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Bradford , Vermont
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January 27, 1982     Journal Opinion
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January 27, 1982
 

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t i ! I ltwentwe pr(00rmns )RI AGRICULTURAL LAND PROTECTION Protection, has been prepared by UVM Extension Service Community and Rural Development Specialists to increase their knowledge about agricultural land retention techfiques. Edited for publication by Lois M. Frey, RC&D Programs for districts is usually specified in geared state enabling legislation to financial or other assure a critical mass to farmland owners necessary to support cam- will keep them actively mercial agriculture. Districts and managing their are created for fixed but renewable terms ranging examples of Incentive from four to 10 years. The include Death Tax condition which agricultural fits; Agricultural districts impose frequently Right to Farm include: (11 farmers may and Purchase of receive use-value appraisal of Lghts. farmland; (21 except for years ago, health or safety reasons, local Vermont farms regulations may not restrict subject to estate taxes, farm practices or structures; the decade, in- (3) state agency policies must farm values encourage agriculture in the even moderate-sized district; (4) alternate sites fairly large must be considered before estates. Both eminent domain is used; (5) and state laws have community facilities are periodically to restricted to prevent un- - signifieate Death Tax necessary development in to farm heirs, districts; (6) farmers are on the various protected from special and gift tax laws, assessments which do not farm tax rules and directly benefit farms in the planning is available district; (7) protection from the UVM Extension nuisance suits for normal agricultural practices is af- method to forded. farmland, used in at These nuisance suits have a half-dozen states, is themselves resulted in Districting. This another type of farmland am permits farmers to protection technique known as form a district, Right-to-Farm i.aws. about certain. Eighteen states, including and expectations Vermont, have adopted I neighboring landowners, statues to protect farmers inimum area for such from lawsuits against nor- mall)' accepted, reasonable farm practices. This legislation may also afford some protection against local government regulation of farming practices. Finally, the incentive program which provides the greatest financial benefit to farmland owners is known as the Purchase of Development Rights. Under this concept the landowner retains ownership and the "right to continue the farming operation, but relinquishes the right to develop the land. A typical program would be the outright purchase of development rights on a one-time basis by a government body. The price paid for development rights reflects the difference bet- ween the development market value and the farm market value. Logically, land designated for this program should be established agricultural areas, under pressure for non-farm development. The sale of rights would be voluntary or through options to the pur- chasing agency whenever the land is placed on the sales market. For more information about farmland retention programs in Vermont, contact your County Extension Service office. ontinued from page 4) -', urant & Adams worked - _meir own naper'groduein sins k- ,- g buenOS.s, /tnd by 1860 were ered[Ucing 150 tons of Manilla lofr a year, with 12 em- L _jees, 3,of them women. !ne -[wding to an official renort e state on Products of ae Ostry in Newbur " eo mont His!orical Sociy) " ?$vg year s time the mill se i 250 tons of rope and re4 i ,,,, , ng, 40 tons of lime, and 'thOrds of wood (probably 'ly for the dryer). '';3hceed a:a:fli g:r:eeaP i roi. from sailing buying it by the box- at the dock in seaports as New Bedford, then tran- it to Wells River by the old days the paper had its own horses and and there used to barns next to the mrtnerships & Adams were enough to expand Papermaking business to m Bradford. Bellows and West Derby, Ver- also owned the River known as House, and the Stable connected with partnership lasted when Adams sold sent in Wells River out to Durant -- then Durant died the same year and the business was sold. (Deeds: 23- 339, 371 ) The next owners were Franklin Iarned and his son Daniel, and Franklin Deming, all of whom were also active in other local businesses. Meanwhile, Mr. Adams continued managing the mill, and he was taken in as a partner in 1887, The Learned shares were sold to Deming and Adams in 1890, and the business was then operated Under the name of the Adams Paper