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January 27, 1982     Journal Opinion
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January 27, 1982-The Journal Opinion-Page 7 i i I Obituaries Bean had been mechanic 40 years Harold E. Vt.; Bonnie Jo Bean and of Bradford died Marsha Bean both of morning Jan. 23, Claremont, N.H.; two sisters Mrs. Harold {Nera) Hun- LsborninOrford, N.H., tington of Orford, and Mrs. 1911 the son of Edwin Kenneth (Ruth) Elder of (Marsh) Bean. Lyme Center, N.H.; one iOrford, brother George Bean of was an automobile Manchester and Lyme, N.H., all his life and was a many nieces, nephews, aunts of several cer- and uncles. He was a member recognition for his of the United Church of Christ m the field by the in Bradford and a former Corporation. member of the Friendship employed by the club. Company, Private funeral services 44 years were held Tuesday, Jan. 26 at years ago was the Hale Funeral Home in the 40 year cer- Bradford with the Rev. John by General Knight officiating. Entombment will take place 8, 1936 in Lyme, in the Sawyer Tomb pending .married Anita Huse spring burial and committal services in the family lot, also survived by one Sawyer Cemetery, Bradford Mrs. Evelyn in the spring. and one son-in-law Donations in his memory both of may be made to the Hospice of Vt.; one son the Upper Valley, in care of and a daughter- Gerry Bradley, River Road, Karen Bean of Piermont, N.H, 03779. The N.H.; four Hale Funeral Home of Debbie Bradford was in charge of 0f Houston, Tex., arrangements. of Lyndonville, Puglisi was active community Robert P. Puglisi, Puglisi four sisters, Miss St., died suddenly Juh"a Puglisi, Mrs. Margaret Jan&gt;17, at Falkowski, Mrs. Jenny P. in Lisbon Feb. the son of Joseph and ) truglisi, and had his life. Mr. an agent for the nee Co. He member of St. Parish and a past of the ;bon Lions ember of the Lisbon a Legion and a veteran of Force. of the family wife, Mrs. Mildred a daughter, Mrs. Tuite; two brothers, Puglisi and. John Previte, and Mrs. Eleanor Previte, and one grandson. The ,funeral was held Wednesday, Jan. 20, at St. Catherine's Catholic Church in Lisbon with Rev. Norman J. Simoneau officiating and assisted by Rev. Susan HOf- fman. Burial will be in Grove Hill Cemetery, Lisbon, at a later date. Bearers were Warren Wetherbee, Fred Winslow, William Clark, Phil Weymouth, Dick Willey. and Warren Wetherbee. In lien of flowers, memorial contributions may he made to the Lisbon FAST Squad. Baldwin, 81, was school principal -- Jessie A. , 81, died Monday, it her home in Quincy, born June 10, 19Ol in the daughter of Jennie (South- Baldwin. She from Turner Falls and from the Normal School University. a teacher in the Boston or several years, to her home in Post She was e member of the Society of Pest the Lake Fairlee Club,. a trustee of Historical member of the Byron Avery = dies at 92 THETFORD CENTER -- ..... ]. i ...... ......... Byron Avery, 92, died Jan. 3 at the Hanover Healthcare Center. He was the son of Charles and Lizzie (Roberts) Avery. Mr. Avery was the last of 10 brothers and lived in S. Stratford and Norwich most of his life. He was a veteran of World War I, and was a carpenter and gardener. The William Godfrey Funeral Home was in charge of arrangements. Walter Cooley had lived in Fairlee FAIRLEE-- Walter Douglas Cooley, 70, died Jan. 12 at Matin Memorial Hospital in Stuart, FI. He was a native of Mount Vernon, N.Y., and came to Florida from Fairlee 16 years ago He was a graduate of Colgate University in 1933, and was a retired real estate dealer and member 'of the Methodist church. He is survived by his wife, Harriet Cooley; a daughter, Margaret Barnard of Christian Springs, N.Y.; a son, John Cooley of Lake Hohegan, N.Y., and five grandchildren. There was a memorial service Jan. 15 in Port St. Lucie, FI. IV. Faidee (continued from page 6) wishes for a Happy Birthday. The fun makers were Darlene, Sue Coombs, Bey Dexter, Charlene Bourgeois and Pare, with their children. The candles on the cake required a second lighting as Jonathon, the ministers' four-year old, got in his "blows", first ! Jack and Ruth Jackson accompanied by Ruby Ricker and Esther Hill attended the turkey dinner of the Thetford Friends Together on Wed- nesday. This was held at the Thefford Hill Churl[h. Several people brought old bells and explained the significance or story of each bell. How in- teresting it is when friends bring back bits of memories and past history. Peabody Library and president for 35 years of the 1Ventworth (continued from page 6) EMT course under Seth Warner of Groton. Bingo -- every Monday night except if there has been a Warren school cancellation. Wanted: bingo callers, at least 18 years old with a strong voice. A town meeting supper is planned. , Cemetery Association. She was writing a book on the history of Thetford at the time of her death. She is survived by her cousins, Haven Southworth of Barre, Gertrude Barber of Lebanon, N.H., Gordon South- worth of Ely, Corrie Gibeau of W. Fairlee and Edna Corn- stock of W. Fairlee. Memorial services and burial will he in Post Mills in the spring. In lien of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Thetford Historical Society. The Godfrey Funeral Home of Ely is in charge of arrangements. Wamboldt, 62, a former nurse MILLS-- Aletha wit and sense of humor. Wamboldt, 62, Jan. 191 at the Memorial illness. April 6, 1919 in daughter of rl Camilla (Pripp) She was at Middlebury High nd the Montpelier She graduated Hanover School of 1967, and she was a nurse in care unit for was an avid reader of the board of at the Peabody Mills. She was community affairs of the Post Church, She was kno ..... )ge ,Wll lor her She is