"
Newspaper Archive of
Journal Opinion
Bradford , Vermont
Lyft
February 4, 1981     Journal Opinion
PAGE 1     (1 of 12 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 1     (1 of 12 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
February 4, 1981
 

Newspaper Archive of Journal Opinion produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




)J t !' 5!3 I0 116, Number 5 Serf',rig Over 48 Commumties in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont February 4, 1981 Lc \\; I IeCi,L E:ENT---Competitors practice for the I98i international J ter Special Olympics Games, to be held March 8-13 at the =age at Smugglers' Notch and Stowe. Special Olympics from mmnd the w I Opening ceremonies and the lighting of the Olympic Torch are scheduled for March t0 at 4:30 p.m. at Smugglers' Notch. All competitions are free and open to the public. For further in. formation call Games lleadquarters at Champlain College in arld and 1,000 volunteers will share a very special week her zc mes Burlin ton (802) 6.58-0800 I With all the pomp and pageantry of the Olymp" Ga . g ". - | oil could da e ine cold weather g g ma en i in q-[Y;uake Quaker St'ate has recalled our knowledge, all of ours is liquid even in very cold because of faulty additives. .ood.'" resulinserious The bad batch ot oil ;:s ioth Ames and t',radtm'd ia,dt>, ail)\\;m ,m)t)v h in cold manuiactuved and dated in ,\\;uloimt.,,aidflie) havehad lrecze up and rt.ult in I|O colnplaints or reports of danmgewhenturnedoll. Quaker State "t hie m;ljor indication of the have sold recently. Roseblade, roger of sales coordination !S Frank ,tor Quaker State, said the tly.itant manager at Ames ,, , problem with the bad batch of ve rtment Store in N. all ours ln, oil was in an additive com- t)etober.'" said a spokesman ponenl'produ,ed by a supplier astrhill of the oil that at Bradford Auto Parts ;'To o, " - . .. ...m normally keeps motor ou :b/. , ,,, Can you identify? l)rol)h'nl i the trial)lilly to el (til |WI".,--tlI! lli I]' lll',l ('\\; Ililllkkt'5 D.I [t'IIUI)c|'a'LIY[.' t)[ /.tWO Id l)Ctt)A .'" llttC [tiei deah,r said. This wonld show (please turn to page 5) i Design task force at work in Newbury by L.F. BARNES physical environment, ana the NEWBURY The Newbury textbooks. Design Committee. formed by At the fourth meeting, the interested parents, teachers and school board members, has met on four occasions. At the first meeting, chaired by Gerry Brooks, members considered the original design, why it's outdated, and the function of the current committee. The second, chaired by Delores Drugach' reviewed the schedules of grades three through six, with an eye to deterr0ining the philosophy as it is current practiced. They noted the need for teacher participation. At the third meeting, chaired by Meg Campbell. principal Edward Arnold conducted the group on a tour of the school building. This generated comments on the use of the building, the current group practiced a "dream exercise." Each jotted down, then shared, his vision of the school by 1986. The following are curriculum suggestions: --Subject areas are to be correlated and when possible, project oriented. Do lots of story writing. Use a variety of mediums. -Limit the class size The teachers requested a maxim um of 20. if not less. Do more work with in- dividuals and small groups, including some cross-age groups and exchanges bet- ween the classes. --Have an aide who could work in the various classes on a rotating schedule, --Make more use of the ( please turn to page I ! ) heaven for little girls... A pretty picture in lace dress, satin ribbons, bows Mary Jant, this little girl posed a long time ago. Those were the days of and candlestick, telephones. Her family lived in this area. But her name. Do you? If you can identify her, please drop us a line. state Police ask help from snowmobilers The Vermont State Police season or unless the operator have received numerous is not closer than five feet complaints regarding ira- from the plowed portion or proper operation of unless the municipality has snowmobiles in thearea. They opened lhe highway to warn that thelaws of thestate s'owmobile travel aud so will be enforced and that the posted the opening. Violators snowmobile patrol will be out will receive a citation with a working the area. In addition $35 fine. . all other law enforcement An all-to-common practice personel will be on the'lookout and one that is very dangerous for violators, is operation of the Snow machines must be snowmobiles on sidewalks. registered if operated on other The fine for doing so is $50. than the properly of theowner A much less common of the machine or solely on viohllion, but one considered privately owned property very serious is the