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January 27, 1982     Journal Opinion
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The Wright Brothers to John Glenn ew people have influenced the course of modern s, rocketry and astronautics as y as Theodore van Karman. In this 1941 March Field, Riverside, Calif., a group of TODAY'S CHUCKLE -New diet: "Eat anything you want -- just don't swallow." Number 4 colleagues looks on as van Karman does some last- minute calculations on the wing of an Ercoupe aircraft prior to the first jet-assisted take-off. Smlthsonlen News Service Photo courtesy of Caltech Archives Theodore van Karman by RITA C. BOBOWSKI Smithsonian News Service Scientist, engineer, teacher. Advisor to heads of govern- ment, consultant to industrial firms, founder of international organizations. Articulate and witty, continental beth in style and appearance. All these qualities describe a single man, Theodore van Karman, whose career in aeronautics and astronautics spanned six decades--from the Wright brothers to John Glenn. Theodore van Karman may not be a name familiar to most Americans, yet he possessed one of the great scientific minds and most colorful personalities of this century. More than any other single individual, van Karman was responsible for the direction that modern aerodynamics took in America during the 1930s and later. Each jet that flies overhead, each spacecraft that probes the outer reaches of the universe are realities today thanks in part to the questioning mind and unrelenting deter- mination of this man. This month marks the 100th anniversary of van Karman's birth. He will be remembered in ceremonies at the Aeronautical Institute (which he once directed) in Achen, West Germany, and at the American Institute of .aeronautics and Astronautics in Long Beach, Calif. A symposium in Washington, D.C., and a special event at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, where he headed the aeronautical school, also will commemorate the date. A native of Budapest, Hungary, van Karman was born on May 11, 1881, into an intellectual Jewish family. As a child, van Karman was a math whiz who often en- tertained and impressed family friends by multiplying large numbers in his head. His father, worried that the boy would become an infant prodigy, discouraged these public displays of precociousness and steered him toward a career in engineering--advice which the young Theodore took to heart. During the summer of 1908, following sints at the Royal Joseph University in Budapest and Gottingen University in Germany, van Karman visited Paris. There, he and a friend drove at dawn to an airfield just outside of Paris to watch the French aviation pioneer Henri Farman fly in a known as the "Karman Vortex oscillation of radio towers, heavier-than-air machine. It Street," and it helped explain chimneys and other tall thin was an image, van Karman other effects not clearly un- bodies in the wind. recalled later in his derstood before, such as the (please turn to page ZA) autobiography, that gave him a lifelong fascination with the airplane and aerodynamics. "My strongest memory of the earliest flying ex.- periments in this period," he wrote, "was the wonderful courage exhibited by the airplane pilots. Usually a  flight ended in a crack-up... The dauntless pilot, if he was still able, often would take off again, as if nothing had happened. I wondered whether anything could he done to make flying safer." Returning to Gottingen in 1909 as an assistant in the aeronautical laboratory, van Karman worked on a mathematical proof of one of the most central concepts in aeronautics--form drag. When an object is set in motion, the air around it does not conform to the object's shape, but rather breaks off on either side in alternating ,vortices, similar to small One of the great scientists of the 20th century, whirlpools. As van Karman explained, "Instead of Theodore van Karman helped shape the marching two by two, the course of modern aeronautics and vortices are staggered like astronautics. This photb of the Hungarian- lampposts along both sides of born scientist was taken in 1962, a year before the street." The phenomenon became his death. Smithsonian News Service Photo