"
Newspaper Archive of
Journal Opinion
Bradford , Vermont
Lyft
January 27, 1982     Journal Opinion
PAGE 4     (4 of 16 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 4     (4 of 16 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
January 27, 1982
 

Newspaper Archive of Journal Opinion produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Page 4-The Journal Opinion-January 27, 1982 i m Lnl I RTHEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY. Inc. Publisher of Journal i Opinion Welb  pdllbllod iao O,rodlm, Wn'iea0o. dldtot mg*o • Vonmom  Now Sampsllm • St.OO Imr yeer; $6.H let sta mN4ks; nt of  • $1I.H pe¢ rmtd $7.00 f sit mNtlos; JkNdeq cithen discemn SLOt. Secemd ¢hst polt  st Bradford, Vermeat o$e|3. Publidmd by Nerflmt Publisbiq Cemlmm¥. Inc., P.0. III 371, |mdtd. Robert F. Humlnski President & Publisher Bradford /  WoodsviUe 802-222,528 i   603-747-201fl %F p An Independent Newspaper ,, n lu ---- I00Editoriai The Town News correspondent Town News columns from local names of their relatives and old correspondents have been part of the friends and also gain a glimpse of Journal Opinion since it began what is happening back in the com- publication and similar columns have munities which many dearly miss. appeared in earlier incarnations of For those in the area, the columns our newspaper for decades before sometimes can tell us important news that. about those we care about. For It is probably safe to say that the example: "Mr .... has returned from columns have never contained what Mary Hitchcock Hospital and is could be termed as earth-shattering recuperating from his surgery." or, news and most of the columns leave "Over 30 gathered at the home of... out reports on the weekly mechanics for their golden anniversary." of their local governments. This And for those who are unfamiliar service we believe we provide on our with the names of those who are front page and throughout the rest of covered in the Town News or with the paper, many of the towns represented in the But behind the Town News' un- columns, the Town News offers an pretensions presence at the center or insight into the lives and traditions in heart of each weekly issue is a strong our area that would he hard to find value that has kept many readers anywhere else. following the columns for years and a Babies continue to arrive to new dedication from a matured and parents. New families continue to discerning group or correspondents arrive to local communities and old with roots deeply embedded in their families continue to leave. A great local communities, part of this has been chraniclnd in the It is these "roots" that make the past and most likely will continue to columns so important. Our readers he chronicled in ,the future in the who have moved away from the area Town News section of the Journal can read the columns and hear the Opinion. 00i00ii!i J Church lis6ng appreciated Chan00e state ...... .... 00Letters to the Editor To the Editor: I am writing you for two reasons. The first is to thank you for having a listing of all the local churches and their times of worship and other weekly events. It is truly rewarding to see your sense of community service shown in this way. I truly appreciate it. The second reason I am writing is to let you know that we have recently changed the day of our weekly Pot luck and Vespers to Thursdays -- the time remains the same. I wonder too if you might in- clude that choir rehearsal is at 7:30 p.m. on Thursdays. Thank you. Rev. Richard A. White E. Corinth Soldier of the 00'ear To the Editor: As Executive Councilor for District One, it is a distinct pleasure for me to write this letter of commendation to Ronald Boutin on becoming the Soldier of the Year for the New Hampshire Army National Buard for the Woodsville Unit. It is an honor and a credit to Boutin, his family, the Guard and the Town of Benton. With best wishes to him on behalf of the State of New Hampshire, I am. Raymond S. Burton Executive Councilor A better way To the Editor: Yankees and the Red Sox; she The Haverhill Police report in the Journal Opinion reminds me of the story of the fellow who went to a night ball game; he didn't get home until the "wee" hours of the morning, his wife wanted to asked for the score, he said 3 to 2, she asked who won, he said '3'. The police report makes about as much sense, they tell you everything except who committed the crime. /nst/mt/ons To the Editor: I believe things are getting a bit out of hand in our Legislature when proposals are made to increase the sales tax and give the proceeds of that increase to education and when a half-million dollars of our tax money is offered as a gift to the state universities. There is much ado in the state of Vermont about taxes, on the state and local levels• With the present represen- tation we have in Congress, there is not much, if any, hope of said representation doing anything for us to have our federal taxes cut, so our ef- forts must necessarily be toward the state and local levels in order to get any relief from the tremendous burden the majority of us taxpayers are saddled with. It is with that thought in" mind that I urge Vermonters to petition their state legislators by phone or letter to do their best to see what can he done to change all of the state educational institutions EXECUTIVE Rawnond