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Bradford , Vermont
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January 27, 1982     Journal Opinion
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January 27, 1982
 

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25' ! 'I-' oinntellT, Number4 Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont January27, 1982 l're, , ............. sh  r00radford's Gary Moore to head [ Garone steps down--two new trustees, new budget Itate Fish and Game Department} Voters meet at annual Vdlage meeting BRADFORD-- Bradford another masters degree in native Gary W. Moore has administration from the been picked to take over the reins of the Vermont Fish and Game Department when commissioner Edward F. Kehoe resigns after 17 years as head of the department in September. Moore, a 35-year old assistant headmaster at St. Johnsbury Academy and a free-lance outdoor columnist, was named to succeed Kehoc last Friday by Environmental Conservation Secretary Brendan Whittaker. Whittaker said Moore would start as a deputy com- missioner next month until Kehoe retires in the fall in order to gain knowledge about the department to "effect an oderly transition." Moore has been a member of the Ver- mont Fish and Game Board for the past five years. The hoard is a quasi-judicial panel which sets seasons for hun- ting, fishing, and trapping along with accompanying regulations. Moore is a life-long resident it( of Bradford and is a graduate ml of Bradford Academy. He is also a graduate of Lyndon { State College in Lyndonville, Vt., has received a masters degree from Dartmouth _" Gary-W. Moore College and is working on of ,00urp,u00 University of Vermont. Local Outdoorsman Moore's weekly column, Thoughts on the Out-of-Doors, has appeared in the Journal Opinion for the last five years. The column has included everything from recent hunting or fishing regulation changes to personal accounts of important game club or environmental and wildlife organization meetings. The column has often included tales of Moore's own hunting and fishing experiences. Along with being an avid outdoorsman, Moore is a Vietnam veteran, an auxilliary state trooper, a justice-of the peace in Bradford, a Bradford Fire Department captain and he is a member of the Bradford FAST Squad. Moore has been at St. Johnsbury Academy for the past 11 years and has received a leave of absence from the school after accepting the deputy commissioner BRADFORD -- Approx- imately 80 people showed up at Bradford Village's annual meeting on Monday night where they saw long-time trustee Gary Garone, in a surprise move, step down in his bid for re- election and where voters elected two new trustees and approved the 1982 village budget as recommended by the trustees and village of- ficials. For the village budget of 1982, voters approved a $16,400 budget for the general fund compared to $14,966.09 last year--a 9.5 percent increase over last year. The voters also approved a public . works budget of $22,500 as compared to $18,693.27 last year--a 20 percent increase. A budget of $54,500 was approved for the village's sewer fund as compared to $147,237.81 last year--a substantial decrease due to the repayment of an $81,500 note. However, at the meeting, village ad- ministrator Susan Spaulding said that the sewer plant will end up with an approximate deficit of $20,000 for the year. Budget figures in the village report show a deficit of at least $17,000. The public safety budget of $23,950 was also approved by the voters. This year's figure is five percent higher than last year's $22,760.71 budget. The total for all four budgets plus $41,698.61 budgeted for the village's Goshen Road pipe replacement'project now stands at $159,048.61, as ap- proved by village voters. This figure represents an increase of 6.8 percent over the same five expenses last year-- $148,858.49. Village voters voted to raise a total of $53,600 in taxes for the year at the meeting. Grand List May Double A tax rate has not yet been set because the Village's listers have not yet completed their grand list, said Spaulding. One lister and Spaulding told the voters Monday night that the amount in the grand list is "likely to double." New Trustees The voters voted-in two new village trustees at the meeting. For the three-year trustee position, Gary Garone chose not to run for re-election. Chester Allen, owner of Allen Refrigeration in Bradford defeated Lou Menure 48 votes Garone said after the commissioner. James Barton, nominations for the sea(were Alfa Gautreau and ttelena made that, "I had decided that Kinney were re-elected as if someone else ran then I auditors. would step