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January 21, 1981     Journal Opinion
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January 21, 1981
 

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Page 4-The Journal Opinion-January 21, 1981 NORTllEAT PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. 5. • Publisher of Journal I1 Opinion Weekly nnwiMper peblisked in Brtldford, Vermont, Subscription rotes - Vermont lind New Nempcklre. $9.00 per year; $6.00 for six monlhs; eat lfl state - $12.00 per year end $1.00 for six montks; Senlar citizen discount $1t.00, Robert F. ltuminski President & Publisher Bradford 7  ' Woodsville 802-222-5281  ;   603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper Playing on bridges no game Chucking an occasional snowball is part of winter fun, but throwing pieces of ice and snow from bridges at moving automobiles and trucks below is no game. It's dangerous for both the youngster who occasionally do it, and for motorists who, startled by the impact, can lose control and crash. Cpl. Robert Haradon of the Vermont State Police asks parents to caution their children against this practice, which is as dangerous for the youngsters as for motorists because the Interstate Highway bridges were not meant for pedestrians and a child could be hit. Bradford had one such near tragedy earlier this winter when ice thrown from a bridge broke a motorist's windshield. Fortunately no one was hurt but a tragedy did occur in a similar incident this year in central Vermont, and New England has recorded deaths in the past as a result of such incidents. We share Cpl. Haradon's thought that no youngsters would want such a serious thing on his or her conscience as the result of a thoughtlessly foolish act and we join the State Police in suggesting that parents warn their children of the dangers of playing on the Interstate bridges. Let's keep the snowball throwing within the hounds of good fun. Tossing ice or snow from bridges at passing cars underneath is out of bounds. Ambassadors of sport A group of Woodsville parents has formed the "Belgium Booster Club" to help their high school youngsters take advantage of a unique op- portunity--a trip to Belgium next August to play on a U.S. high school soccer team. A Belgium soccer team will return the visit at a later date. The Belgium Booster Club will sponsor car washes, food sales, suppers and other events to help their children experience this "thrill of a lifetime." It will also ask for direct contributions. It's a worthwhile project that will also put Woodsville in the spotlight when the team from Belgium visits. We urge you to support the effort of The Belgium Booster Club by patronizing their fund-raising events and making whatever donation is possible. It will take a considerable sum--$7,800--and these parents realize they are asking a lot in soliciting area residents to support them, but they think it's worth it and so do we. The Booster Club has asked civic organizations and businesses° to support soccer exchange. "Inflation has. imposed hardships on every family in this economically deprived area. However, the fine response of civic organizations and businesses in the past has made so many worthwhile opportunities available to our children that we once again request your financial con- tribution," said Michael Ackerman for the Club. The 12 Woodsville High School students were good enough to be chosen as young sports ambassadors from the Upper Valley area to represent the United States in soccer competition abroad. Let's not let them down. The economy indeed is tight and everybody has plenty of use for every hard-earned dollar, but a lot of small contributions can soon add up to enough to make this international sports exchange possible. Solutions II • -" . J by Tom Evslin Yesterday I listened to officials from New York State and Connecticut say that Vermonters shouldn't be allowed to work in their homes. It was at the Labor Department hearings on the regulations which say that people in the knitted outerwear industry -- including Ver- mentors who knit ski hats -- have to do their knitting in factories. The official from New York said that there was a problem with sweat shop labor in New York City. His Department, he said. was about to do a study in the city. They were goaded into action by network television reports of the wholesale ex- ploitation of illegal immigrants. Therefore. he said home work should be eliminated nationwide. "'Do you have any evidence that home workers are being exploited in Vermont ?" I asked him. "'No, I don't know anything about Vermont." "'Have you studied the rural areas of your own state?" I asked. -No.