courtesy of National Air and Soace Museum CIRCULATING IN: ll|W RAMP$11111i - Lying, Lyme Center, Orford, Orfordville, Piermont, Haverhill Haverhill Center, Haverhill Corner, North Haverhill, East Haverhill, Pike, Woodsy|lie, Bath, Monroe, Lisbon, Landaff, Benton. Lyman, Warren, Glendiff, Wentworth . . . VERMONT -- Thetford, East Thefford, Thefford Hill, Thetford Center, North Thetford, Post Mills, Fairlee, West Fairlee, Bradford, Bradford Village, Corinth, East Corinth, Topsham, West Topsham, Newbury Village, South Newbury, West Newbury, Wells River, Groton, Ryegate Corner, East Ryegate, South Ryegate, Peacham, Hornet, West Barnet. cleanmg sizes and shapes to fit the various chimney Lile sizes. The brush should be matched to the tile size of your chim- ney. The brush can be moved up and down in the chimney with ropes or lightweight, fiberglass, screw-together rod sections. This equipment will make the job quicker and easier than many of the homemade methods. Using chains can easily damage the chimney tiles and create more problems to be solved. Chemical chimney cleaners are not recommended. These products may reduce the amount of creosote build-up if used regularly but are not effective in cleaning a dirty chimney. Most of the chemical chimney cleaners contain salt which is very corrosive to all types of chimneys. How serious the corrosion problem is has not been well studied. How often do you need to clean the chimney? . . . The best and safest answer is whenever there is a build-up of 14 inch or more anywhere in the system. The time between cleanings will vary from stove to stove and system to system. There is no one simple time schedule that can be recommended. If you would like a free visit from the Orange County HEAT Energy Outreach Advisor -- contact the Orange County Extension Service Office in Chelsea -- telephone 802-685-4540. 00,:00Chinm ev by ('IIRISTINE KJIR tra Advisor Chimney fires are the most common related to wood During a chimney interior temperatures exceed 2000 degrees t]y high to the chimney itself or any combustible that touches the t. The best way to deal fires is to avoid are two simple chimney fires: l't let creosote build up t, and have fires in the that will ignite a ney fire. burners are going creosote. The only to know how much is being deposited in is through in- m. It is generally that any creosote of 14 inch or more cleaned out. How the chimney needs ;ng depends on a large of factors. The safest is to clean it as necessary. ag inspection of the note the condition of If inspection a tar-like deposit in or stove pipe, going to be nearly The tar will Y gum up the brushes. m no safe solvent that used on this kind of If the tar is a thin leave it. A hot fire in will dry, crack and 'n these so they , later on. material is mey -- this out with mney brush (run up and a couple of times). This material to deal cleaning. material once the Thus, the is for a hot Present in the very hard, is en- difficult is ham- :h a piece damage chimney most cases it deposits THIS WEEK'S PRESS RUN going to clean and stove Would highly d the PUrchasing of brush. The Come in different o ,.Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont 10,220. January 27, 1982 THI': MILITAR Local serviceman for Naval Administrative operated under the Joint Command, Armed Forces Chiefs of Staff. The college orfalk, "trginia the. (00uarter00 is awarded !o Pz Ualter  (Cobb, USN in recognition of foith[ul and oulstondin O service at the Armed Forces Slaff College YOUR 5ELc'rIoN AS SAILOR OF TIlE qUARTI[R FOR TIII PERIOD I'cX"rOBER - 31 DgCEWBER 1951 I$ A TRZBUT TO TII] PRO- FKSSIONAL XOWLEDG, E,'rrHusIASM. DDICTIO.'t. ,t.'