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February 4, 1981     Journal Opinion
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February 4, 1981
 

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Page 4-The Journal Opinion-February 4, 1981 ii I I II I . I | i I I I 9RTHEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. Publisher of Journal Ill Opinion Woekly newslmpe iwlbed in 8redferd, Vormut. Sebxript,.a fetes VormNt nd Sew Ilempikire. $t.0O per yoor $6.00 for six meaw; oot ef stere . $11.00 per yeer end $7.00 for lix mortal; Senior citizen discoeat $2.00. Siceud bui peIlOge Imtd el Irudfenl, Vinnott 0$015. Piblod by Norflleeit Puldiskblg COmlmay, Inc., P.O, Il 178, Imdfeed. Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher RES Bradford  Woodsville 802-222-5281  . 603"747"2016 An Independent Newspaper I Editorials Public service volunteers? With town selectmen, school boards and others --including President Reagan-- looking for ways to chop public spending, it may be time to start thinking about an old tradition in Vermont and American life--volunteers. There is no reason that public- spirited volunteers can't fill some of the gaps in public service that overburdened budgets can't stretch to cover in these inflationary times. It may take a new local ordinance or two, or perhaps clearance from the state school board or other state agencies, but we bet if town and school administrators put their mind to it they could come up with ways in which volunteers could help do the necessary work of the community. Volunteers have a long and honorable tradition in American life in fund- raising campail, in hospital work, and various other forms of com- munity service, They_ could also be tapped to do /, some of the jobs of village, town and schools if political officials would just work out and avenue to legally utilize them. Where personnel are short in the school system, for instance, why couldn't a volunteer man the office phones for a few hours a week, or help out busy town selectmen by manning the selectmen's office at certain times to answer basic questions or just take II II Letters to the Editor I I I I Weou00it To the Editor: It is natural that we should feel irate at h'an. tt is bard. in our aMuent she(ely, to un- derstand tile hungry Ilor. Let us lit, grateful fin' President Carler's diphmlatic and conlpassionale handling of the hlhor. ()nr once healthy American In(lians are dying of cancer from uranium mining, losing their lands and other fundamentals of their life and culhlre. I,el us slop concentrating on the f;ili]ts O[ others and make difficnlt h'anian situation and this a decade of personal soul- now hu'n our aflenlion to our searching a;! victory ()vet' onl)lindness, our own shortcomings. We Much land. once supporting owe it. not only to others but to its inbabitants, is now our ov, n need for true hap- producing crops for us and no piness. longer l't,,ds its starving (;lad)'s I,odge faniilies regardless of I)orset, Vt. nioneia ry rtl ul'n for their Jobs for migrants? To the Editor: "'Agriculture? Who really needs it? Won'l Iliere always he a Grand t In(on?'" l chant tltose who chiint that Ver- ntonl's i.u.OllOnlic future lies wilh induslry and recreation. Wlien ;ill other arguments wear thin Ihe industrial h(xlsters tall back (lit the einphiynienl pitch. (;overnor Silclling spoke for niany IWhile River Junction, eplenilier 7, 191111) when he said: "For years youlig Vernioiih,rs lefl lhe slate ill order hi earn a living, I want Io provide an economic clinmle in wllicll Vermonters can stay here, eal'n a decent living here, have llleir homes and I'llls here" , . . "The messages? There are dozens of tasks that may involve only a few hours here and there which paid officials just don't have time to do and taxpayers can't afford additional full-time staff to handle. So why not make use of willing volunteers, many of whom may well have previous experience and skills that could work to the benefit of the community? One method might be for a village, town or school to create a ro6ter of people willing to do volunteer work, their skills, and the hours and days they would be available. Many retired citizens might even like the chance to keep their hand in, as well as keep their taxes down, by helping out in such tasks. Obviously, there are legal, con- tractual and other wrtrdiles to iron mit to clear the way for the use of volunteers, but it certainly is something to consider in these dif- ficult economic happen unless somebod we happen to think it could work. For many volunteers, with no particular political interests involved, and for the public they would be dealing with, it might even help spark a renewal in responsible com- munity--mindedness on the part of many of us. Let's give it a try. Dartmouth professor sees changes in lran HANOVER--With the release exiled Admiral Madani as its engineers. Madani, who served under the shah and was an early supporter of Khomeini, was not allowed to take his seat in Parliament and is in exile in Europe. But, Professor Garth- wake pointed out, he has ties to the military and to the technocratic