survived by her husband Robert of Post Mills; two sons, Dale Tatro of White' River Junction, Stanley Tatro of St. Johnsbury; a daughter, Camilla Cook of White River Junction; several grand- children and great- grandchildren; two sisters, Rose Southworth of W. Fairlee and Barbara Southworth of Post Mills. Memorial services' were on Sunday afternoon at 2 in the Post Mills Church. The Rev. Charles Pigott officiated. In lien of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the Peabody Library, in care of Arthur Shopp, treasurer, Post Mills, Vt., 05058. The Godfrey Funeral Home in Ely was in charge of arrangements. Lisbon Hii/ah Bedard 838-6725 AVSCC Has Chinese Auction There were 29 Ammonoosuc Valley Seniors who met on the stage of the Lisbon Town Hall on Jan. 20. Each came with a contribution for the Chinese auction, much of it food, and the club netted a neat sum from the activity. There was also another difference, this in refresh, ments, as each brought his own "food", with the club furnishing tea and coffee. The few who came unprepared didn't suffer too much, as several kind ladies baked something extra. Margaret Baker offered "The Dieter's Creed" -- with the 23rd Psalm as a basis. Dorothy Wetherbee read of the courage of a. young paralyzed girl. Mr. Mad]the Haynes promised the Secretary that she would visit us as soon as possible, bringing Raymond when he is able. Madeline had telephoned about the Melvin Haynes having their 68th Wedding Anniversary on Jan. 21. Door Prizes Before the Chinese auction, the following won door prizes: H. Bedard, M Baker, C. Hodge, M. Marcoux, M. Lytte, Waternlan after brief illness k|RLEE Michael died at his 19 after a n. 21, 1944 in )W. and was era- L. Paige, and M. Hunt. Seven ladies -- those helping at the free.Blool Pressure Clinics Anderson of Connecticut; a also v0on something: An in- brother, Roy of Connecticut. vitation to one of the catered Funeral services were held birthday luncheons, each one last week in the W. Fairlee to choose her own time -- so Congregational Church. The the Seniors could show ap- Rev. Gordon Cook officiated, preciation. Next week, Jan. 27, Game Day will be held, with prizes needed. Laura Paige will be in charge of the lunch. Feb. 3, the free Blood Pressure Clinic will be ten to twelve; and the catered Birthday Luncheon will be at 12:30. The most unusual Valentines will be displayed Feb. I0, and a possibility of an exchange box lunch. COMMUNITY HEALTH SERVICES THETFORD-- There will be a of Community Health Services survived bv hi .... ;^ Inc., Town Nurse at the ...... , Thetford Hill Church on w. Falrlee; two sons, Wednesday, Jan. 27 from 2:00 Jason and two to 4:00 p.m. The nurse will be all checking for glaucoma, his father of hypertension and weight ; a sister, Lee problems. ! , ,<, ORFORD. BASKETBALl,-- Action at the Orford gym against Linwood. Orford girls won by a score of 76 to 13. The boys won their game against LinwGl, 69-58. Oxbow sinks Chelsea 62-54; beats up on Randolph 59-24 BRADFORD-- A two season, 21 game Chelsea winning streak came to a screeching halt at Oxbow last Friday night as the Olympian girls' basketball team downed the Chelsea Red Devils 62-54 in a game that was not as close as the score indicated. Oxbow, now 8-5 for the season, added Chelsea to the teams they have spoiled perfect seasons. Last week it was Nortlgield falling to their first loss playing at Oxbow. Perhaps it was a case of 'the devil made me do it' in the win against Chelsea. Whatever it was it worked for Mona Garone's team. They played close to their potential for the first time since the opening season win against St. Johnsbury: The ta played OFFENSE-- Janine Teeter starting a play against Chelsea last Friday. Oxbow stopped Chelsea's win- ning skein at 21. with a cohesiveness that is never catch up. Sharp not let them in the front door. expected of the Oxbow team shooting by Kathy Peterson (8 Although being outscored by this year, but up to now, points in the first quarter) one, 19-18, the Olympiansheld seldom seen. helped put Oxbow in front 15- a comfortable 50-40 lead going Leading the Oxbow charge 11. The defensive duo of into the final quarter. was Karin Dwyer with 21 Dwyer and Pratt denied the Chelsea, try as they might, points but she had a strong ball to Fitzgerald, holding her could get no closer than eight supporting cast. Kathy to but four points: points, going down to their Peterson had a hot first Garone had the team run, first defeaL 62-54. Oxbow Sinks Randolph Last Monday, Oxbow continued their domination over league teams by demolishing Randolph 59-24. Trying to get her team out from the doldrums, coach perhaps her strongest overall prcscribed by Garone to help Garone started Dwyer, Angle game, and scored six points, upend unbeaten Chelsea. Dobbins, Janine Teeter, Chelsea, showing the effects In the third period Chelsea Kathy Peterson and Doreen of three games in four nights, showed some signs of making Smith. The quintet responded fell behind early and could a game of it, but Oxbow would well, going out to a first ........... quarter bulge of 11-3 and then building an insurmountable quarter, ending up with 14 ning in the second quarter points. Angle Dobbins added building up an eleven point, 32- 10 with another strong game, 21 halftime lead. Dwyer hit for followed by 'Mat' Dobbins nine points in the stanza, while with six. Jody Pratt, fronting holding Fitzgerald to only 2 for the defense against high 7 field goals. Both teams were scoring Red Devil center tired at the end of the half Karcn Fitzgerald, played from the running game ,00lh Thoughts on the 27-8 halftime lead. Bytheend of the third quarter, Oxbow of Doors led47tO14. m m With the whole team seeing