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February 10, 1982     Journal Opinion
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February 10, 1982
 

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I !NP&apos;S :'dlX:l IO C+r O)Ol llt, Number 6 + Hampshire and Vermont February Serwng Over 48 Communities in Northern New , . + :o,19g2 d$3 ; 00plans t-axx rat t d Taxpa00'ers to free roof for high school charge million Huntington hits 1000 (Story on sports page) e ecrease Bore for Oxbow roof BRADFORD--The Oxbow board is recommending for Insteadh sa'dthatmos o (approximately $175,000). School Board has completed the 1982-83 school year will the money (minus a $295,OOO Fontana said that the in- its budget meetings for the total $t,521,387 as compared to bond amount plus any ad- terest the district will earn New record for la00est Vermont lawsuit development of budget a budget of $1,453,=0 last ditional roof costs)has been from the investment of the recommendations for the1982- year. reinvested toward completion money from the settlement PPELIER-- A County jury has more plaintiffs against the GAF regarding the of leaking roof were installed 12 years of $3,090,092. brakes the record largest amount in a lawsuit in t history. rd was also wsuit against the ration. Last year, Ilmountain Union High and Rodd Roofing Inc., ve n, .Johnsbury (also a ___.f in the Oxbow lawsuit) )w.arded a sum of $2.3 ta in an Orange County |or Court presided over ]lge Steven D. Martin. Mountain, las year, IWarded $1 million in es and Rndd Roofing awarded $1.3 million ling from a faulty GAF lat was installed at the Mountain High School Ig. GAF is currently ling the verdict. e Martin I ; Oxbowalso presided lawsuit that ) ved resulting from a for a change of venue yers representing GAF  Orange County to ton County on Sept. 10 :wr' High School settled  court on Jan. 5 with agreeing to pay the $675,000 in aamages. No Money Yet her plaintiffs in the :ts against GAF have Y received any money the chemical acturing company i00lic meetings discuss 1 u_ budKet . RIVER-- In order to Dr) orm the public about od ed BMU budget, the rig | board, has invited ts to meet with them at r a [t convenient time, as Jl" [I'o:] llay, Feb. 15, 8: Jlly +i roton Town Clerk s because GAF is appealing the court's verdict in the Blue Mountain case. Philip Kolvoord, an attorney representing Rodd Roofing Inc., told the Journal Opinion that he expects that GAF will he appealing last Saturday's Washington County jury verdict. Kolvoord said that last week the jury awarded Rodd Roofing Inc. a total of $2,130,852. $586,352 of that total was awarded for profit lost by the company as a result of in- stalling the roof at Oxbow; $44,500 went to the company for endemnity damages for lawyers fees; another $1,500,000 was awarded to Rodd Roofing for punitive damages. A second plaintiff last week, Burlington architect Roland Whittier, was awarded a sum of $959,220, said Kolvoord. $200,000 of the total went towards lost profit; $9,228 went towards lawyers fees; another $750,000 was awarded to the architect in punitive damages. Kolvoord said that, among the charges in which GAF was found guilty by the jury, last week, were breach of warranty, breach of contract and fraud. Giant Corporation William Rodd Jr. of Rodd Roofing Inc. told the Journal Opinion, "It's very gratifying to know that two court systems in the State of Ver- mont have come down on the side of the little guy against a giant corporation like GAF." Rodd said the reason his company had not settled out of court like Oxbow High School was that GAF had never been sued by a roofer and that the corporation did not want to settle. Rodd said his company .... installed four roofs in Ver- mont with the GAF roofing material -- in Burlington, in St. Albans, at Blue Mountain High School and at Oxbow; the roofs on all four buildings blistered and bubbled almost immediately after they were installed in the late 60's and early 70's. "My first impression was that I couldn't believe It,'"' said Rodd, "We are a good company and I just knew it wasn't us... that we could not have done that badly in all four places." Rodd said last week's verdict was largely due to evidence that his attorneys produced that showed that GAF knew the roof was going to blister before it was in- stalled. This evidence came in the form of the corporation's own documents, said Rodd. GAF is the largest roof manufacturer in the world said Rodd. He added that the corporation is also being sued for other GAF roofs in New York, New Jersey and Florida. MAGIC MOMENT-- At 7:17 of the fourth quarter against U-32, Ron Huntington puts in his 1,000th high school career point. Huntington currently leads the Upper Valley in scoring with a 24+ point average per game. 83 school