Company. "(Deeds: 24- 107,254) The United Opinion of Bradford reported in 1895 that the mill was at that time producing from 1400 to 1800 pounds of light and heavy manila paper per day, and was running by waterpower, besides buying over 400 cords of firewood annually from nearby farmers. The Adams Paper Company was sold in 1895 to Warren Moore; who retained the Adams name for the business. Mr. Moore was a papermaker with more than ,50 years of experience, and he made further additions to the mill. In 1897 his 48-inch paper machine and 12 employees were producing daily about 1800 pounds of tissue manila and toilet tissue, with heavy manila and white tissue as specialties. In 1901 Mr. Moore's estate sold the mill to the Crabtree family. (Deeds: 27-110, 111 ; 25-207) ( continued next week) ALMOST DIDN'T MAKE IT-- This new-born baby calf was born in Orford in sub- zero weather. Happy to say the calf is doing well. mov0 BY PAICiA BEAN \\; \\; \\; BARRE-- It's Democrats versus Republicans to see who has the most pull on Wed- nesday, Jan. 27 at the Farm Show in the Rarre Auditorium. i li .2DNitTthrough iT?weee;,:l:trM:? ha II barn on the dump road in:::o:flld::t N 00Demoerats vs.RepubHea s at Vermont Farnl Show A Democratic team cap- milking goat being prepared tained by .t. Gov. Madeline by Alice Hooper of the Ver- Kunin will compete with a mont Dairy Goat Marketing team of Republicans cap- Association. rained by Secretary of State It's expected that the i Jim Douglas for the title of winning ribbons will be Letters to the Editor milkers", when they proudly displayed in offices by enter the ring at 7 p.m. during Thursday morning. But, does Consumer's Night Festivities. anyone want the title of "best Team members will hunker milker" if the taxpayers ..... 'down at the business end of a might get the wrong idea? highly educated and in- men and women for New cow being prepared by the Following that competition, Sound invellDnent novative work forcg. That England will harm our UVM Dairy Clubtodetermine contestants will be chosen (continued from page 4) work force is increasingly region's knowledge-intensive who has the best toueh, from the audience for the or resign themselves to lower involved with computers, economy Douglas, victim of a "City Slickers Milking Con- aspirations Neither aban- precision instruments, health It is not too late for citizens newspaper article in test." A number of interesting donment nor resignation care. business management, to act. They should inform December of 1980 headlined demonstrations will be should occur in this nation or technology-based manufac- immediately their U.S. "He can't milk but hesure can featured before and after the in thisregion, turing, and research and Senator and U.S. Represen- shovel" is anxious to affirm milking during consumer's The "new" economy of development in such fields as tative of their opposition to the his standing among dairy night at the Farm Show which Connecticut, Massachusetts, biogenetics, forestry, marine devastating cuts and farmers Kunin is believed runs from Tuesday, Jan. 26 Rhode Island, Maine, New science, and agriculture. Thus restrictions now being eager to impress voters with through Thursday, Jan. 28 at Hampshire, and Vermont a reduction in the number of proposed for federal grants, her abilities to manage a the BarreAuditorium. depends for its health on a college-university-educated loans, and federally successfulteam. end MP, send end fourth 1. I  Fok.l Fndtmd am 10:00 Rev. Arthur BoOby, Smdoy Youth a.m. Fellowship Sunday evnmg. Youth Fellowship Grades 7 thro t 2. All ore welcome. NEWlNIY cFng4, u.c.c. Rev. Jot Xnggorty, SUt'Kk:W Services - 11 a.m. Church Schao110 a.m. ,m7 mbb Omzk Newbury, Yr. Roy. Joseph Rinoldl. School, 9:45 a.m. Morning Servke, 11 a.m. Evening Fellowship, 7:30 p.m. Bible Study, Wed., 7:30 p.m. nay _,,.,...... ors P - . WOOVIIH fJtU! W  St. ,lmm91s .holkCImrd St. M's  [rq] pLire Roy Edwin MIne Saturday Eve Mass 6:30 The Rev William Atkinson S ' , . . . . undayServw.e, p.m. Sandoy Masses, 8 a.m. aed 10 a.m. 10:30 a.m. HC frst, thai and fifth. Sundnys BATH II.C,. Sunday Service - 9 a.m., Sunday SChool, 9:45 11 a.m. Eye,in 0 - Prayer Meeting St. tdm's kcelml lmeck woudsville, N.H. Rev. Frances Potter, Holy Communion 1 st, 3rd and 5th Sundays - 11:00 a.m. Morning Prayer, 2nd and 4th, Sndays - 11:00 a.m. k of eke Ilmorm Rev. HyseeO, pastor. Sunday, 9:45 o.m:, Sunday school. 11 o.m., morning worship. 7 p.m., even9 wip. Wednesday, 7;15 p.m., mid-' service. Uidled Mdisf Rev. William L. Sharer, pastor. Sunday, 11 a.m., mon.ng worship; church school fur pre- school children. Tuesdays, 6,30 a.m., men's Menkft. Helen Ruthedurd is leading a Bible study group at her home on Thursdays from 9:30-I I a.m,; even/me Js welcome. Cetmq I  Albert E. Porker, poster. Sunday, 10 a.m., Sunday school. 