middle class, which is sympathetic to the West. "Once the dust settles from the hostage problem," Gar- thwaite declared, "the Iranian people are going to ask how did we get into this and to ask who's responsible. The finger will inevitably point to the clerical government." As for the future Iranian- American relations, Professor Garthwaite pointt!d out that the two countries have mutual national interests. Iran, he said. is important to the United States because of its strategic location on the Persian Gulf and its long border with the Soviet Union. The United States is important to Iran because, among other things, it needs U.S. technology to get its oil fields bae, k into production." The solution of the hostage problem," Professor Gar- thwaite said, "meam that Reagan is on a new footing with the American people and with the Iranian government. He can let the political air clear and try to establish a relationship with Iran." However, he warned, this would have to be done carefully, for the United States must balance its support between the Arabs grnwtb of agribusiness in the nihlwesi killed tile Vermont faniily farm. But that's soniething we can't change. We  niusl adapt to it by providing Verntoniers with eh(,r SOLiI'Ct (If income.'" These indtLstriai boosters seek blindly to perpetuate a slandard of living a"decent living" . to which Vermont hlis become accustomed Ryegate Granite Works located at what is known as Carter's Island. Later it was known as The Quint Place. It was first operated by R.F. Carter and later Alont4 with the granile Vernionlers. now hnllrting qii:iri'ies on Blue Mountahi, a sonle 75 per cell{ of their illilliher 11[' sloneshe(ls were villles, niusl slarl growing huill in Sonlh Byegale, an I(xid again, and lilt all ulanuer iildlisli',, vhieh is still in of acres, not jusl Ih e "priine". Oll('i'alitii hffkiy. It's nol as {hougli Ihe 85 new industries of which tile Snelling crew is so proud provided jobs for just Ver- nmnters. The industrial drive has drawn all manner of niigrants Io the nice, clean Iohilly dependent Vermont life. l'rofessor Meeks of UVM has been bird-dogging this Irend. Of lhe population in- crease behvcen 1960 and 1970, some 28.5 percent was im- lliigrat ion. b'i'onl 1971) In 1980 it Aas tip hi 56. I percent. \\;'crnioni lias lieen loading tip illl nligranls who must depend entirely on nlilllUfacluring for their well beillg while thousands of acres of I'arlnable and hlrestable land are blithely "paved over" for industrial and resident ial and rcc rea lion use. Many, including tile (invernor, call for a "'balance" lietween industry and agriculture. This tur,ts out Io be the kind of "balance" during the recent cheap- "1hat put that sausage maker in energy, high-inflalion years, court for advertising a 50-50 horse nleat and rabbit sauce niix - one horse, one rabbit! Even new Agriculture ('onlniissioner l)unsmore is ay off the mark when he suggests thai a "balance" can be achieved if only industry xill restore Io farming elsewhere one acre for every acre taken by the new factory. The few acres lakcn over by Ille f;.ichlry arc insignificant lzen compared to the hun- th'eds of acres taken over by houses for the people who Aili'k iV thal plant. Expanded The creanl on Vermont's econonlic ilt has been the second-home industry laiong with recreation), totally dependent on cheap travel, cheap beating, cheap money for initial purchase and construction. Residents who worked in that industry also enjoyed all these cheapies, including cheap food. Those days are gone {orever. Now people who choose to live in this relatively harsh part of New England must be prepared to do with less. As water plays out under the irrigated, acres of the mid- west Mississippi River down several feet. the great Ogalalla Aquifer drying up! I. of the American hostages, the Iranian government now faces three significant problems, according to Gene R. Gar- thwaite, associate professor of history at Dartmouth College and a specialist on Iran. He said the government must justify the release of the hostages to the Iranian population; it must turn the Iraqi war around and ease the attendant economic problems and shortages; and it must reestablish order in the country through the cen- tralization of power. The clerical government, which is now in precarious control of Iran, has been fearful That Western elements in Iran might work to over- throw it with American support, Professor Gar- thwaite said. This was one factor in delaying the release of the hostages, he added, but the Iraqi war was making things worse, so the gover- nment there decided to get rid of at least one problem "The clerical government." he declared. "is inex- perienced, inept and scared." The power, Professor Garthwaite said. now rests largely with the Islamic Republican Party, but it does not have many links to the military, which at present is demoralized and lacking in discipline. However, the Islamic Republican Party has seen a good bit of its power erode, he said. In this context, Professor Garthwaite foresees a coup, built upon military might, as possible, with either BanbSadr or