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January 21, 1981     Journal Opinion
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t SPS s!|x:| IO gle me 116, Number 3 Ser,,ng Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont January 21, 1981 conservation protects $8 acres acres of plementing and enhancing in Lyme, including development. ,000 feet of frontage "I feel that this transaction Hewes Brook trout represents an important rn tributary to the example of how people can River, will be blend the needs for economic in conservation development with those of a result of a gift con- conservation and protection of ation restriction to the open space,"Lincksaid. River Watershed Conservation restrictions are voluntary legally-binding yne Stevenson, president limitations placed on land and Bay-Son Company, its future use by a landowner the restriction "to who retains title to the land vegetation and wildlife and the ability to sell the land for the land, or pass it on to his heirs. The is adjacent to the restriction runs with the land historic preser- as part of the deed to sub- project known as 13 seqnentlandowners. ;mouth College Highway. Most often, restrictions to Bob Linck, limit or entirely prevent executive directorof future development and yet Watershed •Council, the permit forestry, agricultural, is an excellent example or recreational activities on conservation corn- the land. Academy board school calendar executive of Thetford meeting in Straf= adopted the calendar academic year 1981-82 Idopted. open on Monday, 31, and close with y, June 11. Friday in June is date for the graduation exer- to start the year on the same day as the elementary school and to end on the traditional date for graduation in June, while allowing for the full 175 days of school and the same vacation periods. In other action, Headmaster Torrey reported that a con- siderable saving in energy is being effected by the timing devices which were installed on the oil burners this year. hristmas vacation will be a More oil. however, has been two weeks, Dec. 19 consumed to date this year Jan. 3, with school than last because of the corres .n v ntrn tn HolTie € with that of  Orange SO and the Schools start in on the same day. The also agree. executive COmmittee to eliminate snow he 1981-82 calendar continue to hold on the days the school he running for who are able to reason for this policy is' J Economics from Dartmouth College will be assisting Claradella Betts this spring. The photo club will work on a pictorial history of the Academy and slide show to be presented later in the spring. The next meeting of the executive committee will be held at the Elementary School in West Fairlee, Feb. 11 at 7:30 p.m. Parents and townspeople of West Fairlee are especially invited to attend. run extended consideration by L.F. BARNES Newbury was set at tier extensive $32,145,555. The selectmen ;sion at the school have sent petitions to the state ]'s monthly meeting, for redetermination of fair y Brooks made the market value. motion: "In respect Dues of $195 are paid to the and safety, I move Vermont Association of School We make an exception to Boards. This entitles local garten run to community boards to regular Wheeler's house from informative mailings, con- t3, 1981 until Feb. 13, ferences, andlobbying. is the last session In response to an inquiry as the Feb. vacation, to whether Newbury is also noted that had he receiving their fair 15 per cent i the school board last' share of the music teacher's would have time, Rufus Ansley reported Haviland ex- that Newbury gets 14.5 per denied, cent of teaching time which is matter was at least 15 per cent of total the attention of the time. Newbury is buying a their December portion of a total music .9 mile from bus program which also includes a instrumental band. Lrten Gifted and Talented time; it was dif- Program Sought mother to walk When the Orange East to meet him due School Board voted not to (and now support the Gifted and It Would be Talented Program, state the infant matching funds of about $7000 it ontinfrigid were then unable to be Walk the 1.8 miles utilized. :k. The superintendent's office noted an is now asking interested local in last boards to contribute to hiring of the a cooperative coordinator who meeting, would serve Newbury, torequested tran- Thetford, Vershire, Union 36, the house for the and Oxbow. The other boards Only, not for the involved have pledged USrun. tenative support. Newbury's !rd passed the share would be $700 for ,.z-day to provide this a week of consulting time. Feb. 13. This Nancy Benson said, "I'm s an exception due very strongly for the and temporary program." not a change in Gerry Brooks said, "That's just as important as the other matters, William end of the spectrum." of Haverhill, N.H., Delores Drugach said, "We :r " hired as a will consider it." k °lessional to work with In his report, principal Edward ; wergarten teacher. He Arnold reported that organized enrollment is 134 current i_vrlced in and al . . *," ms at the Umverslty students in K-6. Barbara ===_ Hampshnre and m Oaf Duncan is conducting a r. modern dance program for - i e COmpilation eot the the students in grades four, le of taxable prope y (please turn to page 2)  'i i: * I SYMBOL OF PAST---Old wagon, like one that might have brought pioneers to Upper Valley, is a lone symbol on a Bradford field