- "Suppose you regulate home work in New York and we regulate home work in Vermont?" I asked. He didn't like that suggestion. Because of the problem in New York City, he wants home work banned nationwide. He is afraid that. it home knitting is banned in New York and not in Vermont, jobs will move from New York to Vermont. He may be right about that The official from Connecticut said that someone had told him that there was a problem with exploited home workers in the urban areas of his state. He also wants home work prohibited nationwide in- cluding Vermont. He wouldn't answer any questions so I couldn't ask him if he knew of any problem in Vermont. Everybody who testified in favor of prohibiting Vermonters from knitting hats in their homes was from somewhere else citing problems somewhere else. There probably is a problem in New York City. I certainly don't know and wouldn't try to tell anybody from New York how to solve their problems. I can't resist pointing out, however, that, if there ilva oblem in Hartford and New York City, (hal problem exists despite the fact thatome Work is already banned by both federal and state regulation, in both these places. And I hope I don't sound bitter when Lsay that the Labor Depart. ment might better spend its time and in- vestigative energies protecting the ex- ploited city dwellers than in its current attempts to send Vermonters to non- existant factori. " Perhaps each state should take responsibility for proecting its workerL from exploitation, at least until it is cleaff - that the state has failed. We shouldn't tell New York how to solve its problems. And we certainly don't want to be forced to implement their solutions to problems we don't have. Alcoholism and You | with UNCLE MILTY t .... | / Dear Uncle Miity, Those questions in laQt month's column shook me upa little bit, and I would like to learn more about alcohol and alcoholism so that I may make sure where I am on the drinking ladder. People say the CRASH Course is excellent for such in- formation. Can you tell me something about it, and is it pmsible for people to attend voluntarily? Full of Questions Dear Full ofQtiestions: The 25 questions in last month's column had a lot of people thinking about what is happening in their lives. We've had many calls and letters. The CRAStt School is based upon the belief that if a person drinks and he can stay below the level of alcohol impairment, he is in control of his drinking and is entitled to his driver's license. However, if after a few (3 or 4), a person doesn't want to stop drinking or tries to stop and finds out he cannot, then alcohol is in control. These people must learn to control their drinking or stop altogether. This sounds easy to a normal drinker, but is impossible to persons who are problem drinkers. The single purpose of CRASH is to provide people with honest facts about alcohol and how it impairs body and mental functions. This program gives you the opportunity to examine your own drinking to determine who is in control -- YOU OR ALCOHOL. If you are in control, fine; but if not, you'll want to find where you can get help for the problem. This alcohol education program has been designed to provide you with information and insight to help you to un- derstand clearly how alcohol affects your behavior, as well as your body skills. Through lectures, films, and group discussions, you will have the opportunity -- along with others -- to openly and frankly examine the facts and the role alcohol plays in your life. Classes are 2tz hours long, starting at 6:30 p.m. for four consecutive weeks. Class I covers a) blood alcohol concentration, b) tolerance to alcohol, c) drunk versus impairment, d) under the in- fluence, and e) understanding the necessity for each person to know how much alcohol he or she consumes any time they drink. (Awareness of what you are doing). Class II covers a) how alcohol affects the brain, b) safe drinking and driving levels, c) false statements about alcohol, and d) how to prevent future trouble. Class III covers a) definition of problem drining, b) un-. derstanding alcoholism, and e) your own drinking. Class IV covers a) learning what safe drinking limits are and b) if you find you need help, where to get it. In regard to your second question, anybody who is in- terested may attend. The only fee for those who don't have to attend is a small donation to Orange County Mental Health. I've taken the course for DWI and enjoyed the program, and I also enjoy instructing the course. The next classes begin Monday, Jan. 19,1981 at the Chelsea Court House at 6:30 p.m., and Saturday, Jan. 24, 1981 at the Woodstock Correctional Center at 6:30 p.m. If you have any questions, just write Uncle Milty, OCMHS, Box 278, Bradford, Vt., or call 802-222-4466. Keep under control, Uncle Miity From the office of Gordo00 J. Humphrey U.S. Senator New Ilampshire Character is destin, Y Stonesheds of the North Haverhill Granite Company (where Grossman's is now) The North Haverhill Granite Company had a large stoneshed at the present location of Grossman's. From there, the stone was loaded onto freight cars on a railroad siding In'hind what is now Boudreault Plumbing's shop. In 1896, the general manager and superintendent of the North tlaverhill Granite Company was John B. Benzie Scotland and had come to Barre by way of the stonesheds in Quincy, Mass. tte worked one year in North Haverhill, then moved to Groton and started his own stoneshed. (from Groton Times, Groton and Ryegate special edition, around 1900) George Batchelder of Woodsviile used to live in the house just north of Boudreault's shop, and says that when he was a kid, the old stoneshed was used for storing