action, Dwyer led the scoring parade with 18 points, by Gary W. Moor followed by Kathy Peterson with nine. Doreen Smith and Janine Teeter added six each, TWIN STATE MEETING VALUABLE Martha and Angle Dobbius, The Vermont Fish and Game Board and the New Hamp- Heidi Osgood and Jody shire Fish and Game Commission held a joint meeting in Pratt--four apiece. Susy West Lebanon, N.H. Wednesday. Everyone present was Pierson and Becky Ledwith enthusiastic and expressed the desire to meet again, rounded out the scoring with a The discussion was free-wheeling with both sides asking field goal each. ' questions in an attempt to learn how things are done in the Oxbow now has an 18 game other state. We found that we had a great deal in common, winning steak in league Beth sides left the meeting with new ideas and a feeling playing, stretching over the that the meeting had been mot valuable. Prior to the joint meeting the Vermont Board held its parts ofthreeseasons. regular monthly meeting. The spring turkey season was expanded as biologist Jeff Wallin had requested. The open zone will be increased to Interstate 89 from the Connecticut River to Interstate 189 in South Burlington. The season will open on Saturday, May 8 and run through May 31. This is an increase from sixteen to twenty-four days, The season was set for this year 6ply as the board was not ready to take Wallin's advice and start the season on any day but Saturday at this time. Wallin spoke of turkey releases in Grand Isle County and his plans to have turkey hunting all the way to the Canadian border along the Champlain valley soon. The Board spent considerable time discussing the proposed ban on the use of transmitters on bear dogs. Most of the members spoke in favor of retaining the collars and ad- dressing the question of commercialism in some other way. The prevailing attitude was that the good sportsmen should not be penalized for the actions of a very few.- After hearing from biologist James DiStefano the Board chose not to extend the fox hunting season. In other action the Board heard from biologist Angelo lncerpi who told of the progress on the fish ladders and the return of shad and salmon to the Connecticut. WARDEN OF THE YEAR Stuart Archambault of Londonderry has been named "Warden of the Year" for 1981. Warden Archambault was selected by the Fish and Game Department to receive the Shikar Safari Club International's "Warden of the Year' award for Vermont. The club is based in Skokie, Illinois and honors outstanding people in the outdoors field. The award includes a pewter plaque, a par -r chment citation and a contribution to the "Survivor Fund" for the widows and orphans of wardens killed in the line of duty. Archambault has been a warden for 15 years and has won wide respect for his dedication and ability. DERBY TIME The first two weekends in February will see anglers in Vermont and New Hampshire try for thousands of dollars in prize money. Saturday and Sunday, February 6 and 7, the Third Annual Great Winnipesaukee Fishing Derby will be held. The event is sponsored by the Meredith Rotary Club and is headquartered at Meredith, N.H. The ice fishermen will compete for $25,000 in prize money. For tickets and more information write The Great Win- nipesaukee Fishing Derby, P:O. Box 1210, Meredith, New Hampshire 03253. The following weekend, February 13 and 14 the big event will be held on Lake Champlain. This year the Great Benson Fishing Derby will offer 0,000 in prize money. For further details write Derby Headquarters, Box 131, Bomoseen, Vermont 05732 or call 302-468-5673. N Haverhill Katharine Blaisdell ' 787-6315 Town Topics Ed and Kay Blaisdell spent several days in Ithaca, N.Y., last week attending the Annual Conference of the New York State Veterinary College at Cornell University. While Rolarv's Junior High there they participated in their class's13th reunion. Tournament dates set Recent patients at Cottage Hospital include Florence WELLS RIVER-- The Haverhill. Clough, James Mclntyre and Woodsville-Wells River The schools participating on KennethBlaisdell. Rotary Club is sponsoring its Feb. 5 and 6 will be: Fairlee, This weekend, everybody 15th annual Junior High Barnet, Monroe and Water- has been busy digging Basketball Tournament on ford. themselves out of snowdrifts. Jan. 29 and 30, and Feb. 5 and The first game on each 6, at Blue Mountain Union eveningwillstartat5:00p.m. QUOTES School. Rev. William Sbafer and "All doors are open to The schoolsparticipatingon Louis Giroux are the co- courtesy." Jan. 29 and 30 will be: Blue chairmen of the tournament. Thomas Fuller Mountain. Oxbow. Lisbon and HONOR STUDENT AT VTC S. NEWBURY A spokesman for the Vermont Technical College in Randolph has an- nounced that Robin J. Roystan of S. Newbury has received honors for academic achievement at the college during the fall semester of 1981. Oxbow trips up Woodsville, rematch of local rivalry WOODSVILLE-- The Olympians of Oxbow took a giant step in their quest for post-season play by besting the Woodsville Engineers, 66- 60 at the Community Building. The win, the first in two and a half years against Woodsville, left Oxbow one victory short of the playdowns, r Woodsville started out strong, jumping out to a quick 10-2 lead, implementing a full court press in their saltbox gymnasium. The twosome of Magoon and Mellin hit for five quick points each leading the charge of the Engineers. The only bright spot in the first three minutes for Oxbow was Charlie Grant's two pointer, knotting the score at 2-2. With half of the first quarter gone, Oxbow started to solve the press and chipped away at the lead., Ron Huntington, Dave Stever and high scorer for the night Brian Page hit consecutive