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Bradford , Vermont
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January 28, 1981     Journal Opinion
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January 28, 1981
 

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25' 7,f|:l i0 TTACKED--This deer, attacked by domestic dogs whose tracks are visible in now, will probably die. See Gary Moore's Out-of-Doors column. BMU approves b udget ELLS RIVER--A 1981-82 In other matters, poles and one-hour lessons for .lget of $1,246 434 has been Superintendent A. Keith Ober students for a fee of $300, )proved by' the Blue reported that school con- based on 40 students at $1.50 Untain union School Board. sumption of energy is up 10 per lesson The proposed budget is wr cent and costs up 36 ix-r The cost of the lessons will tout $149,0(10 or 13 per cent, cent. b paid b. h, scho,fi The ,hr than the prevmus The bua:'d approved a pr,,.ram .tavtv( tins week 9.3 per proposal by Mike Thomas of aud will be conducted on tn,eaae to raise River Bend Sports Shop and Mondays and Fridays [or five BMU physmal education in- weeks the structor Ellen Smith tostart a The board also confirmed cross-country skiing program hot lunch price increases to 60 at the school, with Thomas cents and 75 cents. Reduced supplying the skis. boots and price lunches are 20 cents. Serw, ng Over 48 Communities ,n Northern New Hampshire and Vermont January 28, 1981 Annual meeting Bradford Village elects officers by I,.F. BARNES l{etiring trustee lh)raee BRAI)FORD--By a margin of Paln|er received standing 25 to 20. voters at the Annual applause m recognition and Village Meeting chose as thanks for his 26 years of trustee of the Village of servicel)n thevillage board Bradford for a three-year I)r. ,lames Barton. tlelena term. Welch is a long-time Kinney. and AIfa Gautreau Bradford resident, with thirty won uncontested ballot as years experience in village audilors for the confing year. service. Several w)ters voiced Welch was also nominated comphlints about the late to succeed himself for a five- distribution of the annual year term as water corn- village report. A broken press missioner, tn response to caused thedelay. quest toning of the propriety of 1981 Budget debated one man holding office as both Town Manager Susan trustee and water corn- Spaulding asked that the missioner, the unanimously village vote to raise a dollar re-elected moderator value, rather than the tax Lawrence Coffin said. "There rate the trustees would then is the legal opinion that one set ihe tax rate when the may hold both offices." grand list is completed. The The second nominee. Bryce nmfion was made to raise Morrill. defeated Welch, $13.575 requested by the winning the five-year water estimated budget. commissioner's term by a Eleanor Donnelly amended vote of 27 to 18. the nlotion "to eliminate the i I e m "m ana g i ng projected maintenance budget village, they were paying n|untcipalily, thereby is less for 1981 than for 1980: thenmelves. reducing lhe budgeted amount $24.500 as opposed to the ex- Patrolman or to $9075.'" Donnelly said. "i pended$27.853.64, watchman debate think the trustees could do Under winter maintenance. Would defraying the public these duties tlmreby deleting the budgeted amount for salt sal ety expenses inw)lve hiring lhe $45001rom the budget "" increased from $1)0 in 1980 to a patrol officer for a total lloraee Palmer offered the $').'_'50 for 1981. Spaulding said estimated expense of $30.650 Irustees an epmion on this: that this reflects the increased pet" year or a mght watchman "We tthe trustees) used to price of salt and the estimated dispatcher at an estimated struggle through the year. usage, annual expense of $14.615. handling all the disper- There is a long stadi:ling Both options were outlined in senlms The town manager agreement between the the public safety report, with has taken quite a burden from village and the town that the the trustees indicating the trustees and has the time town buys trucks and stores prefeFence for the lesser and knowledge to seek the sand. The village then figure. A motion was made to available grants. I think it's a reinlburses the town for half that effect good thing." thecost of thesand. During the discussion, a Tim meeting defeated the Trustee Byron Kidder said, combined townwillage police amendment. The $4500 which "l checked on this to see if it force was advocated. Kidder is the village's one-third share would save money to buy and said. "'l personally feel that ., of the budget remained in the stockpile our own salt. we should- have a combined budget. Ih)wever. we've used about police with the village and the Snow removal expenditures half of the amount allotted for town. Perhaps something also elicited discussion: the this year. So it's six of one, should be