machinery and he was for- bidden to go in there -- but he used to sneak in there sometimes. The building was later moved on rollers and planks to the neighboring Dennis Merrill farm (later Frinks', now Kenistons') and was used for part of the barn there. For a long time after the stoneshed was moved, the (Charlotte Fadden's grand- father,. He was born in Granit qua.rrie Stonesheds in North Haverhill plow would turn up granite chips. Mr. Batchelder says that house sills and fenceposts had been made there. Across the road was another stoneshed, operated by Rosa Brothers. It was a semicircular old frame building with a derrick in front of it - the usual arrangement in those days. Sometime, probably before 1900, it was moved to South Ryegate, where it became part of Rosa's operation there (now Gandin Brothers). For moving, this old frame building with mortice and tennon construction was probably unpinned and taken to South Ryegate in sections. It is said that the back section of Laurence Smith's house was made from one of ,the stonesheds. Also, three honses,t tho urn, ..... ,-'  ,-- village are supposed to have been f'r mer "company houses", moved from the other side of the railroad tracks. These would be Clyde Foo{e's now David Lackie's), Patron's Incorporated, and Sibyl Enderle's. These three houses appear to have was powered by a waterwheel in the lean-to with a sluice from the French Pond area. Later a hot-tube gasoline engine was used. George remembers that water from a stream was used for cooling the engine, and when the water got hot, mosquitoes hatched out in it. " Jesse's daughter Ellen had married Cyrus Bat- chelder, a former printer in Nashua and Lancaster and in Sanford, Maine, whose skill was put to good use in let- tering gravestones. Cyrus (George Batchelder's father) eventually became head of the company. By that time. they were no longer quarrying at Pond Ledge. but brought stone in from elsewhere from Barre. or Quincy, Mass.. or even from Scotland, Finland. color ordered. When a previous gravestone had to be matched, Cyrus knew where to get granite to match it, and would make rubbings of the original gravestone so that he could match the design and leltering perfectly. In the early days, the pink granite the weather.was bad. E tually Cyrus gave up hishl and shop at Center and carried on his barn at his home. (Note: Another dant of Cyrus grandson, is Wilbur of Peacham.) Two years ago, I arrived in Washington to take the oath of office and begin my term as your senator I thought back upon the moment recently--it is one, obviously, I shall always remember and treasure--when I watched the large new group of senators arriving in town. Like me. most all of them come to Washington determined to cut back the growth of government, restore incentives for working Americans and rebuild the strength of our defenses and the credibility of our foreign policy. They are an outstanding group of men and women, and as I watched them being sworn in, I couldn't help wondering what was going through their minds. I was especially struck by one individual whom I predict will have an impact upon our country--Jeremiah Denton, now a retired Rear-Admiral and Senator from Alabama, but formerly a prisoner of war from 1965 until 1973 in North Vietnam. Here. pledging to uphold, honor and defend the Constitution, was the same man who had re peatedly blinked T..O...R..T...U..R..E... in Morse Code during a television interview from Hanoi in 1966; and who, upon regaining his freedom in 1973. had stepped off a plane in the Philippines to announce to the world: "We are honored to have had the op- portunity to serve our country under difficult circumstances. We are profoundly grateful to our Commander-in- Chief and to our nation for this day. God Bless America," Molt individuals bring to Congress an expertise in law, business, education or some other profession. But Denton offers a different and perhaps unique perspective that could well prove invaluable. To put it bluntly, he has lived inside hell on earth and not only learned how to survive, but actually emerged a much stronger person. For the better part of his seven and a half years in captivity, Denton endured torture and lived with vermin for celimates inside a jail the size of a refrigerator. Such situations tend to concentrate a man's mind and enable him to get his priorities strmght. What Denton learned about himself was that his sur- vival hinged upon his strength of character, which, in turn, could only be sustained by an unshakeable faith in his most basic beliefs--God, family and country. Now. Denton is no obsessed, moralizing zealot preaching imminent doom and eternal damnation. He is a tough but compassionate man who loves life and who enjoys, like many other good sailors, in- dulging in a bit of colorful language from time to time. Still. when he returned from Vietnam, he was shocked to find an America he did not recognize--a country that was carelessly, even willfully, discarding the very values upon which he bad relied to survive. The widespread outbreak of por- nography, abortion on demand and in- creasing social tolerance of adultery were all new to him. Observing the dramatic