the The first large shnleshed in toxin as built in tile early Illlllfs tLv ('ai'ler and l(iint)ail al lhe tllilll phice loll old Ilouh, ',lit2, jusl west o[ lhe llreseiil ('shill crealllery i They did excellent work but \\;tel'l' losing Inoney rapidly, so the llhice passed inhi the tlali(Is ot lhe Ilyegale Granite ('Olllpail%. llil'liii (Jibs(in was one ill lhe pill'lllers in lhc eonitialiy, aild I)y Ill!ill had tlilllil oill Ihe olhei's, ill 1902 I he  llllll, place burned Io the gi'iulid aiid as never I'ebuill. (Irinai llealon says lhal liis  iCe's i(real uncle used to h,II al)tll aii experience of liiniself and his falher, ltarry slid .hinies Ih'own, back in the days ,Xhell lit(' shlnesbed was in operalion. ()he day lhey alked up inside lhe long sltlice ay h) nulke soine repairs. The gale had I,en shul al file dani, quile sways up lhe river, so Ihere was no waler coniing down Ihrough, and llte hvo nien were in lhere pulling palehes on lhe walls of Ihe shliceway hi kcp water IToni leakilit oul. As they were oi'kiiig Ilie 3 began hearing a dishinl roar, coining closer alld closer sounding like son(cone hail opened Ihe gates slid Ill{' V/aler was rushing don hlwards lhem. They jtinitx'd and rail doWli lhe shlicevav tasler lhan Ihey ever lhout4bl lhe 3 could rUll epeclint any nionlcnl 1o be caughl in Ihe rush (if water indush'ializalion is totally at hul the waler never came, and odds with expanded .'y [tluilld out the ruite was agricull ure. .lUSl ;i Ira ill passilig iiea ('by. Ilerbert G. Ogden The [ouiidalions of lhe old ilartland, Vermolit lluildings can slill be seen, and Executive Councilor Raymond S. Burton Duties of the Executive Councilor Even Ihougtl there has been a lot of clieckpoinl for niosl slate busiiless ol any publicily and aclivily by Ille Council in COllSe(luence- recenl years, I want to in my own words h lhe 1980 era. 1 believe the Council will explain the dulies of tile Council in this play an even grealer role in assisting week's colunm people Io interact with their government "l'lw Nil ('onslilulion, Articles 60 through mid tile services they are justly deservi!lg 611 calls il the Council. Over the years it has heen called "Governor's Council," "Execulive Council" but the official name ts Council and Article 60 states that its duty is Io advise the Governor in the Executive l)epartnlenl of government. Over the some 200 years of New tlampsliire history Ihe General ('hUrl in nlany instances when crealing a new posl wiLhin the exc:utive pol'lion of governllleUl or set up a new coinuiission lias always pul into the law lhal lhose posilions are fillcl by the (Jovernor wilh lhe advise and consent of lhe ('ouncil. Wilh Iiie slrong influence of the fcJei'al governlllenl in local govei'iilnenlal affairs Ihe ('ouncil is oflen asked to accept and then approve a conlract with a private agency Io deliver a service at the local level with Ihe advice arid consent of the Council. "l'lw Cnuncil in State government is, I believe, best conlpartd Io a board of direclors for slale goveriunent. We deal illl financial (nailers. personllel, eon h'acls, h'ast.'s, and really serves as a of. The Governnr and Council will tit, casl trig a very careful eye (m expenditures Ihat will he conling for approval trom the various deu'tments. Tile ('ouncil has Aealllere(l IG conslilutiollal conventions and I expect will survive many more because this body brings to the executive side of our 14overnlnenl five more elected voices illl voles lhal must be received and deall wilh. i otild like hi pay tribute to I'oi'lnel Speaker George Roberts (if Gihnanton. ('oniing lo New llampshire State Goveriunent in the ti7 General Court 'ssinn. Mr. ltoberts quickly carvc! out a respeclable place in State Goverlnnent as a builder of the l,egislative side. There are niany wl have had tlleir disagreemenls. including nie. hut I conunend George arid llle years he gave to our state ill the h,gishil tlre. If anyone would like to receive a copy of Iht' dulies of lhe Council and a short article about the Council. please write to me at Hl.'i> I W(dsville. Nil 03785 or call ine al 717:11;112 or 271:1632 (Iraq) and lran, a .......... .:s_- predicament the Soviets also ,ao,. Solutions | Once a more stable governme0t hi established in Iran. the chance of a negotiated setUement bet- by Tom Evslin ween it and Iraq will inerease, Professor Garthwaite feels, l,lisl wt'k a nian who was jailed for rape carry Ilte dealli penalty. "An Iranian government has to be established," he explained, "that will live the confidence to make decisions without them backfiring." The hostages-a parable once and Yeas oul on hail pendhig trial for anolher rabH, was arrested for all ab- duel(on and a third rape. lie would probahly tie free on bail again were il not for Ihe facl Ihal lie violafcd his conditions of releuse by leaving tile state. 