amid the changeless beauty of a Vermont winter. i t ....... Presidential personalities by David M. Maxfield Smithsonian News Service As Ronald Reagan settles in at the White House and begins to chart his course for the nation, this may be an ap- propriate time to take a look at some other th-century presidents whose characters ultimately had much to do with the records of their ad- ministrations. But first a related word about how you voted back in November. It is important to weigh the issues before going to the polls, Americans are gold, and every four years millions of voters go through agony trying to sort out the candidates' stands on everything from nuclear strategy to agricultural subsidies. For those,who find this quadrennial eitizn!a duty bewildering if not acttmliy hopeless, there is an alter. native suggested by a number of historians and political observers. In short, it is to focus on the politician's character for clues to how he is likel,, to perform in office. "The basic question in electing our presidents comes down to what timir values are as individuals rather than to their stands on specific issues," says Marc Pachter, Historian of the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery and moderator of a recent sym- posium on "Presidential Personality." "Many voters," Pachter adds, "actually do decide on personalities rather than on issues--and they may be the shrewdest among us. Issues, after all, come and go." Of course, this approach too is not without its own mysteries, and after an election, as Pachter and others realize, there may be How much influence do the personal traits of U.S. presidents ultimately have on the national character? A great deal, say the biographers and White House aides of former leader John F. Kennedy. some startling, unforeseen times ahead. "... We must recognize the discomforting fact that the analysis of presidential in- telligence and wisdom remains a diilicult and error- ridden public sport," Time magazine's llugh Sidey wrote after the November elections. "We can make a pretty good judgment about the individual qualities of a man before he gets to the White House, but we cannot confidently predict how these characteristics will finally interact within the presidential context." Lyndon B. Johnson, for example, was regarded as effective within the context of the U.S. Senate as majority leader, Pachter notes, but the presidency posed an entirely different environment for his brand of deal-making leadership. To complicate any judgment of Johnson, LBJ was saying rather than what he was doing." What, then, are the par- ticular personal traits that have served Reagan's predecessors for better--or worse--once they arrived at the White House? Besides Johnson, the "Presidential Personality" symposium focused on Richard M. Nixon, John F. Kennedy and Theodore Roosevelt to get to know the "private man caught up in the public institution." There's a boom of interest in Roosevelt r these days, possibly, biographer Edmund Morris says, because of his characteristic forcefulness, optimism and essentially positive view of America and its potential. He was, said Teddy's fifth cousin, Franklin D. Roosevelt, "the greatest man I ever knew." Journalist Walter Lippmann said of the Republican leader, "He was the only president who ac- tually was lovable." Even his political opponents were impressed by this ex- ceedingly complex, highly energetic personality. "You can't r, esist the man," Woodrow Wilson once noted. If anything, this president was multi-faceted--"like Hearings set on N.H. current use tax rules writing about seven different men," says Morris, author of The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt. Fragile and weak as a child, Roosevelt built himself into a bear of a man but one who devoured at least one book a da, wrote 7, letters in his first 50 years ol life alone and daily matched wits with natural history scholars, inventors, explorers and the statesmen who paraded through the White House. "No chief executive, certainly, has ever had so much fun," Morris concludes. What served Roosevelt so well in the White House, Morris believes, were "four main seams of character" that developed during his youth, then merged later in life. He @as aggressive, the product of the early health- building regimen. He was righteous, seemingly born with his mind made up. He was full of pride, this demonstrated by his ability to find common strains of an- cestry with voters, earning him the nickname, "57 varieties." Lastly, the Roosevelt personality cnnined a deep seam of militarism, Morris says. At the White House, "to the glazed eyes of most guests," he would demon- strate important military battles by arranging knives and forks in dinner table formations and in one message to Congress, Roosevelt went so far as to assert, "A just war is in the long run far better for a man's soul than the most prosperions peace." "Yet the most ex- traordinary thing about this most pugnacious president," Morris says, "is that his two terms in office (were) com- pletely tranquil ' having achieved his own military catharsis at San Juan Hill during the Spanish-American War, Roosevelt was "at last, incongruously but wholeheartedly a man of peace." The president himself once silenced rumors that he was (please turn to page 6) CONCORD--Two public Administration, said the hearings to review proposed following