harrasslng when, the operator is of wildlife. Deer especially specifically invited to dose by nlost often die if chased,by the owner and has on his snow nlachines at this time of person the written consent of w, ar. Vermonl considers the theowner. :iolalion very serious and Violation of this regulation conviction will result in a fine will result in a $25 fine if of $75. stopped hy an enforcement Persons tlnder sixteen years officer, of age must have in their Operation of the snow immediate possessmn a valid nmchines on public highways snowmobile safety certificate is a frequent source of corn- issued bythecommissioner. plaints, The regulation reads: Anyone wishing to report a person may not operate or illegal snowmobile activity permit to be operated a snow should call the Vermont State machine along a public high- Police. The toll free numbers way unless it is not being are listed elsewhere in this maintained during the snow paper. Flash .floods cause evacuation of homes BRADFORD--A torrent of water from a sudden, un- seasonable February thaw forced the evacuation of several homes on S. Main Street in Bradford Monday. "The culverts are all plugged up and can't handle the water." a Fire Depart- ment official said as firemen worked with sandbags to divert some of the water flow away from several residences and businesses in the down- town area. Electric power had to be turned off in at least four homes, whose residents were evacuated because of the flooding. Other homes had flooded basements. The early thaw also resulted in sch(x)l closings, a rash of fender-bender accidents and stranded vehicles in the Upper Valley area. Some employes were not able to get to work as they found themselves sliding on sheets of ice covered with rapidly rushing water, Temperatures in the 5O- degree range and a rainfall set off the flooding, which was worsened as ice and snow cover melted. S. Main Street in Bradford was closed to traffic as firemen struggled to stem the cascading water crossing the street. Temperatures were to dip sharply after the thaw, posing more problems of standing water turning to ice. making driving hazardous. WllNER--Diane Nelson of E. Ryegate (center) displays her first-place Milk Quality-Dairy Foods award from Barre Farm Show. With her is BMU Principal William Randall and FFA Advisor Beverly Moody. E. Ryegate girl is dairy winner E. RYEGATE Diane Nelson. winner in the Milk Quality and Dairy Industry Association: daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dairy Foods Contest held at Diane has been a member of Edwin J. Nelson of 1. Ryegate the Barre Farm Show. the Blue Mountain Union was First Place Individual She will receive a $200, Future Farmers for 4 years. scholarship from the Vermont I II Haverhill sets fee for impounded dogs ............. IIAVEIttIII,I, T(iwn selec- t. lll',t'l htIvo set zi t'l/argt' ill Sill The ltl\\;,l/ had previously tor tile {irsl (to7 ala4 ?65 {or ptll)i,tt't/;t ltttt',t' t{/att'nt;.{a, i each succeeding day lor any ould tx, eitloi'ced etiective :, .: dog owner to redeem a dog ,Jan, 30. i that has been impounded Although it has tleenin force under the Dog Control law since the Nov 4 election, the approved by voters last Nov. seh,clnien had delayed strict _ . elltOl'enicll| because many PTA etin]!! Iownsl,ople apparently were unaware ol the statute. me  The law stales that it is ill Odord to unlawful for lhe owiier of any dog, licensed, or unlicensed, to air dispute ()iO,'()RI) Due " to con- troversy regarding Orford lligh School's educational (lualilies. slandards and ex- wnses, the Orford PTA will hold an open inecting .for questilms and answers at its Feb. 12 nicet trig. The meeting will be at 7:30 p.m. in Memorial Hall, ilome Economic Room. The'advance meeting, with members of the school board attending is designed to help t)rford taxpayers understand t lit, school's needs prior to the hool Dislricl Meeting. allow the dog to run at large except when accompanied by the owner or custodian and when used for hunting, her- ding or supervised com- petition or training. "Any dog fl)und at large in violation of the above statute will be inlpounded in ac- cortlance wil h the above statute.' said the notice publishtwl Jan. 28. Seleetiiiail Winthrop Klark told the Journal opinion that it had Been tastier, the town an aeva Pe t) ,%'Lt per lin!)ttn4e4 dog in the past for vetel*lnat'y care. Impounded dogs will be cared for by Blackmount Veterinarian Associatious in N Haverhill. "There have been a lot of dogs running loose. We wanted to be sure we were doing it right when we do it." Klark said of the delay in enforcing the dog law. In tither action at last xeek's meeting, selectmen wted to ask the state Board of Taxation to extend its reassessment order deadline from April l, 1982, to AprilA. 