down." Garone inventory Tax said of his last term as trustee, Repeal "We've had our problems but Voters also approved a (on stepping down) it's article that says the villa. nothing personal." will go along with the Town Encumbent trustee Henry Bradford if town votersdecid McGreevy lost his re-election to repeal the town's inven, bid to Larry Drew, a school tax at their annual towr teacher, by a vote of 29 to 21. meeting in March. Lou Menure was also According to one villa nominated for the position and auditor who spoke at Mo he received six votes, day' meeting, the inve, ).,') Lawrence Coffin was re- tax accounts for roughly tout elected as moderator. Chester percent of the town's tax H to eight in a ballot election. Allen was elected as a water come. W. Fairlee's Arnold Dean designed CRREL's underwater radar system * 9 [}Falrleeal town budgor et position. The Verrat IFiShha: and106 Thetford budget employees. All money for Game Department has operation of the department comes from in-state and out- of-state hunting, fishing and trapping licenses and from revenue sharing from a federal tax on sporting equipment. Moore was also appointed (please turn to page 8) JRLEE-- Town budget committee, will be taxes the town's highway attributing a projected 35 raised from $3.40 per $1,000 of fund willincrease from $35,000 g itio 'cent increase in the assessed property value in in1981to $39,:00 this year. a, t, r it.lee tax rate this year to 1981 to $4.60 per $1,000 Of Totais Ior this year's town } leas of surplus monies that assessed valuation in 1982, budget have reached $102,733 are up over bre used up over the year in Budget Increases for the general fund and I1. Budget increases for the $65,000 for the highway IH'let ; [)ther than the surplus general fund and highway budget. """ 00ear ' eyloss, one selectman has budgets means increases of J ld increased expenses are 10.8 percent and 6.7 percent n ely due to "fixed costs respectively. Without the .r which we have no con- $17,000 surplus that helped out l:' such as town salaries taxpayers last year, the tax a. legal fees. Overall in: rate is expected to jump 35 , (ton of costs in goods and percent. "vices was another of the According to FairleeBudget get factors that town o!- Committee figures, the | m ls say ate up last year s amount needed to be raised by tew taxes for the general fund will non-school tax rate, increase from $53,893 in 1981 to i recommended by the this year's $82,150. The ectaen and the town's amount needed to be raised in )r00ord board finds d lo 1 ditlonal cuts tha Tuition up $300 RD--The Orford school $2,000 from insurance costs by s found the additional revising the school s policy. cuts that it believes are This year s Orford budget ary to drop budget includes a 10.1 percent pay ases in their proposed increase for teachers in the lbudget from 10 percent district. sat percent for this year. The pay raise was approved le new proposed budget of last fall after a deadlock over ;,695 was reportedly the issue forced the board to ved at by decreasing the postpone finalization of ary and the work week of a Orford's 1981 budget until dance counselor at the October when the contract 1 and by cutting plans to settlement was reached. e custodial help this Taxlncrease nmer. Additional money Of the new $656,695 budget B saved by eliminating figure, $579,674 will need to be as to install new rugs and raised by the town--the rest .des in SOme areas of the will come from state and ol and by decreasing (please turn to page 8) EMERGENCY CONSERVATION .00PPFAL Dean "black boxes" committee okays after plane Potomac crash school budget W. FAIRLEE-- A plane crash in which the wreckage of the plane is trapped on the bottom THETFORD-- The town cut or reduced this year in of an ice-choked river is an budget committee has okayed order to limit the budget to a unusual, not to mention tragic, BMU budget Due to the shutdown of the ermont Yankee nuclear facility l Central Vermont Public Service 0 must purdmse oil-fired retflaeement fuel at 10 to 20 times the cost ' .of nuclear power. We are for a and prolonged i cOnservation effort by CVI00 customers. More Causes WELLS RIVER-- The school A $6500 rubbish removal board has recommended and cost increase set by Barker approved a budget for the Sargent Corp., plus $2,500 in 1982-83 school year that is 11.5 rubbish removal fees the town percent higher than last still owes from last year is year's budget for the Blue another one of the factors that Mountain Union School town officials say is con-District. tributing to the budget in- The new budget has been set creases. Selectmen say the at $1,284,185. Of that amount $4,000 highway budget in-$789,950 