six proposed changes in current-use tax changes in current-use will be regulations in New Hampshire presented, for discussion, at will be held Jan. 29-30. the hearings: The Current-Use Advisory 1) Reduce the minimum Board will convene the first of acreage required for par- its annual public sessions, ticipation in the program. Jan. 29 in the Keene State' 2) Increase the amount of College Science Center, room land use change tax, which is 102,at7p.m. assessed to the landowner The following night, a when the land use is changed second public bearing will be to one that no longer qualifies held at the Plymouth State for current-use. College Union Building, rooms laandl9,at7p.m. 3) Clarify the criteria to Arthur Danie, advisory specifically allow adding board chairman and assistant together two or more small commissioner of the parcels in different categories Department of Revenue to meet minimum acreage Orford PTA head opposes talk of closing school ORFORD--The Orford Parent-Teachers Association will meet tonight in Memorial Hall and one of the topics to be discussed is the issue of "people who would like to have the school closed," ac- cording to PTA President Mrs. Tony Pease. "For the past several years some people have been dissatisfied with the school, mainly because of their taxes, and they think the best way is to find thorns in the school program to convince people their children could get a better education elsewhere," Mrs. Pease told the Journal Opinion. She issued a special in- vitation to anyone wishing to discuss the issue. "Anyone can voice their opinion there (at the PTA meeting), rather than form private groups to be hostile to the school. Maybe we can correct things if they see a problem if we. don't see it," she continued. "It will give us a chance to make things better, give us new ideas. Why don't they come to us and tell us and give us their ideas?" she said. "I would feel, as a parent myself and even if I wasn't, very sad for all these children to be shipped out to another school. It's already 10 miles to school and 10 miles back" for families in Mt. Cube, where she lives, she added. "I don't believe anybody has to go away to another school to get a good education. They can get it right here in this school i( people want to exert themselves and Lake ad- vantage of it. At most we have 18 children to a classroom and there is no reason why the kids can't get help from the teachers," she said. She also pointed out that Orford would still have to raise taxes to tuition its children to another school system. "You can't say we're not giving a good education in this town. Its there if they want it," she said, adding that her own stepson was educated in the Orford school system then went on to college and a master's degree and is now "a top accountant for the government." Mrs. Pease said a poster has been circulated for a meeting at the Congregational Church on the future of Orford School, called by those who want to close it. "Our PTA organization is not only open to parents and teachers, it is open to all citizens of the town. If there are problems or objections, they can voice their opinion there," she said. "I think everybody has a right to their own opinion. I don't think there is anything wrong with anybody saying anything different to what I think. An educated person with a strong mind can listen to both sides of an issue, People have a right to say what they feel and not be shot down for their opinions," she added. "If People don't plan together then they can't work together and nobody is happy. A lot can be done to make our town a lot better," she said. Also scheduled at the PTA meeting are a discussion of iuture art pr%ects b the High School art instructor, a Boy Scouts visit and a "cake of the month sale." Increased tax rate proposed in Ryegate RYEGATE--A proposed budget if approved at town meeting will result in a 21 per cent increase in 1981 local taxes to raise $524,086 of the total $630,241 budget. The town would raise the remaining $108, t 55 through other revenues. The largest item in the budget proposal completed by a budget committee and selectmen is $399,900 for Blue Mountain Union School, followed by $150,000 for roads and $15,750 for Fire Depart- ment expenses, equipment and labor. The selectmen refused to include $20,000 asked by the Fire Department to build a fire station in S. Ryegate, saying mutual aid from Groton is adequate. Fire Chief Gene Perkins said he would put the request in the warning anyway. Selectmen noted that money allocated, to Blue Mountain Union School is billed to the town when the school budget is determined at the school meeting in late February, not when Ryegate voters bold town meeting. They said many townspeople are-not aware of this and that they should attend the school budget meeting. Wells River gets sewer grant. WELLS RIVER--The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has awarded $1,218,412 to the village of Wells River, Vermont for the construction of a wastewater collection system. The funds will be used for the construction of a new wastewater collection system to transport wastewater across the Connecticut River to the Woodsville, New Hampshire collection and treatment system. Currently, most wastewater in Wells River is discharged untreated directly into the Connecticut and Wells Rivers through an antiquated and disintegrating system of requirements, assessment rates for open 4) Amend the law, so that a space land enrolled in the landowner whose property is program. The board also has taken by eminent domain authority to set ad- would not be liable for the land ministrative criteria. GROTON--Costs of a property could prevent an increase in use change tax. Goals of the current-use tax reappraisal and purchase town fire insurance rates. 