included by petition former practice of contractual hall' a dozen of the other." in the town warrant.'" K. l)onaldWelch snow removal services verses Trust(re Francis Garone Spauldmg indicated that the the current use of village said. "They've done this so town warrant was already equil2ment and staff for winter long that tlo(kiy Palmer can't posted for this year. The Haverhill considering maintenance, even ren,ember hew it star- village would need tomake Welch said, "This is one ted." arrangements for 1981 now. reason [ ran for l,arry Drew questioned the Reflecting general concern trustee- because I'm quite propriety of the villagers about the ineffectual nature of sc,u an uat--'---'---n --w tax bills disturbed over the expense paying lwice-oncewhenthe a night watchman, Connie here. You can'toperatethis as town buys the salt and once Dunlap said. "What authority HAVlgRHILL-Selectmen are system would fiave ad- considering :. a proposal to vantages f6i" both the town. change the town's system of and for many taxpayers. annual tax bills to a semi- "It would give the town annual basis, better control of cash flow and This would mean, if ap- give it money to invest rather proved by voters at Town than having to borrow in Meeting March 10, that tax- anticipation of tax paymen- payers would pay half of their Is." Klark said. "Money would annual bill in June ar)d the be coming in throughout the other half m l)ecember, in- year The town would have a stead of paying lhe entire ('ash incomealI year round.so amount in Deccmben as a to speak " present. The selectmen, at ter Selectman Winthrop Klark discussion 'with budget told the Journal Opinion the committee members on the proposal, decided to inform taxpayers of the idea, probably through public meetings, before it is placed in the warrant for Town Meeting. From the standpoint of the taxpayer. Klark said. "I think I'm in the situation most taxpayers are. I could probably more easily make two $5(X) payments than one $1,()0 payment although I've alwa,s managed to el)pc with the annual payment by putting a little aside. I would prefer to pay twice a year (half in Jqne and half in December). but I'm not sure that everyone feels that way." Klark added that "It is cheap as you were operating when the village pays its would a guy have walking before." share. It was pointed out that about with no badge, no gun Spauiding ipdicated that the as they were both town and (please turn to page 10) Flu bug hits schools by JOANNA GILBRIDE BRADFORD Achoo wheeze, cough! Just as temperatures began to moderate in the Upper Valley and children rushed home to hit the sled slopes, that old pesky winter flu bug attacked. Area schools report that absenteeism rose over the past l0 days due to colds, flu- like viruses and other upper respiratory infections. "Absenteeism has definitely been up," said Pat Ottina, Newbury School secretary. Mrs. Ottina noted that twice as many children were absent last week in grades K-3 and that absences tripled in the interesting that in most towns upper grades at one point, where semi-annual tax But Oxbow High School payments were proposed, it is Nurse Blake said that "it's usually taken toTown Meeting nothing like last year at or to the voters at a public Oxbow." This year's virus- meeting, although selectmen like infection appears to be a are empowered . by state to go bit milder and students return on a semi-annual basis if they to school after a few days, feel it is in the best interest of Mrs. Blake said. the town." While absenteeism has been He added, "What I think is II I I I I up over the past week at Blue right is to put it in the warrant Mountain Union School in for Town Meeting along with Wells River one school era- an explanation of how it would ployee noted that it must be affect town finances, and let some 24-hour virus because the people make a choice. I the students are usually back prefer giving the people a within a day. choice." (please turn to page 10) ...... 8MILE!--Blue Mountain Union School Yearbook staff member Judy Clark (left) and Editor Jenny Rowe have their picture taken by Yearbook Photographer Lois Eastman at Journal Opinion office Where they stopped by to sell an ad for the Yearbook, The three girls are seniors at BMU ' |[AI)FORD_The Oxbow h= ICE--Fishing where the lee is current|y = inches : name and telephone number of occupam, but don,t try dialing  back- liaxbow budget approved Jan. 15 meeting, including total benefits. Other itenis approved in- cluded: $2,400 for visiting artists; $2,076 for repair and 00tl00ham budget to rise to increased costs maintenance: $1,557 for rentals: and $4,000 for field trips. Also approved were $33 for travel; $46 for insurance; approval of $389,426 for regular salaries and $37,694 in ;.%7/ .!get.'ease m the ll'he General Fund increase committee ?.U:n ?. gr,,ater cost for that $761.