jumpers, making the score 10-8. The teams traded baskets with the period ending in Woodsville's favor 16-14. At 3:50 of the second quarter, Oxbow went ahead to stay. Bruce Jacobs fed Huntington on a fast break and Oxbow was never headed. At the half, Oxbow held a 29-25 lead. First half" statistics shewed Oxbow hitting on 14 of 35 field goals compared to only 9 of 34 for the Engineers. The host team did, however, hit on 7 of 12 from the line, Oxbow a mere 1 for 2. The tempo picked up in the third quarter, Woodsville scoring 21 peint]'bUf could only outscore Oxbow by one, still down, 4946 with but eight minutes left. Two players coming off the bench for Wondsville, Aldrich and Patten helped keep them in the game. Huntington, Gary Hayward, Dave Stever and Brian Page each scored four points in the quarter for Oxbow. Strange things have hap- pened in the stretch against Woedsville in past years. Large leads disappear, momehtum changes, and Woodsville generally pulls out a victory. Not this night.. An Oxbow team, displaying teamwork not seen thus far in the season, kept their act together, and garnered another win, putting them at 7- 5 for the year. TWO POINTS--- Senior guard Gary Hayward driving to the hoop for two in a recent game against Harwood. Li LOOSE BALL-- Reserve forward Gary Curley fights for loose ball against Harwood. three from his average. Dave 11 each. Stever, playing an all around The win was important to strong game added 12 to the Oxbow for other reasons than Oxbow total. Gary Hayward just another mark in the The Olympians answered and Bruce Jaeobs added seven victory column. The team the Woodsville challenge and five, each playing their withstood the pressure of a basket for basket, holding a best game also. tight game; the bench, con- three tp five point edge all the Four Woedsville players hit sisting of Greg Garone and way. Brian Page hit four for for double tigures, but Bruce Jacobs showed up with four and Bruce Jacobs played couldn't sustain a scoring good games, and the starting a fine final eight minutes, binge at the end to overcome five played like a team, each gathering four assists. Oxbow. Patten, hitting for contributing to the victory. Brian Page hit a season's seven field goals and one free This Friday, Oxbow faces high of 21 points, all but one throw, led the Engineers with that challenge of St. John- coming from the floor. Ron 15. Aldrich followed with 12, sbury, at St. Jay. Huntington hit for 18, down and Mellin and Kinder added State.wide snowmobile group provides Vermonters with trails and activities MONTPELIER--Touring the participants and this year's scenic Green Mountains by heavy snowfall has injected snowmobile has become a high point for snow travelers in the 1980's. More than 1,600 miles of well-marked, groomed trails through Vermont's moun- tains, hills and lowlands are laced together in the snowmobile corridor system maintained by the Vermont Association of Snow Travelers (VAST). VAST's corridor trails are up to eight feet wide, providing a sort of "superhighway" for snow machine travel, according to a VAST spokesman. Main- tenance of the trails is con- tracted to the 190 local snowmobile clubs that support VAST. Most of this trail grooming is done with wide track grooming machines, the same type used at alpine ski areas. The snowmobile industry in Vermont, like [hat of skiing, was hard-hR by the un- precedented nationwide snow drought the previous two years. However, it did not deter the enthusiasm of the new life in the gast-growing sport. Favorable Winter "There's more enthusiasm this year than we've seen in the past three," said Carmi Duso, Executive Director of VAST. Registration is up, membership is up," he added. "We're getting snowmobilers from as far away as Penn- sylvania and Maryland, not to mention adjoining stat." A strong factor in the suc- cess of the VAST trail system As its information network, according to VAST State Trails Coordinator Victor Wood. " The traisl are marked with signs directing snowmobilers to facilities for dining, repairs, gasoline, and lodging. Other factors cited by Wood include the friendly help of local snowmobile clubs and the condition of the trails them- selves. Wood said. totaling less than $10. A Vermont hosts a number of percentage of the registration activities for the snowmobiler, fee contributes to the main- Local ride-ins and safaris, tenance of the state's trail races, cookouts, dances, and system. dinners, are but a few. Many restaurants and ledges near the trails cater to Silly Sports Statement: "If snowmobilers aswell, we hadn't made so many Trail Maintenance mistakes we would have Adding to the snowmobiling won." opportunities are many more miles of trails in state parks and those maintained by local Can you claim a "moral clubs and landowners which victory" without belonging to are not part of the corridor the Moral Majority? system. However, mem- bership in one of the state snowmobile clubs is a must for You're getting old if you anyone planning to remember when the NFL only snowmobile inVermont, had straight-on field goal Quebec, New York, Maine, kickers , . . and when the and New Hampshire residents dealer's original cards in 21 have registration reciprocity were dealt face down. with Vermont. Residents of other states must register in Vermont even if their machines are registered in their home state. The fee is $15. This registration fee "Trails are excellent throughout the state. We've been getting reports of 'ex- cellent' from out-of-staters," contributes to the state trail FOR BEN' l- system, bedroom apartment Walk to Also, non-residents must Bradford stores. Call 802.222- join a local club, which in- 