5) Change therestrictionsin program are to reduce the of a new fire pumper will the "productive wild land" disappearance of open space result in a tax increase of at category to allow landowners by providing equitable least 10 per cent in 1981 if public and private sewers. A few on-site subsurface disposal systems have been only minimally effective, the agency said. Transporting the wastewater to the Woodsville treatment facility is leas expensive than constructing a separate facility in Wells River. The two communities agreed to cooperate on wastewater treatment in September, 1980. Improvements to the Wood- sville facility are now under construction. The total estimated cost of this project is $2,570,379. The total eligible cost is $2,347,695. Ten percent hike expected in Groton to harvest timber for their assessment of land at the approved attownmeeting. own energy related uses. 6) Increase the current-use assessment for lands in the "forest", "agricultural" and "productive wild land" categories. The current-use law charges the advisory board with responsibility for The budget proposals would take $3,000 out of revenue sharing funds to help pay the $21,000 cost of reappraisal and $7,000 of revenue sharing money would go toward the $15,000 pumper cost. Another $2,000 for the pumper would come from Fire Department funds and the remainder from the town general fund if voters approve. It is expected that the purchase of a new pumper balance of the property tax value of its present usage, The two items would cost a rather than *at some total of $36,000, according to speculative valuation, figures released at a budget Recommendations may he meeting Jan. 9. made by those unable to at- Selectmen and iisters said tend the hearings. Write or the property tax reappraisal call Dante at Department of would reduce taxes for those Revenue Administration, 61 who now are being taxed too Spring Street, Concord, N.H., high. It was also said that the setti,g 03301; 603-271-2191. reappraisal would be borrowed unless the town raises enough revenues to pay for it, selectmen said. The proposed budget in- cludes $13,o00 for salaries and social security; $1,500 for town office expense; $6,500 for community building; $2,500 for street lights; $5,500 for interest payments; $200 for auditing; $250 for legal ser- vices; $200 for elections, and $3,500 for tax collections. t SPS s!|x:| IO gle me 116, Number 3 Ser,,ng Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont January 21, 1981 conservation protects $8 acres acres of plementing and enhancing in Lyme, including development. ,000 feet of frontage "I feel that this transaction Hewes Brook trout represents an important rn tributary to the example of how people can River, will be blend the needs for economic in conservation development with those of a result of a gift con- conservation and protection of ation restriction to the open space,"Lincksaid. River Watershed Conservation restrictions are voluntary legally-binding yne Stevenson, president limitations placed on land and Bay-Son Company, its future use by a landowner the restriction "to who retains title to the land vegetation and wildlife and the ability to sell the land for the land, or pass it on to his heirs. The is adjacent to the restriction runs with the land historic preser- as part of the deed to sub- project known as 13 seqnentlandowners. ;mouth College Highway. Most often, restrictions to Bob Linck, limit or entirely prevent executive directorof future development and yet Watershed •Council, the permit forestry, agricultural, is an excellent example or recreational activities on conservation corn- the land. Academy board school calendar executive of Thetford meeting in Straf= adopted the calendar academic year 1981-82 Idopted. open on Monday, 31, and close with y, June 11. Friday in June is date for the graduation exer- to start the year on the same day as the elementary school and to end on the traditional date for graduation in June, while allowing for the full 175 days of school and the same vacation periods. In other action, Headmaster Torrey reported that a con- siderable saving in energy is being effected by the timing devices which were installed on the oil burners this year. hristmas vacation will be a More oil. however, has been two weeks, Dec. 19 consumed to date this year Jan. 3, with school than last because of the corres .n v ntrn tn HolTie € with that of  Orange SO and the Schools start in on the same day. The also agree. executive COmmittee to eliminate snow he 1981-82 calendar continue to hold on the days the school he running for who are able to reason for this policy is' J Economics from Dartmouth College will be assisting Claradella Betts this spring. The photo club will work on a pictorial history of the Academy and slide show to be presented later in the spring. The next meeting of the executive committee will be held at the Elementary School in West Fairlee, Feb. 11 at 7:30 p.m. Parents and townspeople of West Fairlee