S. Burton, (R.NJI.) Robert Laney of Lebanon was confirmed to public member slot on the Board of Optometry and Russell Dumais of Gilford was confirmed to the New Hampshire Water Supply and Pollution Control Commission to represent recreational interests at the Jan. 20 meeting of the Governor and Council. Ruth Wellington of Pike was nominated to the Status of Women Commission. Twenty-two social service organizations in District One by vote of the Governor and Council were authorized to receive from the state local matching funds. A $3,994,412 contract was authorized for about two miles of interstate highway between Littleton and Waterford, Vt. as part of the Interstate 93 project. Kimball Castle in Gilford received funds to develop a plan for restoration and rehabilitation. Our s(ate-owned railroad between Concord and Lincoln will continue to be operated by N. Stratford Railroad Company through June 30. I hope by then we will know exactly how much money is available and perhaps arrangements can be made to put a salesman on the road to sell the services of the state-owned railroad to potential users and also to develop a business plan to eventually make the line self-sufficient. Community Action programs in Carroll and Grafton Counties, and Beiknap Counties all creases in federal funds all, further assist people in need of money. A contract was awarded by and Council for 7,002 square feet of space in the Town of Littleton for Division of Welfare• This moves all or two people from the Welfare Woodsville to Littleton. A Federal Historic Grant in Aid for the New Ham Museum, Inc. in Milton, for safety improvements and an security system. The Council also accepted the Annual Report of the New Hat Municipal Bond Bank. Anyone obtain a copy of this report, please write me: Ray Burton RFD No. Woodsville, N.H. 0,3785 {Tel. 271-3632). The next meeting of the Governor Council is February 3, 10 a.m. House. I would be pleased and see anyone from my district in at It is an honor to represent you! /! ., know why he was so late; he "There must he a better into private institutions. A lot / A.,,:.: , . -'" /,/" said the game went extra way!" of peopleareconvinced there  .  .a,> innings. She further asked J.tlarveyWalker are too many state univer- o ./- 4- who played?, he said the Woodsville, N.ll. sities for the population size of ,J3':]oL_.. oo00s00a00o, ao00a believe that even one is one too UCP te/ethon a many, when you consider they [f ",-,. ""/" '" Tothe Editor: volunteers stayed at their jobs are in competition to well-  ]L'. The Board of Directors, and worked right to the end managed private institutions. members and staff of United with good humor and en- It seems that the state of  ' ...... ],, .rbral Palsy of Vermont thusiasm. Vermont is very ripe for a ! x ld like to ,t/lnk everyone But, of course, our heartiest Proposition 13 or a Proposition Pap k " "WellsR" ( made the Weekend With thanks go to the wonderful 2 z, such as that put in force in eontinu e Stars Telethon" the grand people of Vermont who sup- our neighboring state of erma l l, rant c;ess it was. The response port UCP of Vermont with Massachusetts.The taxpayers . |h irowz fhe Telethon proves once their Telethon pledged. They bavehadit, right up to here! The first paper mill in ,sheet ata time by the English Growing,pm.,o - , lain that Vermonters make are the heart of the Telethon; Frank L. Cutler Wells River was built in 1810 method, by floating the fibers Ira White s owl . e tt neighbors, an[ they make it possible for Bridport, Vermont by Bill Blake of Bellows Falls, onto a screen (in contrast to enterprises prosoeredUcmg II the pioneer papermaker of the the Chinese method in which grew, and b Aril of r aye A special thanks goes out to UCP to continue working to . • Y - es, 3," regmn, who bmlt and operated the fibers were rolled out like had built a new stone bd i . tndredsthe state°f volunteerSwho are theall palsy.aSsist people with cerebral • Sound a total of s,x" paper mills." At dough to the desired for a papermill, _,,e om[e'ng tc the Wells River mill, Andrew thickness). His papermaking downriver from the Os,,, , ne and muscle of the Again, thanks! Henderson was his partner for process s described in Wells also a covered flume ,m ". . mn effort. Despite bitter William N. Aswad investment " om. several years. One of their History of Newbury: from his millpond to tn  .... and long hours, our President To the Editor: apprentices was Asa Low, who "The rags were sorted mill. However, these i" :Y Created since World War II -- a [( later built his own paper mill and cut up by female help and stretched his re so"din, ,, , f'u/  tO / by Republican and in Bradford. (Newbury deeds: then ground into paper pulp, beyond the hreaking. ,v Democratic Congressional Book 7 pages 5, 6, and 355; the white ones for writing and and eventually he lost  foSr o Ph.D., also by Dr. Gofman, leaders, federal financial aid book 8 -- pages 24) colored ones for wrapping through foreclosed _ a comprehensive in- programs for college- Blake&Henderson leased paper. In some of the wrap- gages. (Deeds: 13-2831u'c1 a Cerebral would like to thank everyone who made the "Weekend With thanks go to the wonderful 2., such as that put in force in the Stars Telethon" the grand people of Vermont who sup. our success it was. The response port UCP of