11:00 morning worship, 7 p.m. evening servke. Wednesday, 7 p.m.. prayer meeting. Saturday, 7 p.m., young people's meeting. llr EGATE CMI Uid IhkytIdI Rev. Mion T. Redding/Sunday Worship, . 11:30 a.m. Church SChool, 9 a.m. $Olffg lUlUl mk-del Admdtut Clmk Elder tee Manning. Worsl Service. Saturday, 2:30.p.m. Rev. Lee Manning. Saturday k - Sabbath Schoal- 1 p.m. Worship Service - 2:30p m. Vermont IDFOIO u.c.c. Rev. John Knight - Sunday Services 10:45, Sunday Schoal 930 a.m. - Child Care Provided, mm Metlkdtt Ckmk Btfl, Vt. R. James Boudrec. Sunday Services 10:30 a.m. Snday Schix)l 9:15 a.m. All Ages Invited. heeedii Free Clmrd Sunday Schoul 9:45 a.m., Morning Wurshp 11:00 a.m., Mid-Wae B5te Study Thurs., 7:30 p.m. O lady d Pmi Ibb arck Brodfocd, Vt. Cather Jinxes Cannon C.s.s.. Sot, Moss,'S:15 p.m. Sun, Mass.. 9:00 am:l 11:0 a.m. comN111 aMIIB itt CIqnqlIlbll Chwd Steghon J. Palmer, pastor. Sunday School, 9,45 a.m. Morning Worship, 11. Evening Sarvice. 7. r/lk Cengregtimml Okrelk U.C.C Richard A. White Pastor, Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m. Sloy choa4 9:45 a.m., Pat Luck & Vespers Thursday. 6:00 p.m. Choir rehearsal, lhu&v 7 30 am iolml i'fllAlrl lled Pmldml Clnm Rev. Marion T. Redding. nday Wershb, I0 a.m, Church School, 9 a.m, WIL RIVtB Night Mass - 7;00 p.m. Sunday Mass, - 9:30 a.m. Service - 10:30 a.m, Child care provided. Sunday School- 9a.m. cu.c.c. Rev. Jose r.-o', Iastor. Sunday Services 10:45 a.m., Church  - 10:45 0.11t. guaranteed bank loans. Getting their Goat John C. Hay Reporters may find more President than a few one-liners to write New EnglandBoard when the teams are later of Higher Education invited to try their hands on a AMC seek/rig new members To the Editor: The Appalachian Mountain Club, the nations oldest mountaineering and con- servation organization, founded in 1876, is seeking to increase its membership. The club currently has over 23,000 members and since much of its work depends on volun- teers, it is hoped that a sub- stantial increase in numbers will occur, and thus help the club meet the challenges that lay ahead in the 80's. AMC has grown and changed over the years. However, its primary purpose and goal to protect and preserve our natural resources for all to enjoy, through sound management and public awareness, has remained constant. AMC means different things to different people. It might be whitewater canoeing, hiking, camping, or participating in an excursmn here in New England or anywhere in the world, or any of the many other activities that AMC encompasses. It affords an opportunity to enjoy outdoor experiences with people who have similar interest and desires. As volunteers, it affordsa an opportunity for hands on experience in search and rescue, trail maintenance or conservation, just to mention a few, and for those who desire, to become leaders and teachers. AMC works with local, state, and federalagencies to protect and preserve the land, rivers, and streams, for all to enjoy. Your membership also provides the club with financial assistance to carry on its work. If you are in- terested in joining, sup- porting, or you just want more information, call New Hampshire Membership Chairperson. Carolyn Coleman, Milford, N.H. 673- 6010. We Need Your Business! 603-942-8173 603-942-5581 NORTHWOOD, N.H. ['[ THE TAYLOR-PALMER AGENCY, INC. t/" ==- 29 Main Street t L( ___ :___ Bradfm'd, Vt. " '\\; Hours: 9AM-SPM /J January 27, 1982-The Journal Opinion-Page 5 WlSI' FAllU Was h, ,p. Ct., POseur, Gordon Cook, Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.: Warship Service, 10:30 a.m.; Preyer Service Im.), 7:00 p.m.; Tues. ladies IW&e Study, 10.00 a,ra.; Fellowship Night (Wed,), 7:00 p.m.  5d :'91"45 a mP-m,, Wed., rs {o.m,, Chikl Cur FARM BUREAU NEWS by HELEN UNDERHILL The American Farm Buceau Federation's annual meeting was held in San Diego, Calif., last month with a very large attendance and the usual enthusiasm and participation. Included were the Associated Women of Farm Bureau, Marilyn Campbell of Salem, N.H. being our voting delegate. The "Discussion Meet" which starts in each state with the winrmr decided at the national meeting was for the first time a woman, Pat Wulff of Minden, Iowa, where she and her husband operate a hog farm. She is active in many community area farm ac- tivities. A Vesper Service Sunday afternoon led by Reverend Paul Pulleam and the New Dawn Singers, from the First Presbyterian Church in San Diego, was inspiring. A n opportunity to enjoy the warmth and beauty of San Diego was most appreciated especially by the many who had been enveloped in the "Big Freeze" which