escalation of divorce rates, he asked: "If we can no longer commit ourselves to a single person whom we love, then how can we commit ourselves to more abstract, but equally important concepts? If the in- stitution of the family dissolves, then this country loses its basic building block, its nmin foundation as a nation." Then. ton. Denton is convinced our long neglect of our national security could also have disastrous consequences. By the mid- l.t0's, he says, "We will have less national security than we had proportionately when George Washington's troops were walking around barefoot at Valley Forge." So as I watched the new Senator from Alabama being sworn in. it occurred to me that here was a man who would not be swayed from his beliefs and would also have an impact upon the nation. And not a moment ton soon, because as Pulitzer Prize winning commentator George Will has written: 'For nations, as for individuals. character is destiny..." Madelelne Kunln, (D-Vt.) Lieutenant Governor's Report Legislative session opens Even in good times, the purse is never plump enough to flU the palm of each outstretched hand, but this year, the state purse shows no bulges at all. Not only dowe begin with deficits in both the highway and general funds, but we originally been identical. inside and out, and with a quality of design and con- struction which indicated that they were built for company managers, not laborers. Patten's was moved sometime between 1893 and 1909, judging from old deeds (Hubert Eastman to Oscar Swift, 1893, and Swift to John and Wilbur Eastman, 1909). Another old deed, found by chance, gives us the names of other granite companies working in the Briar Hill area: WondsviUe Granite Company and New Hampshire Westerly Granite Company (Book 487- page 314). Jesseman Granite Company George Batchelder has told us about the granite company founded sometime before 1883 by his grand- father. Jesse Jesseman, who operated a quarry and stoneshed at the foot of Pond Ledge in Center Haverhill (the present Maurice Horne place, where James Morrill has a rock-crusher now). In the early days there were eight men working for the Jesseman Granite Company, cutting granite blocks from the base of the ledge (while other companies were cutting from the top of the ledge). They got gray granite from the south end of the ledge, and pink granite from the north end. (Note: This was the source of the name of North Haverhill's "'Pink Granite Grange.") There was a huge derrick close to the base of the ledge for handling the big blocks of granite. George Batchelder remembers one large order of paving blocks sent to Massachusetts. George says that there were steel pins driven into the ledge, for climbing when necessary, making a trail'up the steep part of the ledge. When Grandfather Jesseman was nearly 80, he went up over the trail -- just to prove that he could. Nobody knew where he had gone, and when he came back he looked like he had "been through the mill". Jesse Jesseman had cut and hand-hewed all the tim- hers for his stoneshed om that he used from Pond Ledge was the hardest granite anywhere, and dulled his chisel so fast that he would have to have it sharpened before finishing even one letter. In later years, Cyrus moved his family into North Haverhill to the house north of Boudreault's shop during the winters. George and others remember his father hiking out to Center Haverhill every day to the shop, then coming home soaked and muddy when At the fall of the gavel, the 180 members of the 198eneral Assembly took their seats, marl(tog the opening of another legislative session. One of the first and undoubtedly the most difficult issu which will face this year's legislature is how to allocate the state's budget and balance it--both in the highway fund and in the general fund. The power of the purse remains the crucial power of any legislative body. l I Soapstone quarries s North of Briar an old soapstone (Drive .7 mile north corner by Millers 3 Kenistons; follow the s wall and fence eastwar to the left of the ledge.f __l Errol Nelson re a__t the quarry from hisdlaan ,ul and climbing around on rocks. At that time, t an][hrol way up there was open fields, but it basil ictive hen ---- "Errol used tell " there, atad was full of waif ,:i,, about 40 feet deep. Etll dumped in a pailful of I hornedpout, but doesn't k whether the descendants any of them are still there. says the soapstone could sawed with a crosscut but it dulled the saw Some of the soapstone like it had feaLhers in it. used to be used extensivel making stoves, sinks, forth -- some of it is use. but not from here. There also used soapstone quarnes in and Orfordville. (Next week: Ryegate, Groton, Newbury. By the way, welcome more and photos of quarries mines of this area.) may face further deficits during this year, unless cutbacks are made. On top of that, there is a prospect of a federal tax cut, which would effect our revenues, as well (please turn to page 6) dead white oaks. which had been killed by some kind of blight. The building measured 40 by 40, and also had a lean-to blacksmith shop. The place Cyrus Batchelder at work on Manning Boulder, on trail below Lake Tarleton. which commemorated Manning railroad accident in 1924. Photo from Mr. Batchelder's granddaughter. Caroline French. * Page 4-The Journal Opinion-January 21, 1981 NORTllEAT PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. 