- ers when he plants fruits and vegetables that aren't available in giant, size. "In general," he advises, "if the word prolific appears on a seed pack, I know I've got a winner even before I begin putting in my garden." And, number three, Jack "double crops" most of his produce patch. "Fertile, organically rich land will usu- ally grow two or more crops during a single season, if you know how to start a second planting while the first s still ripening. Early beans, for instance, can be fol- owed, on the same ground, by celery corn, carrots, or beets." . So Jet it blow outside! This is the season to sit by the fire, flip through a good seed catalog or two ... and dream of Jack Roland Coggins-sized yields! Of course, you could also follow the advice of John C. Huckans, who does more than dream. "If you haven't started this year's garden yet, it's high time you be gan," he says. And John, who raises bountiful harvests on a small city lot in upstate New York, knows what be's talking about "Instead of waiting for the traditional beginmng of a e gardening season--which falls around Memorial y in my area--I started a few tomato plants in flow- ftrPOts one January. I don't have any fancy equipment indoo|_gard),ing., but the vines seemed to grow window.'* = weu when simply placed in a large, southern bay "By mid-March, the plants were 15 inches tall and s to" bloom. I actually began nicking vine-rip- ened tomatoes, indoors " • - first rine .,,a ..... . in April... and harvested my v,-,,,,uuor omatoes on May 16 (This was about two weeks before most of my neighl3ors even set their P sltts outsidet)" tart a garden next month9 Yo ' a good idea..  ........ • u d better believe it's New York[ -a  you uve as far north as upstate And while those tomatoes are growing in your south- facing window, it'll also be a good time to make sure your gardening equipment is in top running order. Take advantage of the less busy season to o" s en oulu°th:rwul. care for your tols, eleim up l'ourhn . .,_ , . u--m general--take care of the myriad little ¢oores that you won't have time for later in the year. F O FREE IOdlttonat information on winter gardening or on THE ;InTHERoER RTH NEWs" magazine send your name and address to 638 '¶j----' ' With LEss!, care of this paper Ask for Reprint No • o, uumm Artichokes' N4145 derstanding of the hazards of monoxide eventually carbon monoxide is essential separates from hemoglobin for safe automobile use in the this is a slow process so winter. Carbon monoxide is a anyone who breathes air with colorless, odorless gas which elevated carbon monoxide is produced when most levels has a gradual increase materials are burned in- in the amount of hemoglobin cluding petroleum, kerosene, which is unable to carry coal, wood and other oxygen. headache, nausea, dizziness or dimness of vision. With more rapid exposure there may be no signs other than drowsiness. Once the victim falls asleep, he or she will continue to breathe the poisonous gas and will die if not rescued and placed in Construction industry Confiaent about .future by HUBERT BEA1WY From construction's perspective, the first year of the Reagan Presidency has a surface appearance of parismony that would make Scrooge seem like a philan- thropost. For example, page 52 of the Reagan Administration's own report card states "Consistent with overall Administration policy, total federal high- way spending was reduced to $8 billion per year from the $10 billion planned by the previous Administration." The Environmental Protection Agency's Construction Grants Program has been reduced to $2.4 billion for F '82, from a projected $3.7 billion. Long term, the Reagan Administration has reduced federal expenditure for EPA's con- struction program by $50 billion! It wants the states more involved in meeting states' needs. As early as March 1981, the Associated General Contractors of America, com- posed of more than 30,000 industry firms, anticipated that President Reagan's proposals would reduce federal funding of construction by at least $18.2 billion. The construction industry, already devastated in home building, was due for even tougher times. The scenario was ripe for a strident attack on Ronald Wilson Reagan. The vocal and powerful construction industry thai employs more than 4,o00,000 on-site workers--and more than 20,000,000 when indirect employment is considered-- would show the 40th President that he could not be so cavalier. The attack never occurred. Instead, on March 16, 1981, the Associated General Contractors of America named President Reagan as its Man of the Year in support of his program of spending, tax and regulatory cuts. Later, more than 40 associations formed the Construction Industry Coalition for The New Beginning and worked like beavers to ensure congressional approval of the President's program for economic recovery. Today, as the Reagan Administration approaches its first anniversary, as its critics plant seeds of doubt, is the hard- pressed construction industry emerging from its shell to attack, discredit or lambast the Administration? Not by a long shot! Why? The reason the construction industry is so