Vermont with to the Telethon proves once their Telethon pledged. They have had it, right up to here! again that Vermonters make are the heart of the Telethon: great neighbors. the hundreds of volunteers all assist over the state who are the palsy. backbone and muscle of the Telethon effort. Despite bitter cold To the Editor: Christmas is over, but an for essential gift to our children, a vestigation of evidence, university students are one of the mill in 1815 to Ira White, healthful place to live, is in "Radiation and Human the soundest investments in who bought it in 1823 in par- jeopardy. A multimillion Health" 1981. For corn- the future of this country. But tnership with Samuel Reed. dollar public relations plan to parative advantages and current and future un- They manufactured writing justify the President's disadvantages of all our promotion of nuclear energy sources of energy I recom- has been proposed, mend: "Energy Strategies Rep. Richard Ottinger has Toward a Solar Future", a called it "a blatant Report of the Union of Con- nda campaign. It eetmed Scientists, 190 and outlines methods for reaching "Energy Future". a report of practically every adult in the the Energy Project at Har- country. Under the pretense of yard Business School, 1979. giving the public needed in- The path to comfort and an formation, it would use our abundant life is not hy way of taxes to make us believe that a nuclear economy with nuclear power is sufficiently t-adioaetive wastes puffed into benign and the solution to our the air, leaked into streams, transported over our roads and blown off of dump. piles to be deposited who knows where or at what cost. Be prepared for a multimillion dollar nuclear- promotion blitz, or, better yet, prevent it. Gladys Ledge energy problems. For sound information on the health effects of nuclear energy I recommend: for brevity "Nuclear Madness" by Dr. Helen Caldicott; for a touch of humor, "Irrevy", "An Irreverent Illustrated View of Nuclear Power" hy ping paper, straw was mixed 14-122, 123, 124) Taxes. taxes, taxes Tax questions will pervade the deliberations of the 1982 Vermont Legislature• Massive cuts in federal funding for social service programs, couplewith the I0 percent federal income tax cut, scheduled for July I, significantly alter the revenue picture for Fiscal Year 1983• Vermont's income tax is piggy-backed to the federal liability at the rate of 23 per- cent. Ctmsequently, the income tax pass- through would lower Vermont taxes by $7.2 million. The Governor wants to in- crease the state rate in order to retain the current level of revenue. He has proposed a $311.8million General Fund budget for FY83. This represents a 12.4 percent increase from the current base of $377A million. The budget is predicted on plugging the pass-through. The $7.2 million plug consists of $3 million for the Property Tax Relief Fund and $4.2 million for State Aid to Education. This incremental approach would add 10 percent to state aid for each of the next five years, while phasing out the "tilting floor" that guarantees some state aid to every Vermont town. The Education and Ways and Means Committees proposed $10 milfion for property tax relief and $8 million for state aid. Added to a $42 million base, this would provide a sizeable windfall to most Ver- mont communities. The sales tax would be raised two cents -- from 3 cents to 5 cents in order to finance the measure. The Governor was opposed to the proposal. He stated his opposition to raising any of Vermont's. broad-based General Fund taxes. He said we should save them for future years when the state's needs might be greater. Besides, the sales tax is considered regressive i.e., it penalizes those on the lower end of the income scale more than it hurts those who make plenty of money. Thus, the battle was joined. The Speaker and the Republican leadership worked for the plan, while the Governor, head of the party, worked against it. The Democratic leadership was split, but many of the rank and file were concerned about social service cutbacks, and questioned the fairness of a dedicated tax. There were members in both parties who thought any tax increases should be distributed to a variety of programs based on priority needs. And then the border towns entered the fray. Realizing that a sales tax increase would spell disaster for retailers along the Connecticut, we quietly amassed artillery to help defeat the measure. But 50 pieces was all we could solidly muster. Salvos were lofted in a six-hour debate designed to persuade the uncommitted. Then, after a few brilliant flashes and a lot of din and thunder, the black smoke cleaned. The bill was lead: 77-70! The aftermath will strongly influence the rest of the session. The defeated General who chairs Ways and Means has stated his opposition to plugging the pass- through of $7•2 million. Since Governor Snelling opposed the sales tax, Chairman Guiliani says the proposal to increase the Vermont income tax rate is at "the bottom of the heap". Also, Chairman Morse of the Education Committee doesn't plan to consider state aid anymore this year. Therefore, the FY1983 budget proposal will have to he reduced from $311.8 to $304.6 million. Several other tax questions will also be up for consideration. Most prominent are a Roams and Meals Tax, a Diesel Tax, and a Cigarette