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January 13, 1982     Journal Opinion
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January 13, 1982
 

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January 13, 1982-The Second Opinion-Page 3A Lingeri CARD OF THANKS The family of Lyle Carter wish to express thanks to friends, relatives, hospital and nursing home staff, who assisted in any way to make his past years more pleasant. During a time like this, we realize how much ,you really mean to us. Members of the Carter Family Your CARD OF THANKS in the Second Opinion is only $10.00 CARD OF THANKS A thank you to our many friends, neighbors and relatives for the support you gave us at the recent loss of my husband, son, brother. Special thanks for the food, cards, money and the many prayers. They helped so much. God Bless each one. " Marjorie Ricker Roger and Sue Ricker &amp; sons Ruby Ricker Russell and Madeline & family Eugene and Joyce & family REGATTA--Hydroplane races will be again next September as part of 1982 Chrysler- International Regatta held at the Moore Dam " 8 busses hydroplanes Segal, money in excess of $20,000.00 g Sanel Auto announced that company has agreed to associate sponsor for the N. H. Chrysler-Dodge Regatta. The is to be held at Moore in Littleton, N.H. Under auspices of the Littleton Chamber of Commerce. year's race dates have slated for September 11- ,1982. "This will be our second as the associate sponsor event in sponsoring the Prix Inboard Racing said Segal. "The and fans really those big racing chines and the huge rooster tails they ntinued. year more than 30,000 ,yed to Moore to witness the Nor- only Grand Prix and Nationa! Speed Boat Is. At this race, onlookers wit- two ,l:ltacular boat boats and their flipped in Race Ed Harris said are fortunate neither one drivers got seriously but this is the type of i that sPectators will remember and will en- e tieir return in future -aving the N. H. l.er-Dodge dealers ??g event for sehi_,a,n.e. 1. Associate P Will enable us ' an --- to .. even more exciting show to secure bigger, and more racing craft next year's event", he Littleton Area Chamber has been the organization of event since 1979. from across the U. S. have come to the of New Hampshire each to compete for prize and record points. The Grand National Class of Boats held their world championship at Moore Dam in 1981. Duff Daily won the marathon race driving "Oh Mona" GN 333. Daily was handling a 20 foot racing craft powered by a 473 cubic inch Chrysler engine running at speeds in excess of 100 miles per hour. The owner of the boat is Del Daily, Duff's father. Both are from Miami, FI. "We really enjoyed the New Hampshire hospitality this year and we are pleased to announce that we have been invited back to race in Lit- tleton in September 1982. Our guys (Marathon Racing Association) thought Moore Dam was really terridic and we can't wait to come back", said Daily. The Daily's and several other racing teams from Florida and California travel all over the U. S. racing their high powered machines for prize money and points. Duff Daily has been racing since age 16. He is a fireman for the city of Miami Fire Depart- ment. SMILES lle'll Find Out A neighbor tried to comfort the deserted husband. "It was a terrific shock to hear that Smithers ran awaY with your wife. I'd always thought he was your best friend." "He is," replied the husband " ] with a happy smile, on y he doesn't know it yet." NOTES & COMMENTS Parking regulations, in the opinion of some automobile drivers, are made for other drivers. i: IIL..._, * Make safety a part of the season (continued from page IA) children indoors and a review of the house for potential hazards should be as much a part of preparing for winter as putting up storm windows. Drugs, cleaning materials and other hazardous substances should be kept where toddlers cannot reach them either directly or by climbing. Many ingestions occur when products are used rather than stored and suitable precautions should be taken. Parents should be aware of particular hazards during the What can you do with 10 acres? BURLINGTON-- Suppose you just bought ten acres of good Vermont farmland; what can you do with it? Dwight Eddy, Extension farm management specialist at the University of Vermont, has some suggestions. They are included in a recently published Extension brief let which is part of the series "Farming for Fun and Profit," and will be available at a series of emerging farm workshops to be held after the first of the year around Vermont. The free brieflet will also be available from your local county Extension Service office or from Publications, Morrill Hall, UVM, Burlington, 05405-0106. The first step toward deciding what use to make of your land is to