{D KXCP- 'IONAL PERFOR]4ANC OF DUTY YOU IIA'f DISPLD ! N COI- rRII;UTI";G "[O TIlE ACCOMPLISHME. OF TIlE MISSION OF TltI AV L DIISTRA'rIVE DIA.1D. ARMEO FOF.CES ST.F COLLEGe. (.j'l.]' lhis 1"nl day o} ,:.xU,RY zs. F. J. =AL'O a[n s ottt%r X.ival x,lattntat rat v honored by Naval administrators Petty Officer 2nd Class Walter H. Cobb annually conducts two 21- week courses to prepare mid- ca reef officers for assignment to joint and combined com- mands. Petty ()fficer Cobb serv: as a Religious Program Specialist at the Staff ('()liege Chapel. assisting the college's Chaplain in preparations for Sunday services, religious instruction, and Bible study, Illllll I I Soldier.takes part in Mid.East war games accomplish any mmsmn. CAIRO WEST, EGYPT-- ideal location for an air- equipment fielded during the temperatures are a balmy ' ' " While millions of Americans defense unit to complete any exercise, also required ex- eight or so degrees, plunging To those whose job it might were reading about the Mid- mission given." tensive support and special to the forties at night. Blowing someday be toactuallyfight in East exercise "Bright Star," a Bright Star 82 desert gear to operate and sand adds to the fun. Still, this enwronment, the Littleton, N.H., soldier, Army "Bright Star 82," a multi- survive, most of the men and women revelations were many. Sgt. Jeffry P. Ross, was in on service exercise and test of "I feel this was a very participating in "Bright Star" Navigation is tough, with no the action, the nation's Rapid important exercise," said gained fromtheexporience terrain features, to use in Ross, 22, son of Stanley J. Deployment Force (RDF), Ross. "It not only gave us Better Soldier locating one's position. There Ross, Mountain Lakes, highlighted many of the more confidence in ourselves, "To put it simply," Ross is little concealment for man Woodsville, was with the 24th problems and situations U.S. but in my opinion showed the said, "I've learned that if the or machine, and the inevitable Infantry Division's task force Forces would encounter in rest of the world we are the need should arise, my unit is clouds of dust give away in the Western Desert some desert operations. The fine, best fighting force in the ready, able, and capable of movement for miles. forty miles southwest of Cairo. abrasive sand coats world." deploying anywhere in the Distances are hard to He was assigned as a senior everything with a gritty layer The troops of the 24th were world and can successfully (please turn to page 3A) gunner with 5th Battalion, of dust. Engines require fortunate in onerespect, they 52nd Air Defense Artillery of constant attention to keep did not maneuver in the in- the 24th Division. them going, credible heat of the high Your ad, this size, This portion of the Western Optical sytems, weapons summer, when temperatures Desert, scene of some of the systems--virtually canreach 120 degrees, making on page 1 of fiercest battles for North everything--needs constant equipment almost impossible the Second Opinion Africa during World War lI, is attention to protect it from the to handle and movement on one of the most inhospitable environment. Soldiers, while foot an agony During the JS 0nly $5.00 areas on earth. There are no probably the toughest piece of winter months, daytime trees, no large rocks, no hills-- nothing but a barren / expanse of sand and gravel Your ad, this. size, on page 1 WANTED stretching to the horizon in all 1955 CHEVY directions, of the Second Opinion Cars&Parts "It took me by surprise," AR';'S AUTO BODY ROSS said. "I was expecting a iS 0nly $10.00 Bradford, Vt. more hilly terrain. The flat- ness of the terrain makes it an , 222-4451 as well as performing ad- ministrative duties for the Chaplain's office throughout the week. Cobb has displayed a special dedication to duty and a professional attitude while working in the Chaplain's office, where extra hours and weekend duty are the rule and not the exception, Woodsvie woman nssi00ed to Kessler Air Force Base WOODSVILLE--Airman Anna M. Allan, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Fraser of Woodsville has been according to a Navy Navy. His older brother, Petty spokesman. Officer 1st Class Theodore F. During one period inwhicha Cobb, is an Electronics Chaplain's conference was Technician stationed in San being held at the Staff College he worked 13 days in a row. In addition to his regular responsibilities, Cobb has volunteered off-duty hours to support the college's athletic program, tte coached one of the women's volleyball teams and acted as scorekeeper for assigned to Keesler Air Force Brooks Jr., son of Mr. and Base, Miss., after completing Mrs. Victor A. Brooks of Pike Air Forcebasictraining. . has been assigned to Lowry During the six weeks at Lackland Air Force Base, Air Force Base, Colo., after