would need to be crease is due to increases in raised by the three towns in the cost of petroleum products the Blue Mountain District that are applied to the town's --Wells River, Ryegate and roads. Groton. The school portion of School officials attribute the Fairlee's tax rate will not be 11.5 percent budget increase finalized until the school's to electricity, salary and annual meeting in June. transportation cost increases. Fairlee voters will vote on Tuition Increases the approval of the town's Tuition costs will alsoriseat budget recommendation at Blue Mountain High School their March 2 annual town and forelementarystudents. meeting. (please turn to page 8) the Thetford school's recommended budget of over a million dollars for 1982 but has held the tax rate down to a three percent increase over last year. Budget committee figures reportedly show the school's portion of this year's tax rate to be at $33.10 per $1,000 of assessed property value. The school's tax rate combined with Thetford's town and highway taxes, would raise the total tax rate for the town to $41.10 per $1,000 of assessed property value. Small Increase The $41.10 figure is said to be only three percent more than last year's tax rate in the town. The school budget for this year is up approximately six percent over last year. The budget, passed by the budget committee last week, stands at $I,059,897. The amount the town needs to raise in order to meet the $1,059,897 budget figure is $932,812. The remainder will come from state and federal funding. School officials say a number of programs had to be six percent increase and that funding for the school's lunch program was not included in the budget. School officials say the program was forced "into the red" last year by federal lunch program cut- backs. It may be up to Thetford voters to decide the final fate of the lunch program at their town meeting in March. Town and school officials are said to be consideringplacing fun- ding for the program as a separate article on the war- ning for the town meeting. This year's school budget is also said to include a 10 per- cent raise "across the board" for teachers at the school. The Thetford Teachers Association is currently negotiating a contract with the Thetford school hoard. Tuition that the town pays to Thetford Academy is not included in the general school budget. However, this year the Academy's executive committee has recently ap- proved a $120 increase in student tuition costs. No second, fires in Vershire Correction VERSHIRE-- Following a story in the previous issue of the Journal Opinion involving a fire at the Mountain School in Vershire, the director of the Mountain School, W. McNiven Carnard, has informed us that there are in fact two private schools in the Town of Ver- occurrence. It is also the kind of accident that calls for unusual recovery methods. When an Air Florida jet crashed into the icy Potomac River in Washington, D.C. killing 78 people, two weeks ago, recovery of the "black boxes" storing vital in- formation relating to the cause of the crash and the location of the many of the bodies of the victims of the crash were made possible by a remarkable set of cir- cumstances. " Those circumstances made the difficult recovery mission possible through the use of an electronic system devised for studying ice jams on rivers-- designed by a man from W. Fairlee. Arnold Dean, a nine-year resident of W. Fairlee and an electronic engineer at the Army Corps of Engineers' Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) in Hanover, is the designer of what he describes as a kind of "impulse radar system" that was originally developed for measuring ice jams. Dean has developed the :system into the only radar system that can see through water. One of a Kind Unlike conventional radar which emits only one frequency signal, Dean's system can emit many signal frequencies which gives it the ability to locate objects un- derwater. Dean and his assistants at CRREL have been working on the system for eight years. shire and that the Mountain The system doesn't register School is in no way connected radar's traditional blips on a to the Vershire School that is screen. Instead, Dean says, located approximatel five there is a delay in the time miles away. between when the device is Carnard said that his school "has never received any fire code violations before the (Jan. 13) fire and has not received any fire code violations as a result of the fire." The fire was reported as the second fire at the school when in fact the first fire referred to in the story had taken place at the neighboring Vershire School. The Vershire School was the recipient of a number