covered a large area of our country. The annual address by A.F.B.F. President Robert Delano was the highlight of Monday's session. He began at 7:00 a.m. pleased to report that the "system" is working. It is a system built on faith and based on the spirit of volun- tary cooperation. I am speaking of the system that is America and the system that is agriculture within it. St. Augustine said "Faith is to believe what you do not yet see -- The reward for this faith is to see what you believe." Through the strength of their faith in this country and .in the Farm Bureau, farm and ranch families are creating a desirable future for them- selves and for America. Delano later said "Contrary Delano touched on several problems which face agriculture along with other tarsesses. "We must not relax our efforts to carry out the policies we have adopted. Courage, patience, initiative, personal commitment will be the keys to Farm Bureau's role in making our country strong again." Robert Delano was re- VERMONT STATE towhatyou may hear, the vast elected F.B.F. President and majority of Americans are Elton Smith, of Illinois is the aware and appreciative of the new Vice President. freedoms they enjoy and Walter Huddles(on, United liberty most often is listed at a State Senator of Kentucky and source of their national ranking member, Senate price." Agricultural Commission and He also stated that the Farm James Watt, U.S. Secretary of Bureau is strongly in favor of Interior were also featured government regulatory speakers, as well as members reforms, tle said that between of A.F.B.F. directors. 1970 and 1979 expenditures of At the Awards Program, major regulatory agencies Tennessee Ernie Ford, and quadrupled. In 1979, the listing another session members of of federal regulations the Laurence Welk Show. required 77,000 printed pages, Some of the enjoyable events increasing to 87,000 pages in were a "ttarbor Cruise", tour 1980. After one year with of the "Old Town" with it's emphasis on regulatory historic sites and Spanish reform, the number of pages influence, a trip to San Diego's of listings has dropped from Zoo and a tour of the Imperial 90,000 to 60,000; a full one Valley and Universalstudios. third. "This is progress in Errol Peters, New Ham- which Farm Bureau has had pshire State Farm Bureau an active role. President and I were the only "This voluntary Grafton County members cooperative, basic to Farm attending. Bureau resulted this past year As usual, one of the ira- in the 21st consecutive quota portarfl aspects of this busting F.B. membership and meeting was the meeting of a gain of more than 93,000 new fellow members and member families. Mere- agricultural leader's from all bership now totals 3,158,694," parts of the country. Each ore said Delan0. returns home with new ideas and understandings, new goals and pride in the Farm Bureau organization. POLICE REPORT '1 (continued from page 3) in Vershire at approximately estimated $30) but that the 10:30a.m. car, a 1978 Chevrolet driven by Police say the driver of the a 68-year old Thetford Center vehicle, a 42-year old Vershire man, received approximately (please turn to page 6) DIAMONDS. WATCHES- We Repa,r ACCUTFION. TIMEX and A;I Makes. HASKELL JEWELERS Littleton, NH 03561 [80.3) 4,44-3351 $1000 in front end damage resulting from the incident. The bus was being operated by a 67-year old W. Fairlee man. Police described weather conditions at the time of the accident as cloudy but said that road conditions were "clear." No injuries were reported in the incident. Accident WELLS RIVER-- Two vehicles collided under the railroad bridge on Route 302 in Wells River on Thursday, Jan. 14 at approximately 12:00 a.m. Police say that a 197 Chevrolet Blazer operated by a 26-year old Fraohia, N.H., man slid coming into the underpass and collided with a 1973 Chevrolet pickup driven by 31-year old Groton, Vt, man. No injuries were reported in the incident. Police said it was snowing at the time of the accident and described road conditions at the time as "snow-covered." Accident VERSHIRE-- A 1977 Scout flipped over into a stream after sliding off the left side of Route 113 on Sunday, Jan. 10 Does trh00. Evangelical Free Church practice baptism? Yes, both baptism and the Lord's Supper are observed regularly at: erodford lvaneelk00 Free  m'hi I) er ire I I :Ira ItOLTE 5 Sulniay School S:4b I,t 'F:I{ PI,A! N Bill ,ick. M, Die.. Pastor ( 811: ) 222-N121 Article 7 of our statement of faith declares: "That water baptism and the Lord's Supper are or- dinances to be observed by the Church durin the present age. They are. however, not to be regrd- .1 ed as means of salvatin''' ._ 30 Washers 24 Dryers WARM - CLEAN Shower Facility Available LAUNDROMAT * LOUNGE AREA CLEAN RESTROOM SINK FACILITY ENJOY SOOTHING MUSIC WHILE YOU WASH[ Located Next To Tuck Press On Street Between Woodsville Banks t i ! I ltwentwe pr(00rmns )RI AGRICULTURAL LAND PROTECTION Protection, has been prepared by UVM Extension Service Community and Rural Development Specialists to increase their knowledge about agricultural land retention techfiques. Edited for publication by Lois M. Frey, RC&D Programs for districts is usually specified in geared state enabling legislation to financial or other assure a critical mass to farmland owners necessary to support cam- will keep them actively mercial agriculture. Districts and managing their are created for fixed but renewable terms ranging examples of Incentive from four to 10 years. The include Death Tax condition which agricultural fits; Agricultural districts impose frequently Right to Farm include: (11 farmers may and Purchase of receive use-value appraisal of Lghts. farmland; (21 except for years ago, health or safety reasons, local Vermont farms regulations may not restrict subject to estate taxes, farm practices or structures; the decade, in- (3) state agency policies must farm values encourage agriculture in the even moderate-sized district; (4) alternate sites fairly large must be considered before estates. Both eminent domain is used; (5) and state laws have community facilities are periodically to restricted to prevent un- - signifieate Death Tax necessary development in to farm heirs, districts; (6) farmers are on the various protected from special and gift tax laws, assessments which do not farm tax rules and directly benefit farms in the planning is available district; (7) protection from the UVM Extension nuisance suits for normal agricultural practices is af- method to forded. farmland, used in at These nuisance suits have a half-dozen states, is themselves resulted in Districting. This another type of farmland am permits farmers to protection technique known as form a district, Right-to-Farm i.aws. about certain. Eighteen states, including and expectations Vermont, have adopted I neighboring landowners, statues to protect farmers inimum area for such from lawsuits against nor- mall)' accepted, reasonable farm practices. This legislation may also afford some protection against local government regulation of farming practices. Finally, the incentive program which provides the greatest financial benefit to farmland owners is known as the Purchase of Development Rights. Under this concept the landowner retains ownership and the "right to continue the farming operation, but relinquishes the right to develop the land. A typical program would be the outright purchase of development rights on a one-time basis by a government body. The price paid for development rights reflects the difference bet- ween the development market value and the farm market value. Logically, land designated for this program should be established agricultural areas, under pressure for non-farm development. The sale of rights would be voluntary or through options to the pur- chasing agency whenever the land is placed on the sales market. For more information about farmland retention programs in Vermont, contact your County Extension Service office. ontinued from page 4) -', urant & Adams worked - _meir own naper'groduein sins k- ,- g buenOS.s, /tnd by 1860 were ered[Ucing 150 tons of Manilla lofr a year, with 12 em- L _jees, 3,of them women. !ne -[wding to an official renort e state on Products of ae Ostry in Newbur " eo mont His!orical Sociy) " ?$vg year s time the mill se i 250 tons of rope and re4 i ,,,, , ng, 40 tons of lime, and 'thOrds of wood (probably 'ly for the dryer). '';3hceed a:a:fli g:r:eeaP i roi. from sailing buying it by the box- at the dock in seaports as New Bedford, then tran- it to Wells River by the old days the paper had its own horses and and there used to barns next to the mrtnerships & Adams were enough to expand Papermaking business to m Bradford. Bellows and West Derby, Ver- also owned the River known as House, and the Stable connected with partnership lasted when Adams sold sent in Wells River out to Durant -- then Durant died the same year and the business was sold. (Deeds: 23- 339, 371 ) The next owners were Franklin Iarned and his son Daniel, and Franklin Deming, all of whom were also active in other local businesses. Meanwhile, Mr. Adams continued managing the mill, and he was taken in as a partner in 1887, The Learned shares were sold to Deming and Adams in 1890, and the business was then operated Under the name of the Adams Paper Company. "(Deeds: 24- 107,254) The United Opinion of Bradford reported in 1895 that the mill was at that time producing from 1400 to 1800 pounds