{J B'.' c mr t .e ne  grader, for the on u; greater cost for fuel records , .i electricity for the Town |it! and office, $1,450;: new remainder for a much needed IIK Security taxes, reappraisal.  iev The town has not been |: county tax: increase, completely reappraised since l['.... "m_ an 'increase in t: I fund hlghv,,ay ex- - ?SHAM ,,, . . opsnam penses of $2,000 which in- $2,000 for copying machine; :(men held t ;et co .... her annual eludes diesel fuel, oil, and $1,600 for scheduling; $20,518 """utt Pvenn,o meeting equipment repairs. Grader for supplies; $1.950 for 21 "w'inaring hearing blades have nearly doubled in gasoline: $5,357 for books; "', uU et $2,199 for audio-visual; $1,250 ;We ee Mem lg Com- price in the past year. .... oers Geor e The increase in the fire for grade exp. and report budget represented an in- cards: $6,604 for equipment; mill ,o.m 'illleV;an,un,. n, Charles crease of $500 in the amount $4 for dues and fees. ..... |l[e e-omm'iflmApPleton, for the Tri-Village Fire The board approved a total tee approved a Department. of $12,800 for special education .......  increase over lat .T. ..... L,IF s. General Fund Bu.=-e Of the Revenue Sharing and for the gifted and talented | increase o ...... u , money available -- a total of after reducing the original :" e _ -or last years .... ' IIPget for Fire - - $14,761.96 which includes proposal by$2,800. ' . , ann a $5,000 interest not previously ap- A total of $121,822 for Highway propriated and the money to salaries and benefits of $10,999 be received in 1981 -- the for the vocational program will recommend were also approved. to greater cost for that $761.96 be appropriated An item of $3,745 for co- race for th.enew grader, for the ongoing restoration of curricular activities was -dter cost for fuel records project, and the approved. ' The board approved $37,407 for athletics "with the un- derstanding that tran- sportation must be contained as .budgeted and games (pleaseturntopage 10) ' ! N.Y. e PlERMONT--Working  a vironment I was living in "at farm and dwellingamotl- FllicoltVifle," a suburban mountains of the Upper Valley area of Buffalo, he said. He ; area is a new bxelce for helps feed the cows, at the Mark Rivers;an American Underhill Farm, cleans the Field Service exchange lmrn, assists in milking, and student from Eilicottville, N.YI, and he's enjoying it. ,' have hills in western New York. These are real mountains," says Mark, who is living at the Lawrence Underhill farm and attending his sophomore year al Oxbow lligh School where he is active in sports and the Drama Club: "It is totally different living on a farm than the en- 'well be doing sugaring next month." said Mark. who has been in this area for two weeks and will rentain until June: "It's different. Sometimes it's enjoyable, sometimes it's not as enjoyable as other things, but it is something new and I lhink will help make me a better person," he says of the hard work of farm cl)res. Mark's home area is in a ski NEW EXPERIENCE--Doing farm chores is a new experience for Mark Rivers, American Field Serl, ice exchange student who is staying at Lawrence who received an exchange to Underhill farm in Piermont. Fatif(wnia. Arther friend in enjoying Upper Valley resort area and he wants to try some oft he skiing slopes in the Uppe' Valley before the winter is over At 15, Mark is a self- possessed young man who knows exactly what he wants Iodo ill life. "1 would like to pursue a cm'eer at a military academy, mapolis or West Point, and after that go into the law field and maybe go into sports management. "My long-range goal is to be athletic director at the U.S. Military Academy." In pursuit of these goals, he has actively pursued social studies and American history : courses and taken part in ' oratorical contests it] New York state "to help with my public speaking." He also likes dramatics and has the nude lead in Oxbow's presentation of "Guys and Dulls." Back at Ellicottville, Mark played on his high school basketball, football, baseball, volleyball and track teams. During the summer he works at a camp for the mentally retarded and in his spare time plays golf and tennis. Mark also made a try at getting appointed as a congressional page at the national  capitol in Washington, "but un- fortunately my congressman didn't have enoiagh seniority.'! Ills application for an ex- change student experience was prompted by a friend. Eiltcottville has been ap- pointed to the U.S. Military Academy, and Mark hopes that is a good omen for him. How's the weather here compared with western New York? "We had 61 inches of snow before I left. llere there are only about nine inches and the temperatures are a lot colder." Another thing that's different are those New England accents. CONFERENCE--Mark RerS of EIIlcottvllle, N.Y., discusses his American Field Service exchange student program with Kathryn Ober, AFS coordinator (center), and Nancy Underhill, Mark's AFS parent in Piermont. 