are especially invited to attend. run extended consideration by L.F. BARNES Newbury was set at tier extensive $32,145,555. The selectmen ;sion at the school have sent petitions to the state ]'s monthly meeting, for redetermination of fair y Brooks made the market value. motion: "In respect Dues of $195 are paid to the and safety, I move Vermont Association of School We make an exception to Boards. This entitles local garten run to community boards to regular Wheeler's house from informative mailings, con- t3, 1981 until Feb. 13, ferences, andlobbying. is the last session In response to an inquiry as the Feb. vacation, to whether Newbury is also noted that had he receiving their fair 15 per cent i the school board last' share of the music teacher's would have time, Rufus Ansley reported Haviland ex- that Newbury gets 14.5 per denied, cent of teaching time which is matter was at least 15 per cent of total the attention of the time. Newbury is buying a their December portion of a total music .9 mile from bus program which also includes a instrumental band. Lrten Gifted and Talented time; it was dif- Program Sought mother to walk When the Orange East to meet him due School Board voted not to (and now support the Gifted and It Would be Talented Program, state the infant matching funds of about $7000 it ontinfrigid were then unable to be Walk the 1.8 miles utilized. :k. The superintendent's office noted an is now asking interested local in last boards to contribute to hiring of the a cooperative coordinator who meeting, would serve Newbury, torequested tran- Thetford, Vershire, Union 36, the house for the and Oxbow. The other boards Only, not for the involved have pledged USrun. tenative support. Newbury's !rd passed the share would be $700 for ,.z-day to provide this a week of consulting time. Feb. 13. This Nancy Benson said, "I'm s an exception due very strongly for the and temporary program." not a change in Gerry Brooks said, "That's just as important as the other matters, William end of the spectrum." of Haverhill, N.H., Delores Drugach said, "We :r " hired as a will consider it." k °lessional to work with In his report, principal Edward ; wergarten teacher. He Arnold reported that organized enrollment is 134 current i_vrlced in and al . . *," ms at the Umverslty students in K-6. Barbara ===_ Hampshnre and m Oaf Duncan is conducting a r. modern dance program for - i e COmpilation eot the the students in grades four, le of taxable prope y (please turn to page 2)  'i i: * I SYMBOL OF PAST---Old wagon, like one that might have brought pioneers to Upper Valley, is a lone symbol on a Bradford field amid the changeless beauty of a Vermont winter. i t ....... Presidential personalities by David M. Maxfield Smithsonian News Service As Ronald Reagan settles in at the White House and begins to chart his course for the nation, this may be an ap- propriate time to take a look at some other th-century presidents whose characters ultimately had much to do with the records of their ad- ministrations. But first a related word about how you voted back in November. It is important to weigh the issues before going to the polls, Americans are gold, and every four years millions of voters go through agony trying to sort out the candidates' stands on everything from nuclear strategy to agricultural subsidies. For those,who find this quadrennial eitizn!a duty bewildering if not acttmliy hopeless, there is an alter. native suggested by a number of historians and political observers. In short, it is to focus on the politician's character for clues to how he is likel,, to perform in office. "The basic question in electing our presidents comes down to what timir values are as individuals rather than to their stands on specific issues," says Marc Pachter, Historian of the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery and moderator of a recent sym- posium on "Presidential Personality." "Many voters," Pachter adds, "actually do decide on personalities rather than on issues--and they may be the shrewdest among us. Issues, after all, come and go." Of course, this approach too is not without its own mysteries, and after an election, as Pachter and others realize, there may be How much influence do the personal traits of U.S. presidents ultimately have on the national character? A great deal, say the biographers and White House aides of former leader John F. Kennedy. some startling, unforeseen times ahead. "... We must recognize the discomforting fact that the analysis of presidential in- telligence and wisdom remains a diilicult and error- ridden public sport," Time magazine's llugh Sidey wrote after the November elections. "We can make a pretty good judgment about the individual qualities of a man before he gets to the White House, but we cannot confidently predict how these characteristics will finally interact within the presidential context." Lyndon B. Johnson, for example, was regarded as effective within the context of the U.S. Senate as majority leader, Pachter notes, but the presidency posed an entirely different environment for his brand of deal-making leadership. To complicate any judgment of Johnson, LBJ was saying rather than what he was doing." What, then, are the par- ticular personal traits that have served Reagan's predecessors for better--or worse--once they arrived at the White House? Besides Johnson, the "Presidential