discover what it is best suited for, Eddy says. Some of the possibilities include crops such as vegetable growing; small fruits, or small grains. Eddy also outlines other possibilities such as cow-calf- ,beef or sheep operations or raising poultry. Whatever your choice Eddy cautions, "be sure you study carefully the financial marketing and management requirements of your best possibilities; start small and grow gradually as you gain experience." The series of workshops is scheduled to begin on Saturday, Jan. 9, in the Lyndonville Congregational Church. Other dates and locations include: Jan. 16, Vergermes Union High School; Jan. 23, Bellows Falls Union High School; Jan. 30, Rutland area vocational center; Feb. 6, Essex Educational Center, Essex Junction; Feb. 13, Conant Hall, Vermont Technical College, Randolph Center. All workshops begin at 9:00 a.m. Information about the workshops is available from your local county Extension Service office or from the workshop coordinator, Los Ravlin, Extension Rural Land Farm Family Rehabilitationl office, Morrill Hall, UVM, Burlington, 05405-0106 or by calling 828-3013. holiday season. Many ac- cidental ingestions occur when very young children visit their grandparents. The grandparent's home is less likely to be "child-proofed." Some medications commonly and appropriately prescribed for older people, particularly antidepressants and drugs for heart ailments, can be fatal to a child if several tablets are ingested. Attention to hazards in the home should be a part of planning for the holidays when visits from small children are expected. Idealy parent and grandparent should walk around the home and place any potentially hazardous substance well out of the child's reach. Locations likely to be involved in accidental ingestions include the notorious cabinet under the sink (there is no more dangerous place to store cleaning materials), cellars, closets and medicine chests which an active toddler can reach by climbing. Medicine bottles should have the child- proof lid properly fastened. (In spite of numerous jokes by fumbling adults these devices are very effective and have saved the lives of hundreds of children.) Pocketbooks are attractive to curious children; they should not contain more than a single dose of the owner's medications. Alcoholic beverages play a prominent part in holiday festivities for many families. Every year in the United States several children develop hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) from consuming remnants of drinks left by adults. Characteristically the child awakes the morning after a party full of energy while the adults sleep off the effects of the previous nights indulgence. The child then consumes the remainders of several drinks which may contain enough alcohol to produce intoxication. If this is noticed, the adults then may regard the episode as amusing and simply put the child to bed. Unfortunately alcohol blocks the body's ability to make sugar and when supplies in the liver are exhausted, low blood sugar, which can produce seizures and brain damage, may result. Drinks should not be left where children can find them. Any alcohol ingestion by a child should be regarded as potentially hazardous and advice sought from the Vermont Poison Center. More specific advice is available concerning poison prevention measures from the Vermont Poison Center at 802- 658-3456. The Vermont Poison Center operates seven days a week 24 hours a day. If poison exposure or ingestion does occur, whether in a child or adult, the first action taken should be a call to the Poison Center. Even recently published books or articles may contain outdated or misleading information. Similarly, popular home remedies should not be em- ployed without just consulting the poison center. Most are ineffective; some are dangerous. For many ingestions, induction of vomiting is an important way of preventing the poison from being taken into the body. A small bottle of syrup of Ipecac can be obtained without prescription from any pharmacy; it should be in every home with children. In same cases however, syrup of Ipecac should not be used; always call the Vermont Poison Center for instructions before administering Ipecac or any other treatment for poisoning. By spending the small amount of time necessary to safely store hazardous materials, adults can make their homes safe for small visitors and prevent the ac- cidents which can turn holiday celebrations into tragedy. HANOVER BANK ideally /0000u00/LOCATED for yOUl Orthodontist Chops Down Prices! Dr. Irving Anders, Orthodontist, 154 Main St., Montpeller. points out the cost of sit goods and services Is spiralling up. ward and will never be cheaper again. However, he is deter- mined to make the necessity of orthodontics