of light and heavy manila paper per day, and was running by waterpower, besides buying over 400 cords of firewood annually from nearby farmers. The Adams Paper Company was sold in 1895 to Warren Moore; who retained the Adams name for the business. Mr. Moore was a papermaker with more than ,50 years of experience, and he made further additions to the mill. In 1897 his 48-inch paper machine and 12 employees were producing daily about 1800 pounds of tissue manila and toilet tissue, with heavy manila and white tissue as specialties. In 1901 Mr. Moore's estate sold the mill to the Crabtree family. (Deeds: 27-110, 111 ; 25-207) ( continued next week) ALMOST DIDN'T MAKE IT-- This new-born baby calf was born in Orford in sub- zero weather. Happy to say the calf is doing well. mov0 BY PAICiA BEAN \\; \\; \\; BARRE-- It's Democrats versus Republicans to see who has the most pull on Wed- nesday, Jan. 27 at the Farm Show in the Rarre Auditorium. i li .2DNitTthrough iT?weee;,:l:trM:? ha II barn on the dump road in:::o:flld::t N 00Demoerats vs.RepubHea s at Vermont Farnl Show A Democratic team cap- milking goat being prepared tained by .t. Gov. Madeline by Alice Hooper of the Ver- Kunin will compete with a mont Dairy Goat Marketing team of Republicans cap- Association. rained by Secretary of State It's expected that the i Jim Douglas for the title of winning ribbons will be Letters to the Editor milkers", when they proudly displayed in offices by enter the ring at 7 p.m. during Thursday morning. But, does Consumer's Night Festivities. anyone want the title of "best Team members will hunker milker" if the taxpayers ..... 'down at the business end of a might get the wrong idea? highly educated and in- men and women for New cow being prepared by the Following that competition, Sound invellDnent novative work forcg. That England will harm our UVM Dairy Clubtodetermine contestants will be chosen (continued from page 4) work force is increasingly region's knowledge-intensive who has the best toueh, from the audience for the or resign themselves to lower involved with computers, economy Douglas, victim of a "City Slickers Milking Con- aspirations Neither aban- precision instruments, health It is not too late for citizens newspaper article in test." A number of interesting donment nor resignation care. business management, to act. They should inform December of 1980 headlined demonstrations will be should occur in this nation or technology-based manufac- immediately their U.S. "He can't milk but hesure can featured before and after the in thisregion, turing, and research and Senator and U.S. Represen- shovel" is anxious to affirm milking during consumer's The "new" economy of development in such fields as tative of their opposition to the his standing among dairy night at the Farm Show which Connecticut, Massachusetts, biogenetics, forestry, marine devastating cuts and farmers Kunin is believed runs from Tuesday, Jan. 26 Rhode Island, Maine, New science, and agriculture. Thus restrictions now being eager to impress voters with through Thursday, Jan. 28 at Hampshire, and Vermont a reduction in the number of proposed for federal grants, her abilities to manage a the BarreAuditorium. depends for its health on a college-university-educated loans, and federally successfulteam. end MP, send end fourth 1. I  Fok.l Fndtmd am 10:00 Rev. Arthur BoOby, Smdoy Youth a.m. Fellowship Sunday evnmg. Youth Fellowship Grades 7 thro t 2. All ore welcome. NEWlNIY cFng4, u.c.c. Rev. Jot Xnggorty, SUt'Kk:W Services - 11 a.m. Church Schao110 a.m. ,m7 mbb Omzk Newbury, Yr. Roy. Joseph Rinoldl. School, 9:45 a.m. Morning Servke, 11 a.m. Evening Fellowship, 7:30 p.m. Bible Study, Wed., 7:30 p.m. nay _,,.,...... ors P - . WOOVIIH fJtU! W  St. ,lmm91s .holkCImrd St. M's  [rq] pLire Roy Edwin MIne Saturday Eve Mass 6:30 The Rev William Atkinson S ' , . . . . undayServw.e, p.m. Sandoy Masses, 8 a.m. aed 10 a.m. 10:30 a.m. HC frst, thai and fifth. Sundnys BATH II.C,. Sunday Service - 9 a.m., Sunday SChool, 9:45 11 a.m. Eye,in 0 - Prayer Meeting St. tdm's kcelml lmeck woudsville, N.H. Rev. Frances Potter, Holy Communion 1 st, 3rd and 5th Sundays - 11:00 a.m. Morning Prayer, 2nd and 4th, Sndays - 11:00 a.m. k of eke Ilmorm Rev. HyseeO, pastor. Sunday, 9:45 o.m:, Sunday school. 11 o.m., morning worship. 7 p.m., even9 wip. Wednesday, 7;15 p.m., mid-' service. Uidled Mdisf Rev. William L. Sharer, pastor. Sunday, 11 a.m., mon.ng worship; church school fur pre- school children. Tuesdays, 6,30 a.m., men's Menkft. Helen Ruthedurd is leading a Bible study group at her home on Thursdays from 9:30-I I a.m,; even/me Js welcome. Cetmq I  Albert E. Porker, poster. Sunday, 10 a.m., Sunday school. 