1983, so the State Department of Revenue and Ahninistration can do the reassessments, rather than hiring a private reassessment firm. Oxbow will propose tight school budget l'arties who do uot wish to BItADFORD--The Oxbow Ix, recognized for questions at School Board will hold a public the meeting nmy send their hearing Feb. 19 on the questionnaires to Toni Pose, proposed 1981-82 school budget P.T.A. president, prior to el $1,453.820, a seven per cent meetilg, increase over the current "Parties should bethere for hudget. answers, names nmy stay "You are always hurting annonymous. The meeting yourself it you budget the will he kept in order with no same amount when inflation is accusatious or arguments," 12 per cent." said School Mrs. Peasesaid. Superintendent John D. At the Jan. 21 PTA meeting Fonlana. "It is a very. very Mrs. t'ease discussed the tight budget.Peoplearegoing Nalionai P.T.A, Contest, to Ix, tighteuing their belts." "Faniily Togetherness." for Many budget items contain grades K-12. and urged thesameanlounl aslast year. paivents to have their children Final aetion on th(l budget participate by voters from Bradford and The Boy Scouts Troop :it; Newbury will come at the (please turn to page tO) annlial ilieeting (if Union tligh Ryegate selectmen reject reapportionment proposal $20,000 for a biiildiug fund for it ltnunfcipal fire station. Another article requests that tilt, real estate owned by Blue Mountain Grange No. 263 be exenlpled front hixes. Selectmen reviewed equalizalion figures to deterrnine lhe amount of state I{ F(;,VI'E Selectnlen have i'ejected a reapportionment liropos;.i I of Ihe State I,cgishllive Iteapport ininnell[ Ihlai'(I lhal would have linked Iyegale with leachaln alid Itii'net ill a new represen- lalive dislrict, insleadof the Iwesenl alignlllenl with (irliton and Newbul'y. School histrict No. 30 in Bradford Feb. 24. Aroline Putnam of W. Newbury, board chairman, said the board tried to limit spending increases to seven per cent wherever possible but thai some increases, such as the 17 per cent hike for transportation, could not he avoided. The final budget proposal is "something the school can live with and I hope it is something the taxpayers can live with," Putnam said. Items cut from hhe budget included the Gifted and Talented Program, plus reduced money for field trips and for vocational supplies and materiais. Funds for repairing badly leaking school roofs are not hlcluded in the proposed budget and Fontana said wlers will be asked to con- sider alternative financing methods including the possibility of five or IO-year bonds to finance repairs. The board also hopes to recover some funds in a suit against the firm that installed the roofs when the school was built in 1970, In other action at its Jan, 22 meeting, the school board increased the price of milk from nine to to cents, reflecting higher costs: adopted a policy that swim- ming is not permitted on field trips; and approved a motion to put out the school bus contract for a three-year bid. The board also set a tuition rale of $2,750 per student for the 1981-82 school year. Gary Moore Gary Moore named to state, federal compact on salmon BRADFORD--Gary Moore, "Out of Doors' columnist for the Journal Opinio.. has been appointed by Gov. Richard Snelling as a member of the recently formed Connecticut River Atlantic Salmon Compact. The Compact includes the states of Vermont, New Hampshire, Connecticut and Massachusetts. and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service. Moore, an area native who lives in Brad[ord, is a well- known outdoorsman and friend of the environment. He is also a Game Warden and writes for a number of other publications, including magazines. Moore is an avid hunter and fisherman. ,The purpose of this compact is to promote the restoration of Atlantic salmon in the Connecticut River basin by the development of a joint interstate program for stocking, protection, management, research and regulation. It is the purpose of the compact to restore Atlantic salmon to the Connecticut River in numbers as near as possible to their historical abundance. Each state in the compact appoints two representatives (please turn to page tO) and aid and noted a two per ('urrenl econolnic and ('enl increase over the grand cullural lies and ties Io trnion lisl. I)istrict No. 21 school were The I)oard also votcl to oiled as reasons for ie.iecting increase Ihe amount of Ihe clmllge, caiciunl t'bloride purchased to ltyegale scleclincii al their conlrol dusl on town roads .lan. 2(i iiit,ling also signed fronl lasi year's 20 tons at a Ihowariiiilg [or,the 19111 Town cosl ol $3,300 hi 24 Ions for l%hqing in March, which $4,500 Ihis year. hleludes arlicles re(itlesting ill allother /tqilln. |5 names Ilie 1399,900 budgeted [or Blue ei'e i'enoved froin lhe town Mounlain Illiion lioilt and eheeklisl andone added )J t !' 