Texas, the airman studied the completing Air Force basic Air Foce mission, training organization and customs and During the six weeks at received special training in Lackland Air Force Base, human relations. Texas, the airman studied the In addition, airmen who Air Force mission, complete basic training earn organization and customs and credits toward an associate received special training in degree in applied science human relations. through the Community In addition, airmen who College of the Air Force. complete basic training earn The airmanwillnowreceive credits toward an associate specialized instruction in the degree in applied science air operations field, through the Community Her husband, Stephen, is the College of the Air Force. son of Mr. and Mrs. Phil Allan The airman will now receive of Randolph, Mass. specialized instruction in the The airman is a 1980 supply field. graduate of Woodsville High School. BUYING ANTIQUES. Oak roll top desks, tables, bureaus, chests, tools you name it... 1-603-272-5864 JIM MUSTY WELCOME! John & Judy Haggarty From your friends at the Newbury and Haverhill Churches Happy Birthday ANDY CORRIGAN! Diego. His younger brother, Petty' Officer 2nd Class Frederic B. Cobb, I1, is also an Electronics Technician and serves at New London, Conn. Cobb will complete a three- year tour at the Staff College in March, 1984. He has been in the Navy for nine years. In the two of the College's softball future he would like to serve a teams, tour as Religious Program Cobb has two brothers who Specialist with the U.S. also serve proudly in the Marine Corps. Pike man eompletes Air Force training PIKE-- Airman Victor A. Brooks is a 1981 graduate of Airman Victor A. Brooks Woodsy|lie High School, N.H. $125 PAINT SPECIAL ON ANY CAR $15l) FOH Pi('K-UI" TIIU('KS (inch=des paint materials) BODY WORK EXTRA (802) 222-44S1 FREE ESTIMATES BRADFORD. VT 05033 Paul and Scott Happy Valentines Day YOU LIGHT UP MY LIFE! LOVes Hues, Kisses, MOJ - FLOOR COVERING - Carpet & NoWax Vinyl 3.89yd.&up ope. 10 DAYS BARRE HOME SUPPLY RT. 14 SO. BARRE, VT. WALLPAPER 88' Single Roll o.. III I I II III I oDAvs BARRE HOME SUPPLY BT. 14 1000's of Rolls at / price so. BARRE, VT. The Wright Brothers to John Glenn ew people have influenced the course of modern s, rocketry and astronautics as y as Theodore van Karman. In this 1941 March Field, Riverside, Calif., a group of TODAY'S CHUCKLE -New diet: "Eat anything you want -- just don't swallow." Number 4 colleagues looks on as van Karman does some last- minute calculations on the wing of an Ercoupe aircraft prior to the first jet-assisted take-off. Smlthsonlen News Service Photo courtesy of Caltech Archives Theodore van Karman by RITA C. BOBOWSKI Smithsonian News Service Scientist, engineer, teacher. Advisor to heads of govern- ment, consultant to industrial firms, founder of international organizations. Articulate and witty, continental beth in style and appearance. All these qualities describe a single man, Theodore van Karman, whose career in aeronautics and astronautics spanned six decades--from the Wright brothers to John Glenn. Theodore van Karman may not be a name familiar to most Americans, yet he possessed one of the great scientific minds and most colorful personalities of this century. More than any other single individual, van Karman was responsible for the direction that modern aerodynamics took in America during the 1930s and later. Each jet that flies overhead, each spacecraft that probes the outer reaches of the universe are realities today thanks in part to the questioning mind and unrelenting deter- mination of this man. This month marks the 100th anniversary of van Karman's birth. He will be remembered in ceremonies at the Aeronautical Institute (which he once directed) in Achen, West Germany, and at the American Institute of .aeronautics and Astronautics in Long Beach, Calif. A symposium in Washington, D.C., and a special event at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, where he headed the aeronautical school, also will commemorate the date. A native of Budapest, Hungary, van Karman was born on May 11, 1881, into an intellectual Jewish family. As a child, van Karman was a math whiz who often en- tertained and impressed