25' 7,f|:l i0 TTACKED--This deer, attacked by domestic dogs whose tracks are visible in now, will probably die. See Gary Moore's Out-of-Doors column. BMU approves b udget ELLS RIVER--A 1981-82 In other matters, poles and one-hour lessons for .lget of $1,246 434 has been Superintendent A. Keith Ober students for a fee of $300, )proved by' the Blue reported that school con- based on 40 students at $1.50 Untain union School Board. sumption of energy is up 10 per lesson The proposed budget is wr cent and costs up 36 ix-r The cost of the lessons will tout $149,0(10 or 13 per cent, cent. b paid b. h, scho,fi The ,hr than the prevmus The bua:'d approved a pr,,.ram .tavtv( tins week 9.3 per proposal by Mike Thomas of aud will be conducted on tn,eaae to raise River Bend Sports Shop and Mondays and Fridays [or five BMU physmal education in- weeks the structor Ellen Smith tostart a The board also confirmed cross-country skiing program hot lunch price increases to 60 at the school, with Thomas cents and 75 cents. Reduced supplying the skis. boots and price lunches are 20 cents. Serw, ng Over 48 Communities ,n Northern New Hampshire and Vermont January 28, 1981 Annual meeting Bradford Village elects officers by I,.F. BARNES l{etiring trustee lh)raee BRAI)FORD--By a margin of Paln|er received standing 25 to 20. voters at the Annual applause m recognition and Village Meeting chose as thanks for his 26 years of trustee of the Village of servicel)n thevillage board Bradford for a three-year I)r. ,lames Barton. tlelena term. Welch is a long-time Kinney. and AIfa Gautreau Bradford resident, with thirty won uncontested ballot as years experience in village audilors for the confing year. service. Several w)ters voiced Welch was also nominated comphlints about the late to succeed himself for a five- distribution of the annual year term as water corn- village report. A broken press missioner, tn response to caused thedelay. quest toning of the propriety of 1981 Budget debated one man holding office as both Town Manager Susan trustee and water corn- Spaulding asked that the missioner, the unanimously village vote to raise a dollar re-elected moderator value, rather than the tax Lawrence Coffin said. "There rate the trustees would then is the legal opinion that one set ihe tax rate when the may hold both offices." grand list is completed. The The second nominee. Bryce nmfion was made to raise Morrill. defeated Welch, $13.575 requested by the winning the five-year water estimated budget. commissioner's term by a Eleanor Donnelly amended vote of 27 to 18. the nlotion "to eliminate the i I e m "m ana g i ng projected maintenance budget village, they were paying n|untcipalily, thereby is less for 1981 than for 1980: thenmelves. reducing lhe budgeted amount $24.500 as opposed to the ex- Patrolman or to $9075.'" Donnelly said. "i pended$27.853.64, watchman debate think the trustees could do Under winter maintenance. Would defraying the public these duties tlmreby deleting the budgeted amount for salt sal ety expenses inw)lve hiring lhe $45001rom the budget "" increased from $1)0 in 1980 to a patrol officer for a total lloraee Palmer offered the $').'_'50 for 1981. Spaulding said estimated expense of $30.650 Irustees an epmion on this: that this reflects the increased pet" year or a mght watchman "We tthe trustees) used to price of salt and the estimated dispatcher at an estimated struggle through the year. usage, annual expense of $14.615. handling all the disper- There is a long stadi:ling Both options were outlined in senlms The town manager agreement between the the public safety report, with has taken quite a burden from village and the town that the the trustees indicating the trustees and has the time town buys trucks and stores prefeFence for the lesser and knowledge to seek the sand. The village then figure. A motion was made to available grants. I think it's a reinlburses the town for half that effect good thing." thecost of thesand. During the discussion, a Tim meeting defeated the Trustee Byron Kidder said, combined townwillage police amendment. The $4500 which "l checked on this to see if it force was advocated. Kidder is the village's one-third share would save money to buy and said. "'l personally feel that ., of the budget remained in the stockpile our own salt. we should- have a combined budget. Ih)wever. we've used about police with the village and the Snow removal expenditures half of the amount allotted for town. Perhaps something also elicited discussion: the this year. So it's six of one, should be included by petition former practice of contractual hall' a dozen of the other." in the town warrant.'" K. l)onaldWelch snow removal services