5. • Publisher of Journal I1 Opinion Weekly nnwiMper peblisked in Brtldford, Vermont, Subscription rotes - Vermont lind New Nempcklre. $9.00 per year; $6.00 for six monlhs; eat lfl state - $12.00 per year end $1.00 for six montks; Senlar citizen discount $1t.00, Robert F. ltuminski President & Publisher Bradford 7  ' Woodsville 802-222-5281  ;   603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper Playing on bridges no game Chucking an occasional snowball is part of winter fun, but throwing pieces of ice and snow from bridges at moving automobiles and trucks below is no game. It's dangerous for both the youngster who occasionally do it, and for motorists who, startled by the impact, can lose control and crash. Cpl. Robert Haradon of the Vermont State Police asks parents to caution their children against this practice, which is as dangerous for the youngsters as for motorists because the Interstate Highway bridges were not meant for pedestrians and a child could be hit. Bradford had one such near tragedy earlier this winter when ice thrown from a bridge broke a motorist's windshield. Fortunately no one was hurt but a tragedy did occur in a similar incident this year in central Vermont, and New England has recorded deaths in the past as a result of such incidents. We share Cpl. Haradon's thought that no youngsters would want such a serious thing on his or her conscience as the result of a thoughtlessly foolish act and we join the State Police in suggesting that parents warn their children of the dangers of playing on the Interstate bridges. Let's keep the snowball throwing within the hounds of good fun. Tossing ice or snow from bridges at passing cars underneath is out of bounds. Ambassadors of sport A group of Woodsville parents has formed the "Belgium Booster Club" to help their high school youngsters take advantage of a unique op- portunity--a trip to Belgium next August to play on a U.S. high school soccer team. A Belgium soccer team will return the visit at a later date. The Belgium Booster Club will sponsor car washes, food sales, suppers and other events to help their children experience this "thrill of a lifetime." It will also ask for direct contributions. It's a worthwhile project that will also put Woodsville in the spotlight when the team from Belgium visits. We urge you to support the effort of The Belgium Booster Club by patronizing their fund-raising events and making whatever donation is possible. It will take a considerable sum--$7,800--and these parents realize they are asking a lot in soliciting area residents to support them, but they think it's worth it and so do we. The Booster Club has asked civic organizations and businesses° to support soccer exchange. "Inflation has. imposed hardships on every family in this economically deprived area. However, the fine response of civic organizations and businesses in the past has made so many worthwhile opportunities available to our children that we once again request your financial con- tribution," said Michael Ackerman for the Club. The 12 Woodsville High School students were good enough to be chosen as young sports ambassadors from the Upper Valley area to represent the United States in soccer competition abroad. Let's not let them down. The economy indeed is tight and everybody has plenty of use for every hard-earned dollar, but a lot of small contributions can soon add up to enough to make this international sports exchange possible. Solutions II • -" . J by Tom Evslin Yesterday I listened to officials from New York State and Connecticut say that Vermonters shouldn't be allowed to work in their homes. It was at the Labor Department hearings on the regulations which say that people in the knitted outerwear industry -- including Ver- mentors who knit ski hats -- have to do their knitting in factories. The official from New York said that there was a problem with sweat shop labor in New York City. His Department, he said. was about to do a study in the city. They were goaded into action by network television reports of the wholesale ex- ploitation of illegal immigrants. Therefore. he said home work should be eliminated nationwide. "'Do you have any evidence that home workers are being exploited in Vermont ?" I asked him. "'No, I don't know anything about Vermont." "'Have you studied the rural areas of your own state?" I asked. -No.