Tax. Rooms and Meals is now at 5 percent. Expect a proposal to raise it to 6 percent with the revenue dedicated to property tax relief. A Diesel Fuel Tax of 16 percent has already been approved by the Tran- sportation Committee and sent to Ways and Means. It is designed to replace the truck entry-fee system• However, it would raise $4 million less than the trip fees. A Cigarette Tax hike of five cents --to t7 cents per pack -- would finance a transfer of $4 million in non-highway services to the General Fund. It has not yet been ear- marked for this purpose. However, it is sponsored by Transportation Chairman Zampieri. He and most of the other hankers of this measure were among those who helped defeat the Sales Tax which would mve .financed the Giuiiani-Morse state aid proposal. Chairman Giuliani says the Cigarette Tax is at the end oftheliSt . Id thisabove or below "the bottom of the heap"? Only Peter knows for sure ! If you have any legislative concerns or if you need assistance with state or federal. programs, please let me knew. Telephone, toll free, 1-800-322-5616. Address: State House, Montpelier: or Bradford, Vermont. John W. Gofman, M.D., Dorset, Vt. (please turn to page 5) with the rags. "After the rags were beaten into pulp in two great beaters, the pulp was put onto a wire sieve the size of the sheet of paper, and shaken to even it on the sieve, when it dergraduate and graduate and wrapping paper. White students and their parentswill bought out Reed's share in be deeply hurt if cuts and 1830 and greatly expanded the restrictions are made in business The paper mill also federal grants and federally had a " insured bank loans now with" ii available. (Deeds: 7-375; 8-231; 9-104; 10- In great jeopardy at the 177) present time are Pell Grants In the early days, paper (given to the most needy was made from rags, and Ira students), Supplemental White sent peddlers Equal Opportunity Grants. throughout northern New time, College Work Study, National Hampshire and Vermont press and the paper removed Direct Student Loans (for the trading tin dippers, pails, from the felting and dried in a most needy), and low-interest brooms etc. for cotton and room in the second story of the Guaranteed Bank Loans for linen rags -- also for sheep mill, having sliding pieces of low and middle-income pelts and calf skins for making boards, so that the air had free students, leather to bind books, as Mr. access to dry the paper. If students of New England White was also a book lose the support provided by publisher and the first printer these federalprograms, many and book binder in Wells of them will have to give up River• their goal of higher education For his book business he # erected in 1833 the building on the west side of Main Street which for many years was operated as a jewelry store by Jesse Sheldon and is now occupied by Burnham's Shoe Store. Mr. White used the storefront as his showroom or sales room and the remainder of the building as his printing office and book-bindery. One of his best-known books was Noah Webster's Spelling Book, for which he manufactured the paper, printed the pages and bound them into a book. He also printed an edition of the New Testament. Early methods of papermaking Ira White made paper a were alternately till the pile was of the proper size, when the mass was put into a large press, capable of taking great pressure, and after tlm proper was taken from the "After the paper was sufficiently dried it was finished by having first all the lumps picked out of the paper, and it was calendered (passed through rollers) so as to make it smooth and fit to write on." Wells wrote that the dryer was a unique contrivance with a fire inside it, and the sheets of paper were hung on wooden rods constructed on a swivel in such a way that no part of the paper was touched in the drying process. The paper produced by this process was coarse and fibrous and was called "foolscap." According to an article by Charles W. Hughes in Ver- mont History News, Sept.-Oct. 1981, the earliest patent dealing with paper manufacture, dated Feb. 27, 1827, was issued to Ira White and Leonard Gale for "a glazing rdll or plate to render 'the surface smooth without injuring its strength and to improve it in durability and firmness." Mr. Gale, too, manufactured writing paper, along with other things, in what later was the Sherwin & Son building. Wells River in manuscript by Nelson in the Wells River explains what ha June 1847 Chancellor Hall decreed the Timothy Shedd and Shedd and Hale and they in Henry K. White, the soo! and he mortgaged brother Darius tried and finally Hale and his niece Shedd Scott were take title to the mill I expect Henry a time, but in April Durant came from Massachusetts and mill, and in 1855 Adams became half (Deeds: 15-469; 17-190) We don't know became of Ira White's building, as it does not as part of the present J mill buildings- sone was used in the dation of a later White himself may outlived his buildings, lived to be 98 years months of age.. The first For a while, Adams used the old eq and produced rag paper, but in 1857 enlarged and mill buildings. photographs showed the smokestack with the painted on it, indicating was probably built year. Durant & Adams replaced the old, papermaking a cylinder machine from England, manufactured a roll of paper separate