of fire code violations issued by fire inspectors in May of 1981 and was the sight of the Nov. 14 cabin fire in which two students were injured. As reported, Vershire school Officials have been engaged in a cooperative effort to comply with the state's fire codes, according to state fire of- ficials. It should also be made clear that there was no fire at the WINTER SCENE-- The cupola, the fir tree, the cloud and the sun blend together for this winter scene. Vershire School on Jan. 13; the fire was five miles away at the Mountain School in Ver- shire. Neither school has had a second fire. RADAR PROFILE CHART-- Dean is shown in this photograph interpreting river bottom data that his impulse radar system has provided on a radar profile chart. SENDING IMPULSES THROUGH THE ICE-- Radar measurement can be made through the ice using a helicopter. The information is gained with the use of the helicopter and then taken to a ground station for print out and interpretation, said Dean. bouncing signals off objects "squiggly lines." This in- underwater and when the formation is then transformed machine delivers the in- to magnetic tape and the formation. The machinepick_s result comes out in in- up its information by sending formation tapes looking out pulses through the ice and similar to those used in some water to outline the size and fish finder machines. In other shapes of objects on the river words, the device is still bottom or submerged un-somewhat difficult for the derwater. average person to The device has a screen that read--something Dean and his reads like an oscillioscope assistants at CRREL are showing pulse sign waves or currently working on. Although Dean is not responsible for the initial design of the machine (originally purchased by CRREL from an engineering firm in Nassau, N.H.), he is responsible for development of modifications to the machine which has produced the system that can ac- curately find objects ac- cording to their density and dimensions under.water. This same system Dean used to locate the information boxes and bodies in the Potomac River last week. Called to Washington Dean's supervisor at CRREL, Col. Wayne Hanson, was in Washington, D.C. at the time of the crash, talking with the Corps of Engineers' Director of Research and Development, James Choromokos, about, among other things, CRREL's im- pulse radar system. In fact, Dean himself had recently been briefing a US. Senator on "the military capability" of (please turn to page 8) 25' ! 'I-' oinntellT, Number4 Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont January27, 1982 l're, , ............. sh  r00radford's Gary Moore to head [ Garone steps down--two new trustees, new budget Itate Fish and Game Department} Voters meet at annual Vdlage meeting BRADFORD-- Bradford another masters degree in native Gary W. Moore has administration from the been picked to take over the reins of the Vermont Fish and Game Department when commissioner Edward F. Kehoe resigns after 17 years as head of the department in September. Moore, a 35-year old assistant headmaster at St. Johnsbury Academy and a free-lance outdoor columnist, was named to succeed Kehoc last Friday by Environmental Conservation Secretary Brendan Whittaker. Whittaker said Moore would start as a deputy com- missioner next month until Kehoe retires in the fall in order to gain knowledge about the department to "effect an oderly transition." Moore has been a member of the Ver- mont Fish and Game Board for the past five years. The hoard is a quasi-judicial panel which sets seasons for hun- ting, fishing, and trapping along with accompanying regulations. Moore is a life-long resident it( of Bradford and is a graduate ml of Bradford Academy. He is also a graduate of Lyndon { State College in Lyndonville, Vt., has received a masters degree from Dartmouth _" Gary-W. Moore College and is working on of ,00urp,u00 University of Vermont. Local Outdoorsman Moore's weekly column, Thoughts on the Out-of-Doors, has appeared in the Journal Opinion for the last five years. The column has included everything from recent hunting or fishing regulation changes to personal accounts of important game club or environmental and wildlife organization meetings. The column has often included tales of Moore's own hunting and fishing experiences. Along with being an avid outdoorsman, Moore is a Vietnam veteran, an auxilliary state trooper, a justice-of the peace in Bradford, a Bradford Fire Department captain and he is a member of the Bradford FAST Squad. Moore has been at St. Johnsbury Academy for the past 11 years and has received a leave of absence from the school after accepting the deputy commissioner BRADFORD -- Approx- imately 80 people showed up at Bradford Village's annual meeting on Monday night where they saw long-time trustee Gary Garone, in a surprise move, step down in his bid for re- election and where voters elected two new trustees and approved the 1982 village budget as recommended by the trustees and village of- ficials. For the village budget of 1982, voters approved a $16,400 budget for the general fund compared to $14,966.09 last year--a 9.5 percent increase over last year. The voters also approved a public . works budget of $22,500 as compared to $18,693.27 last year--a 20 percent increase. A budget of $54,500 was approved for the village's sewer fund as compared to $147,237.81 last year--a substantial decrease due to the repayment of an $81,500 note. However, at the meeting, village ad- ministrator Susan Spaulding said that the sewer plant will end up with an approximate deficit of $20,000 for the year. Budget figures in the village report show a deficit of at least $17,000. The public safety budget of $23,950 was also approved by the voters. This year's figure is five percent higher than last year's $22,760.71 budget. The total for all four budgets plus $41,698.61 budgeted for the village's Goshen Road pipe replacement'project now stands at $159,048.61, as ap- proved by village voters. This figure represents an increase of 6.8 percent over the same five expenses last year-- $148,858.49. Village voters voted to raise a total of $53,600 in taxes for the year at the meeting. Grand List May Double A tax rate has not yet been set because the Village's listers have not yet completed their grand list, said Spaulding. One lister and Spaulding told the voters Monday night that the amount in the grand list is "likely to double." New Trustees The voters voted-in two new village trustees at the meeting. For the three-year trustee position, Gary Garone chose not to run for re-election. Chester Allen, owner of Allen Refrigeration in Bradford defeated Lou Menure 48 votes Garone said after the commissioner. James Barton, nominations for the sea(were Alfa Gautreau and ttelena made that, "I had decided that Kinney were re-elected as if someone else ran then I auditors. would step down." Garone inventory Tax said of his last term as trustee, Repeal "We've had our problems but Voters also approved a (on stepping down) it's article that says the villa. nothing personal." will go along with the Town Encumbent trustee Henry Bradford if town votersdecid McGreevy lost his re-election to repeal the town's inven, bid to Larry Drew, a school tax at their annual towr teacher, by a vote of 29 to 21. meeting in March. Lou Menure was also According to one villa nominated for the position and auditor who spoke at Mo he received six votes, day' meeting, the inve, ).,') Lawrence Coffin was re- tax accounts for roughly tout elected as moderator. Chester percent of the town's tax H to eight in a ballot election. Allen was elected as a water come. W. Fairlee's Arnold Dean designed CRREL's underwater radar system * 9 [}Falrleeal town budgor et position. The Verrat IFiShha: and106 Thetford budget employees. All money for Game Department has operation of the department comes from in-state and out- of-state hunting, fishing and trapping licenses and from revenue sharing from a federal tax on sporting equipment. Moore was also appointed (please turn to page 8) JRLEE-- Town budget committee, will be taxes the town's highway attributing a projected 35 raised from $3.40 per $1,000 of fund willincrease from $35,000 g itio 'cent increase in the assessed property value in in1981to $39,:00 this year. a, t, r it.lee tax rate this year to 1981 to $4.60 per $1,000 Of Totais Ior this year's town } leas of surplus monies that assessed valuation in 1982, budget have reached $102,733 are up over bre used up over the year in Budget Increases for the general fund and I1. Budget increases for the $65,000 for the highway IH'let ; [)ther than the surplus general fund and highway budget. """ 00ear ' eyloss, one selectman has budgets means increases of J ld increased expenses are 10.8 percent and 6.7 percent n ely due to "fixed costs respectively. Without the .r which we have no con- $17,000 surplus that helped out l:' such as town salaries taxpayers last year, the tax a. legal fees. Overall in: rate is expected to jump 35 , (ton of costs in goods and percent. "vices was another of the According to FairleeBudget get factors that town o!