'l oU niay wouder whal kilid of judge ouhl lel a known danger to society out on bail The answer is that any judge would. They have no choice. In 1976 lhe Vcrnioni Supreme Court inh'rpreled scelion 41) (if ihe Vermont ('onslilulillii lo inean that no one can be denied hail purely because he or she is a polenliai dlnlgcr Io olher people. Bail can mly be denied whcl tllcrc is a significant likelihood that the suspect will jump bail and nol sliow up fnr h'ial. As long as the set'used has a gtxxi recnrd of slmwing up for courl appeal'allel or Mixing tios to the t'(luiniunily which Inake flight unlikely, llie ipreine ('OUl'l rultl Ihal bail caunol lit, tk'ni(l fnr fill(ted crhnes which do not by J.M, COPELAND to disobey ltim they would Once, a long time ago, there aulomatically become subject was a land belonging to a to anolher ruler, one called Great King. tits relationship Death. with tits subjects was warm A rebel prince, an associate and close, tie regarded them and in fact the over-lord of hhn called Death, through treachery and subversion entered the garden and in disguise approached the King's subjects. By use of false logic, claims and I,aw) ers disagree on whether the Vernionl Snprelne Courl inlerprelod our constihilion correclly ill ils decision. Wlielher llie courl erred or iiol. ils ruling (.'Ul Olliy be changed by alnending the Vernlonl Constitution. ll's past time for thal amendnlenl. Allorney General John Easton .,,uggesled during his campaign that the t'onslilulion should be amended to allow .judges to consider danger to the public in deler niining w liel her I o allow release prior hi h'ial. (iovernor Snelling supports such a snggeslion. Rc2elll events as well as eOlnlnlln sense show wily il is nclcl. 'llle queslion is nol simple, though. "" huineenl unl il proven guilty" is one of the llillars ol our sysleln of laws. l)etention prlnl" hi t'onviclion is an abridgeinent ot Ibis pillar. We have no choice bul Io delain some penplc who prcsenl a particularly clear danger, hul we Inusl nol htoille 8 (please turn to page 10) with a special kind of love and as Ills very own. In His love for lhem lie gave them a beautiful garden and complete freedom- freedom to obey llim or to disobey Him. It was underslood-that if they chine by Martin H. Gibson. It was destroyed by fire 1900. Stonecutting in S. R2,,,, 'the place x liei'e lhe sluiceway ilSt,(I hi rliii. ,,\\;lso, sc;itlei'ed here and lhere are shorl set!lions of Ihe round gi'allile colt(In ns which were a specially of lhis shlneslied. Afh,r (;ihsoli'S shlneshed t)uriled, several local families shirled lheir own sheds. In I)tlSiiiess al various lilnL%,' ere Ihe l{osis, Beat(ins, ('i'aigies, Andreoleltis, 1 t'l)llla I(Is, ,S a ('gent s, ('otlrliievs. Alldersons. I'Tasiers, "and (Isgoods. Seols and Italians lhiny of lhe early Scottish seltlers in ltyegate were experienced quarrynlen, who conlinued with lhis line (if xoi'k. Wilh the growth of the sloiiet'ul liiig indush'y, others canle front col]alid lo work in lhe sl Olleshe(ts. I)rinan Ilealon says that in lhe liig0"s his gralldfallier, ,tanles Beahln, calne over froth ,Scolland to (tuificy, Mass., wllere Ihere was a large shinectllling indlstry. l,efore long lit' llioved Io South l(yet2,ale and selil Ior his bride- hi-be Io conic over fl'oln ,%,'ot land. The llalians slarled coniint in around 190o. Like lhe ,Scots. Ihey were skilled shlnecul let's Rosa Brothers bought out the Blue Mountain Granite t'olnpany and aftt;rwards ni,lvt,d a large shed Iroin Nurth Ilaverhill Io South I{yegate. Tilts business was laler owned by Libero Andreolelli. and at the present l iine by Gandin Brothers. Adjaceut to Gandins' is C. 1{ Davidson Company's sloneshed. Clyde Davidson says thai lhe original building had started as a feed store, then in the early 1900's was converled to a stoneshed by ,Janles Beaton. Mr. Davidson t>ughl it iii around 1930. then as Ihe years went by he moved Ihe orlgutal building, ex- panded the buildings twice. and inslalled new machinery. With the quarries on Blue l%lounlain it() longer in operalion, bolh lhe Gandin and l)avidson stonesheds get lheir granile fronl Barre or olher outside sources, depending on the color and lype of slone necked to fill particular orders. Some of it comes front Canada. South Anierica. or Africa, During Ihe years when the Monlpelier & Wells River Raih'oad was in operation, the shmesheds were located close to the tracks, in fact at Gandins'. a sidetrack went righl through the end of one of tile buildings. 11 is ntost interesting to visit these hvo stonesheds aud Io see the remarkable things Ihal can be done by modern niachinery the sawing, polishing, sandblasting, and Iransporling. ,mle of the pr(.,esses are automalic, but ihere is slill considerable skill and experience required along special shapes, such lhe way, such as in planning Russian cross, and (lid nil(king lhe leltering and has a special saw thatc designs for various kinds of ti'anite into the IliOnUlllenls. shapes. 