proactive toward the Reagan Administration is almost elusive in its simplicity. It is not limited to support of spending, tax and regulatory cuts. The fourth reason for its proactive stance is the realization that the return to reason it had so long advocated for government had actually arrived. The construction industry did not want constant confrontation with the best form of government on earth even as we had to attack the regulatory juggernaut of hiring and sub-contracting quotas, paperwork blizzards that followed hailstorms of regulations, and,the erosion of confidence in government and business alike that followed attack and counterattack. A return to reason was in order. What has the Reagan Administration done to achieve a return to reason? The con- struction industry believes that the greatest achievements so far has been: restoration of confidence in government from a business community that does not want to be feared or abused; a truce in the regulatory wars followed by real progress in clearing the regulatory jungle; leadership qualities of firmness, openness and evenhanded responsiveness that promote proaction and reject reaction; and tax incentives that will promote growth and progress. Looking to 1982 and the second year of the Reagan Administration, the con- struction industry is cautionusly op- timistic although not overwhelmed by the prospect of immediate prosperity. For the long range future, the .construction in- dustry is highly optimistic. Demand for construction is building in all sectors from homes to highways to industrial facilities. Although construction is shaky now, it is far from down and has total confidence in America's future. The potential exists and is readily achievable for the construction industry to boom from $230 billion an- nually to 00 billion plus. As exorbitant interest rates decline, as inflation recedes, and as mutual government, business and public confidence is restored and solidified by further regulatory reductions, the construction industry and the 20,000,000 Americans it employs directly and in- directly will again become the most vibrant force in our economy. llubert Beatty is executive vice president of the Assoclated General Contractors of America. a national trade association of more than 30,000 companies. but it cannot be assumed in any car that exhaust gases will not accumulate. During winter driving, the windows should be opened and thecar's air exchanged at least every hour. While this is un- comfortable on a bitter winter day, it is obviously preferable to carbon monoxide poisoning. The motor should not be left running for more than five minutes to keep a stationary car heated. When this is done carbon monoxide builds up not only inside but around the outside of the car, thus even an open window does not necessarily protect the oc- cupants. Similarly a car should never be left running in a garage or other enclosed space. Winter's cold brings (please turn to page 3A) retaining land in agriculture are diverse. In order to help community leaders in- crease their understanding of the issues, the UVM Extension Service has developed an educational program to address the issue of agricultural land protection. This information will be a part of five regional conferences, which will explore agricultural land use and allempt to create a better understanding of various agricultural land retention techniques, being sponsored by the UVM Extension Service in February and early March. The recently completed National Agricultural Lands Study found a total of 1112 slale, 110 county and 177 municipal hmd programs to protect farmland in the t!nitc, d States. These programs fall into three general categories: (1) Incentive Programs. geared to provide financial or other incentives to farmland owners to keep Ihcm actively using and managing their land: (2) Land Use Controls, in- 13) Integrated Programs, a combination of incentives and controls. In subsequent articles in this newspaper, the above farmland retention techniques will be discttsed. There are many groups, organizations and agencies addressing the issue of agricultural land use in Vermont. The UVM Extension Service hopes the public will be better equipped to decide what direction it wishes to take concerning the use of agricultural land by being in- formed on the subject. This series will highlight the basic concept of various farmhmd retention techniques to provide information on the various alternatives awtilable to Vermont and its citizens. The decision, whether to preserve agricultural land or not, rests with the citizens of Vermont. For more in- fornmtion, contact the Agricultural Agent or Community and Rural Development Specialist in your County Extension Service office. Farm show opens in Barre BARRE-- If you want to find a.m. to 6:00 p.m.; Wednesday, contest for the FFA queen and The Vermont Sugar Makers out what Vermont agriculture is all about, be at Barre Municipal Auditorium Jan. 26- 28for the 48th annual Vermont Farm Show. The annual event showcases Vermont agricultural products and gives a central location for annual meetings of various farm-related organizations. Hours