family friends by multiplying large numbers in his head. His father, worried that the boy would become an infant prodigy, discouraged these public displays of precociousness and steered him toward a career in engineering--advice which the young Theodore took to heart. During the summer of 1908, following sints at the Royal Joseph University in Budapest and Gottingen University in Germany, van Karman visited Paris. There, he and a friend drove at dawn to an airfield just outside of Paris to watch the French aviation pioneer Henri Farman fly in a known as the "Karman Vortex oscillation of radio towers, heavier-than-air machine. It Street," and it helped explain chimneys and other tall thin was an image, van Karman other effects not clearly un- bodies in the wind. recalled later in his derstood before, such as the (please turn to page ZA) autobiography, that gave him a lifelong fascination with the airplane and aerodynamics. "My strongest memory of the earliest flying ex.- periments in this period," he wrote, "was the wonderful courage exhibited by the airplane pilots. Usually a  flight ended in a crack-up... The dauntless pilot, if he was still able, often would take off again, as if nothing had happened. I wondered whether anything could he done to make flying safer." Returning to Gottingen in 1909 as an assistant in the aeronautical laboratory, van Karman worked on a mathematical proof of one of the most central concepts in aeronautics--form drag. When an object is set in motion, the air around it does not conform to the object's shape, but rather breaks off on either side in alternating ,vortices, similar to small One of the great scientists of the 20th century, whirlpools. As van Karman explained, "Instead of Theodore van Karman helped shape the marching two by two, the course of modern aeronautics and vortices are staggered like astronautics. This photb of the Hungarian- lampposts along both sides of born scientist was taken in 1962, a year before the street." The phenomenon became his death. Smithsonian News Service Photo courtesy of National Air and Soace Museum CIRCULATING IN: ll|W RAMP$11111i - Lying, Lyme Center, Orford, Orfordville, Piermont, Haverhill Haverhill Center, Haverhill Corner, North Haverhill, East Haverhill, Pike, Woodsy|lie, Bath, Monroe, Lisbon, Landaff, Benton. Lyman, Warren, Glendiff, Wentworth . . . VERMONT -- Thetford, East Thefford, Thefford Hill, Thetford Center, North Thetford, Post Mills, Fairlee, West Fairlee, Bradford, Bradford Village, Corinth, East Corinth, Topsham, West Topsham, Newbury Village, South Newbury, West Newbury, Wells River, Groton, Ryegate Corner, East Ryegate, South Ryegate, Peacham, Hornet, West Barnet. cleanmg sizes and shapes to fit the various chimney Lile sizes. The brush should be matched to the tile size of your chim- ney. The brush can be moved up and down in the chimney with ropes or lightweight, fiberglass, screw-together rod sections. This equipment will make the job quicker and easier than many of the homemade methods. Using chains can easily damage the chimney tiles and create more problems to be solved. Chemical chimney cleaners are not recommended. These products may reduce the amount of creosote build-up if used regularly but are not effective in cleaning a dirty chimney. Most of the chemical chimney cleaners contain salt which is very corrosive to all types of chimneys. How serious the corrosion problem is has not been well studied. How often do you need to clean the chimney? . . . The best and safest answer is whenever there is a build-up of 14 inch or more anywhere in the system. The time between cleanings will vary from stove to stove and system to system. There is no one simple time schedule that can be recommended. If you would like a free visit from the Orange County HEAT Energy Outreach Advisor -- contact the Orange County Extension Service Office in Chelsea -- telephone 802-685-4540. 