5711, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 2T--2- cludes membership in VAST,  January 27, 1982-The Journal Opinion-Page 7 i i I Obituaries Bean had been mechanic 40 years Harold E. Vt.; Bonnie Jo Bean and of Bradford died Marsha Bean both of morning Jan. 23, Claremont, N.H.; two sisters Mrs. Harold {Nera) Hun- LsborninOrford, N.H., tington of Orford, and Mrs. 1911 the son of Edwin Kenneth (Ruth) Elder of (Marsh) Bean. Lyme Center, N.H.; one iOrford, brother George Bean of was an automobile Manchester and Lyme, N.H., all his life and was a many nieces, nephews, aunts of several cer- and uncles. He was a member recognition for his of the United Church of Christ m the field by the in Bradford and a former Corporation. member of the Friendship employed by the club. Company, Private funeral services 44 years were held Tuesday, Jan. 26 at years ago was the Hale Funeral Home in the 40 year cer- Bradford with the Rev. John by General Knight officiating. Entombment will take place 8, 1936 in Lyme, in the Sawyer Tomb pending .married Anita Huse spring burial and committal services in the family lot, also survived by one Sawyer Cemetery, Bradford Mrs. Evelyn in the spring. and one son-in-law Donations in his memory both of may be made to the Hospice of Vt.; one son the Upper Valley, in care of and a daughter- Gerry Bradley, River Road, Karen Bean of Piermont, N.H, 03779. The N.H.; four Hale Funeral Home of Debbie Bradford was in charge of 0f Houston, Tex., arrangements. of Lyndonville, Puglisi was active community Robert P. Puglisi, Puglisi four sisters, Miss St., died suddenly Juh"a Puglisi, Mrs. Margaret Jan>17, at Falkowski, Mrs. Jenny P. in Lisbon Feb. the son of Joseph and ) truglisi, and had his life. Mr. an agent for the nee Co. He member of St. Parish and a past of the ;bon Lions ember of the Lisbon a Legion and a veteran of Force. of the family wife, Mrs. Mildred a daughter, Mrs. Tuite; two brothers, Puglisi and. John Previte, and Mrs. Eleanor Previte, and one grandson. The ,funeral was held Wednesday, Jan. 20, at St. Catherine's Catholic Church in Lisbon with Rev. Norman J. Simoneau officiating and assisted by Rev. Susan HOf- fman. Burial will be in Grove Hill Cemetery, Lisbon, at a later date. Bearers were Warren Wetherbee, Fred Winslow, William Clark, Phil Weymouth, Dick Willey. and Warren Wetherbee. In lien of flowers, memorial contributions may he made to the Lisbon FAST Squad. Baldwin, 81, was school principal -- Jessie A. , 81, died Monday, it her home in Quincy, born June 10, 19Ol in the daughter of Jennie (South- Baldwin. She from Turner Falls and from the Normal School University. a teacher in the Boston or several years, to her home in Post She was e member of the Society of Pest the Lake Fairlee Club,. a trustee of Historical member of the Byron Avery = dies at 92 THETFORD CENTER -- ..... ]. i ...... ......... Byron Avery, 92, died Jan. 3 at the Hanover Healthcare Center. He was the son of Charles and Lizzie (Roberts) Avery. Mr. Avery was the last of 10 brothers and lived in S. Stratford and Norwich most of his life. He was a veteran of World War I, and was a carpenter and gardener. The William Godfrey Funeral Home was in charge of arrangements. Walter Cooley had lived in Fairlee FAIRLEE-- Walter Douglas Cooley, 70, died Jan. 12 at Matin Memorial Hospital in Stuart, FI. He was a native of Mount Vernon, N.Y., and came to Florida from Fairlee 16 years ago He was a graduate of Colgate University in 1933, and was a retired real estate dealer and member 'of the Methodist church. He is survived by his wife, Harriet Cooley; a daughter, Margaret Barnard of Christian Springs, N.Y.; a son, John Cooley of Lake Hohegan, N.Y., and five grandchildren. There was a memorial service Jan. 15 in Port St. Lucie, FI. IV. Faidee (continued from page 6) wishes for a Happy Birthday. The fun makers were Darlene, Sue Coombs, Bey Dexter, Charlene Bourgeois and Pare, with their children. The candles on the cake required a second lighting as Jonathon, the ministers' four-year old, got in his "blows", first ! Jack and Ruth Jackson accompanied by Ruby Ricker and Esther Hill attended the turkey dinner of the Thetford Friends Together on Wed- nesday. This was held at the Thefford Hill Churl[h. Several people brought old bells and explained the significance or story of each bell. How in- teresting it is when friends bring back bits of memories and past history. Peabody Library and president for 35 years of the 1Ventworth (continued from page 6) EMT course under Seth Warner of Groton. Bingo -- every Monday night except if there has been a Warren school cancellation. Wanted: bingo callers, at least 18 years old with a strong voice. A town meeting supper is planned. , Cemetery Association. She was writing a book on the history of Thetford at the time of her death. She is survived by her cousins, Haven Southworth of Barre, Gertrude Barber of Lebanon, N.H., Gordon South- worth of Ely, Corrie Gibeau of W. Fairlee and Edna Corn- stock of W. Fairlee. Memorial services and burial will he in Post Mills in the spring. In lien of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Thetford Historical Society. The Godfrey Funeral Home of Ely is in charge of arrangements. Wamboldt, 62, a former nurse MILLS-- Aletha wit and sense of humor. Wamboldt, 62, Jan. 191 at the Memorial illness. April 6, 1919 in daughter of rl Camilla (Pripp) She was at Middlebury High nd the Montpelier She graduated Hanover School of 1967, and she was a nurse in care unit for was an avid reader of the board of at the Peabody Mills. She was community affairs of the Post Church, She was kno ..... )ge ,Wll lor her She is survived by her husband Robert of Post Mills; two sons, Dale Tatro of