at the exhibit halls which cover both floors of the auditorium are Tuesday, 9:00 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. and Thursday, 9:00 a.m. to the farm show closing at 4:00 p.m. On Wednesday evening the annual consumer night will be held with a variety of events and displays on the stage of the auditorium. FFA Activities The events get underway for the Future Farmers of America on Monday when they have a full day of ac- tivities beginning with a Happy Birthday ED BROWN From The Neighbors erection of booths by various chapters. On Tuesday judging of the educational exhibits will take place, and on Wednesday morning, following a round of competition on forestry and conservation and farm management, the annual FFA banquet will be held climaxed with the crowning of the FFA queen for 1982. Verment Sugar Makers Association takes over the main auditorium on Tuesday with its annual noon banquet (please turn to page 2A) $125 PAINT SPECIAL ON ANY CAR $1.50 FOR PICK-UP TRUCKS (includes paint materials) BODY WORK EXTRA 8o@ (802) 222;4451 FREE fIMATI BRADFORD, VT 05033 Your ad, this size, on page 1 of. the Second Opinion is only $5.00 Authorized VOLKSWAGEN AUDI--MAZDA Sales & Service CROSSWAY MOTORS Barre-Montpelier Rd. 802.223-a4 HAPPY BIRTHDAY SUE! L Your ad, this size, on page of the Second Opinion is only $10.00 Happy Birthday MOTHER Love All The 6iimans Smithsonian News Service Art 8 A new place .for everything tZictorian by MARY COMBS was best sununed up in the tuts a separate establishment The antipathy toxvat-d Smithsnnian News Service Metrol)olitan Muscum of Art's for 19th-cenlury furniture and Victorian styh' sometimes For ntost of the 20th con- (;uide to the Collections of htry, hish)rians, critics and 1931. which warned unwary designers treated the ar- visilors to its tiny lgth-century chih,clure and decorative arts (h,coralive arts gallery: of the Victorian era in ","qmte of the exhibits. ,. arc An|or)ca as if a kind of shmn not because they have aesthetic insanity had af- artistic meril, but because fliclcd the nation between 1841) lhey illustralc certain phases. an(t 191X). When the topic . . lhal cnuld not beam)tied." arosc, it was hastily covered, 'l'lay. the United States is the slyles ahnosl universally experiencing a major revival dismissed as an illogical and of inleresl in Victoriana. incmuprehensible jumble. Museums nationwide take Indeed, "Victorian" and "in nc pride in their collections, liad taste" became research on the era thrives synonynlous. Nineteenth aim reproductiottsof Victorian cenhlry archileclure was I'urnilure and accessories are relegal(t to the covers of I,eing produced by top Golhic novels. Victorian nlanufachlrers. Prices of fine furnishings, even bona fide pieees, no hmger relegated to anlitlues, were banished to jttnk sales, have soared in the second-hand furnitureslorcs, pasl few years, and one This anti-Victorian attilude prcsligions aitction house now The legend for this illustration in an 1854 edition of Gleason's Pictorial Drawing-Room Companion praises the elegant Rococo Revival decor as sumptuous yet graceful, "not vulgarly elaborate," each single article in perfect keeping with the whole-- a suitable setting for an eminent merchant and his family, surrounded by "all the elegancies and luxuries to which years of successful enterprise entitle him.., a fitting abode of a man of refinement.., where a lady of elegant manners and educated taste might appropriately receive her guests" and a demonstration that "a true and classic idea of the beautiful in decorative arts is beginning to prevail in our country," ol)jels d'art. Metnbership in preservation organizations and in the Viclorian Society in America conlinnes to grow; buildings that would have b(,n htrn down without a siwond thought 20 years ago are It, ing carefully restored. The rejeclion of all things Vk'tm'ian in favor of earlier Airier)can slylcs, and the current renaissance, can be traced in part to specific in- fluential events, according to historian Jantes Goodc, curalor of the Smithsonian lnslilulion's first building, the "Castle" on the National Mall in Washington. D.C, Goodc has been restoring that 1855 Nornlan Revival landmark and enriching its furniture collection, even finding some original Castle furniture sold at ariel)on for a few dollars in the l.140s. The glorification of the 18th century at the expensc of the Victorians--- "the Chippendale syndrome," as Goode calls it, dales from the 1976 Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia where an exhibit on early America was a huge success. Fvcntually. the Colonial and Federal periods became the only "excellent" periods in American design of the past. The restoration of Colonial Williamsburg in the 1920s sanclifict this trend. look extrcntc form. Washingt(in, I).C., for exantple, w as a swamp during the ('ohm)el era; nearly 70 percent of the residential city ,xas built at the height of the VichJrian period. Yet today ninny areas in the capital city present a spurious Colonial- Federal appearance. This goes back. Goode says, to the P.13(Is, when the now-elite (,eorgetown area was rul hlessly