year and is offering taxpayers in Bradford and Newbury a decrease in the school's tax rate. In Bradford, the school is asking for a tax rate of $2.11 per $100 of assessed property value this year as compared to $2.50 per $100 of assessed property value in 1981. In 1980 the Bradford tax rate stood at $2.37. This year's Bradford tax rate reflects a 15.8 percent decrease from last year: This year in Newbury, the school is asking for a tax rate of $1.41 per $100 of assessed property value as compared to $1.47 in 1981. The year before, in 1980, the Newbury tax rate stood at approximately $1.50 per $100 in assessed valuation. This year's Newbury tax rate reflects an 4 percent decrease from last year. Orange East Supervisory Superintendent John Fontana said that these figures will actually he less when the town decides to raise the money in taxes. He pointed out that in Vermont, state aid to education goes to individual towns rather than to school districts. When the towns receive the state funds and apply them toward the tax rate as set by the school board, said Fontana, the amount the town will actually have to raise will he sub- stantially less than the $2.11 and $1.41 figures. The Budget The budget that the school Among the programs at Oxbow High School that received substantial cuts were the debt service budget, cut by $4,038; monies budget for transportation, lowered by $11,107; media services were cut by $1,042; psychological services were cut by $1,376; monies budgeted for the board of education were also cut by $2,462. Among the major budget increases at the school reflected in the school board's recommended budget are increases in expenditures for instructional programs, up $28,009; vocational programs, up $25,677; executive ad- ministration services, up $4,562; the principal's office budget, up $9,099; the vocational director's office budget was also up $8,523. Actual money budgeted for operation- and maintenance for the school building itself was down by $2,144 over last year. The Roof Settlement When Oxbow settled their lawsuit last month with the GAF Corporation over their leaking roof, the school settled out of court for $675,000. Out of the settlement money, Oxbow's attorney in the case, Sten Lium of St. Johnsbury, received $100,000. According to Fontana, the remaining $575,000 is not in- cluded in the school board's budget recommendation for the 1982-83 school year. ar00le oct/t/on ...... Towns to vote on nuclear arms freeze THETFORD-- When voters in area that have worked to missiles and new aircraft However, petition nuclear arms freeze proposals our area go to their annual place the article up for vote designed primarily to deliver organizers set their sights for last year. town meetings this year to are not representing a par- nuclear weapons, with ver- articles in 100 towns earlier AFirstStep vote on the seemingly regular ticular organization in their tification safeguards this year, McCoster said they McCoster, an architectural issues of town and highway efforts. McCoster called the satisfactory to both coun- are now surprised they have designer and potter, said that budgets and maintenance group "a grassroots' tries." by far surpassed that amount he views the local town most of them will also be movement made up of in- Petitions lgnored and are up to 157 towns. He nuclear armsfreezeproposals voting on an article, placed by dividuals." The article has not been met said support for a nuclear as "a good first step." He petition, that calls for support Although some of the ar- with open arms in all the arms freeze has increased stressed the use of local of a mutual U.S.-Soviet ticles are said to differ towns and municipalities in greatly since last year. support for the proposals to nuclear arms freeze, slightly, a model example of which the petition has been The article will not appear show foreign policy makers in This year, the article will be the wording is the wording of presented. Barre City and on the warning in Thetford Washington that nuclear arms voted on in no less than 157 the article submitted by Town of Barre officials have this year because it was one of control has support at the towns in the State of Ver- petition to the town of Brad- refused to place the article on 18 Vermont towns that passed locallevel. mont--a figure totaling more ford. " " their ballots despite having the article by vote on last Supporters of the nuclear The Article been presented the required year's town meeting day. The The articles states: "By number of signatures on article was passed in all the petition: Shall the State petition. Barre officials towns that petitions were Senators and Representatives claimed they were "under no submitted in last year. These from thisdistrictbeadvisedto obligation" to heed to the