5!3 I0 116, Number 5 Serf',rig Over 48 Commumties in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont February 4, 1981 Lc \\; I IeCi,L E:ENT---Competitors practice for the I98i international J ter Special Olympics Games, to be held March 8-13 at the =age at Smugglers' Notch and Stowe. Special Olympics from mmnd the w I Opening ceremonies and the lighting of the Olympic Torch are scheduled for March t0 at 4:30 p.m. at Smugglers' Notch. All competitions are free and open to the public. For further in. formation call Games lleadquarters at Champlain College in arld and 1,000 volunteers will share a very special week her zc mes Burlin ton (802) 6.58-0800 I With all the pomp and pageantry of the Olymp" Ga . g ". - | oil could da e ine cold weather g g ma en i in q-[Y;uake Quaker St'ate has recalled our knowledge, all of ours is liquid even in very cold because of faulty additives. .ood.'" resulinserious The bad batch ot oil ;:s ioth Ames and t',radtm'd ia,dt>, ail)\\;m ,m)t)v h in cold manuiactuved and dated in ,\\;uloimt.,,aidflie) havehad lrecze up and rt.ult in I|O colnplaints or reports of danmgewhenturnedoll. Quaker State "t hie m;ljor indication of the have sold recently. Roseblade, roger of sales coordination !S Frank ,tor Quaker State, said the tly.itant manager at Ames ,, , problem with the bad batch of ve rtment Store in N. all ours ln, oil was in an additive com- t)etober.'" said a spokesman ponenl'produ,ed by a supplier astrhill of the oil that at Bradford Auto Parts ;'To o, " - . .. ...m normally keeps motor ou :b/. , ,,, Can you identify? l)rol)h'nl i the trial)lilly to el (til |WI".,--tlI! lli I]' lll',l ('\\; Ililllkkt'5 D.I [t'IIUI)c|'a'LIY[.' t)[ /.tWO Id l)Ctt)A .'" llttC [tiei deah,r said. This wonld show (please turn to page 5) i Design task force at work in Newbury by L.F. BARNES physical environment, ana the NEWBURY The Newbury textbooks. Design Committee. formed by At the fourth meeting, the interested parents, teachers and school board members, has met on four occasions. At the first meeting, chaired by Gerry Brooks, members considered the original design, why it's outdated, and the function of the current committee. The second, chaired by Delores Drugach' reviewed the schedules of grades three through six, with an eye to deterr0ining the philosophy as it is current practiced. They noted the need for teacher participation. At the third meeting, chaired by Meg Campbell. principal Edward Arnold conducted the group on a tour of the school building. This generated comments on the use of the building, the current group practiced a "dream exercise." Each jotted down, then shared, his vision of the school by 1986. The following are curriculum suggestions: --Subject areas are to be correlated and when possible, project oriented. Do lots of story writing. Use a variety of mediums. -Limit the class size The teachers requested a maxim um of 20. if not less. Do more work with in- dividuals and small groups, including some cross-age groups and exchanges bet- ween the classes. --Have an aide who could work in the various classes on a rotating schedule, --Make more use of the ( please turn to page I ! ) heaven for little girls... A pretty picture in lace dress, satin ribbons, bows Mary Jant, this little girl posed a long time ago. Those were the days of and candlestick, telephones. Her family lived in this area. But her name. Do you? If you can identify her, please drop us a line. state Police ask help from snowmobilers The Vermont State Police season or unless the operator have received numerous is not closer than five feet complaints regarding ira- from the plowed portion or proper operation of unless the municipality has snowmobiles in thearea. They opened lhe highway to warn that thelaws of thestate s'owmobile travel aud so will be enforced and that the posted the opening. Violators snowmobile patrol will be out will receive a citation with a working the area. In addition $35 fine. . all other law enforcement An all-to-common practice personel will be on the'lookout and one that is very dangerous for violators, is operation of the Snow machines must be snowmobiles on sidewalks. registered if operated on other The fine for doing so is $50. than the properly of theowner A much less common of the machine or solely on viohllion, but one considered privately owned property very serious is the harrasslng when, the operator is of wildlife. Deer especially specifically invited to dose by nlost often die if chased,by the owner and has on his snow nlachines at this time of person