sheets. They installed a cylinder which the paper passedl over a big metal drum' fire inside ¢a wood fire early years, coal). This used until 1923. (please turn to An artist concept Page 4-The Journal Opinion-January 27, 1982 i m Lnl I RTHEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY. Inc. Publisher of Journal i Opinion Welb  pdllbllod iao O,rodlm, Wn'iea0o. dldtot mg*o • Vonmom  Now Sampsllm • St.OO Imr yeer; $6.H let sta mN4ks; nt of  • $1I.H pe¢ rmtd $7.00 f sit mNtlos; JkNdeq cithen discemn SLOt. Secemd ¢hst polt  st Bradford, Vermeat o$e|3. Publidmd by Nerflmt Publisbiq Cemlmm¥. Inc., P.0. III 371, |mdtd. Robert F. Humlnski President & Publisher Bradford /  WoodsviUe 802-222,528 i   603-747-201fl %F p An Independent Newspaper ,, n lu ---- I00Editoriai The Town News correspondent Town News columns from local names of their relatives and old correspondents have been part of the friends and also gain a glimpse of Journal Opinion since it began what is happening back in the com- publication and similar columns have munities which many dearly miss. appeared in earlier incarnations of For those in the area, the columns our newspaper for decades before sometimes can tell us important news that. about those we care about. For It is probably safe to say that the example: "Mr .... has returned from columns have never contained what Mary Hitchcock Hospital and is could be termed as earth-shattering recuperating from his surgery." or, news and most of the columns leave "Over 30 gathered at the home of... out reports on the weekly mechanics for their golden anniversary." of their local governments. This And for those who are unfamiliar service we believe we provide on our with the names of those who are front page and throughout the rest of covered in the Town News or with the paper, many of the towns represented in the But behind the Town News' un- columns, the Town News offers an pretensions presence at the center or insight into the lives and traditions in heart of each weekly issue is a strong our area that would he hard to find value that has kept many readers anywhere else. following the columns for years and a Babies continue to arrive to new dedication from a matured and parents. New families continue to discerning group or correspondents arrive to local communities and old with roots deeply embedded in their families continue to leave. A great local communities, part of this has been chraniclnd in the It is these "roots" that make the past and most likely will continue to columns so important. Our readers he chronicled in ,the future in the who have moved away from the area Town News section of the Journal can read the columns and hear the Opinion. 00i00ii!i J Church lis6ng appreciated Chan00e state ...... .... 00Letters to the Editor To the Editor: I am writing you for two reasons. The first is to thank you for having a listing of all the local churches and their times of worship and other weekly events. It is truly rewarding to see your sense of community service shown in this way. I truly appreciate it. The second reason I am writing is to let you know that we have recently changed the day of our weekly Pot luck and Vespers to Thursdays -- the time remains the same. I wonder too if you might in- clude that choir rehearsal is at 7:30 p.m. on Thursdays. Thank you. Rev. Richard A. White E. Corinth Soldier of the 00'ear To the Editor: As Executive Councilor for District One, it is a distinct pleasure for me to write this letter of commendation to Ronald Boutin on becoming the Soldier of the Year for the New Hampshire Army National Buard for the Woodsville Unit. It is an honor and a credit to Boutin, his family, the Guard and the Town of Benton. With best wishes to him on behalf of the State of New Hampshire, I am. Raymond S. Burton Executive Councilor A better way To the Editor: Yankees and the Red Sox; she The Haverhill Police report in the Journal Opinion reminds me of the story of the fellow who went to a night ball game; he didn't get home until the "wee" hours of the morning, his wife wanted to asked for the score, he said 3 to 2, she asked who won, he said '3'. The police report makes about as much sense, they tell you everything except who committed the crime. /nst/mt/ons To the Editor: I believe things are getting a bit out of hand in our Legislature when proposals are made to increase the sales tax and give the proceeds of that increase to education and when a half-million dollars of our tax money is offered as a gift to the state universities. There is much ado in the state of Vermont about taxes, on the state and local levels• With the present represen- tation we have in Congress, there is not much, if any, hope of said representation doing anything for us to have our federal taxes cut, so our ef- forts must necessarily be toward the state and local levels in order to get any relief from the tremendous burden the majority of us taxpayers are saddled with. It is with that thought in" mind that I urge Vermonters to petition their state legislators by phone or letter to do their best to see what can he done to change all of the state educational institutions EXECUTIVE Rawnond S. Burton, (R.NJI.) Robert Laney of Lebanon was confirmed to public member slot on the Board of Optometry and Russell Dumais of Gilford was confirmed to the New Hampshire Water