00,:00Chinm ev by ('IIRISTINE KJIR tra Advisor Chimney fires are the most common related to wood During a chimney interior temperatures exceed 2000 degrees t]y high to the chimney itself or any combustible that touches the t. The best way to deal fires is to avoid are two simple chimney fires: l't let creosote build up t, and have fires in the that will ignite a ney fire. burners are going creosote. The only to know how much is being deposited in is through in- m. It is generally that any creosote of 14 inch or more cleaned out. How the chimney needs ;ng depends on a large of factors. The safest is to clean it as necessary. ag inspection of the note the condition of If inspection a tar-like deposit in or stove pipe, going to be nearly The tar will Y gum up the brushes. m no safe solvent that used on this kind of If the tar is a thin leave it. A hot fire in will dry, crack and 'n these so they , later on. material is mey -- this out with mney brush (run up and a couple of times). This material to deal cleaning. material once the Thus, the is for a hot Present in the very hard, is en- difficult is ham- :h a piece damage chimney most cases it deposits THIS WEEK'S PRESS RUN going to clean and stove Would highly d the PUrchasing of brush. The Come in different o ,.Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont 10,220. January 27, 1982 THI': MILITAR Local serviceman for Naval Administrative operated under the Joint Command, Armed Forces Chiefs of Staff. The college orfalk, "trginia the. (00uarter00 is awarded !o Pz Ualter  (Cobb, USN in recognition of foith[ul and oulstondin O service at the Armed Forces Slaff College YOUR 5ELc'rIoN AS SAILOR OF TIlE qUARTI[R FOR TIII PERIOD I'cX"rOBER - 31 DgCEWBER 1951 I$ A TRZBUT TO TII] PRO- FKSSIONAL XOWLEDG, E,'rrHusIASM. DDICTIO.'t. ,t.'{D KXCP- 'IONAL PERFOR]4ANC OF DUTY YOU IIA'f DISPLD ! N COI- rRII;UTI";G "[O TIlE ACCOMPLISHME. OF TIlE MISSION OF TltI AV L DIISTRA'rIVE DIA.1D. ARMEO FOF.CES ST.F COLLEGe. (.j'l.]' lhis 1"nl day o} ,:.xU,RY zs. F. J. =AL'O a[n s ottt%r X.ival x,lattntat rat v honored by Naval administrators Petty Officer 2nd Class Walter H. Cobb annually conducts two 21- week courses to prepare mid- ca reef officers for assignment to joint and combined com- mands. Petty ()fficer Cobb serv: as a Religious Program Specialist at the Staff ('()liege Chapel. assisting the college's Chaplain in preparations for Sunday services, religious instruction, and Bible study, Illllll I I Soldier.takes part in Mid.East war games accomplish any mmsmn. CAIRO WEST, EGYPT-- ideal location for an air- equipment fielded during the temperatures are a balmy ' ' " While millions of Americans defense unit to complete any exercise, also required ex- eight or so degrees, plunging To those whose job it might were reading about the Mid- mission given." tensive support and special to the forties at night. Blowing someday be toactuallyfight in East exercise "Bright Star," a Bright Star 82 desert gear to operate and sand adds to the fun. Still, this enwronment, the Littleton, N.H., soldier, Army "Bright Star 82," a multi- survive, most of the men and women revelations were many. Sgt. Jeffry P. Ross, was in on service exercise and test of "I feel this was a very participating in "Bright Star" Navigation is tough, with no the action, the nation's Rapid important exercise," said gained fromtheexporience terrain features, to use in Ross, 22, son of Stanley J. Deployment Force (RDF), Ross. "It not only gave us Better Soldier locating one's position. There Ross, Mountain Lakes, highlighted many of the more confidence in ourselves, "To put it simply," Ross is little concealment for man Woodsville, was with the 24th problems and situations U.S. but in my opinion showed the said, "I've learned that if the or machine, and the inevitable Infantry Division's task force Forces would encounter in rest of the world we are the need should arise, my unit is clouds of dust give away in the Western Desert some desert operations. The fine, best fighting force in the ready, able, and capable of movement for miles. forty miles southwest of Cairo. abrasive sand coats world." deploying anywhere in the Distances are hard to He was assigned as a senior everything with a gritty layer The troops of the 24th were world and can successfully (please turn to page 3A) gunner with 5th Battalion, of dust. Engines require fortunate in onerespect, they 52nd Air Defense Artillery of constant attention to keep did not maneuver in the in- the 24th Division. them going, credible heat of the high Your ad, this size, This portion