the written consent of w, ar. Vermonl considers the theowner. :iolalion very serious and Violation of this regulation conviction will result in a fine will result in a $25 fine if of $75. stopped hy an enforcement Persons tlnder sixteen years officer, of age must have in their Operation of the snow immediate possessmn a valid nmchines on public highways snowmobile safety certificate is a frequent source of corn- issued bythecommissioner. plaints, The regulation reads: Anyone wishing to report a person may not operate or illegal snowmobile activity permit to be operated a snow should call the Vermont State machine along a public high- Police. The toll free numbers way unless it is not being are listed elsewhere in this maintained during the snow paper. Flash .floods cause evacuation of homes BRADFORD--A torrent of water from a sudden, un- seasonable February thaw forced the evacuation of several homes on S. Main Street in Bradford Monday. "The culverts are all plugged up and can't handle the water." a Fire Depart- ment official said as firemen worked with sandbags to divert some of the water flow away from several residences and businesses in the down- town area. Electric power had to be turned off in at least four homes, whose residents were evacuated because of the flooding. Other homes had flooded basements. The early thaw also resulted in sch(x)l closings, a rash of fender-bender accidents and stranded vehicles in the Upper Valley area. Some employes were not able to get to work as they found themselves sliding on sheets of ice covered with rapidly rushing water, Temperatures in the 5O- degree range and a rainfall set off the flooding, which was worsened as ice and snow cover melted. S. Main Street in Bradford was closed to traffic as firemen struggled to stem the cascading water crossing the street. Temperatures were to dip sharply after the thaw, posing more problems of standing water turning to ice. making driving hazardous. WllNER--Diane Nelson of E. Ryegate (center) displays her first-place Milk Quality-Dairy Foods award from Barre Farm Show. With her is BMU Principal William Randall and FFA Advisor Beverly Moody. E. Ryegate girl is dairy winner E. RYEGATE Diane Nelson. winner in the Milk Quality and Dairy Industry Association: daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dairy Foods Contest held at Diane has been a member of Edwin J. Nelson of 1. Ryegate the Barre Farm Show. the Blue Mountain Union was First Place Individual She will receive a $200, Future Farmers for 4 years. scholarship from the Vermont I II Haverhill sets fee for impounded dogs ............. IIAVEIttIII,I, T(iwn selec- t- lll',t'l htIvo set zi t'l/argt' ill Sill The ltl\\;,l/ had previously tor tile {irsl (to7 ala4 ?65 {or ptll)i,tt't/;t ltttt',t' t{/att'nt;.{a, i each succeeding day lor any ould tx, eitloi'ced etiective :, .: dog owner to redeem a dog ,Jan, 30. i that has been impounded Although it has tleenin force under the Dog Control law since the Nov 4 election, the approved by voters last Nov. seh,clnien had delayed strict _ . elltOl'enicll| because many PTA etin]!! Iownsl,ople apparently were unaware ol the statute. me  The law stales that it is ill Odord to unlawful for lhe owiier of any dog, licensed, or unlicensed, to air dispute ()iO,'()RI) Due " to con- troversy regarding Orford lligh School's educational (lualilies. slandards and ex- wnses, the Orford PTA will hold an open inecting .for questilms and answers at its Feb. 12 nicet trig. The meeting will be at 7:30 p.m. in Memorial Hall, ilome Economic Room. The'advance meeting, with members of the school board attending is designed to help t)rford taxpayers understand t lit, school's needs prior to the hool Dislricl Meeting. allow the dog to run at large except when accompanied by the owner or custodian and when used for hunting, her- ding or supervised com- petition or training. "Any dog fl)und at large in violation of the above statute will be inlpounded in ac- cortlance wil h the above statute.' said the notice publishtwl Jan. 28. Seleetiiiail Winthrop Klark told the Journal opinion that it had Been tastier, the town an aeva Pe t) ,%'Lt per lin!)ttn4e4 dog in the past for vetel*lnat'y care. Impounded dogs will be cared for by Blackmount Veterinarian Associatious in N Haverhill. "There have been a lot of dogs running loose. We wanted to be sure we were doing it right when we do it." Klark said of the delay in enforcing the dog law. In tither action at last xeek's meeting, selectmen wted to ask the state Board of Taxation to extend its reassessment order deadline from April l, 1982, to AprilA. 