towns were: Andover, introduce into the Vermont petitions. Officials in theTown Bakersfield, Burlington, S. Legislature a resolution of Goshen, Vt., are also said to Burlington, Duxbury, Fair- asking the Vermont have refused to place the field, Fletcher, Jericho, Mt. Congressional Delegationto: article on the warning for Holly, Milton, Moretown, "Request the President of their town meeting. Mont-Norwich, Randolph, Rich- the United States to propose to pelier aldermen are con- mend, Ripton, St. Albans, the Soviet Union a mutual ducting an "informal poll", Thetford and Waterbury. freeze on the testing, after receiving a similar Three New Hampshire production, and deployment of petition, in order to be assured towns--Hanover, Plainfield nuclear weapons and of of support for the issue, and Henniker--also passed arms freeze allege that despite official government policy relying on the hope that nuclear weapons will never be used, U.S. officials have considered using nuclear weapons six times since World War If. They also say that, according to the New York Times, on Nov. 9, 1979, a "computer error" led military officials to believe that the U.S. was under nuclear attack from the Soviet Union. Six minutes went by before the than 60 percent of the state's municipalities. According to one petition organizer, Timothy McCoster of Thetford, the article will appear on "just about all" of the warnings for town meeting in Orange County. In order to make this possible, petition gatherers had to obtain signatures from five percent of the voters in each town to get the article on the warning. McCoster said that he and most of the other people in the computer error was discovered. Nine minutes more and allegedly our own missiles would have been launched. No Winners "Nobody wins in a nuclear war," said McCoster. He referred to the nuclear weapons build-up on the part of the U.S. and the Soviet Union as a "nuclear mad- hesS." McCoster said many Ver- mont church groups are supporting the nuclear arms freeze proposal. The proposal is said to be supported nationally by the National Council of Churches, the United Universalist Association, the United Presbyterian Church and the YWCA. State legislatures are said to have supported the proposal in New York, Oregon and Massachusetts. Democratic Senator Patrick Leahy, has ( please turn to page 4) of the entire roof. Last May, district voters approved a $295,000 bond to fund roof repairs at the school. But Fontana said that the money was never actually raised by taxes. The school board did not have to borrow a substantial amount to make their first bill on the repairs will pay off the interest from the loan. The $295,000 bond will be taken out of the set- tlement money so the district's towns will not have to raise it through taxes. The result of the settlement, said Fontana, is a new roof for the entire school with no cost to the taxpayers. Board will announce articles this week HAVERHILL--- The warrant predicts the new budget will of articles for this year's annual Haverhill Cooperative School District meeting is expected to be announced this Wednesday, Feb. l0 at the Haverhill Cooperative District School Board's regular meeting, according to an agenda issued last week by district officials. Along with the an- nouncement of articles to be voted on at the district's an- nual meeting scheduled for March 18, district superin- tendent Norman Mullen is expected to discuss recom- mendations for the district's 1982-83 budget with the school board at Wednesday's (tonight's) meeting. The new budget has been locked in a review process by the district's budget com- mittee over the last month or so. School district officials will present the recommended budget to the public on Monday, Feb. 15---at the district's annual budget hearing. The budget hearing be approximately six percent higher than the 1981-82 budget. The total 1981-82 budget stood at $1,403,952.40. In the five precincts that make up the voting Town of Haverhill, the Haverhill Cooperative School District represents 64 percent of the town's tax rate, according to town selectmen. In other business, the school is expected to act on the setting of tuition charges for the 1982-83 school yeaL District officials are asking for a tuition rate of $641 for kindergarten, $1,282 for elementary age students, $1,695 for junior high students and $2,025 for students wishing to attend Woodsville High School from outside of the district. According to the agenda, the school board will also act on the resignation of a district employee and will hear a report on a hearing held on Monday, Feb. a regarchng financial responsibility in the will be held at the James placement ofanout-of-district Morrill School in N. Haverhill handicapped child at a starting at 7:30 