White' River Junction, Stanley Tatro of St. Johnsbury; a daughter, Camilla Cook of White River Junction; several grand- children and great- grandchildren; two sisters, Rose Southworth of W. Fairlee and Barbara Southworth of Post Mills. Memorial services' were on Sunday afternoon at 2 in the Post Mills Church. The Rev. Charles Pigott officiated. In lien of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the Peabody Library, in care of Arthur Shopp, treasurer, Post Mills, Vt., 05058. The Godfrey Funeral Home in Ely was in charge of arrangements. Lisbon Hii/ah Bedard 838-6725 AVSCC Has Chinese Auction There were 29 Ammonoosuc Valley Seniors who met on the stage of the Lisbon Town Hall on Jan. 20. Each came with a contribution for the Chinese auction, much of it food, and the club netted a neat sum from the activity. There was also another difference, this in refresh, ments, as each brought his own "food", with the club furnishing tea and coffee. The few who came unprepared didn't suffer too much, as several kind ladies baked something extra. Margaret Baker offered "The Dieter's Creed" -- with the 23rd Psalm as a basis. Dorothy Wetherbee read of the courage of a. young paralyzed girl. Mr. Mad]the Haynes promised the Secretary that she would visit us as soon as possible, bringing Raymond when he is able. Madeline had telephoned about the Melvin Haynes having their 68th Wedding Anniversary on Jan. 21. Door Prizes Before the Chinese auction, the following won door prizes: H. Bedard, M Baker, C. Hodge, M. Marcoux, M. Lytte, Waternlan after brief illness k|RLEE Michael died at his 19 after a n. 21, 1944 in )W. and was era- L. Paige, and M. Hunt. Seven ladies -- those helping at the free.Blool Pressure Clinics Anderson of Connecticut; a also v0on something: An in- brother, Roy of Connecticut. vitation to one of the catered Funeral services were held birthday luncheons, each one last week in the W. Fairlee to choose her own time -- so Congregational Church. The the Seniors could show ap- Rev. Gordon Cook officiated, preciation. Next week, Jan. 27, Game Day will be held, with prizes needed. Laura Paige will be in charge of the lunch. Feb. 3, the free Blood Pressure Clinic will be ten to twelve; and the catered Birthday Luncheon will be at 12:30. The most unusual Valentines will be displayed Feb. I0, and a possibility of an exchange box lunch. COMMUNITY HEALTH SERVICES THETFORD-- There will be a of Community Health Services survived bv hi .... ;^ Inc., Town Nurse at the ...... , Thetford Hill Church on w. Falrlee; two sons, Wednesday, Jan. 27 from 2:00 Jason and two to 4:00 p.m. The nurse will be all checking for glaucoma, his father of hypertension and weight ; a sister, Lee problems. ! , ,<, ORFORD. BASKETBALl,-- Action at the Orford gym against Linwood. Orford girls won by a score of 76 to 13. The boys won their game against LinwGl, 69-58. Oxbow sinks Chelsea 62-54; beats up on Randolph 59-24 BRADFORD-- A two season, 21 game Chelsea winning streak came to a screeching halt at Oxbow last Friday night as the Olympian girls' basketball team downed the Chelsea Red Devils 62-54 in a game that was not as close as the score indicated. Oxbow, now 8-5 for the season, added Chelsea to the teams they have spoiled perfect seasons. Last week it was Nortlgield falling to their first loss playing at Oxbow. Perhaps it was a case of 'the devil made me do it' in the win against Chelsea. Whatever it was it worked for Mona Garone's team. They played close to their potential for the first time since the opening season win against St. Johnsbury: The ta played OFFENSE-- Janine Teeter starting a play against Chelsea last Friday. Oxbow stopped Chelsea's win- ning skein at 21. with a cohesiveness that is never catch up. Sharp not let them in the front door. expected of the Oxbow team shooting by Kathy Peterson (8 Although being outscored by this year, but up to now, points in the first quarter) one, 19-18, the Olympiansheld seldom seen. helped put Oxbow in front 15- a comfortable 50-40 lead going Leading the Oxbow charge 11. The defensive duo of into the final quarter. was Karin Dwyer with 21 Dwyer and Pratt denied the Chelsea, try as they might, points but she had a strong ball to Fitzgerald, holding her could get no closer than eight supporting cast. Kathy to but four points: points, going down to their Peterson had a hot first Garone had the team run, first defeaL 62-54. Oxbow Sinks Randolph Last Monday, Oxbow continued their domination over league teams by demolishing Randolph 59-24. Trying to get her team out from the doldrums, coach perhaps her strongest overall prcscribed by Garone to help Garone started Dwyer, Angle game, and scored six points, upend unbeaten Chelsea. Dobbins, Janine Teeter, Chelsea, showing the effects In the third period Chelsea Kathy Peterson and Doreen of three games in four nights, showed some signs of making Smith. The quintet responded fell behind early and could a game of it, but Oxbow would well, going out to a first ........... quarter bulge of 11-3 and then building an insurmountable quarter, ending up with 14 ning in the second quarter points. Angle Dobbins added building up an eleven point, 32- 10 with another strong game, 21 halftime lead. Dwyer hit for followed by 'Mat' Dobbins nine points in the stanza, while with six. Jody Pratt, fronting holding Fitzgerald to only 2 for the defense against high 7 field goals. Both teams were scoring Red Devil center tired at the end of the half Karcn Fitzgerald, played from the running game ,00lh Thoughts on the 27-8 halftime lead. Bytheend of the third quarter, Oxbow of Doors led47tO14. m m With the whole team seeing action, Dwyer led the scoring parade with 18 points, by Gary W. Moor