1983, so the State Department of Revenue and Ahninistration can do the reassessments, rather than hiring a private reassessment firm. Oxbow will propose tight school budget l'arties who do uot wish to BItADFORD--The Oxbow Ix, recognized for questions at School Board will hold a public the meeting nmy send their hearing Feb. 19 on the questionnaires to Toni Pose, proposed 1981-82 school budget P.T.A. president, prior to el $1,453.820, a seven per cent meetilg, increase over the current "Parties should bethere for hudget. answers, names nmy stay "You are always hurting annonymous. The meeting yourself it you budget the will he kept in order with no same amount when inflation is accusatious or arguments," 12 per cent." said School Mrs. Peasesaid. Superintendent John D. At the Jan. 21 PTA meeting Fonlana. "It is a very. very Mrs. t'ease discussed the tight budget.Peoplearegoing Nalionai P.T.A, Contest, to Ix, tighteuing their belts." "Faniily Togetherness." for Many budget items contain grades K-12. and urged thesameanlounl aslast year. paivents to have their children Final aetion on th(l budget participate by voters from Bradford and The Boy Scouts Troop :it; Newbury will come at the (please turn to page tO) annlial ilieeting (if Union tligh Ryegate selectmen reject reapportionment proposal $20,000 for a biiildiug fund for it ltnunfcipal fire station. Another article requests that tilt, real estate owned by Blue Mountain Grange No. 263 be exenlpled front hixes. Selectmen reviewed equalizalion figures to deterrnine lhe amount of state I{ F(;,VI'E Selectnlen have i'ejected a reapportionment liropos;.i I of Ihe State I,cgishllive Iteapport ininnell[ Ihlai'(I lhal would have linked Iyegale with leachaln alid Itii'net ill a new represen- lalive dislrict, insleadof the Iwesenl alignlllenl with (irliton and Newbul'y. School histrict No. 30 in Bradford Feb. 24. Aroline Putnam of W. Newbury, board chairman, said the board tried to limit spending increases to seven per cent wherever possible but thai some increases, such as the 17 per cent hike for transportation, could not he avoided. The final budget proposal is "something the school can live with and I hope it is something the taxpayers can live with," Putnam said. Items cut from hhe budget included the Gifted and Talented Program, plus reduced money for field trips and for vocational supplies and materiais. Funds for repairing badly leaking school roofs are not hlcluded in the proposed budget and Fontana said wlers will be asked to con- sider alternative financing methods including the possibility of five or IO-year bonds to finance repairs. The board also hopes to recover some funds in a suit against the firm that installed the roofs when the school was built in 1970, In other action at its Jan, 22 meeting, the school board increased the price of milk from nine to to cents, reflecting higher costs: adopted a policy that swim- ming is not permitted on field trips; and approved a motion to put out the school bus contract for a three-year bid. The board also set a tuition rale of $2,750 per student for the 1981-82 school year. Gary Moore Gary Moore named to state, federal compact on salmon BRADFORD--Gary Moore, "Out of Doors' columnist for the Journal Opinio.. has been appointed by Gov. Richard Snelling as a member of the recently formed Connecticut River Atlantic Salmon Compact. The Compact includes the states of Vermont, New Hampshire, Connecticut and Massachusetts. and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service. Moore, an area native who lives in Brad[ord, is a well- known outdoorsman and friend of the environment. He is also a Game Warden and writes for a number of other publications, including magazines. Moore is an avid hunter and fisherman. ,The purpose of this compact is to promote the restoration of Atlantic salmon in the Connecticut River basin by the development of a joint interstate program for stocking, protection, management, research and regulation. It is the purpose of the compact to restore Atlantic salmon to the Connecticut River in numbers as near as possible to their historical abundance. Each state in the compact appoints two representatives (please turn to page tO) and aid and noted a two per ('urrenl econolnic and ('enl increase over the grand cullural lies and ties Io trnion lisl. I)istrict No. 21 school were The I)oard also votcl to oiled as reasons for ie.iecting increase Ihe amount of Ihe clmllge, caiciunl t'bloride purchased to ltyegale scleclincii al their conlrol dusl on town roads .lan. 2(i iiit,ling also signed fronl lasi year's 20 tons at a Ihowariiiilg [or,the 19111 Town cosl ol $3,300 hi 24 Ions for l%hqing in March, which $4,500 Ihis year. hleludes arlicles re(itlesting ill allother /tqilln. |5 names Ilie 1399,900 budgeted [or Blue ei'e i'enoved froin lhe town Mounlain Illiion lioilt and eheeklisl andone added