11 was a surprise at (Note: We apprec (;andins' to see Russian let- cooperalion of h'rinl4 being put on a l)avidson, Gayhlrd iiiiHlunienl, bul it is because ail(t ()rnian Beaton I{tlssian-Anieric;.ins like to p]oriiig l{yegate's flare lileir gravestones cut in induslry, pasl and li Gaylord Gandin and Warren Goodwin design for a granite monument. Clyde Davidson and Guy Haskell chipping a monument to make a square corner. Gaylord Gandin lettering the design for a Gibson stoneshed at the Quint place. Crossing just below the old sluiceway. Page 4-The Journal Opinion-February 4, 1981 ii I I II I . I | i I I I 9RTHEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. Publisher of Journal Ill Opinion Woekly newslmpe iwlbed in 8redferd, Vormut. Sebxript,.a fetes VormNt nd Sew Ilempikire. $t.0O per yoor $6.00 for six meaw; oot ef stere . $11.00 per yeer end $7.00 for lix mortal; Senior citizen discoeat $2.00. Siceud bui peIlOge Imtd el Irudfenl, Vinnott 0$015. Piblod by Norflleeit Puldiskblg COmlmay, Inc., P.O, Il 178, Imdfeed. Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher RES Bradford  Woodsville 802-222-5281  . 603"747"2016 An Independent Newspaper I Editorials Public service volunteers? With town selectmen, school boards and others --including President Reagan-- looking for ways to chop public spending, it may be time to start thinking about an old tradition in Vermont and American life--volunteers. There is no reason that public- spirited volunteers can't fill some of the gaps in public service that overburdened budgets can't stretch to cover in these inflationary times. It may take a new local ordinance or two, or perhaps clearance from the state school board or other state agencies, but we bet if town and school administrators put their mind to it they could come up with ways in which volunteers could help do the necessary work of the community. Volunteers have a long and honorable tradition in American life in fund- raising campail, in hospital work, and various other forms of com- munity service, They_ could also be tapped to do /, some of the jobs of village, town and schools if political officials would just work out and avenue to legally utilize them. Where personnel are short in the school system, for instance, why couldn't a volunteer man the office phones for a few hours a week, or help out busy town selectmen by manning the selectmen's office at certain times to answer basic questions or just take II II Letters to the Editor I I I I Weou00it To the Editor: It is natural that we should feel irate at h'an. tt is bard. in our aMuent she(ely, to un- derstand tile hungry Ilor. Let us lit, grateful fin' President Carler's diphmlatic and conlpassionale handling of the hlhor. ()nr once healthy American In(lians are dying of cancer from uranium mining, losing their lands and other fundamentals of their life and culhlre. I,el us slop concentrating on the f;ili]ts O[ others and make difficnlt h'anian situation and this a decade of personal soul- now hu'n our aflenlion to our searching a;! victory ()vet' onl)lindness, our own shortcomings. We Much land. once supporting owe it. not only to others but to its inbabitants, is now our ov, n need for true hap- producing crops for us and no piness. longer l't,,ds its starving (;lad)'s I,odge faniilies regardless of I)orset, Vt. nioneia ry rtl ul'n for their Jobs for migrants? To the Editor: "'Agriculture? Who really needs it? Won'l Iliere always he a Grand t In(on?'" l chant tltose who chiint that Ver- ntonl's i.u.OllOnlic future lies wilh induslry and recreation. Wlien ;ill other arguments wear thin Ihe industrial h(xlsters tall back (lit the einphiynienl pitch. (;overnor Silclling spoke for niany IWhile River Junction, eplenilier 7, 191111) when he said: "For years youlig Vernioiih,rs lefl lhe slate ill order hi earn a living, I want Io provide an economic clinmle in wllicll Vermonters can stay here, eal'n a decent living here, have llleir homes and I'llls here" , . . "The messages? There are dozens of tasks that may involve only a few hours here and there which paid officials just don't have time to do and taxpayers can't afford additional full-time staff to handle. So why not make use of willing volunteers, many of whom may well have previous experience and skills that could work to the benefit of the community? One method might be for a village, town or school to create a ro6ter of people willing to do volunteer work, their skills, and the hours and days they would be available. Many retired citizens might even like the chance to keep their hand in, as well as keep their taxes down, by helping out in such tasks. Obviously, there are legal, con- tractual and other wrtrdiles to iron mit to clear the way for the use of volunteers, but it certainly is something to consider in these dif- ficult economic happen unless somebod we happen to think it could work. For many volunteers, with no particular political interests involved, and for the public they would be dealing with, it might even help spark a renewal in responsible com- munity--mindedness on the part of many of us. Let's give it a try. Dartmouth professor sees changes in lran HANOVER--With the release exiled Admiral Madani as its engineers. Madani, who served under the shah and was an early supporter of Khomeini, was not allowed to take his seat in Parliament and is in exile in Europe. But, Professor Garth- wake pointed out, he has ties to the military and to the technocratic middle class, which is sympathetic to the West. "Once the dust settles from the hostage problem," Gar- thwaite