11:00 morning worship, 7 p.m. evening servke. Wednesday, 7 p.m.. prayer meeting. Saturday, 7 p.m., young people's meeting. llr EGATE CMI Uid IhkytIdI Rev. Mion T. Redding/Sunday Worship, . 11:30 a.m. Church SChool, 9 a.m. $Olffg lUlUl mk-del Admdtut Clmk Elder tee Manning. Worsl Service. Saturday, 2:30.p.m. Rev. Lee Manning. Saturday k - Sabbath Schoal- 1 p.m. Worship Service - 2:30p m. Vermont IDFOIO u.c.c. Rev. John Knight - Sunday Services 10:45, Sunday Schoal 930 a.m. - Child Care Provided, mm Metlkdtt Ckmk Btfl, Vt. R. James Boudrec. Sunday Services 10:30 a.m. Snday Schix)l 9:15 a.m. All Ages Invited. heeedii Free Clmrd Sunday Schoul 9:45 a.m., Morning Wurshp 11:00 a.m., Mid-Wae B5te Study Thurs., 7:30 p.m. O lady d Pmi Ibb arck Brodfocd, Vt. Cather Jinxes Cannon C.s.s.. Sot, Moss,'S:15 p.m. Sun, Mass.. 9:00 am:l 11:0 a.m. comN111 aMIIB itt CIqnqlIlbll Chwd Steghon J. Palmer, pastor. Sunday School, 9,45 a.m. Morning Worship, 11. Evening Sarvice. 7. r/lk Cengregtimml Okrelk U.C.C Richard A. White Pastor, Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m. Sloy choa4 9:45 a.m., Pat Luck & Vespers Thursday. 6:00 p.m. Choir rehearsal, lhu&v 7 30 am iolml i'fllAlrl lled Pmldml Clnm Rev. Marion T. Redding. nday Wershb, I0 a.m, Church School, 9 a.m, WIL RIVtB Night Mass - 7;00 p.m. Sunday Mass, - 9:30 a.m. Service - 10:30 a.m, Child care provided. Sunday School- 9a.m. cu.c.c. Rev. Jose r.-o', Iastor. Sunday Services 10:45 a.m., Church  - 10:45 0.11t. guaranteed bank loans. Getting their Goat John C. Hay Reporters may find more President than a few one-liners to write New EnglandBoard when the teams are later of Higher Education invited to try their hands on a AMC seek/rig new members To the Editor: The Appalachian Mountain Club, the nations oldest mountaineering and con- servation organization, founded in 1876, is seeking to increase its membership. The club currently has over 23,000 members and since much of its work depends on volun- teers, it is hoped that a sub- stantial increase in numbers will occur, and thus help the club meet the challenges that lay ahead in the 80's. AMC has grown and changed over the years. However, its primary purpose and goal to protect and preserve our natural resources for all to enjoy, through sound management and public awareness, has remained constant. AMC means different things to different people. It might be whitewater canoeing, hiking, camping, or participating in an excursmn here in New England or anywhere in the world, or any of the many other activities that AMC encompasses. It affords an opportunity to enjoy outdoor experiences with people who have similar interest and desires. As volunteers, it affordsa an opportunity for hands on experience in search and rescue, trail maintenance or conservation, just to mention a few, and for those who desire, to become leaders and teachers. AMC works with local, state, and federalagencies to protect and preserve the land, rivers, and streams, for all to enjoy. Your membership also provides the club with financial assistance to carry on its work. If you are in- terested in joining, sup- porting, or you just want more information, call New Hampshire Membership Chairperson. Carolyn Coleman, Milford, N.H. 673- 6010. We Need Your Business! 603-942-8173 603-942-5581 NORTHWOOD, N.H. ['[ THE TAYLOR-PALMER AGENCY, INC. t/" ==- 29 Main Street t L( ___ :___ Bradfm'd, Vt. " '\\; Hours: 9AM-SPM /J January 27, 1982-The Journal Opinion-Page 5 WlSI' FAllU Was h, ,p. Ct., POseur, Gordon Cook, Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.: Warship Service, 10:30 a.m.; Preyer Service Im.), 7:00 p.m.; Tues. ladies IW&e Study, 10.00 a,ra.; Fellowship Night (Wed,), 7:00 p.m.  5d :'91"45 a mP-m,, Wed., rs {o.m,, Chikl Cur FARM BUREAU NEWS by HELEN UNDERHILL The American Farm Buceau Federation's annual meeting was held in San Diego, Calif., last month with a very large attendance and the usual enthusiasm and participation. Included were the Associated Women of Farm Bureau, Marilyn Campbell of Salem, N.H. being our voting delegate. The "Discussion Meet" which starts in each state with the winrmr decided at the national meeting was for the first time a woman, Pat Wulff of Minden, Iowa, where she and her husband operate a hog farm. She is active in many community area farm ac- tivities. A Vesper Service Sunday afternoon led by Reverend Paul Pulleam and the New Dawn Singers, from the First Presbyterian Church in San Diego, was inspiring. A n opportunity to enjoy the warmth and beauty of San Diego was most appreciated especially by the many who had been enveloped in the "Big Freeze" which covered a large area of our country. The annual address by A.F.B.F. President Robert Delano was the highlight of Monday's session. He began at 