within the reach to most people. For a limited lima, Dr. Anders will be offering Ill new patients active orthodontic treatmant for maximum cost of $1,111 and preseMetion of this lid e! the first visit. The fee includes everything from x-ray to retainers (broken/ lost retainers extra). The fee must be pro-paid. If not. the maximum cost would be $1.390. Or. Anders works with both children and adults. He offers steel and clear plastic braces. A full.time, board-qualified orthodontist, Dr. Anders Is available dally, and for emergencies. He accepts Toothfalry, Medicaid and all insurances. "We pride ourselves In quality care, com. munication and price," states Dr. Anders. CMI Dr. Anders at 229-9883 for morn Information on this exciting offer. NOWot Both Locoiiom. HANOVB, N.R and B00nD, VT. shop early for BEST Selection! price cuts 20% to 50% STORES SUB ZERO SAVINGS GARAGE & SHOP HEATER Portable, uses just 2A gallons of kerosene or fuel oil per day and less electricty than a light bulb, to keep garage or shoo warm and comfortable. Heats instantly and safely, flame retardant water pipe insulation. No tape or special fittings needed. 3" lengths. s499 W040 FIBERGLASS INSULATION ," x 3" x 35' insulation with Vapor Seal. Covers 40% more than 25 ft. roll. WO-40 HER 3 HEAT HEATER INSULATION PoSy Guard. Hot and COld YOUR CHOICE =39 00RILL HARDWARE Mils  arld|od, Vormost 2:12-SSZ7 ,aeBed Sheets GALORE! 1" 'l:]'t"s;mmr:'Filim ' " Our Entire Collection Our finest quallty Bath from Every Manufacturer Fashion in 24 Great Colors! for twin, full, queen prices cut 20% to 60% price cut to 30% hvln. fuL queen, klna in Take your Dick of pedectly motchlrl excJr)Q I:x]tterr deep SOIS. ThQht bath. I-'. wash,  towels astea mcs, Juvense ts ttyt, mot bath 'mats and more. you trust  Savlr you'll a lOVe. 'l I P" If m Life Time Pads for . | Twin, Full. Queen or King | pdces old 20% I , I e recoe ... no. l our oes se Choose onchor bane i ,. co.tr ,.e s*,, IIIonkets/Oomforters Our entire colkction pdce cut 20% to 30% Choose from l.rnp bed comforters In I:)O4), filled or ck:)wn or feuther flllecL Every bkmket in stock .,. soft caCtos to out finest wool, Plenty of match your boo decort :llletdc t. ut ,tot 5 #ct. t 'kre price Our Year cotroe Best Guoranteed cut c=s. Fteldcrest Iliklnke to crone  Autornoflc 38e1) for easy duaJ - or ffm'no- re<x  ,t, :_ i c0mmmm Sll0ppllK Main Street Main Street HANOVER, N.H. BRADFORD, v'r. Phone 643-3109 Phone 222-9012 Open daily 9 to $ Open daily 9 to 5, Fri. 'til 8 p,m. January 13, 1982-The Second Opinion-Page 3A Lingeri CARD OF THANKS The family of Lyle Carter wish to express thanks to friends, relatives, hospital and nursing home staff, who assisted in any way to make his past years more pleasant. During a time like this, we realize how much ,you really mean to us. Members of the Carter Family Your CARD OF THANKS in the Second Opinion is only $10.00 CARD OF THANKS A thank you to our many friends, neighbors and relatives for the support you gave us at the recent loss of my husband, son, brother. Special thanks for the food, cards, money and the many prayers. They helped so much. God Bless each one. " Marjorie Ricker Roger and Sue Ricker & sons Ruby Ricker Russell and Madeline & family Eugene and Joyce & family REGATTA--Hydroplane races will be again next September as part of 1982 Chrysler- International Regatta held at the Moore Dam " 8 busses hydroplanes Segal, money in excess of $20,000.00 g Sanel Auto announced that company has agreed to associate sponsor for the N. H. Chrysler-Dodge Regatta. The is to be held at Moore in Littleton, N.H. Under auspices of the Littleton Chamber of Commerce. year's race dates have slated for September 11- ,1982. "This will be our second as the associate sponsor event in sponsoring the Prix Inboard Racing said Segal. "The and fans really those big racing chines and the huge rooster tails they ntinued. year more than 30,000 ,yed to Moore to witness the Nor- only Grand Prix and Nationa! Speed Boat Is. At this race, onlookers wit- two ,l:ltacular boat boats and their flipped in Race Ed Harris said are fortunate neither one drivers got seriously but this is the type of i that sPectators will remember and will en- e tieir return in future -aving the N. H. l.er-Dodge dealers ??g event for sehi_,a,n.e. 1. Associate P Will enable us ' an --- to .. even more exciting show to secure bigger, and more racing craft next year's event", he Littleton Area Chamber has been the organization of event since 1979. from across the U. S. have come to the of New Hampshire each to compete for prize and record points. The Grand National Class of Boats held their world championship at Moore Dam in 1981. Duff Daily won the marathon race driving "Oh Mona" GN 333. Daily was handling a 20 foot racing craft powered