- "Suppose you regulate home work in New York and we regulate home work in Vermont?" I asked. He didn't like that suggestion. Because of the problem in New York City, he wants home work banned nationwide. He is afraid that. it home knitting is banned in New York and not in Vermont, jobs will move from New York to Vermont. He may be right about that The official from Connecticut said that someone had told him that there was a problem with exploited home workers in the urban areas of his state. He also wants home work prohibited nationwide in- cluding Vermont. He wouldn't answer any questions so I couldn't ask him if he knew of any problem in Vermont. Everybody who testified in favor of prohibiting Vermonters from knitting hats in their homes was from somewhere else citing problems somewhere else. There probably is a problem in New York City. I certainly don't know and wouldn't try to tell anybody from New York how to solve their problems. I can't resist pointing out, however, that, if there ilva oblem in Hartford and New York City, (hal problem exists despite the fact thatome Work is already banned by both federal and state regulation, in both these places. And I hope I don't sound bitter when Lsay that the Labor Depart. ment might better spend its time and in- vestigative energies protecting the ex- ploited city dwellers than in its current attempts to send Vermonters to non- existant factori. " Perhaps each state should take responsibility for proecting its workerL from exploitation, at least until it is cleaff - that the state has failed. We shouldn't tell New York how to solve its problems. And we certainly don't want to be forced to implement their solutions to problems we don't have. Alcoholism and You | with UNCLE MILTY t .... | / Dear Uncle Miity, Those questions in laQt month's column shook me upa little bit, and I would like to learn more about alcohol and alcoholism so that I may make sure where I am on the drinking ladder. People say the CRASH Course is excellent for such in- formation. Can you tell me something about it, and is it pmsible for people to attend voluntarily? Full of Questions Dear Full ofQtiestions: The 25 questions in last month's column had a lot of people thinking about what is happening in their lives. We've had many calls and letters. The CRAStt School is based upon the belief that if a person drinks and he can stay below the level of alcohol impairment, he is in control of his drinking and is entitled to his driver's license. However, if after a few (3 or 4), a person doesn't want to stop drinking or tries to stop and finds out he cannot, then alcohol is in control. These people must learn to control their drinking or stop altogether. This sounds easy to a normal drinker, but is impossible to persons who are problem drinkers. The single purpose of CRASH is to provide people with honest facts about alcohol and how it impairs body and mental functions. This program gives you the opportunity to examine your own drinking to determine who is in control -- YOU OR ALCOHOL. If you are in control, fine; but if not, you'll want to find where you can get help for the problem. This alcohol education program has been designed to provide you with information and insight to help you to un- derstand clearly how alcohol affects your behavior, as well as your body skills. Through lectures, films, and group discussions, you will have the opportunity -- along with others -- to openly and frankly examine the facts and the role alcohol plays in your life. Classes are 2tz hours long, starting at 6:30 p.m. for four consecutive weeks. Class I covers a) blood alcohol concentration, b) tolerance to alcohol, c) drunk versus impairment, d) under the in- fluence, and e) understanding the necessity for each person to know how much alcohol he or she consumes any time they drink. (Awareness of what you are doing). Class II covers a) how alcohol affects the brain, b) safe drinking and driving levels, c) false statements about alcohol, and d) how to prevent future trouble. Class III covers a) definition of problem drining, b) un-. derstanding alcoholism, and e) your own drinking. Class IV covers a) learning what safe drinking limits are and b) if you find you need help, where to get it. In regard to your second question, anybody who is in- terested may attend. The only fee for those who don't have to attend is a small donation to Orange County Mental Health. I've taken the course for DWI and enjoyed the program, and I also enjoy instructing the course. The next classes begin Monday, Jan. 19,1981 at the Chelsea Court House at 6:30 p.m., and Saturday, Jan. 24, 1981 at the Woodstock Correctional Center at 6:30 p.m. If you have any questions, just write Uncle Milty, OCMHS, Box 278, Bradford, Vt., or call 802-222-4466. Keep under control, Uncle Miity From the office of Gordo00 J. Humphrey U.S. Senator New Ilampshire Character is destin, Y Stonesheds of the North Haverhill Granite Company (where Grossman's is now) The North Haverhill Granite Company had a large stoneshed at the present location of Grossman's. From there, the stone was loaded onto freight cars on a railroad siding In'hind what is now Boudreault Plumbing's shop. In 1896, the general manager and superintendent of the North tlaverhill Granite Company was John B. Benzie Scotland and had come to Barre by way of the stonesheds in Quincy, Mass. tte worked one year in North Haverhill, then moved to Groton and started his own stoneshed. (from Groton Times, Groton and Ryegate special edition, around 1900) George Batchelder of Woodsviile used to live in the house just north of Boudreault's shop, and says that when he was a kid, the old stoneshed was used for storing machinery and he was for- bidden to go in there -- but he used to sneak in there sometimes. The building was