p.m. Haverhill school. Moderate Budget Wednesday's meeting will Increase be held at the Haverhill Mullen has told the schonl Academy Junior High School board at two previous school in Haverhill Corner at 7:30 board meetings that he p.m. school board will 00lve "handtmok committee" a chance BRADFORD--The Oxbow School Board has been per- suaded by complaints from the Oxbow Teachers Association to take steps to look into what teachers describe as a student behavior problem stemming from a lack of consistent discipline at the school. A.s a result of a proposal from the teachers, the school board indicated at their meeting last Thursday that they are in favor of reac- tivating an idle Student Handbook Committee to / further look into the discipline problem and to discuss possible reforms in the present discipline policy at the school. The topic of discipline at Oxbow has been a major one since the teachers association aired their grievances over the issue at the board's January 7 meeting. Approximately 30 teachers attended the meeting at which representative speakers for the group fired charges that the school's administration or (please turn to page 4) Feb. 16, 8:00 Town Clerk's Feb. 18, 8:00 Memorial Res interested in the school board the Feb. at 7:30, in s annual viii be held on Feb. are "all country" at WYKR LLS RIVER-- When been a major part of the A bit of Nashville in IVells River ask Gene Puffer, of Wells River's radio station, to radio station in he will tell music or the sound" has station's programming since the station was started by Gene and his brother Harold in October of 1976 (Harold has since gone into real estate.). But six months ago, WYKR dropped its other music + +. @ ? +'+ , .... 8taUon owner Gene Puffer formats to "go 100 percent country," according to Puffer who now owns the station with his wife Clara. Office manager and announcer Gerry Brooks calls WYKR "a real family operation." And a family operation it is. Owners Gene and Clara Puffer are both heard on the air and Clara is also the station's receptionist. Announcer and program director Steven John (Puffer) is the Puffer's son. Engineer Tim Westman, bookkeeper Faith Westman and ad salesman Ed Westman are another family at the station. Visitors Welcome The Puffers live in the same building in which the station is located--the old school building on S. Main St. in Wells River Village. Gene and Clara have a large apartment upstairs over the studio and their son Steven and his wife also have an apartment in the .... j building. ,+..., Other personnel at the  station besides the Puffers and the Westmans include i0ii] i}! iii Clara Puffer Brooks, music director and announcer Rick Davis and secretary Deborah Milnor. The small I00 watt station is housed on the ground floor of the old school building and is laid out in glassed-in sections in order, said Puffer, to open the station up to the public. Puffer said they encourage the public to visit the station and have welcomed school groups in the past. Puffer rents out another section of the building to the Orange County Probate Court of Wells River, presided over by Judg Rena Vigneau. The old school building is on the National Historic Register, said Puffer. People Want It "The reason we are (playing) country is because the people want it," says Puffer who cites what he sees as a favorable response from the com- munity. Puffer is proud of the station and his staff, but also with his affiliation i: ! Gerry Brooks / Steven John (Puffer) with a number of country music performers who have been in contact with Wq<R in one way or another. WYKR is the only i Vermont station that reports to a country music trade magazine called Radio and Records Magazine which helps formulate the charts  for country music. Pictures of Puffer clasping hands with a number of country music recording artists line the window sill across from the desk in his office. Country music per- former Boxcar Willie has visited WYKR in his travels through the area, said Puffer and he added that recording artist Sonny James recently called the station from Nashville. Sports Coverage The station is also known as the "Voice of Norwich Football" in the fall and the WYKR staff say they pride themselves on their local sports broadcasts of area high school basketball and Rick Davis t The old Wells River school building that houses WYKR baseball games. The station also broadcasts town team softball games plus local store "grand openings" and fair coverage. What is ahead for WYKR in 19827 Gerry Brooks said the station is anxiously awaiting the proposed relaxation of FCC regulations that presently require the station to shut down their power from lt10 to 250 watts at night. Puffer said more country music is sure to be in store in the years to come. "Surveys