of the Western Optical sytems, weapons summer, when temperatures Desert, scene of some of the systems--virtually canreach 120 degrees, making on page 1 of fiercest battles for North everything--needs constant equipment almost impossible the Second Opinion Africa during World War lI, is attention to protect it from the to handle and movement on one of the most inhospitable environment. Soldiers, while foot an agony During the JS 0nly $5.00 areas on earth. There are no probably the toughest piece of winter months, daytime trees, no large rocks, no hills-- nothing but a barren / expanse of sand and gravel Your ad, this. size, on page 1 WANTED stretching to the horizon in all 1955 CHEVY directions, of the Second Opinion Cars&Parts "It took me by surprise," AR';'S AUTO BODY ROSS said. "I was expecting a iS 0nly $10.00 Bradford, Vt. more hilly terrain. The flat- ness of the terrain makes it an , 222-4451 as well as performing ad- ministrative duties for the Chaplain's office throughout the week. Cobb has displayed a special dedication to duty and a professional attitude while working in the Chaplain's office, where extra hours and weekend duty are the rule and not the exception, Woodsvie woman nssi00ed to Kessler Air Force Base WOODSVILLE--Airman Anna M. Allan, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Fraser of Woodsville has been according to a Navy Navy. His older brother, Petty spokesman. Officer 1st Class Theodore F. During one period inwhicha Cobb, is an Electronics Chaplain's conference was Technician stationed in San being held at the Staff College he worked 13 days in a row. In addition to his regular responsibilities, Cobb has volunteered off-duty hours to support the college's athletic program, tte coached one of the women's volleyball teams and acted as scorekeeper for assigned to Keesler Air Force Brooks Jr., son of Mr. and Base, Miss., after completing Mrs. Victor A. Brooks of Pike Air Forcebasictraining. . has been assigned to Lowry During the six weeks at Lackland Air Force Base, Air Force Base, Colo., after Texas, the airman studied the completing Air Force basic Air Foce mission, training organization and customs and During the six weeks at received special training in Lackland Air Force Base, human relations. Texas, the airman studied the In addition, airmen who Air Force mission, complete basic training earn organization and customs and credits toward an associate received special training in degree in applied science human relations. through the Community In addition, airmen who College of the Air Force. complete basic training earn The airmanwillnowreceive credits toward an associate specialized instruction in the degree in applied science air operations field, through the Community Her husband, Stephen, is the College of the Air Force. son of Mr. and Mrs. Phil Allan The airman will now receive of Randolph, Mass. specialized instruction in the The airman is a 1980 supply field. graduate of Woodsville High School. BUYING ANTIQUES. Oak roll top desks, tables, bureaus, chests, tools you name it... 1-603-272-5864 JIM MUSTY WELCOME! John & Judy Haggarty From your friends at the Newbury and Haverhill Churches Happy Birthday ANDY CORRIGAN! Diego. His younger brother, Petty' Officer 2nd Class Frederic B. Cobb, I1, is also an Electronics Technician and serves at New London, Conn. Cobb will complete a three- year tour at the Staff College in March, 1984. He has been in the Navy for nine years. In the two of the College's softball future he would like to serve a teams, tour as Religious Program Cobb has two brothers who Specialist with the U.S. also serve proudly in the Marine Corps. Pike man eompletes Air Force training PIKE-- Airman Victor A. Brooks is a 1981 graduate of Airman Victor A. Brooks Woodsy|lie High School, N.H. $125 PAINT SPECIAL ON ANY CAR $15l) FOH Pi('K-UI" TIIU('KS (inch=des paint materials) BODY WORK EXTRA (802) 222-44S1 FREE ESTIMATES BRADFORD. VT 05033 Paul and Scott Happy Valentines Day YOU LIGHT UP MY LIFE! LOVes Hues, Kisses, MOJ - FLOOR COVERING - Carpet & NoWax Vinyl 3.89yd.&up ope. 10 DAYS BARRE HOME SUPPLY RT. 14 SO. BARRE, VT. WALLPAPER 88' Single Roll o.. III I I II III I oDAvs BARRE HOME SUPPLY BT. 14 1000's of Rolls at / price so. BARRE, VT.