Personality" symposium focused on Richard M. Nixon, John F. Kennedy and Theodore Roosevelt to get to know the "private man caught up in the public institution." There's a boom of interest in Roosevelt r these days, possibly, biographer Edmund Morris says, because of his characteristic forcefulness, optimism and essentially positive view of America and its potential. He was, said Teddy's fifth cousin, Franklin D. Roosevelt, "the greatest man I ever knew." Journalist Walter Lippmann said of the Republican leader, "He was the only president who ac- tually was lovable." Even his political opponents were impressed by this ex- ceedingly complex, highly energetic personality. "You can't r, esist the man," Woodrow Wilson once noted. If anything, this president was multi-faceted--"like Hearings set on N.H. current use tax rules writing about seven different men," says Morris, author of The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt. Fragile and weak as a child, Roosevelt built himself into a bear of a man but one who devoured at least one book a da, wrote 7, letters in his first 50 years ol life alone and daily matched wits with natural history scholars, inventors, explorers and the statesmen who paraded through the White House. "No chief executive, certainly, has ever had so much fun," Morris concludes. What served Roosevelt so well in the White House, Morris believes, were "four main seams of character" that developed during his youth, then merged later in life. He @as aggressive, the product of the early health- building regimen. He was righteous, seemingly born with his mind made up. He was full of pride, this demonstrated by his ability to find common strains of an- cestry with voters, earning him the nickname, "57 varieties." Lastly, the Roosevelt personality cnnined a deep seam of militarism, Morris says. At the White House, "to the glazed eyes of most guests," he would demon- strate important military battles by arranging knives and forks in dinner table formations and in one message to Congress, Roosevelt went so far as to assert, "A just war is in the long run far better for a man's soul than the most prosperions peace." "Yet the most ex- traordinary thing about this most pugnacious president," Morris says, "is that his two terms in office (were) com- pletely tranquil ' having achieved his own military catharsis at San Juan Hill during the Spanish-American War, Roosevelt was "at last, incongruously but wholeheartedly a man of peace." The president himself once silenced rumors that he was (please turn to page 6) CONCORD--Two public Administration, said the hearings to review proposed following six proposed changes in current-use tax changes in current-use will be regulations in New Hampshire presented, for discussion, at will be held Jan. 29-30. the hearings: The Current-Use Advisory 1) Reduce the minimum Board will convene the first of acreage required for par- its annual public sessions, ticipation in the program. Jan. 29 in the Keene State' 2) Increase the amount of College Science Center, room land use change tax, which is 102,at7p.m. assessed to the landowner The following night, a when the land use is changed second public bearing will be to one that no longer qualifies held at the Plymouth State for current-use. College Union Building, rooms laandl9,at7p.m. 3) Clarify the criteria to Arthur Danie, advisory specifically allow adding board chairman and assistant together two or more small commissioner of the parcels in different categories Department of Revenue to meet minimum acreage Orford PTA head opposes talk of closing school ORFORD--The Orford Parent-Teachers Association will meet tonight in Memorial Hall and one of the topics to be discussed is the issue of "people who would like to have the school closed," ac- cording to PTA President Mrs. Tony Pease. "For the past several years some people have been dissatisfied with the school, mainly because of their taxes, and they think the best way is to find thorns in the school program to convince people their children could get a better education elsewhere," Mrs. Pease told the Journal Opinion. She issued a special in- vitation to anyone wishing to discuss the issue. "Anyone can voice their opinion there (at the PTA meeting), rather than form private groups to be hostile to the school. Maybe we can correct things if they see a problem if we. don't see it," she continued. "It will give us a chance to make things better, give us new ideas. Why don't they come to us and tell us and give us their ideas?" she said. "I would feel, as a parent myself and even if I wasn't, very sad for all these children to be shipped out to another school. It's already 10 miles to school and 10 miles back" for families in Mt. Cube, where she lives, she added. "I don't believe anybody has to go away to another school to get a good education. They can get it right here in this school i( people want to exert themselves and Lake ad- vantage of it. At most we have 18 children to a classroom and there is no reason why the kids can't get help from the teachers," she said. She also pointed out that Orford would still have to raise taxes to tuition its children to another school system. "You can't say we're not giving a good education in this town. Its there if they want it," she said, adding that her own stepson was educated in the Orford school system then went on to college and a master's degree