by a 473 cubic inch Chrysler engine running at speeds in excess of 100 miles per hour. The owner of the boat is Del Daily, Duff's father. Both are from Miami, FI. "We really enjoyed the New Hampshire hospitality this year and we are pleased to announce that we have been invited back to race in Lit- tleton in September 1982. Our guys (Marathon Racing Association) thought Moore Dam was really terridic and we can't wait to come back", said Daily. The Daily's and several other racing teams from Florida and California travel all over the U. S. racing their high powered machines for prize money and points. Duff Daily has been racing since age 16. He is a fireman for the city of Miami Fire Depart- ment. SMILES lle'll Find Out A neighbor tried to comfort the deserted husband. "It was a terrific shock to hear that Smithers ran awaY with your wife. I'd always thought he was your best friend." "He is," replied the husband " ] with a happy smile, on y he doesn't know it yet." NOTES & COMMENTS Parking regulations, in the opinion of some automobile drivers, are made for other drivers. i: IIL..._, * Make safety a part of the season (continued from page IA) children indoors and a review of the house for potential hazards should be as much a part of preparing for winter as putting up storm windows. Drugs, cleaning materials and other hazardous substances should be kept where toddlers cannot reach them either directly or by climbing. Many ingestions occur when products are used rather than stored and suitable precautions should be taken. Parents should be aware of particular hazards during the What can you do with 10 acres? BURLINGTON-- Suppose you just bought ten acres of good Vermont farmland; what can you do with it? Dwight Eddy, Extension farm management specialist at the University of Vermont, has some suggestions. They are included in a recently published Extension brief let which is part of the series "Farming for Fun and Profit," and will be available at a series of emerging farm workshops to be held after the first of the year around Vermont. The free brieflet will also be available from your local county Extension Service office or from Publications, Morrill Hall, UVM, Burlington, 05405-0106. The first step toward deciding what use to make of your land is to discover what it is best suited for, Eddy says. Some of the possibilities include crops such as vegetable growing; small fruits, or small grains. Eddy also outlines other possibilities such as cow-calf- ,beef or sheep operations or raising poultry. Whatever your choice Eddy cautions, "be sure you study carefully the financial marketing and management requirements of your best possibilities; start small and grow gradually as you gain experience." The series of workshops is scheduled to begin on Saturday, Jan. 9, in the Lyndonville Congregational Church. Other dates and locations include: Jan. 16, Vergermes Union High School; Jan. 23, Bellows Falls Union High School; Jan. 30, Rutland area vocational center; Feb. 6, Essex Educational Center, Essex Junction; Feb. 13, Conant Hall, Vermont Technical College, Randolph Center. All workshops begin at 9:00 a.m. Information about the workshops is available from your local county Extension Service office or from the workshop coordinator, Los Ravlin, Extension Rural Land Farm Family Rehabilitationl office, Morrill Hall, UVM, Burlington, 05405-0106 or by calling 828-3013. holiday season. Many ac- cidental ingestions occur when very young children visit their grandparents. The grandparent's home is less likely to be "child-proofed." Some medications commonly and appropriately prescribed for older people, particularly antidepressants and drugs for heart ailments, can be fatal to a child if several tablets are ingested. Attention to hazards in the home should be a part of planning for the holidays when visits from small children are expected. Idealy parent and grandparent should walk around the home and place any potentially hazardous substance well out of the child's reach. Locations likely to be involved in accidental ingestions include the notorious cabinet under the sink (there is no more dangerous place to store cleaning materials), cellars, closets and medicine chests which an active toddler can reach by climbing. Medicine bottles should have the child- proof lid properly fastened. (In spite of numerous jokes by fumbling adults these devices are very effective and have saved the lives of hundreds of children.) Pocketbooks are attractive to curious children; they should not contain more than a single dose of the owner's medications. Alcoholic beverages play a prominent part in holiday festivities for many families. Every year in the United States several children develop hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) from