later moved on rollers and planks to the neighboring Dennis Merrill farm (later Frinks', now Kenistons') and was used for part of the barn there. For a long time after the stoneshed was moved, the (Charlotte Fadden's grand- father,. He was born in Granit qua.rrie Stonesheds in North Haverhill plow would turn up granite chips. Mr. Batchelder says that house sills and fenceposts had been made there. Across the road was another stoneshed, operated by Rosa Brothers. It was a semicircular old frame building with a derrick in front of it - the usual arrangement in those days. Sometime, probably before 1900, it was moved to South Ryegate, where it became part of Rosa's operation there (now Gandin Brothers). For moving, this old frame building with mortice and tennon construction was probably unpinned and taken to South Ryegate in sections. It is said that the back section of Laurence Smith's house was made from one of ,the stonesheds. Also, three honses,t tho urn, ..... ,-'  ,-- village are supposed to have been f'r mer "company houses", moved from the other side of the railroad tracks. These would be Clyde Foo{e's now David Lackie's), Patron's Incorporated, and Sibyl Enderle's. These three houses appear to have was powered by a waterwheel in the lean-to with a sluice from the French Pond area. Later a hot-tube gasoline engine was used. George remembers that water from a stream was used for cooling the engine, and when the water got hot, mosquitoes hatched out in it. " Jesse's daughter Ellen had married Cyrus Bat- chelder, a former printer in Nashua and Lancaster and in Sanford, Maine, whose skill was put to good use in let- tering gravestones. Cyrus (George Batchelder's father) eventually became head of the company. By that time. they were no longer quarrying at Pond Ledge. but brought stone in from elsewhere from Barre. or Quincy, Mass.. or even from Scotland, Finland. color ordered. When a previous gravestone had to be matched, Cyrus knew where to get granite to match it, and would make rubbings of the original gravestone so that he could match the design and leltering perfectly. In the early days, the pink granite the weather.was bad. E tually Cyrus gave up hishl and shop at Center and carried on his barn at his home. (Note: Another dant of Cyrus grandson, is Wilbur of Peacham.) Two years ago, I arrived in Washington to take the oath of office and begin my term as your senator I thought back upon the moment recently--it is one, obviously, I shall always remember and treasure--when I watched the large new group of senators arriving in town. Like me. most all of them come to Washington determined to cut back the growth of government, restore incentives for working Americans and rebuild the strength of our defenses and the credibility of our foreign policy. They are an outstanding group of men and women, and as I watched them being sworn in, I couldn't help wondering what was going through their minds. I was especially struck by one individual whom I predict will have an impact upon our country--Jeremiah Denton, now a retired Rear-Admiral and Senator from Alabama, but formerly a prisoner of war from 1965 until 1973 in North Vietnam. Here. pledging to uphold, honor and defend the Constitution, was the same man who had re peatedly blinked T..O...R..T...U..R..E... in Morse Code during a television interview from Hanoi in 1966; and who, upon regaining his freedom in 1973. had stepped off a plane in the Philippines to announce to the world: "We are honored to have had the op- portunity to serve our country under difficult circumstances. We are profoundly grateful to our Commander-in- Chief and to our nation for this day. God Bless America," Molt individuals bring to Congress an expertise in law, business, education or some other profession. But Denton offers a different and perhaps unique perspective that could well prove invaluable. To put it bluntly, he has lived inside hell on earth and not only learned how to survive, but actually emerged a much stronger person. For the better part of his seven and a half years in captivity, Denton endured torture and lived with vermin for celimates inside a jail the size of a refrigerator. Such situations tend to concentrate a man's mind and enable him to get his priorities strmght. What Denton learned about himself was that his sur- vival hinged upon his strength of character, which, in turn, could only be sustained by an unshakeable faith in his most basic beliefs--God, family and country. Now. Denton is no obsessed, moralizing zealot preaching imminent doom and eternal damnation. He is a tough but compassionate man who loves life and who enjoys, like many other good sailors, in- dulging in a bit of colorful language from time to time. Still. when he returned from Vietnam, he was shocked to find an America he did not recognize--a country that was carelessly, even willfully, discarding the very values upon which he bad relied to survive. The widespread outbreak of por- nography, abortion on demand and in- creasing social tolerance of adultery were all new to him. Observing the dramatic escalation of divorce rates, he asked: "If we can no longer commit ourselves to a single person whom we