show," he said, "that country music will con- tinue to be popular in this area, at least for the next five years." I !NP'S :'dlX:l IO C+r O)Ol llt, Number 6 + Hampshire and Vermont February Serwng Over 48 Communities in Northern New , . + :o,19g2 d$3 ; 00plans t-axx rat t d Taxpa00'ers to free roof for high school charge million Huntington hits 1000 (Story on sports page) e ecrease Bore for Oxbow roof BRADFORD--The Oxbow board is recommending for Insteadh sa'dthatmos o (approximately $175,000). School Board has completed the 1982-83 school year will the money (minus a $295,OOO Fontana said that the in- its budget meetings for the total $t,521,387 as compared to bond amount plus any ad- terest the district will earn New record for la00est Vermont lawsuit development of budget a budget of $1,453,=0 last ditional roof costs)has been from the investment of the recommendations for the1982- year. reinvested toward completion money from the settlement PPELIER-- A County jury has more plaintiffs against the GAF regarding the of leaking roof were installed 12 years of $3,090,092. brakes the record largest amount in a lawsuit in t history. rd was also wsuit against the ration. Last year, Ilmountain Union High and Rodd Roofing Inc., ve n, .Johnsbury (also a ___.f in the Oxbow lawsuit) )w.arded a sum of $2.3 ta in an Orange County |or Court presided over ]lge Steven D. Martin. Mountain, las year, IWarded $1 million in es and Rndd Roofing awarded $1.3 million ling from a faulty GAF lat was installed at the Mountain High School Ig. GAF is currently ling the verdict. e Martin I ; Oxbowalso presided lawsuit that ) ved resulting from a for a change of venue yers representing GAF  Orange County to ton County on Sept. 10 :wr' High School settled  court on Jan. 5 with agreeing to pay the $675,000 in aamages. No Money Yet her plaintiffs in the :ts against GAF have Y received any money the chemical acturing company i00lic meetings discuss 1 u_ budKet . RIVER-- In order to Dr) orm the public about od ed BMU budget, the rig | board, has invited ts to meet with them at r a [t convenient time, as Jl" [I'o:] llay, Feb. 15, 8: Jlly +i roton Town Clerk s because GAF is appealing the court's verdict in the Blue Mountain case. Philip Kolvoord, an attorney representing Rodd Roofing Inc., told the Journal Opinion that he expects that GAF will he appealing last Saturday's Washington County jury verdict. Kolvoord said that last week the jury awarded Rodd Roofing Inc. a total of $2,130,852. $586,352 of that total was awarded for profit lost by the company as a result of in- stalling the roof at Oxbow; $44,500 went to the company for endemnity damages for lawyers fees; another $1,500,000 was awarded to Rodd Roofing for punitive damages. A second plaintiff last week, Burlington architect Roland Whittier, was awarded a sum of $959,220, said Kolvoord. $200,000 of the total went towards lost profit; $9,228 went towards lawyers fees; another $750,000 was awarded to the architect in punitive damages. Kolvoord said that, among the charges in which GAF was found guilty by the jury, last week, were breach of warranty, breach of contract and fraud. Giant Corporation William Rodd Jr. of Rodd Roofing Inc. told the Journal Opinion, "It's very gratifying to know that two court systems in the State of Ver- mont have come down on the side of the little guy against a giant corporation like GAF." Rodd said the reason his company had not settled out of court like Oxbow High School was that GAF had never been sued by a roofer and that the corporation did not want to settle. Rodd said his company .... installed four roofs in Ver- mont with the GAF roofing material -- in Burlington, in St. Albans, at Blue Mountain High School and at Oxbow; the roofs on all four buildings blistered and bubbled almost immediately after they were installed in the late 60's and early 70's. "My first impression was that I couldn't believe It,'"' said Rodd, "We are a good company and I just knew it wasn't us... that we could not have done that badly in all four places." Rodd said last week's verdict was largely due to evidence that his attorneys produced that showed that GAF knew the roof was going to blister before it was in- stalled. This evidence came in the form of the corporation's own documents, said Rodd. GAF is the largest roof manufacturer in the world said Rodd. He added that the corporation is also being sued for other GAF roofs in New York, New Jersey and Florida. MAGIC MOMENT-- At 7:17 of the fourth quarter against U-32, Ron Huntington puts in his 1,000th high school career point. Huntington currently leads the Upper Valley in scoring with a 24+ point average per game. 83 school year and is offering taxpayers in Bradford and Newbury a decrease in the school's tax rate. In Bradford, the