7:00 a.m. pleased to report that the "system" is working. It is a system built on faith and based on the spirit of volun- tary cooperation. I am speaking of the system that is America and the system that is agriculture within it. St. Augustine said "Faith is to believe what you do not yet see -- The reward for this faith is to see what you believe." Through the strength of their faith in this country and .in the Farm Bureau, farm and ranch families are creating a desirable future for them- selves and for America. Delano later said "Contrary Delano touched on several problems which face agriculture along with other tarsesses. "We must not relax our efforts to carry out the policies we have adopted. Courage, patience, initiative, personal commitment will be the keys to Farm Bureau's role in making our country strong again." Robert Delano was re- VERMONT STATE towhatyou may hear, the vast elected F.B.F. President and majority of Americans are Elton Smith, of Illinois is the aware and appreciative of the new Vice President. freedoms they enjoy and Walter Huddles(on, United liberty most often is listed at a State Senator of Kentucky and source of their national ranking member, Senate price." Agricultural Commission and He also stated that the Farm James Watt, U.S. Secretary of Bureau is strongly in favor of Interior were also featured government regulatory speakers, as well as members reforms, tle said that between of A.F.B.F. directors. 1970 and 1979 expenditures of At the Awards Program, major regulatory agencies Tennessee Ernie Ford, and quadrupled. In 1979, the listing another session members of of federal regulations the Laurence Welk Show. required 77,000 printed pages, Some of the enjoyable events increasing to 87,000 pages in were a "ttarbor Cruise", tour 1980. After one year with of the "Old Town" with it's emphasis on regulatory historic sites and Spanish reform, the number of pages influence, a trip to San Diego's of listings has dropped from Zoo and a tour of the Imperial 90,000 to 60,000; a full one Valley and Universalstudios. third. "This is progress in Errol Peters, New Ham- which Farm Bureau has had pshire State Farm Bureau an active role. President and I were the only "This voluntary Grafton County members cooperative, basic to Farm attending. Bureau resulted this past year As usual, one of the ira- in the 21st consecutive quota portarfl aspects of this busting F.B. membership and meeting was the meeting of a gain of more than 93,000 new fellow members and member families. Mere- agricultural leader's from all bership now totals 3,158,694," parts of the country. Each ore said Delan0. returns home with new ideas and understandings, new goals and pride in the Farm Bureau organization. POLICE REPORT '1 (continued from page 3) in Vershire at approximately estimated $30) but that the 10:30a.m. car, a 1978 Chevrolet driven by Police say the driver of the a 68-year old Thetford Center vehicle, a 42-year old Vershire man, received approximately (please turn to page 6) DIAMONDS. WATCHES- We Repa,r ACCUTFION. TIMEX and A;I Makes. HASKELL JEWELERS Littleton, NH 03561 [80.3) 4,44-3351 $1000 in front end damage resulting from the incident. The bus was being operated by a 67-year old W. Fairlee man. Police described weather conditions at the time of the accident as cloudy but said that road conditions were "clear." No injuries were reported in the incident. Accident WELLS RIVER-- Two vehicles collided under the railroad bridge on Route 302 in Wells River on Thursday, Jan. 14 at approximately 12:00 a.m. Police say that a 197 Chevrolet Blazer operated by a 26-year old Fraohia, N.H., man slid coming into the underpass and collided with a 1973 Chevrolet pickup driven by 31-year old Groton, Vt, man. No injuries were reported in the incident. Police said it was snowing at the time of the accident and described road conditions at the time as "snow-covered." Accident VERSHIRE-- A 1977 Scout flipped over into a stream after sliding off the left side of Route 113 on Sunday, Jan. 10 Does trh00. Evangelical Free Church practice baptism? Yes, both baptism and the Lord's Supper are observed regularly at: erodford lvaneelk00 Free  m'hi I) er ire I I :Ira ItOLTE 5 Sulniay School S:4b I,t 'F:I{ PI,A! N Bill ,ick. M, Die.. Pastor ( 811: ) 222-N121 Article 7 of our statement of faith declares: "That water baptism and the Lord's Supper are or- dinances to be observed by the Church durin the present age. They are. however, not to be regrd- .1 ed as means of salvatin''' ._ 30 Washers 24 Dryers WARM - CLEAN Shower Facility Available LAUNDROMAT * LOUNGE AREA CLEAN RESTROOM SINK FACILITY ENJOY SOOTHING MUSIC WHILE YOU WASH[ Located Next To Tuck Press On Street Between Woodsville Banks