and is now "a top accountant for the government." Mrs. Pease said a poster has been circulated for a meeting at the Congregational Church on the future of Orford School, called by those who want to close it. "Our PTA organization is not only open to parents and teachers, it is open to all citizens of the town. If there are problems or objections, they can voice their opinion there," she said. "I think everybody has a right to their own opinion. I don't think there is anything wrong with anybody saying anything different to what I think. An educated person with a strong mind can listen to both sides of an issue, People have a right to say what they feel and not be shot down for their opinions," she added. "If People don't plan together then they can't work together and nobody is happy. A lot can be done to make our town a lot better," she said. Also scheduled at the PTA meeting are a discussion of iuture art pr%ects b the High School art instructor, a Boy Scouts visit and a "cake of the month sale." Increased tax rate proposed in Ryegate RYEGATE--A proposed budget if approved at town meeting will result in a 21 per cent increase in 1981 local taxes to raise $524,086 of the total $630,241 budget. The town would raise the remaining $108, t 55 through other revenues. The largest item in the budget proposal completed by a budget committee and selectmen is $399,900 for Blue Mountain Union School, followed by $150,000 for roads and $15,750 for Fire Depart- ment expenses, equipment and labor. The selectmen refused to include $20,000 asked by the Fire Department to build a fire station in S. Ryegate, saying mutual aid from Groton is adequate. Fire Chief Gene Perkins said he would put the request in the warning anyway. Selectmen noted that money allocated, to Blue Mountain Union School is billed to the town when the school budget is determined at the school meeting in late February, not when Ryegate voters bold town meeting. They said many townspeople are-not aware of this and that they should attend the school budget meeting. Wells River gets sewer grant. WELLS RIVER--The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has awarded $1,218,412 to the village of Wells River, Vermont for the construction of a wastewater collection system. The funds will be used for the construction of a new wastewater collection system to transport wastewater across the Connecticut River to the Woodsville, New Hampshire collection and treatment system. Currently, most wastewater in Wells River is discharged untreated directly into the Connecticut and Wells Rivers through an antiquated and disintegrating system of requirements, assessment rates for open 4) Amend the law, so that a space land enrolled in the landowner whose property is program. The board also has taken by eminent domain authority to set ad- would not be liable for the land ministrative criteria. GROTON--Costs of a property could prevent an increase in use change tax. Goals of the current-use tax reappraisal and purchase town fire insurance rates. 5) Change therestrictionsin program are to reduce the of a new fire pumper will the "productive wild land" disappearance of open space result in a tax increase of at category to allow landowners by providing equitable least 10 per cent in 1981 if public and private sewers. A few on-site subsurface disposal systems have been only minimally effective, the agency said. Transporting the wastewater to the Woodsville treatment facility is leas expensive than constructing a separate facility in Wells River. The two communities agreed to cooperate on wastewater treatment in September, 1980. Improvements to the Wood- sville facility are now under construction. The total estimated cost of this project is $2,570,379. The total eligible cost is $2,347,695. Ten percent hike expected in Groton to harvest timber for their assessment of land at the approved attownmeeting. own energy related uses. 6) Increase the current-use assessment for lands in the "forest", "agricultural" and "productive wild land" categories. The current-use law charges the advisory board with responsibility for The budget proposals would take $3,000 out of revenue sharing funds to help pay the $21,000 cost of reappraisal and $7,000 of revenue sharing money would go toward the $15,000 pumper cost. Another $2,000 for the pumper would come from Fire Department funds and the remainder from the town general fund if voters approve. It is expected that the purchase of a new pumper balance of the property tax value of its present usage, The two items would cost a rather than *at some total of $36,000, according to speculative valuation, figures released at a budget Recommendations may he meeting Jan. 9. made by those unable to at- Selectmen and iisters said tend the hearings. Write or the property tax reappraisal call Dante at Department of would reduce taxes for those Revenue Administration, 61 who now are being taxed too Spring Street, Concord, N.H., high. It was also said that the setti,g 03301; 603-271-2191. reappraisal would be borrowed unless the town raises enough revenues to pay for it, selectmen said. The proposed budget in- cludes $13,o00 for salaries and social security; $1,500 for town office expense; $6,500 for community building; $2,500 for street lights; $5,500 for interest payments; $200 for auditing; $250 for legal ser- vices; $200 for elections, and $3,500 for tax collections.