Supply and Pollution Control Commission to represent recreational interests at the Jan. 20 meeting of the Governor and Council. Ruth Wellington of Pike was nominated to the Status of Women Commission. Twenty-two social service organizations in District One by vote of the Governor and Council were authorized to receive from the state local matching funds. A $3,994,412 contract was authorized for about two miles of interstate highway between Littleton and Waterford, Vt. as part of the Interstate 93 project. Kimball Castle in Gilford received funds to develop a plan for restoration and rehabilitation. Our s(ate-owned railroad between Concord and Lincoln will continue to be operated by N. Stratford Railroad Company through June 30. I hope by then we will know exactly how much money is available and perhaps arrangements can be made to put a salesman on the road to sell the services of the state-owned railroad to potential users and also to develop a business plan to eventually make the line self-sufficient. Community Action programs in Carroll and Grafton Counties, and Beiknap Counties all creases in federal funds all, further assist people in need of money. A contract was awarded by and Council for 7,002 square feet of space in the Town of Littleton for Division of Welfare• This moves all or two people from the Welfare Woodsville to Littleton. A Federal Historic Grant in Aid for the New Ham Museum, Inc. in Milton, for safety improvements and an security system. The Council also accepted the Annual Report of the New Hat Municipal Bond Bank. Anyone obtain a copy of this report, please write me: Ray Burton RFD No. Woodsville, N.H. 0,3785 {Tel. 271-3632). The next meeting of the Governor Council is February 3, 10 a.m. House. I would be pleased and see anyone from my district in at It is an honor to represent you! /! ., know why he was so late; he "There must he a better into private institutions. A lot / A.,,:.: , . -'" /,/" said the game went extra way!" of peopleareconvinced there  .  .a,> innings. She further asked J.tlarveyWalker are too many state univer- o ./- 4- who played?, he said the Woodsville, N.ll. sities for the population size of ,J3':]oL_.. oo00s00a00o, ao00a believe that even one is one too UCP te/ethon a many, when you consider they [f ",-,. ""/" '" Tothe Editor: volunteers stayed at their jobs are in competition to well-  ]L'. The Board of Directors, and worked right to the end managed private institutions. members and staff of United with good humor and en- It seems that the state of  ' ...... ],, .rbral Palsy of Vermont thusiasm. Vermont is very ripe for a ! x ld like to ,t/lnk everyone But, of course, our heartiest Proposition 13 or a Proposition Pap k " "WellsR" ( made the Weekend With thanks go to the wonderful 2 z, such as that put in force in eontinu e Stars Telethon" the grand people of Vermont who sup- our neighboring state of erma l l, rant c;ess it was. The response port UCP of Vermont with Massachusetts.The taxpayers . |h irowz fhe Telethon proves once their Telethon pledged. They bavehadit, right up to here! The first paper mill in ,sheet ata time by the English Growing,pm.,o - , lain that Vermonters make are the heart of the Telethon; Frank L. Cutler Wells River was built in 1810 method, by floating the fibers Ira White s owl . ett neighbors, an[ they make it possible for Bridport, Vermont by Bill Blake of Bellows Falls, onto a screen (in contrast to enterprises prosoeredUcmg II the pioneer papermaker of the the Chinese method in which grew, and b Aril of r a ye A special thanks goes out to UCP to continue working to . • Y - es, 3," regmn, who bmlt and operated the fibers were rolled out like had built a new stone bd i . tndredsthe state°f volunteerSwho are theall palsy.aSsist people with cerebral • Sound a total of s,x" paper mills." At dough to the desired for a papermill, _,,e om[e'ng tc the Wells River mill, Andrew thickness). His papermaking downriver from the Os,,, , ne and muscle of the Again, thanks! Henderson was his partner for process s described in Wells also a covered flume ,m ". . mn effort. Despite bitter William N. Aswad investment " om. several years. One of their History of Newbury: from his millpond to tn  .... and long hours, our President To the Editor: apprentices was Asa Low, who "The rags were sorted mill. However, these i" :Y Created since World War II -- a [( later built his own paper mill and cut up by female help and stretched his re so"din, ,, , f'u/  tO / by Republican and in Bradford. (Newbury deeds: then ground into paper pulp, beyond the hreaking. ,v Democratic Congressional Book 7 pages 5, 6, and 355; the white ones for writing and and eventually he lost  foSr o Ph.D., also by Dr. Gofman, leaders, federal financial aid book 8 -- pages 24) colored ones for wrapping through foreclosed _ a comprehensive in- programs for college- Blake&Henderson leased paper. In some of the wrap- gages. (Deeds: 13-2831u'c1 a Cerebral would like to thank everyone who made the "Weekend With thanks go to the wonderful 2., such as that put in force in the Stars Telethon" the grand people of Vermont who sup. our success it was. The response port UCP of Vermont with to the Telethon proves once their Telethon pledged. They have had it, right up to here! again that Vermonters make are the heart of the Telethon: great neighbors. the