followed by Kathy Peterson with nine. Doreen Smith and Janine Teeter added six each, TWIN STATE MEETING VALUABLE Martha and Angle Dobbius, The Vermont Fish and Game Board and the New Hamp- Heidi Osgood and Jody shire Fish and Game Commission held a joint meeting in Pratt--four apiece. Susy West Lebanon, N.H. Wednesday. Everyone present was Pierson and Becky Ledwith enthusiastic and expressed the desire to meet again, rounded out the scoring with a The discussion was free-wheeling with both sides asking field goal each. ' questions in an attempt to learn how things are done in the Oxbow now has an 18 game other state. We found that we had a great deal in common, winning steak in league Beth sides left the meeting with new ideas and a feeling playing, stretching over the that the meeting had been mot valuable. Prior to the joint meeting the Vermont Board held its parts ofthreeseasons. regular monthly meeting. The spring turkey season was expanded as biologist Jeff Wallin had requested. The open zone will be increased to Interstate 89 from the Connecticut River to Interstate 189 in South Burlington. The season will open on Saturday, May 8 and run through May 31. This is an increase from sixteen to twenty-four days, The season was set for this year 6ply as the board was not ready to take Wallin's advice and start the season on any day but Saturday at this time. Wallin spoke of turkey releases in Grand Isle County and his plans to have turkey hunting all the way to the Canadian border along the Champlain valley soon. The Board spent considerable time discussing the proposed ban on the use of transmitters on bear dogs. Most of the members spoke in favor of retaining the collars and ad- dressing the question of commercialism in some other way. The prevailing attitude was that the good sportsmen should not be penalized for the actions of a very few.- After hearing from biologist James DiStefano the Board chose not to extend the fox hunting season. In other action the Board heard from biologist Angelo lncerpi who told of the progress on the fish ladders and the return of shad and salmon to the Connecticut. WARDEN OF THE YEAR Stuart Archambault of Londonderry has been named "Warden of the Year" for 1981. Warden Archambault was selected by the Fish and Game Department to receive the Shikar Safari Club International's "Warden of the Year' award for Vermont. The club is based in Skokie, Illinois and honors outstanding people in the outdoors field. The award includes a pewter plaque, a par -r chment citation and a contribution to the "Survivor Fund" for the widows and orphans of wardens killed in the line of duty. Archambault has been a warden for 15 years and has won wide respect for his dedication and ability. DERBY TIME The first two weekends in February will see anglers in Vermont and New Hampshire try for thousands of dollars in prize money. Saturday and Sunday, February 6 and 7, the Third Annual Great Winnipesaukee Fishing Derby will be held. The event is sponsored by the Meredith Rotary Club and is headquartered at Meredith, N.H. The ice fishermen will compete for $25,000 in prize money. For tickets and more information write The Great Win- nipesaukee Fishing Derby, P:O. Box 1210, Meredith, New Hampshire 03253. The following weekend, February 13 and 14 the big event will be held on Lake Champlain. This year the Great Benson Fishing Derby will offer 0,000 in prize money. For further details write Derby Headquarters, Box 131, Bomoseen, Vermont 05732 or call 302-468-5673. N Haverhill Katharine Blaisdell ' 787-6315 Town Topics Ed and Kay Blaisdell spent several days in Ithaca, N.Y., last week attending the Annual Conference of the New York State Veterinary College at Cornell University. While Rolarv's Junior High there they participated in their class's13th reunion. Tournament dates set Recent patients at Cottage Hospital include Florence WELLS RIVER-- The Haverhill. Clough, James Mclntyre and Woodsville-Wells River The schools participating on KennethBlaisdell. Rotary Club is sponsoring its Feb. 5 and 6 will be: Fairlee, This weekend, everybody 15th annual Junior High Barnet, Monroe and Water- has been busy digging Basketball Tournament on ford. themselves out of snowdrifts. Jan. 29 and 30, and Feb. 5 and The first game on each 6, at Blue Mountain Union eveningwillstartat5:00p.m. QUOTES School. Rev. William Sbafer and "All doors are open to The schoolsparticipatingon Louis Giroux are the co- courtesy." Jan. 29 and 30 will be: Blue chairmen of the tournament. Thomas Fuller Mountain. Oxbow. Lisbon and HONOR STUDENT AT VTC S. NEWBURY A spokesman for the Vermont Technical College in Randolph has an- nounced that Robin J. Roystan of S. Newbury has received honors for academic achievement at the college during the fall semester of 1981. Oxbow trips up Woodsville, rematch of local rivalry WOODSVILLE-- The Olympians of Oxbow took a giant step in their quest for post-season play by besting the Woodsville Engineers, 66- 60 at the Community Building. The win, the first in two and a half years against Woodsville, left Oxbow one victory short of the playdowns, r Woodsville started out strong, jumping out to a quick 10-2 lead, implementing a full court press in their saltbox gymnasium. The twosome of Magoon and Mellin hit for five quick points each leading the charge of the Engineers. The only bright spot in the first three minutes for Oxbow was Charlie Grant's two pointer, knotting the score at 2-2. With half of the first quarter gone, Oxbow started to solve the press and chipped away at the lead., Ron Huntington, Dave Stever and high scorer for the night Brian Page hit consecutive jumpers, making the score 10-8. The teams traded baskets with the