love, then how can we commit ourselves to more abstract, but equally important concepts? If the in- stitution of the family dissolves, then this country loses its basic building block, its nmin foundation as a nation." Then. ton. Denton is convinced our long neglect of our national security could also have disastrous consequences. By the mid- l.t0's, he says, "We will have less national security than we had proportionately when George Washington's troops were walking around barefoot at Valley Forge." So as I watched the new Senator from Alabama being sworn in. it occurred to me that here was a man who would not be swayed from his beliefs and would also have an impact upon the nation. And not a moment ton soon, because as Pulitzer Prize winning commentator George Will has written: 'For nations, as for individuals. character is destiny..." Madelelne Kunln, (D-Vt.) Lieutenant Governor's Report Legislative session opens Even in good times, the purse is never plump enough to flU the palm of each outstretched hand, but this year, the state purse shows no bulges at all. Not only dowe begin with deficits in both the highway and general funds, but we originally been identical. inside and out, and with a quality of design and con- struction which indicated that they were built for company managers, not laborers. Patten's was moved sometime between 1893 and 1909, judging from old deeds (Hubert Eastman to Oscar Swift, 1893, and Swift to John and Wilbur Eastman, 1909). Another old deed, found by chance, gives us the names of other granite companies working in the Briar Hill area: WondsviUe Granite Company and New Hampshire Westerly Granite Company (Book 487- page 314). Jesseman Granite Company George Batchelder has told us about the granite company founded sometime before 1883 by his grand- father. Jesse Jesseman, who operated a quarry and stoneshed at the foot of Pond Ledge in Center Haverhill (the present Maurice Horne place, where James Morrill has a rock-crusher now). In the early days there were eight men working for the Jesseman Granite Company, cutting granite blocks from the base of the ledge (while other companies were cutting from the top of the ledge). They got gray granite from the south end of the ledge, and pink granite from the north end. (Note: This was the source of the name of North Haverhill's "'Pink Granite Grange.") There was a huge derrick close to the base of the ledge for handling the big blocks of granite. George Batchelder remembers one large order of paving blocks sent to Massachusetts. George says that there were steel pins driven into the ledge, for climbing when necessary, making a trail'up the steep part of the ledge. When Grandfather Jesseman was nearly 80, he went up over the trail -- just to prove that he could. Nobody knew where he had gone, and when he came back he looked like he had "been through the mill". Jesse Jesseman had cut and hand-hewed all the tim- hers for his stoneshed om that he used from Pond Ledge was the hardest granite anywhere, and dulled his chisel so fast that he would have to have it sharpened before finishing even one letter. In later years, Cyrus moved his family into North Haverhill to the house north of Boudreault's shop during the winters. George and others remember his father hiking out to Center Haverhill every day to the shop, then coming home soaked and muddy when At the fall of the gavel, the 180 members of the 198eneral Assembly took their seats, marl(tog the opening of another legislative session. One of the first and undoubtedly the most difficult issu which will face this year's legislature is how to allocate the state's budget and balance it--both in the highway fund and in the general fund. The power of the purse remains the crucial power of any legislative body. l I Soapstone quarries s North of Briar an old soapstone (Drive .7 mile north corner by Millers 3 Kenistons; follow the s wall and fence eastwar to the left of the ledge.f __l Errol Nelson re a__t the quarry from hisdlaan ,ul and climbing around on rocks. At that time, t an][hrol way up there was open fields, but it basil ictive hen ---- "Errol used tell " there, atad was full of waif ,:i,, about 40 feet deep. Etll dumped in a pailful of I hornedpout, but doesn't k whether the descendants any of them are still there. says the soapstone could sawed with a crosscut but it dulled the saw Some of the soapstone like it had feaLhers in it. used to be used extensivel making stoves, sinks, forth -- some of it is use. but not from here. There also used soapstone quarnes in and Orfordville. (Next week: Ryegate, Groton, Newbury. By the way, welcome more and photos of quarries mines of this area.) may face further deficits during this year, unless cutbacks are made. On top of that, there is a prospect of a federal tax cut, which would effect our revenues, as well (please turn to page 6) dead white oaks. which had been killed by some kind of blight. The building measured 40 by 40, and also had a lean-to blacksmith shop. The place Cyrus Batchelder at work on Manning Boulder, on trail below Lake Tarleton. which commemorated Manning railroad accident in 1924. Photo from Mr. Batchelder's granddaughter. Caroline French. *