verses Trust(re Francis Garone Spauldmg indicated that the the current use of village said. "They've done this so town warrant was already equil2ment and staff for winter long that tlo(kiy Palmer can't posted for this year. The Haverhill considering maintenance, even ren,ember hew it star- village would need tomake Welch said, "This is one ted." arrangements for 1981 now. reason [ ran for l,arry Drew questioned the Reflecting general concern trustee- because I'm quite propriety of the villagers about the ineffectual nature of sc,u an uat--'---'---n --w tax bills disturbed over the expense paying lwice-oncewhenthe a night watchman, Connie here. You can'toperatethis as town buys the salt and once Dunlap said. "What authority HAVlgRHILL-Selectmen are system would fiave ad- considering :. a proposal to vantages f6i" both the town. change the town's system of and for many taxpayers. annual tax bills to a semi- "It would give the town annual basis, better control of cash flow and This would mean, if ap- give it money to invest rather proved by voters at Town than having to borrow in Meeting March 10, that tax- anticipation of tax paymen- payers would pay half of their Is." Klark said. "Money would annual bill in June ar)d the be coming in throughout the other half m l)ecember, in- year The town would have a stead of paying lhe entire ('ash incomealI year round.so amount in Deccmben as a to speak " present. The selectmen, at ter Selectman Winthrop Klark discussion 'with budget told the Journal Opinion the committee members on the proposal, decided to inform taxpayers of the idea, probably through public meetings, before it is placed in the warrant for Town Meeting. From the standpoint of the taxpayer. Klark said. "I think I'm in the situation most taxpayers are. I could probably more easily make two $5(X) payments than one $1,()0 payment although I've alwa,s managed to el)pc with the annual payment by putting a little aside. I would prefer to pay twice a year (half in Jqne and half in December). but I'm not sure that everyone feels that way." Klark added that "It is cheap as you were operating when the village pays its would a guy have walking before." share. It was pointed out that about with no badge, no gun Spauiding ipdicated that the as they were both town and (please turn to page 10) Flu bug hits schools by JOANNA GILBRIDE BRADFORD Achoo wheeze, cough! Just as temperatures began to moderate in the Upper Valley and children rushed home to hit the sled slopes, that old pesky winter flu bug attacked. Area schools report that absenteeism rose over the past l0 days due to colds, flu- like viruses and other upper respiratory infections. "Absenteeism has definitely been up," said Pat Ottina, Newbury School secretary. Mrs. Ottina noted that twice as many children were absent last week in grades K-3 and that absences tripled in the interesting that in most towns upper grades at one point, where semi-annual tax But Oxbow High School payments were proposed, it is Nurse Blake said that "it's usually taken toTown Meeting nothing like last year at or to the voters at a public Oxbow." This year's virus- meeting, although selectmen like infection appears to be a are empowered . by state to go bit milder and students return on a semi-annual basis if they to school after a few days, feel it is in the best interest of Mrs. Blake said. the town." While absenteeism has been He added, "What I think is II I I I I up over the past week at Blue right is to put it in the warrant Mountain Union School in for Town Meeting along with Wells River one school era- an explanation of how it would ployee noted that it must be affect town finances, and let some 24-hour virus because the people make a choice. I the students are usually back prefer giving the people a within a day. choice." (please turn to page 10) ...... 8MILE!--Blue Mountain Union School Yearbook staff member Judy Clark (left) and Editor Jenny Rowe have their picture taken by Yearbook Photographer Lois Eastman at Journal Opinion office Where they stopped by to sell an ad for the Yearbook, The three girls are seniors at BMU ' |[AI)FORD_The Oxbow h= ICE--Fishing where the lee is current|y = inches : name and telephone number of occupam, but don,t try dialing  back- liaxbow budget approved Jan. 15 meeting, including total benefits. Other itenis approved in- cluded: $2,400 for visiting artists; $2,076 for repair and 00tl00ham budget to rise to increased costs maintenance: $1,557 for rentals: and $4,000 for field trips. Also approved were $33 for travel; $46 for insurance; approval of $389,426 for regular salaries and $37,694 in ;.%7/ .!get.'ease m the ll'he General Fund increase committee ?.U:n ?. gr,,ater cost for that $761.{J B'.' c mr t .e ne  grader, for the on u; greater cost for fuel records , .i electricity for the Town |it! and office, $1,450;: new remainder for a much needed IIK Security taxes, reappraisal.  