- Committee figures, the | m ls say ate up last year s amount needed to be raised by tew taxes for the general fund will non-school tax rate, increase from $53,893 in 1981 to i recommended by the this year's $82,150. The ectaen and the town's amount needed to be raised in )r00ord board finds d lo 1 ditlonal cuts tha Tuition up $300 RD--The Orford school $2,000 from insurance costs by s found the additional revising the school s policy. cuts that it believes are This year s Orford budget ary to drop budget includes a 10.1 percent pay ases in their proposed increase for teachers in the lbudget from 10 percent district. sat percent for this year. The pay raise was approved le new proposed budget of last fall after a deadlock over ;,695 was reportedly the issue forced the board to ved at by decreasing the postpone finalization of ary and the work week of a Orford's 1981 budget until dance counselor at the October when the contract 1 and by cutting plans to settlement was reached. e custodial help this Taxlncrease nmer. Additional money Of the new $656,695 budget B saved by eliminating figure, $579,674 will need to be as to install new rugs and raised by the town--the rest .des in SOme areas of the will come from state and ol and by decreasing (please turn to page 8) EMERGENCY CONSERVATION .00PPFAL Dean "black boxes" committee okays after plane Potomac crash school budget W. FAIRLEE-- A plane crash in which the wreckage of the plane is trapped on the bottom THETFORD-- The town cut or reduced this year in of an ice-choked river is an budget committee has okayed order to limit the budget to a unusual, not to mention tragic, BMU budget Due to the shutdown of the ermont Yankee nuclear facility l Central Vermont Public Service 0 must purdmse oil-fired retflaeement fuel at 10 to 20 times the cost ' .of nuclear power. We are for a and prolonged i cOnservation effort by CVI00 customers. More Causes WELLS RIVER-- The school A $6500 rubbish removal board has recommended and cost increase set by Barker approved a budget for the Sargent Corp., plus $2,500 in 1982-83 school year that is 11.5 rubbish removal fees the town percent higher than last still owes from last year is year's budget for the Blue another one of the factors that Mountain Union School town officials say is con-District. tributing to the budget in- The new budget has been set creases. Selectmen say the at $1,284,185. Of that amount $4,000 highway budget in-$789,950 would need to be crease is due to increases in raised by the three towns in the cost of petroleum products the Blue Mountain District that are applied to the town's --Wells River, Ryegate and roads. Groton. The school portion of School officials attribute the Fairlee's tax rate will not be 11.5 percent budget increase finalized until the school's to electricity, salary and annual meeting in June. transportation cost increases. Fairlee voters will vote on Tuition Increases the approval of the town's Tuition costs will alsoriseat budget recommendation at Blue Mountain High School their March 2 annual town and forelementarystudents. meeting. (please turn to page 8) the Thetford school's recommended budget of over a million dollars for 1982 but has held the tax rate down to a three percent increase over last year. Budget committee figures reportedly show the school's portion of this year's tax rate to be at $33.10 per $1,000 of assessed property value. The school's tax rate combined with Thetford's town and highway taxes, would raise the total tax rate for the town to $41.10 per $1,000 of assessed property value. Small Increase The $41.10 figure is said to be only three percent more than last year's tax rate in the town. The school budget for this year is up approximately six percent over last year. The budget, passed by the budget committee last week, stands at $I,059,897. The amount the town needs to raise in order to meet the $1,059,897 budget figure is $932,812. The remainder will come from state and federal funding. School officials say a number of programs had to be six percent increase and that funding for the school's lunch program was not included in the budget. School officials say the program was forced "into the red" last year by federal lunch program cut- backs. It may be up to Thetford voters to decide the final fate of the lunch program at their town meeting in March. Town and school officials are said to be consideringplacing fun- ding for the program as a separate article on the war- ning for the town meeting. This year's school budget is also said to include a 10 per- cent raise "across the board" for teachers at the school. The Thetford Teachers Association is currently negotiating a contract with the Thetford school hoard. Tuition that the town pays to Thetford Academy is not included in the general school budget. However, this year the Academy's executive committee has recently ap- proved a $120 increase in student tuition costs. No