hundreds of volunteers all assist over the state who are the palsy. backbone and muscle of the Telethon effort. Despite bitter cold To the Editor: Christmas is over, but an for essential gift to our children, a vestigation of evidence, university students are one of the mill in 1815 to Ira White, healthful place to live, is in "Radiation and Human the soundest investments in who bought it in 1823 in par- jeopardy. A multimillion Health" 1981. For corn- the future of this country. But tnership with Samuel Reed. dollar public relations plan to parative advantages and current and future un- They manufactured writing justify the President's disadvantages of all our promotion of nuclear energy sources of energy I recom- has been proposed, mend: "Energy Strategies Rep. Richard Ottinger has Toward a Solar Future", a called it "a blatant Report of the Union of Con- nda campaign. It eetmed Scientists, 190 and outlines methods for reaching "Energy Future". a report of practically every adult in the the Energy Project at Har- country. Under the pretense of yard Business School, 1979. giving the public needed in- The path to comfort and an formation, it would use our abundant life is not hy way of taxes to make us believe that a nuclear economy with nuclear power is sufficiently t-adioaetive wastes puffed into benign and the solution to our the air, leaked into streams, transported over our roads and blown off of dump. piles to be deposited who knows where or at what cost. Be prepared for a multimillion dollar nuclear- promotion blitz, or, better yet, prevent it. Gladys Ledge energy problems. For sound information on the health effects of nuclear energy I recommend: for brevity "Nuclear Madness" by Dr. Helen Caldicott; for a touch of humor, "Irrevy", "An Irreverent Illustrated View of Nuclear Power" hy ping paper, straw was mixed 14-122, 123, 124) Taxes. taxes, taxes Tax questions will pervade the deliberations of the 1982 Vermont Legislature• Massive cuts in federal funding for social service programs, couplewith the I0 percent federal income tax cut, scheduled for July I, significantly alter the revenue picture for Fiscal Year 1983• Vermont's income tax is piggy-backed to the federal liability at the rate of 23 per- cent. Ctmsequently, the income tax pass- through would lower Vermont taxes by $7.2 million. The Governor wants to in- crease the state rate in order to retain the current level of revenue. He has proposed a $311.8million General Fund budget for FY83. This represents a 12.4 percent increase from the current base of $377A million. The budget is predicted on plugging the pass-through. The $7.2 million plug consists of $3 million for the Property Tax Relief Fund and $4.2 million for State Aid to Education. This incremental approach would add 10 percent to state aid for each of the next five years, while phasing out the "tilting floor" that guarantees some state aid to every Vermont town. The Education and Ways and Means Committees proposed $10 milfion for property tax relief and $8 million for state aid. Added to a $42 million base, this would provide a sizeable windfall to most Ver- mont communities. The sales tax would be raised two cents -- from 3 cents to 5 cents in order to finance the measure. The Governor was opposed to the proposal. He stated his opposition to raising any of Vermont's. broad-based General Fund taxes. He said we should save them for future years when the state's needs might be greater. Besides, the sales tax is considered regressive i.e., it penalizes those on the lower end of the income scale more than it hurts those who make plenty of money. Thus, the battle was joined. The Speaker and the Republican leadership worked for the plan, while the Governor, head of the party, worked against it. The Democratic leadership was split, but many of the rank and file were concerned about social service cutbacks, and questioned the fairness of a dedicated tax. There were members in both parties who thought any tax increases should be distributed to a variety of programs based on priority needs. And then the border towns entered the fray. Realizing that a sales tax increase would spell disaster for retailers along the Connecticut, we quietly amassed artillery to help defeat the measure. But 50 pieces was all we could solidly muster. Salvos were lofted in a six-hour debate designed to persuade the uncommitted. Then, after a few brilliant flashes and a lot of din and thunder, the black smoke cleaned. The bill was lead: 77-70! The aftermath will strongly influence the rest of the session. The defeated General who chairs Ways and Means has stated his opposition to plugging the pass- through of $7•2 million. Since Governor Snelling opposed the sales tax, Chairman Guiliani says the proposal to increase the Vermont income tax rate is at "the bottom of the heap". Also, Chairman Morse of the Education Committee doesn't plan to consider state aid anymore this year. Therefore, the FY1983 budget proposal will have to he reduced from $311.8 to $304.6 million. Several other tax questions will also be up for consideration. Most prominent are a Roams and Meals Tax, a Diesel Tax, and a Cigarette Tax. Rooms and Meals is now at 5 percent. Expect a proposal to raise it to 6 percent with the revenue dedicated to property tax relief. A Diesel Fuel Tax of 16 percent has already