reworkcd--doors and windows of Victorian houses were altered and or- nanienlation torn off--to conhrnt to the demands of 18lh-ccnlury fever, (if cnurse, every city across the nation saw the destruction of old buihtings to make way for new. Ironically, some of the finest examples of Vie- t nrian neighborhoods survived sirnply because they had hecome neglected slums. Then, in the late '70s, came the rehabilitation boom;, tax breaks, soaring re-sale values and the high cost of new construct ion made restoration lucrative. Yet,.. more than economic benefit spurs the Victorian revival. Another factor is the cnntplex way in which taste changes and fluctuates within our culture. "Modern" (please turn to page 8A) TODAY'S CHUCKLE Actually I'm a born leader -- if 1 could only find some born followers. i €IKOUtTINa II1:11111 IIAMIIIIII| -- Lyme, Lyme Canter, Orford, Orfordvills, Piermont, Haverhill, Haverhill Center, Haverhill Comer, North Haverhill, East Haverhill, Pike, Woodsvllla, Bath, Monroe, Lisbon, Landaff, Benton Lymon, Warren, 61ancliff, Wentworth . . . YntMONT -- Thetford, Esst Thefford, Thetford Hill, Thetford Censer, North Thetford, "Pelt Mills, Foirlou, West Fairlae, Bradford, Bradford Village, C0r]nth, East Corlnth, i'opsharn, West Topsham, Newbury Village, South Newbury, Welt Newlry, Wells River, Grates, Ryse C,rt/, tstRy .tt, South IlynOte, -hom, Bemet. West hmet. . ..... . _ THIS WEEK'S PRESS RUN 10,220 tuber2 ,.Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont , , , January l3, i ,i i O ake safety a part f the season Asrieul00 Land Protection a • P. Redmond, The toltofVermontwinters teristically happen at this vegetable material. When It isessentialtorealizethat fresh air or oxygen, tFarmland retenuon technulue,00 M.D. is taken not only in the form of time of year. The recent tragic breathed in, the carbon there may be no warning that Combustion in or near an Medical Director high fuel bills but in kinds of deaths of two Vermont monoxide combined with carbon monoxide is being enclosed unventilated space is[ An overview Vermont Poison Center accidents which charac- teenagers from carbon hemoglobin in the blood and breathed. Carbon monoxide dangerous and mus! bel ThisseriesAgriuturoiLandPrtectinhasbeenPre.par/UVMxt|mslanServicCmemmihr¢mdRumlevepmentSpecidistto monoxide poisoning are a sad renders it unable to perform has no odor; the smell of avoided. A leaking exhaust I  citizens imrease thor kndedgo lout a¢tcelteml land mtlaa sechlues. Edited for publicofion by Lois M. Frey, RQkD reminder of the danger of its vital function of delivering exhaust fumes is due to other sy:emfgrT:y r:nexie Tth using the automobile as a oxygen to the tissues of the substances. When exposure is °me ] *'* e issue of agricultural land use and tended it) restrict the non-agricultural source of heat. An un- body. Although carbon gradual there may be poisoning to the passengers the techniques available to assist in uses or development of farmland; and WINTER GARDENING The wind may be howling the snow into drifts out- aide.., but it's already garden planning time in hun- dreds of thousands of American homes. And, whether out winter is snowy or mild, with the cost of store- ught produce as high as it is today, we thought You'd like to learn a few tips from Jack Roland Coggins of Raymond, Nebraska. Mr. Coggins claims, "I garden seriously.., so seriously that I've learned to grow ten times more vegetables in my organic produce plot than most other gardeners can raise on the same size patch." What is Jack's secret? Number one, he plants jumbo varieties of most of the vegetables he cultivates. "When you harvest 20-pound cabbages, 50-pound .squash, 40-pound watermelons, and 2-1/2-pound on- runs, ' says Jack, "your yield adds up fast!" Number two, Coggins concentrates on heavy produc- ers when he plants fruits and vegetables that aren't available in giant, size. "In general," he advises, "if the word prolific appears on a seed pack, I know I've got a winner even before I begin putting in my garden." And, number three, Jack "double crops" most of his produce patch. "Fertile, organically rich land will usu- ally grow two or more crops during a single season, if you know how to start a second planting while the first s still ripening. Early beans, for instance, can be fol- owed, on the same ground, by celery corn, carrots, or beets." . So Jet it blow outside! This is the season to sit by the fire, flip through a good seed catalog or two ... and dream of Jack Roland Coggins-sized yields! Of course, you could also follow the advice of John C. Huckans, who does more than dream. "If you haven't started this year's garden yet, it's high time you be gan," he says. And John, who raises bountiful harvests on a small city lot in upstate New York, knows what be's talking about "Instead of waiting for the traditional beginmng of a e gardening season--which falls around Memorial y in my area--I started a few tomato plants in flow- ftrPOts one January. I don't have any fancy equipment indoo|_gard),ing., but the vines seemed to grow window.'