declared, "the Iranian people are going to ask how did we get into this and to ask who's responsible. The finger will inevitably point to the clerical government." As for the future Iranian- American relations, Professor Garthwaite pointt!d out that the two countries have mutual national interests. Iran, he said. is important to the United States because of its strategic location on the Persian Gulf and its long border with the Soviet Union. The United States is important to Iran because, among other things, it needs U.S. technology to get its oil fields bae, k into production." The solution of the hostage problem," Professor Gar- thwaite said, "meam that Reagan is on a new footing with the American people and with the Iranian government. He can let the political air clear and try to establish a relationship with Iran." However, he warned, this would have to be done carefully, for the United States must balance its support between the Arabs grnwtb of agribusiness in the nihlwesi killed tile Vermont faniily farm. But that's soniething we can't change. We  niusl adapt to it by providing Verntoniers with eh(,r SOLiI'Ct (If income.'" These indtLstriai boosters seek blindly to perpetuate a slandard of living a"decent living" . to which Vermont hlis become accustomed Ryegate Granite Works located at what is known as Carter's Island. Later it was known as The Quint Place. It was first operated by R.F. Carter and later Alont4 with the granile Vernionlers. now hnllrting qii:iri'ies on Blue Mountahi, a sonle 75 per cell{ of their illilliher 11[' sloneshe(ls were villles, niusl slarl growing huill in Sonlh Byegale, an I(xid again, and lilt all ulanuer iildlisli',, vhieh is still in of acres, not jusl Ih e "priine". Oll('i'alitii hffkiy. It's nol as {hougli Ihe 85 new industries of which tile Snelling crew is so proud provided jobs for just Ver- nmnters. The industrial drive has drawn all manner of niigrants Io the nice, clean Iohilly dependent Vermont life. l'rofessor Meeks of UVM has been bird-dogging this Irend. Of lhe population in- crease behvcen 1960 and 1970, some 28.5 percent was im- lliigrat ion. b'i'onl 1971) In 1980 it Aas tip hi 56. I percent. \\;'crnioni lias lieen loading tip illl nligranls who must depend entirely on nlilllUfacluring for their well beillg while thousands of acres of I'arlnable and hlrestable land are blithely "paved over" for industrial and resident ial and rcc rea lion use. Many, including tile (invernor, call for a "'balance" lietween industry and agriculture. This tur,ts out Io be the kind of "balance" during the recent cheap- "1hat put that sausage maker in energy, high-inflalion years, court for advertising a 50-50 horse nleat and rabbit sauce niix - one horse, one rabbit! Even new Agriculture ('onlniissioner l)unsmore is ay off the mark when he suggests thai a "balance" can be achieved if only industry xill restore Io farming elsewhere one acre for every acre taken by the new factory. The few acres lakcn over by Ille f;.ichlry arc insignificant lzen compared to the hun- th'eds of acres taken over by houses for the people who Aili'k iV thal plant. Expanded The creanl on Vermont's econonlic ilt has been the second-home industry laiong with recreation), totally dependent on cheap travel, cheap beating, cheap money for initial purchase and construction. Residents who worked in that industry also enjoyed all these cheapies, including cheap food. Those days are gone {orever. Now people who choose to live in this relatively harsh part of New England must be prepared to do with less. As water plays out under the irrigated, acres of the mid- west Mississippi River down several feet. the great Ogalalla Aquifer drying up! I. of the American hostages, the Iranian government now faces three significant problems, according to Gene R. Gar- thwaite, associate professor of history at Dartmouth College and a specialist on Iran. He said the government must justify the release of the hostages to the Iranian population; it must turn the Iraqi war around and ease the attendant economic problems and shortages; and it must reestablish order in the country through the cen- tralization of power. The clerical government, which is now in precarious control of Iran, has been fearful That Western elements in Iran might work to over- throw it with American support, Professor Gar- thwaite said. This was one factor in delaying the release of the hostages, he added, but the Iraqi war was making things worse, so the gover- nment there decided to get rid of at least one problem "The clerical government." he declared. "is inex- perienced, inept and scared." The power, Professor Garthwaite said. now rests largely with the Islamic Republican Party, but it does not have many links to the military, which at present is demoralized and lacking in discipline. However, the Islamic Republican Party has seen a good bit of its power erode, he said. In this context, Professor Garthwaite foresees a coup, built upon military might, as possible, with either BanbSadr or the The first large shnleshed in toxin as built in tile early Illlllfs tLv ('ai'ler and l(iint)ail al lhe