school is asking for a tax rate of $2.11 per $100 of assessed property value this year as compared to $2.50 per $100 of assessed property value in 1981. In 1980 the Bradford tax rate stood at $2.37. This year's Bradford tax rate reflects a 15.8 percent decrease from last year: This year in Newbury, the school is asking for a tax rate of $1.41 per $100 of assessed property value as compared to $1.47 in 1981. The year before, in 1980, the Newbury tax rate stood at approximately $1.50 per $100 in assessed valuation. This year's Newbury tax rate reflects an 4 percent decrease from last year. Orange East Supervisory Superintendent John Fontana said that these figures will actually he less when the town decides to raise the money in taxes. He pointed out that in Vermont, state aid to education goes to individual towns rather than to school districts. When the towns receive the state funds and apply them toward the tax rate as set by the school board, said Fontana, the amount the town will actually have to raise will he sub- stantially less than the $2.11 and $1.41 figures. The Budget The budget that the school Among the programs at Oxbow High School that received substantial cuts were the debt service budget, cut by $4,038; monies budget for transportation, lowered by $11,107; media services were cut by $1,042; psychological services were cut by $1,376; monies budgeted for the board of education were also cut by $2,462. Among the major budget increases at the school reflected in the school board's recommended budget are increases in expenditures for instructional programs, up $28,009; vocational programs, up $25,677; executive ad- ministration services, up $4,562; the principal's office budget, up $9,099; the vocational director's office budget was also up $8,523. Actual money budgeted for operation- and maintenance for the school building itself was down by $2,144 over last year. The Roof Settlement When Oxbow settled their lawsuit last month with the GAF Corporation over their leaking roof, the school settled out of court for $675,000. Out of the settlement money, Oxbow's attorney in the case, Sten Lium of St. Johnsbury, received $100,000. According to Fontana, the remaining $575,000 is not in- cluded in the school board's budget recommendation for the 1982-83 school year. ar00le oct/t/on ...... Towns to vote on nuclear arms freeze THETFORD-- When voters in area that have worked to missiles and new aircraft However, petition nuclear arms freeze proposals our area go to their annual place the article up for vote designed primarily to deliver organizers set their sights for last year. town meetings this year to are not representing a par- nuclear weapons, with ver- articles in 100 towns earlier AFirstStep vote on the seemingly regular ticular organization in their tification safeguards this year, McCoster said they McCoster, an architectural issues of town and highway efforts. McCoster called the satisfactory to both coun- are now surprised they have designer and potter, said that budgets and maintenance group "a grassroots' tries." by far surpassed that amount he views the local town most of them will also be movement made up of in- Petitions lgnored and are up to 157 towns. He nuclear armsfreezeproposals voting on an article, placed by dividuals." The article has not been met said support for a nuclear as "a good first step." He petition, that calls for support Although some of the ar- with open arms in all the arms freeze has increased stressed the use of local of a mutual U.S.-Soviet ticles are said to differ towns and municipalities in greatly since last year. support for the proposals to nuclear arms freeze, slightly, a model example of which the petition has been The article will not appear show foreign policy makers in This year, the article will be the wording is the wording of presented. Barre City and on the warning in Thetford Washington that nuclear arms voted on in no less than 157 the article submitted by Town of Barre officials have this year because it was one of control has support at the towns in the State of Ver- petition to the town of Brad- refused to place the article on 18 Vermont towns that passed locallevel. mont--a figure totaling more ford. " " their ballots despite having the article by vote on last Supporters of the nuclear The Article been presented the required year's town meeting day. The The articles states: "By number of signatures on article was passed in all the petition: Shall the State petition. Barre officials towns that petitions were Senators and Representatives claimed they were "under no submitted in last year. These from thisdistrictbeadvisedto obligation" to heed to the towns were: Andover, introduce into the Vermont petitions. Officials in theTown Bakersfield, Burlington, S. Legislature