second, fires in Vershire Correction VERSHIRE-- Following a story in the previous issue of the Journal Opinion involving a fire at the Mountain School in Vershire, the director of the Mountain School, W. McNiven Carnard, has informed us that there are in fact two private schools in the Town of Ver- occurrence. It is also the kind of accident that calls for unusual recovery methods. When an Air Florida jet crashed into the icy Potomac River in Washington, D.C. killing 78 people, two weeks ago, recovery of the "black boxes" storing vital in- formation relating to the cause of the crash and the location of the many of the bodies of the victims of the crash were made possible by a remarkable set of cir- cumstances. " Those circumstances made the difficult recovery mission possible through the use of an electronic system devised for studying ice jams on rivers-- designed by a man from W. Fairlee. Arnold Dean, a nine-year resident of W. Fairlee and an electronic engineer at the Army Corps of Engineers' Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) in Hanover, is the designer of what he describes as a kind of "impulse radar system" that was originally developed for measuring ice jams. Dean has developed the :system into the only radar system that can see through water. One of a Kind Unlike conventional radar which emits only one frequency signal, Dean's system can emit many signal frequencies which gives it the ability to locate objects un- derwater. Dean and his assistants at CRREL have been working on the system for eight years. shire and that the Mountain The system doesn't register School is in no way connected radar's traditional blips on a to the Vershire School that is screen. Instead, Dean says, located approximatel five there is a delay in the time miles away. between when the device is Carnard said that his school "has never received any fire code violations before the (Jan. 13) fire and has not received any fire code violations as a result of the fire." The fire was reported as the second fire at the school when in fact the first fire referred to in the story had taken place at the neighboring Vershire School. The Vershire School was the recipient of a number of fire code violations issued by fire inspectors in May of 1981 and was the sight of the Nov. 14 cabin fire in which two students were injured. As reported, Vershire school Officials have been engaged in a cooperative effort to comply with the state's fire codes, according to state fire of- ficials. It should also be made clear that there was no fire at the WINTER SCENE-- The cupola, the fir tree, the cloud and the sun blend together for this winter scene. Vershire School on Jan. 13; the fire was five miles away at the Mountain School in Ver- shire. Neither school has had a second fire. RADAR PROFILE CHART-- Dean is shown in this photograph interpreting river bottom data that his impulse radar system has provided on a radar profile chart. SENDING IMPULSES THROUGH THE ICE-- Radar measurement can be made through the ice using a helicopter. The information is gained with the use of the helicopter and then taken to a ground station for print out and interpretation, said Dean. bouncing signals off objects "squiggly lines." This in- underwater and when the formation is then transformed machine delivers the in- to magnetic tape and the formation. The machinepick_s result comes out in in- up its information by sending formation tapes looking out pulses through the ice and similar to those used in some water to outline the size and fish finder machines. In other shapes of objects on the river words, the device is still bottom or submerged un-somewhat difficult for the derwater. average person to The device has a screen that read--something Dean and his reads like an oscillioscope assistants at CRREL are showing pulse sign waves or currently working on. Although Dean is not responsible for the initial design of the machine (originally purchased by CRREL from an engineering firm in Nassau, N.H.), he is responsible for development of modifications to the machine which has produced the system that can ac- curately find objects ac- cording to their density and dimensions under.water. This same system Dean used to locate the information boxes and bodies in the Potomac River last week. Called to Washington Dean's supervisor at CRREL, Col. Wayne Hanson, was in Washington, D.C. at the time of the crash, talking with the Corps of Engineers' Director of Research and Development, James Choromokos, about, among other things, CRREL's im- pulse radar system. In fact, Dean himself had recently been briefing a US. Senator on "the military capability" of (please turn to page 8)