consuming remnants of drinks left by adults. Characteristically the child awakes the morning after a party full of energy while the adults sleep off the effects of the previous nights indulgence. The child then consumes the remainders of several drinks which may contain enough alcohol to produce intoxication. If this is noticed, the adults then may regard the episode as amusing and simply put the child to bed. Unfortunately alcohol blocks the body's ability to make sugar and when supplies in the liver are exhausted, low blood sugar, which can produce seizures and brain damage, may result. Drinks should not be left where children can find them. Any alcohol ingestion by a child should be regarded as potentially hazardous and advice sought from the Vermont Poison Center. More specific advice is available concerning poison prevention measures from the Vermont Poison Center at 802- 658-3456. The Vermont Poison Center operates seven days a week 24 hours a day. If poison exposure or ingestion does occur, whether in a child or adult, the first action taken should be a call to the Poison Center. Even recently published books or articles may contain outdated or misleading information. Similarly, popular home remedies should not be em- ployed without just consulting the poison center. Most are ineffective; some are dangerous. For many ingestions, induction of vomiting is an important way of preventing the poison from being taken into the body. A small bottle of syrup of Ipecac can be obtained without prescription from any pharmacy; it should be in every home with children. In same cases however, syrup of Ipecac should not be used; always call the Vermont Poison Center for instructions before administering Ipecac or any other treatment for poisoning. By spending the small amount of time necessary to safely store hazardous materials, adults can make their homes safe for small visitors and prevent the ac- cidents which can turn holiday celebrations into tragedy. HANOVER BANK ideally /0000u00/LOCATED for yOUl Orthodontist Chops Down Prices! Dr. Irving Anders, Orthodontist, 154 Main St., Montpeller. points out the cost of sit goods and services Is spiralling up. ward and will never be cheaper again. However, he is deter- mined to make the necessity of orthodontics within the reach to most people. For a limited lima, Dr. Anders will be offering Ill new patients active orthodontic treatmant for maximum cost of $1,111 and preseMetion of this lid e! the first visit. The fee includes everything from x-ray to retainers (broken/ lost retainers extra). The fee must be pro-paid. If not. the maximum cost would be $1.390. Or. Anders works with both children and adults. He offers steel and clear plastic braces. A full.time, board-qualified orthodontist, Dr. Anders Is available dally, and for emergencies. He accepts Toothfalry, Medicaid and all insurances. "We pride ourselves In quality care, com. munication and price," states Dr. Anders. CMI Dr. Anders at 229-9883 for morn Information on this exciting offer. NOWot Both Locoiiom. HANOVB, N.R and B00nD, VT. shop early for BEST Selection! price cuts 20% to 50% STORES SUB ZERO SAVINGS GARAGE & SHOP HEATER Portable, uses just 2A gallons of kerosene or fuel oil per day and less electricty than a light bulb, to keep garage or shoo warm and comfortable. Heats instantly and safely, flame retardant water pipe insulation. No tape or special fittings needed. 3" lengths. s499 W040 FIBERGLASS INSULATION ," x 3" x 35' insulation with Vapor Seal. Covers 40% more than 25 ft. roll. WO-40 HER 3 HEAT HEATER INSULATION PoSy Guard. Hot and COld YOUR CHOICE =39 00RILL HARDWARE Mils  arld|od, Vormost 2:12-SSZ7 ,aeBed Sheets GALORE! 1" 'l:]'t"s;mmr:'Filim ' " Our Entire Collection Our finest quallty Bath from Every Manufacturer Fashion in 24 Great Colors! for twin, full, queen prices cut 20% to 60% price cut to 30% hvln. fuL queen, klna in Take your Dick of pedectly motchlrl excJr)Q I:x]tterr deep SOIS. ThQht bath. I-'. wash,  towels astea mcs, Juvense ts ttyt, mot bath 'mats and more. you trust  Savlr you'll a lOVe. 'l I P" If m Life Time Pads for . | Twin, Full. Queen or King | pdces old 20% I , I e recoe ... no. l our oes se Choose onchor bane i ,. co.tr ,.e s*,, IIIonkets/Oomforters Our entire colkction pdce cut 20% to 30% Choose from l.rnp bed comforters In I:)O4), filled or ck:)wn or feuther flllecL Every bkmket in stock .,. soft caCtos to out finest wool, Plenty of match your boo decort :llletdc t. ut ,tot 5 #ct. t 'kre price Our Year cotroe Best Guoranteed cut c=s. Fteldcrest Iliklnke to crone  Autornoflc 38e1) for easy duaJ - or ffm'no- re<x  ,t, :_ i c0mmmm Sll0ppllK Main Street Main Street HANOVER, N.H. BRADFORD, v'r. Phone 643-3109 Phone 222-9012 Open daily 9 to $ Open daily 9 to 5, Fri. 'til 8 p,m.