iev The town has not been |: county tax: increase, completely reappraised since l['.... "m_ an 'increase in t: I fund hlghv,,ay ex- - ?SHAM ,,, . . opsnam penses of $2,000 which in- $2,000 for copying machine; :(men held t ;et co .... her annual eludes diesel fuel, oil, and $1,600 for scheduling; $20,518 """utt Pvenn,o meeting equipment repairs. Grader for supplies; $1.950 for 21 "w'inaring hearing blades have nearly doubled in gasoline: $5,357 for books; "', uU et $2,199 for audio-visual; $1,250 ;We ee Mem lg Com- price in the past year. .... oers Geor e The increase in the fire for grade exp. and report budget represented an in- cards: $6,604 for equipment; mill ,o.m 'illleV;an,un,. n, Charles crease of $500 in the amount $4 for dues and fees. ..... |l[e e-omm'iflmApPleton, for the Tri-Village Fire The board approved a total tee approved a Department. of $12,800 for special education .......  increase over lat .T. ..... L,IF s. General Fund Bu.=-e Of the Revenue Sharing and for the gifted and talented | increase o ...... u , money available -- a total of after reducing the original :" e _ -or last years .... ' IIPget for Fire - - $14,761.96 which includes proposal by$2,800. ' . , ann a $5,000 interest not previously ap- A total of $121,822 for Highway propriated and the money to salaries and benefits of $10,999 be received in 1981 -- the for the vocational program will recommend were also approved. to greater cost for that $761.96 be appropriated An item of $3,745 for co- race for th.enew grader, for the ongoing restoration of curricular activities was -dter cost for fuel records project, and the approved. ' The board approved $37,407 for athletics "with the un- derstanding that tran- sportation must be contained as .budgeted and games (pleaseturntopage 10) ' ! N.Y. e PlERMONT--Working  a vironment I was living in "at farm and dwellingamotl- FllicoltVifle," a suburban mountains of the Upper Valley area of Buffalo, he said. He ; area is a new bxelce for helps feed the cows, at the Mark Rivers;an American Underhill Farm, cleans the Field Service exchange lmrn, assists in milking, and student from Eilicottville, N.YI, and he's enjoying it. ,' have hills in western New York. These are real mountains," says Mark, who is living at the Lawrence Underhill farm and attending his sophomore year al Oxbow lligh School where he is active in sports and the Drama Club: "It is totally different living on a farm than the en- 'well be doing sugaring next month." said Mark. who has been in this area for two weeks and will rentain until June: "It's different. Sometimes it's enjoyable, sometimes it's not as enjoyable as other things, but it is something new and I lhink will help make me a better person," he says of the hard work of farm cl)res. Mark's home area is in a ski NEW EXPERIENCE--Doing farm chores is a new experience for Mark Rivers, American Field Serl, ice exchange student who is staying at Lawrence who received an exchange to Underhill farm in Piermont. Fatif(wnia. Arther friend in enjoying Upper Valley resort area and he wants to try some oft he skiing slopes in the Uppe' Valley before the winter is over At 15, Mark is a self- possessed young man who knows exactly what he wants Iodo ill life. "1 would like to pursue a cm'eer at a military academy, mapolis or West Point, and after that go into the law field and maybe go into sports management. "My long-range goal is to be athletic director at the U.S. Military Academy." In pursuit of these goals, he has actively pursued social studies and American history : courses and taken part in ' oratorical contests it] New York state "to help with my public speaking." He also likes dramatics and has the nude lead in Oxbow's presentation of "Guys and Dulls." Back at Ellicottville, Mark played on his high school basketball, football, baseball, volleyball and track teams. During the summer he works at a camp for the mentally retarded and in his spare time plays golf and tennis. Mark also made a try at getting appointed as a congressional page at the national  capitol in Washington, "but un- fortunately my congressman didn't have enoiagh seniority.'! Ills application for an ex- change student experience was prompted by a friend. Eiltcottville has been ap- pointed to the U.S. Military Academy, and Mark hopes that is a good omen for him. How's the weather here compared with western New York? "We had 61 inches of snow before I left. llere there are only about nine inches and the temperatures are a lot colder." Another thing that's different are those New England accents. CONFERENCE--Mark RerS of EIIlcottvllle, N.Y., discusses his American Field Service exchange student program with Kathryn Ober, AFS coordinator (center), and Nancy Underhill, Mark's AFS parent in Piermont.