* = weu when simply placed in a large, southern bay "By mid-March, the plants were 15 inches tall and s to" bloom. I actually began nicking vine-rip- ened tomatoes, indoors " • - first rine .,,a ..... . in April... and harvested my v,-,,,,uuor omatoes on May 16 (This was about two weeks before most of my neighl3ors even set their P sltts outsidet)" tart a garden next month9 Yo ' a good idea..  ........ • u d better believe it's New York[ -a  you uve as far north as upstate And while those tomatoes are growing in your south- facing window, it'll also be a good time to make sure your gardening equipment is in top running order. Take advantage of the less busy season to o" s en oulu°th:rwul. care for your tols, eleim up l'ourhn . .,_ , . u--m general--take care of the myriad little ¢oores that you won't have time for later in the year. F O FREE IOdlttonat information on winter gardening or on THE ;InTHERoER RTH NEWs" magazine send your name and address to 638 '¶j----' ' With LEss!, care of this paper Ask for Reprint No • o, uumm Artichokes' N4145 derstanding of the hazards of monoxide eventually carbon monoxide is essential separates from hemoglobin for safe automobile use in the this is a slow process so winter. Carbon monoxide is a anyone who breathes air with colorless, odorless gas which elevated carbon monoxide is produced when most levels has a gradual increase materials are burned in- in the amount of hemoglobin cluding petroleum, kerosene, which is unable to carry coal, wood and other oxygen. headache, nausea, dizziness or dimness of vision. With more rapid exposure there may be no signs other than drowsiness. Once the victim falls asleep, he or she will continue to breathe the poisonous gas and will die if not rescued and placed in Construction industry Confiaent about .future by HUBERT BEA1WY From construction's perspective, the first year of the Reagan Presidency has a surface appearance of parismony that would make Scrooge seem like a philan- thropost. For example, page 52 of the Reagan Administration's own report card states "Consistent with overall Administration policy, total federal high- way spending was reduced to $8 billion per year from the $10 billion planned by the previous Administration." The Environmental Protection Agency's Construction Grants Program has been reduced to $2.4 billion for F '82, from a projected $3.7 billion. Long term, the Reagan Administration has reduced federal expenditure for EPA's con- struction program by $50 billion! It wants the states more involved in meeting states' needs. As early as March 1981, the Associated General Contractors of America, com- posed of more than 30,000 industry firms, anticipated that President Reagan's proposals would reduce federal funding of construction by at least $18.2 billion. The construction industry, already devastated in home building, was due for even tougher times. The scenario was ripe for a strident attack on Ronald Wilson Reagan. The vocal and powerful construction industry thai employs more than 4,o00,000 on-site workers--and more than 20,000,000 when indirect employment is considered-- would show the 40th President that he could not be so cavalier. The attack never occurred. Instead, on March 16, 1981, the Associated General Contractors of America named President Reagan as its Man of the Year in support of his program of spending, tax and regulatory cuts. Later, more than 40 associations formed the Construction Industry Coalition for The New Beginning and worked like beavers to ensure congressional approval of the President's program for economic recovery. Today, as the Reagan Administration approaches its first anniversary, as its critics plant seeds of doubt, is the hard- pressed construction industry emerging from its shell to attack, discredit or lambast the Administration? Not by a long shot! Why? The reason the construction industry is so proactive toward the Reagan Administration is almost elusive in its simplicity. It is not limited to support of spending, tax and regulatory cuts. The fourth reason for its proactive stance is the realization that the return to reason it had so long advocated for government had actually arrived. The construction industry did not want constant confrontation with the best form of government on earth even as we had to attack the regulatory juggernaut of hiring and sub-contracting quotas, paperwork blizzards that followed hailstorms of regulations, and,the erosion of confidence in government and business alike that followed attack and counterattack. A return to reason was in order. What has the Reagan Administration done to achieve a return to reason? The con- struction industry believes that the greatest achievements so far has been: restoration of confidence in government from a business community that does not want to be feared or abused; a truce in the regulatory wars followed by real progress in clearing the regulatory jungle; leadership qualities of firmness, openness and evenhanded responsiveness that promote proaction and reject reaction; and tax incentives that will promote growth and progress. Looking to 1982 and the second year of the Reagan Administration, the con- struction industry is cautionusly op- timistic