a resolution of Goshen, Vt., are also said to Burlington, Duxbury, Fair- asking the Vermont have refused to place the field, Fletcher, Jericho, Mt. Congressional Delegationto: article on the warning for Holly, Milton, Moretown, "Request the President of their town meeting. Mont-Norwich, Randolph, Rich- the United States to propose to pelier aldermen are con- mend, Ripton, St. Albans, the Soviet Union a mutual ducting an "informal poll", Thetford and Waterbury. freeze on the testing, after receiving a similar Three New Hampshire production, and deployment of petition, in order to be assured towns--Hanover, Plainfield nuclear weapons and of of support for the issue, and Henniker--also passed arms freeze allege that despite official government policy relying on the hope that nuclear weapons will never be used, U.S. officials have considered using nuclear weapons six times since World War If. They also say that, according to the New York Times, on Nov. 9, 1979, a "computer error" led military officials to believe that the U.S. was under nuclear attack from the Soviet Union. Six minutes went by before the than 60 percent of the state's municipalities. According to one petition organizer, Timothy McCoster of Thetford, the article will appear on "just about all" of the warnings for town meeting in Orange County. In order to make this possible, petition gatherers had to obtain signatures from five percent of the voters in each town to get the article on the warning. McCoster said that he and most of the other people in the computer error was discovered. Nine minutes more and allegedly our own missiles would have been launched. No Winners "Nobody wins in a nuclear war," said McCoster. He referred to the nuclear weapons build-up on the part of the U.S. and the Soviet Union as a "nuclear mad- hesS." McCoster said many Ver- mont church groups are supporting the nuclear arms freeze proposal. The proposal is said to be supported nationally by the National Council of Churches, the United Universalist Association, the United Presbyterian Church and the YWCA. State legislatures are said to have supported the proposal in New York, Oregon and Massachusetts. Democratic Senator Patrick Leahy, has ( please turn to page 4) of the entire roof. Last May, district voters approved a $295,000 bond to fund roof repairs at the school. But Fontana said that the money was never actually raised by taxes. The school board did not have to borrow a substantial amount to make their first bill on the repairs will pay off the interest from the loan. The $295,000 bond will be taken out of the set- tlement money so the district's towns will not have to raise it through taxes. The result of the settlement, said Fontana, is a new roof for the entire school with no cost to the taxpayers. Board will announce articles this week HAVERHILL--- The warrant predicts the new budget will of articles for this year's annual Haverhill Cooperative School District meeting is expected to be announced this Wednesday, Feb. l0 at the Haverhill Cooperative District School Board's regular meeting, according to an agenda issued last week by district officials. Along with the an- nouncement of articles to be voted on at the district's an- nual meeting scheduled for March 18, district superin- tendent Norman Mullen is expected to discuss recom- mendations for the district's 1982-83 budget with the school board at Wednesday's (tonight's) meeting. The new budget has been locked in a review process by the district's budget com- mittee over the last month or so. School district officials will present the recommended budget to the public on Monday, Feb. 15---at the district's annual budget hearing. The budget hearing be approximately six percent higher than the 1981-82 budget. The total 1981-82 budget stood at $1,403,952.40. In the five precincts that make up the voting Town of Haverhill, the Haverhill Cooperative School District represents 64 percent of the town's tax rate, according to town selectmen. In other business, the school is expected to act on the setting of tuition charges for the 1982-83 school yeaL District officials are asking for a tuition rate of $641 for kindergarten, $1,282 for elementary age students, $1,695 for junior high students and $2,025 for students wishing to attend Woodsville High School from outside of the district. According to the agenda, the school board will also act on the resignation of a district employee and will hear a report on a hearing held on Monday, Feb. a regarchng financial responsibility in the will be held at the James placement ofanout-of-district Morrill School in N. Haverhill handicapped child at a starting at 7:30 p.m. Haverhill school. Moderate Budget Wednesday's meeting will Increase be held at the Haverhill Mullen has told the