been approved by the Tran- sportation Committee and sent to Ways and Means. It is designed to replace the truck entry-fee system• However, it would raise $4 million less than the trip fees. A Cigarette Tax hike of five cents --to t7 cents per pack -- would finance a transfer of $4 million in non-highway services to the General Fund. It has not yet been ear- marked for this purpose. However, it is sponsored by Transportation Chairman Zampieri. He and most of the other hankers of this measure were among those who helped defeat the Sales Tax which would mve .financed the Giuiiani-Morse state aid proposal. Chairman Giuliani says the Cigarette Tax is at the end oftheliSt . Id thisabove or below "the bottom of the heap"? Only Peter knows for sure ! If you have any legislative concerns or if you need assistance with state or federal. programs, please let me knew. Telephone, toll free, 1-800-322-5616. Address: State House, Montpelier: or Bradford, Vermont. John W. Gofman, M.D., Dorset, Vt. (please turn to page 5) with the rags. "After the rags were beaten into pulp in two great beaters, the pulp was put onto a wire sieve the size of the sheet of paper, and shaken to even it on the sieve, when it dergraduate and graduate and wrapping paper. White students and their parentswill bought out Reed's share in be deeply hurt if cuts and 1830 and greatly expanded the restrictions are made in business The paper mill also federal grants and federally had a " insured bank loans now with" ii available. (Deeds: 7-375; 8-231; 9-104; 10- In great jeopardy at the 177) present time are Pell Grants In the early days, paper (given to the most needy was made from rags, and Ira students), Supplemental White sent peddlers Equal Opportunity Grants. throughout northern New time, College Work Study, National Hampshire and Vermont press and the paper removed Direct Student Loans (for the trading tin dippers, pails, from the felting and dried in a most needy), and low-interest brooms etc. for cotton and room in the second story of the Guaranteed Bank Loans for linen rags -- also for sheep mill, having sliding pieces of low and middle-income pelts and calf skins for making boards, so that the air had free students, leather to bind books, as Mr. access to dry the paper. If students of New England White was also a book lose the support provided by publisher and the first printer these federalprograms, many and book binder in Wells of them will have to give up River• their goal of higher education For his book business he # erected in 1833 the building on the west side of Main Street which for many years was operated as a jewelry store by Jesse Sheldon and is now occupied by Burnham's Shoe Store. Mr. White used the storefront as his showroom or sales room and the remainder of the building as his printing office and book-bindery. One of his best-known books was Noah Webster's Spelling Book, for which he manufactured the paper, printed the pages and bound them into a book. He also printed an edition of the New Testament. Early methods of papermaking Ira White made paper a were alternately till the pile was of the proper size, when the mass was put into a large press, capable of taking great pressure, and after tlm proper was taken from the "After the paper was sufficiently dried it was finished by having first all the lumps picked out of the paper, and it was calendered (passed through rollers) so as to make it smooth and fit to write on." Wells wrote that the dryer was a unique contrivance with a fire inside it, and the sheets of paper were hung on wooden rods constructed on a swivel in such a way that no part of the paper was touched in the drying process. The paper produced by this process was coarse and fibrous and was called "foolscap." According to an article by Charles W. Hughes in Ver- mont History News, Sept.-Oct. 1981, the earliest patent dealing with paper manufacture, dated Feb. 27, 1827, was issued to Ira White and Leonard Gale for "a glazing rdll or plate to render 'the surface smooth without injuring its strength and to improve it in durability and firmness." Mr. Gale, too, manufactured writing paper, along with other things, in what later was the Sherwin & Son building. Wells River in manuscript by Nelson in the Wells River explains what ha June 1847 Chancellor Hall decreed the Timothy Shedd and Shedd and Hale and they in Henry K. White, the soo! and he mortgaged brother Darius tried and finally Hale and his niece Shedd Scott were take title to the mill I expect Henry a time, but in April Durant came from Massachusetts and mill, and in 1855 Adams became half (Deeds: 15-469; 17-190) We don't know became of Ira White's building, as it does not as part of the present J mill buildings- sone was used in the dation of a later White himself may outlived his buildings, lived to be 98 years months of age.. The first For a while, Adams used the old eq and produced rag paper, but in 1857 enlarged and mill buildings. photographs showed the smokestack with the painted on it, indicating was probably built year. Durant & Adams replaced the old, papermaking a cylinder machine from England, manufactured a roll of paper separate sheets. They installed a cylinder which the paper passedl over a big metal drum' fire inside ¢a wood fire early years, coal). This used until 1923. (please turn to An artist concept