although not overwhelmed by the prospect of immediate prosperity. For the long range future, the .construction in- dustry is highly optimistic. Demand for construction is building in all sectors from homes to highways to industrial facilities. Although construction is shaky now, it is far from down and has total confidence in America's future. The potential exists and is readily achievable for the construction industry to boom from $230 billion an- nually to 00 billion plus. As exorbitant interest rates decline, as inflation recedes, and as mutual government, business and public confidence is restored and solidified by further regulatory reductions, the construction industry and the 20,000,000 Americans it employs directly and in- directly will again become the most vibrant force in our economy. llubert Beatty is executive vice president of the Assoclated General Contractors of America. a national trade association of more than 30,000 companies. but it cannot be assumed in any car that exhaust gases will not accumulate. During winter driving, the windows should be opened and thecar's air exchanged at least every hour. While this is un- comfortable on a bitter winter day, it is obviously preferable to carbon monoxide poisoning. The motor should not be left running for more than five minutes to keep a stationary car heated. When this is done carbon monoxide builds up not only inside but around the outside of the car, thus even an open window does not necessarily protect the oc- cupants. Similarly a car should never be left running in a garage or other enclosed space. Winter's cold brings (please turn to page 3A) retaining land in agriculture are diverse. In order to help community leaders in- crease their understanding of the issues, the UVM Extension Service has developed an educational program to address the issue of agricultural land protection. This information will be a part of five regional conferences, which will explore agricultural land use and allempt to create a better understanding of various agricultural land retention techniques, being sponsored by the UVM Extension Service in February and early March. The recently completed National Agricultural Lands Study found a total of 1112 slale, 110 county and 177 municipal hmd programs to protect farmland in the t!nitc, d States. These programs fall into three general categories: (1) Incentive Programs. geared to provide financial or other incentives to farmland owners to keep Ihcm actively using and managing their land: (2) Land Use Controls, in- 13) Integrated Programs, a combination of incentives and controls. In subsequent articles in this newspaper, the above farmland retention techniques will be discttsed. There are many groups, organizations and agencies addressing the issue of agricultural land use in Vermont. The UVM Extension Service hopes the public will be better equipped to decide what direction it wishes to take concerning the use of agricultural land by being in- formed on the subject. This series will highlight the basic concept of various farmhmd retention techniques to provide information on the various alternatives awtilable to Vermont and its citizens. The decision, whether to preserve agricultural land or not, rests with the citizens of Vermont. For more in- fornmtion, contact the Agricultural Agent or Community and Rural Development Specialist in your County Extension Service office. Farm show opens in Barre BARRE-- If you want to find a.m. to 6:00 p.m.; Wednesday, contest for the FFA queen and The Vermont Sugar Makers out what Vermont agriculture is all about, be at Barre Municipal Auditorium Jan. 26- 28for the 48th annual Vermont Farm Show. The annual event showcases Vermont agricultural products and gives a central location for annual meetings of various farm-related organizations. Hours at the exhibit halls which cover both floors of the auditorium are Tuesday, 9:00 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. and Thursday, 9:00 a.m. to the farm show closing at 4:00 p.m. On Wednesday evening the annual consumer night will be held with a variety of events and displays on the stage of the auditorium. FFA Activities The events get underway for the Future Farmers of America on Monday when they have a full day of ac- tivities beginning with a Happy Birthday ED BROWN From The Neighbors erection of booths by various chapters. On Tuesday judging of the educational exhibits will take place, and on Wednesday morning, following a round of competition on forestry and conservation and farm management, the annual FFA banquet will be held climaxed with the crowning of the FFA queen for 1982. Verment Sugar Makers Association takes over the main auditorium on Tuesday with its annual noon banquet (please turn to page 2A) $125 PAINT SPECIAL ON ANY CAR $1.50 FOR PICK-UP TRUCKS (includes paint materials) BODY WORK EXTRA 8o@ (802) 222;4451 FREE fIMATI BRADFORD, VT 05033 Your ad, this size, on page 1 of. the Second Opinion is only $5.00 Authorized VOLKSWAGEN AUDI--MAZDA Sales & Service CROSSWAY MOTORS Barre-Montpelier Rd. 802.223-a4 HAPPY BIRTHDAY SUE! 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