schonl Academy Junior High School board at two previous school in Haverhill Corner at 7:30 board meetings that he p.m. school board will 00lve "handtmok committee" a chance BRADFORD--The Oxbow School Board has been per- suaded by complaints from the Oxbow Teachers Association to take steps to look into what teachers describe as a student behavior problem stemming from a lack of consistent discipline at the school. A.s a result of a proposal from the teachers, the school board indicated at their meeting last Thursday that they are in favor of reac- tivating an idle Student Handbook Committee to / further look into the discipline problem and to discuss possible reforms in the present discipline policy at the school. The topic of discipline at Oxbow has been a major one since the teachers association aired their grievances over the issue at the board's January 7 meeting. Approximately 30 teachers attended the meeting at which representative speakers for the group fired charges that the school's administration or (please turn to page 4) Feb. 16, 8:00 Town Clerk's Feb. 18, 8:00 Memorial Res interested in the school board the Feb. at 7:30, in s annual viii be held on Feb. are "all country" at WYKR LLS RIVER-- When been a major part of the A bit of Nashville in IVells River ask Gene Puffer, of Wells River's radio station, to radio station in he will tell music or the sound" has station's programming since the station was started by Gene and his brother Harold in October of 1976 (Harold has since gone into real estate.). But six months ago, WYKR dropped its other music + +. @ ? +'+ , .... 8taUon owner Gene Puffer formats to "go 100 percent country," according to Puffer who now owns the station with his wife Clara. Office manager and announcer Gerry Brooks calls WYKR "a real family operation." And a family operation it is. Owners Gene and Clara Puffer are both heard on the air and Clara is also the station's receptionist. Announcer and program director Steven John (Puffer) is the Puffer's son. Engineer Tim Westman, bookkeeper Faith Westman and ad salesman Ed Westman are another family at the station. Visitors Welcome The Puffers live in the same building in which the station is located--the old school building on S. Main St. in Wells River Village. Gene and Clara have a large apartment upstairs over the studio and their son Steven and his wife also have an apartment in the .... j building. ,+..., Other personnel at the  station besides the Puffers and the Westmans include i0ii] i}! iii Clara Puffer Brooks, music director and announcer Rick Davis and secretary Deborah Milnor. The small I00 watt station is housed on the ground floor of the old school building and is laid out in glassed-in sections in order, said Puffer, to open the station up to the public. Puffer said they encourage the public to visit the station and have welcomed school groups in the past. Puffer rents out another section of the building to the Orange County Probate Court of Wells River, presided over by Judg Rena Vigneau. The old school building is on the National Historic Register, said Puffer. People Want It "The reason we are (playing) country is because the people want it," says Puffer who cites what he sees as a favorable response from the com- munity. Puffer is proud of the station and his staff, but also with his affiliation i: ! Gerry Brooks / Steven John (Puffer) with a number of country music performers who have been in contact with Wq<R in one way or another. WYKR is the only i Vermont station that reports to a country music trade magazine called Radio and Records Magazine which helps formulate the charts  for country music. Pictures of Puffer clasping hands with a number of country music recording artists line the window sill across from the desk in his office. Country music per- former Boxcar Willie has visited WYKR in his travels through the area, said Puffer and he added that recording artist Sonny James recently called the station from Nashville. Sports Coverage The station is also known as the "Voice of Norwich Football" in the fall and the WYKR staff say they pride themselves on their local sports broadcasts of area high school basketball and Rick Davis t The old Wells River school building that houses WYKR baseball games. The station also broadcasts town team softball games plus local store "grand openings" and fair coverage. What is ahead for WYKR in 19827 Gerry Brooks said the station is anxiously awaiting the proposed relaxation of FCC regulations that presently require the station to shut down their power from lt10 to 250 watts at night. Puffer said more country music is sure to be in store in the years to come. "Surveys show," he said, "that country music will con- tinue to be popular in this area, at least for the next five years."