tllilll phice loll old Ilouh, ',lit2, jusl west o[ lhe llreseiil ('shill crealllery i They did excellent work but \\;tel'l' losing Inoney rapidly, so the llhice passed inhi the tlali(Is ot lhe Ilyegale Granite ('Olllpail%. llil'liii (Jibs(in was one ill lhe pill'lllers in lhc eonitialiy, aild I)y Ill!ill had tlilllil oill Ihe olhei's, ill 1902 I he  llllll, place burned Io the gi'iulid aiid as never I'ebuill. (Irinai llealon says lhal liis  iCe's i(real uncle used to h,II al)tll aii experience of liiniself and his falher, ltarry slid .hinies Ih'own, back in the days ,Xhell lit(' shlnesbed was in operalion. ()he day lhey alked up inside lhe long sltlice ay h) nulke soine repairs. The gale had I,en shul al file dani, quile sways up lhe river, so Ihere was no waler coniing down Ihrough, and llte hvo nien were in lhere pulling palehes on lhe walls of Ihe shliceway hi kcp water IToni leakilit oul. As they were oi'kiiig Ilie 3 began hearing a dishinl roar, coining closer alld closer sounding like son(cone hail opened Ihe gates slid Ill{' V/aler was rushing don hlwards lhem. They jtinitx'd and rail doWli lhe shlicevav tasler lhan Ihey ever lhout4bl lhe 3 could rUll epeclint any nionlcnl 1o be caughl in Ihe rush (if water indush'ializalion is totally at hul the waler never came, and odds with expanded .'y [tluilld out the ruite was agricull ure. .lUSl ;i Ira ill passilig iiea ('by. Ilerbert G. Ogden The [ouiidalions of lhe old ilartland, Vermolit lluildings can slill be seen, and Executive Councilor Raymond S. Burton Duties of the Executive Councilor Even Ihougtl there has been a lot of clieckpoinl for niosl slate busiiless ol any publicily and aclivily by Ille Council in COllSe(luence- recenl years, I want to in my own words h lhe 1980 era. 1 believe the Council will explain the dulies of tile Council in this play an even grealer role in assisting week's colunm people Io interact with their government "l'lw Nil ('onslilulion, Articles 60 through mid tile services they are justly deservi!lg 611 calls il the Council. Over the years it has heen called "Governor's Council," "Execulive Council" but the official name ts Council and Article 60 states that its duty is Io advise the Governor in the Executive l)epartnlenl of government. Over the some 200 years of New tlampsliire history Ihe General ('hUrl in nlany instances when crealing a new posl wiLhin the exc:utive pol'lion of governllleUl or set up a new coinuiission lias always pul into the law lhal lhose posilions are fillcl by the (Jovernor wilh lhe advise and consent of lhe ('ouncil. Wilh Iiie slrong influence of the fcJei'al governlllenl in local govei'iilnenlal affairs Ihe ('ouncil is oflen asked to accept and then approve a conlract with a private agency Io deliver a service at the local level with Ihe advice arid consent of the Council. "l'lw Cnuncil in State government is, I believe, best conlpartd Io a board of direclors for slale goveriunent. We deal illl financial (nailers. personllel, eon h'acls, h'ast.'s, and really serves as a of. The Governnr and Council will tit, casl trig a very careful eye (m expenditures Ihat will he conling for approval trom the various deu'tments. Tile ('ouncil has Aealllere(l IG conslilutiollal conventions and I expect will survive many more because this body brings to the executive side of our 14overnlnenl five more elected voices illl voles lhal must be received and deall wilh. i otild like hi pay tribute to I'oi'lnel Speaker George Roberts (if Gihnanton. ('oniing lo New llampshire State Goveriunent in the ti7 General Court 'ssinn. Mr. ltoberts quickly carvc! out a respeclable place in State Goverlnnent as a builder of the l,egislative side. There are niany wl have had tlleir disagreemenls. including nie. hut I conunend George arid llle years he gave to our state ill the h,gishil tlre. If anyone would like to receive a copy of Iht' dulies of lhe Council and a short article about the Council. please write to me at Hl.'i> I W(dsville. Nil 03785 or call ine al 717:11;112 or 271:1632 (Iraq) and lran, a .......... .:s_- predicament the Soviets also ,ao,. Solutions | Once a more stable governme0t hi established in Iran. the chance of a negotiated setUement bet- by Tom Evslin ween it and Iraq will inerease, Professor Garthwaite feels, l,lisl wt'k a nian who was jailed for rape carry Ilte dealli penalty. "An Iranian government has to be established," he explained, "that will live the confidence to make decisions without them backfiring." The hostages-a parable once and Yeas oul on hail pendhig trial for anolher rabH, was arrested for all ab- duel(on and a third rape. lie would probahly tie free on bail again were il not for Ihe facl Ihal lie violafcd his conditions of releuse by leaving tile state. 