period ending in Woodsville's favor 16-14. At 3:50 of the second quarter, Oxbow went ahead to stay. Bruce Jacobs fed Huntington on a fast break and Oxbow was never headed. At the half, Oxbow held a 29-25 lead. First half" statistics shewed Oxbow hitting on 14 of 35 field goals compared to only 9 of 34 for the Engineers. The host team did, however, hit on 7 of 12 from the line, Oxbow a mere 1 for 2. The tempo picked up in the third quarter, Woodsville scoring 21 peint]'bUf could only outscore Oxbow by one, still down, 4946 with but eight minutes left. Two players coming off the bench for Wondsville, Aldrich and Patten helped keep them in the game. Huntington, Gary Hayward, Dave Stever and Brian Page each scored four points in the quarter for Oxbow. Strange things have hap- pened in the stretch against Woedsville in past years. Large leads disappear, momehtum changes, and Woodsville generally pulls out a victory. Not this night.. An Oxbow team, displaying teamwork not seen thus far in the season, kept their act together, and garnered another win, putting them at 7- 5 for the year. TWO POINTS--- Senior guard Gary Hayward driving to the hoop for two in a recent game against Harwood. Li LOOSE BALL-- Reserve forward Gary Curley fights for loose ball against Harwood. three from his average. Dave 11 each. Stever, playing an all around The win was important to strong game added 12 to the Oxbow for other reasons than Oxbow total. Gary Hayward just another mark in the The Olympians answered and Bruce Jaeobs added seven victory column. The team the Woodsville challenge and five, each playing their withstood the pressure of a basket for basket, holding a best game also. tight game; the bench, con- three tp five point edge all the Four Woedsville players hit sisting of Greg Garone and way. Brian Page hit four for for double tigures, but Bruce Jacobs showed up with four and Bruce Jacobs played couldn't sustain a scoring good games, and the starting a fine final eight minutes, binge at the end to overcome five played like a team, each gathering four assists. Oxbow. Patten, hitting for contributing to the victory. Brian Page hit a season's seven field goals and one free This Friday, Oxbow faces high of 21 points, all but one throw, led the Engineers with that challenge of St. John- coming from the floor. Ron 15. Aldrich followed with 12, sbury, at St. Jay. Huntington hit for 18, down and Mellin and Kinder added State.wide snowmobile group provides Vermonters with trails and activities MONTPELIER--Touring the participants and this year's scenic Green Mountains by heavy snowfall has injected snowmobile has become a high point for snow travelers in the 1980's. More than 1,600 miles of well-marked, groomed trails through Vermont's moun- tains, hills and lowlands are laced together in the snowmobile corridor system maintained by the Vermont Association of Snow Travelers (VAST). VAST's corridor trails are up to eight feet wide, providing a sort of "superhighway" for snow machine travel, according to a VAST spokesman. Main- tenance of the trails is con- tracted to the 190 local snowmobile clubs that support VAST. Most of this trail grooming is done with wide track grooming machines, the same type used at alpine ski areas. The snowmobile industry in Vermont, like [hat of skiing, was hard-hR by the un- precedented nationwide snow drought the previous two years. However, it did not deter the enthusiasm of the new life in the gast-growing sport. Favorable Winter "There's more enthusiasm this year than we've seen in the past three," said Carmi Duso, Executive Director of VAST. Registration is up, membership is up," he added. "We're getting snowmobilers from as far away as Penn- sylvania and Maryland, not to mention adjoining stat." A strong factor in the suc- cess of the VAST trail system As its information network, according to VAST State Trails Coordinator Victor Wood. " The traisl are marked with signs directing snowmobilers to facilities for dining, repairs, gasoline, and lodging. Other factors cited by Wood include the friendly help of local snowmobile clubs and the condition of the trails them- selves. Wood said. totaling less than $10. A Vermont hosts a number of percentage of the registration activities for the snowmobiler, fee contributes to the main- Local ride-ins and safaris, tenance of the state's trail races, cookouts, dances, and system. dinners, are but a few. Many restaurants and ledges near the trails cater to Silly Sports Statement: "If snowmobilers aswell, we hadn't made so many Trail Maintenance mistakes we would have Adding to the snowmobiling won." opportunities are many more miles of trails in state parks and those maintained by local Can you claim a "moral clubs and landowners which victory" without belonging to are not part of the corridor the Moral Majority? system. However, mem- bership in one of the state snowmobile clubs is a must for You're getting old if you anyone planning to remember when the NFL only snowmobile inVermont, had straight-on field goal Quebec, New York, Maine, kickers , . . and when the and New Hampshire residents dealer's original cards in 21 have registration reciprocity were dealt face down. with Vermont. Residents of other states must register in Vermont even if their machines are registered in their home state. The fee is $15. This registration fee "Trails are excellent throughout the state. We've been getting reports of 'ex- cellent' from out-of-staters," contributes to the state trail FOR BEN' l- system, bedroom apartment Walk to Also, non-residents must Bradford stores. Call 802.222- join a local club, which in- 5711, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 2T--2- cludes membership in VAST,