'l oU niay wouder whal kilid of judge ouhl lel a known danger to society out on bail The answer is that any judge would. They have no choice. In 1976 lhe Vcrnioni Supreme Court inh'rpreled scelion 41) (if ihe Vermont ('onslilulillii lo inean that no one can be denied hail purely because he or she is a polenliai dlnlgcr Io olher people. Bail can mly be denied whcl tllcrc is a significant likelihood that the suspect will jump bail and nol sliow up fnr h'ial. As long as the set'used has a gtxxi recnrd of slmwing up for courl appeal'allel or Mixing tios to the t'(luiniunily which Inake flight unlikely, llie ipreine ('OUl'l rultl Ihal bail caunol lit, tk'ni(l fnr fill(ted crhnes which do not by J.M, COPELAND to disobey ltim they would Once, a long time ago, there aulomatically become subject was a land belonging to a to anolher ruler, one called Great King. tits relationship Death. with tits subjects was warm A rebel prince, an associate and close, tie regarded them and in fact the over-lord of hhn called Death, through treachery and subversion entered the garden and in disguise approached the King's subjects. By use of false logic, claims and I,aw) ers disagree on whether the Vernionl Snprelne Courl inlerprelod our constihilion correclly ill ils decision. Wlielher llie courl erred or iiol. ils ruling (.'Ul Olliy be changed by alnending the Vernlonl Constitution. ll's past time for thal amendnlenl. Allorney General John Easton .,,uggesled during his campaign that the t'onslilulion should be amended to allow .judges to consider danger to the public in deler niining w liel her I o allow release prior hi h'ial. (iovernor Snelling supports such a snggeslion. Rc2elll events as well as eOlnlnlln sense show wily il is nclcl. 'llle queslion is nol simple, though. "" huineenl unl il proven guilty" is one of the llillars ol our sysleln of laws. l)etention prlnl" hi t'onviclion is an abridgeinent ot Ibis pillar. We have no choice bul Io delain some penplc who prcsenl a particularly clear danger, hul we Inusl nol htoille 8 (please turn to page 10) with a special kind of love and as Ills very own. In His love for lhem lie gave them a beautiful garden and complete freedom- freedom to obey llim or to disobey Him. It was underslood-that if they chine by Martin H. Gibson. It was destroyed by fire 1900. Stonecutting in S. R2,,,, 'the place x liei'e lhe sluiceway ilSt,(I hi rliii. ,,\\;lso, sc;itlei'ed here and lhere are shorl set!lions of Ihe round gi'allile colt(In ns which were a specially of lhis shlneslied. Afh,r (;ihsoli'S shlneshed t)uriled, several local families shirled lheir own sheds. In I)tlSiiiess al various lilnL%,' ere Ihe l{osis, Beat(ins, ('i'aigies, Andreoleltis, 1 t'l)llla I(Is, ,S a ('gent s, ('otlrliievs. Alldersons. I'Tasiers, "and (Isgoods. Seols and Italians lhiny of lhe early Scottish seltlers in ltyegate were experienced quarrynlen, who conlinued with lhis line (if xoi'k. Wilh the growth of the sloiiet'ul liiig indush'y, others canle front col]alid lo work in lhe sl Olleshe(ts. I)rinan Ilealon says that in lhe liig0"s his gralldfallier, ,tanles Beahln, calne over froth ,Scolland to (tuificy, Mass., wllere Ihere was a large shinectllling indlstry. l,efore long lit' llioved Io South l(yet2,ale and selil Ior his bride- hi-be Io conic over fl'oln ,%,'ot land. The llalians slarled coniint in around 190o. Like lhe ,Scots. Ihey were skilled shlnecul let's Rosa Brothers bought out the Blue Mountain Granite t'olnpany and aftt;rwards ni,lvt,d a large shed Iroin Nurth Ilaverhill Io South I{yegate. Tilts business was laler owned by Libero Andreolelli. and at the present l iine by Gandin Brothers. Adjaceut to Gandins' is C. 1{ Davidson Company's sloneshed. Clyde Davidson says thai lhe original building had started as a feed store, then in the early 1900's was converled to a stoneshed by ,Janles Beaton. Mr. Davidson t>ughl it iii around 1930. then as Ihe years went by he moved Ihe orlgutal building, ex- panded the buildings twice. and inslalled new machinery. With the quarries on Blue l%lounlain it() longer in operalion, bolh lhe Gandin and l)avidson stonesheds get lheir granile fronl Barre or olher outside sources, depending on the color and lype of slone necked to fill particular orders. Some of it comes front Canada. South Anierica. or Africa, During Ihe years when the Monlpelier & Wells River Raih'oad was in operation, the shmesheds were located close to the tracks, in fact at Gandins'. a sidetrack went righl through the end of one of tile buildings. 11 is ntost interesting to visit these hvo stonesheds aud Io see the remarkable things Ihal can be done by modern niachinery the sawing, polishing, sandblasting, and Iransporling. ,mle of the pr(.,esses are automalic, but ihere is slill considerable skill and experience required along special shapes, such lhe way, such as in planning Russian cross, and (lid nil(king lhe leltering and has a special saw thatc designs for various kinds of ti'anite into the IliOnUlllenls. shapes. 11 was a surprise at (Note: We apprec (;andins' to see Russian let- cooperalion of h'rinl4 being put on a l)avidson, Gayhlrd iiiiHlunienl, bul it is because ail(t ()rnian Beaton I{tlssian-Anieric;.ins like to p]oriiig l{yegate's flare lileir gravestones cut in induslry, pasl and li Gaylord Gandin and Warren Goodwin design for a granite monument. Clyde Davidson and Guy Haskell chipping a monument to make a square corner. Gaylord Gandin lettering the design for a Gibson stoneshed at the Quint place. Crossing just below the old sluiceway.