"
Newspaper Archive of
Journal Opinion
Bradford , Vermont
Lyft
February 10, 1982     Journal Opinion
PAGE 4     (4 of 16 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 4     (4 of 16 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
February 10, 1982
 

Newspaper Archive of Journal Opinion produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Page 4-The Journal Opinion-February 10, 1982 LEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. Publisher of Journal I1 Opinion Weekly oowspepor published in Ibodford, Vornent. $ob0criptteo rotes - Vornent lid Now ltmRpshk, e - $/.00 If 1met; S$.90 for sir 0heaths; out of stets . SI2.00 per yeor end ST.00 for six memtks; Seude citizee dtlcou $2.N. SnceRd less pos0mle peld ot IIredferd, orment 0$O$3. PvbHshed by Nertkust PubUskiq Compoaff, Inc., P.O. Box 378, Ilmdford, Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher .w 4 v Bradford ,;   Woodsville ;02-T22-528 i  :,: 603-747-20 ! 6 An Independent Newspaper Editorial Police reports The police reports, a recently begun regular feature in the Journal Opinion, have been a topic of con- siderable discussion within our office since we initiated them last month, From e start, we realized that there were risks involved with run- ning such a feature and its affect on our small communities. We have debated its problems when they have surfaced on a number of occasions, and in fact, one week we did not run the names of those cited in the police reports because of that debate. When this occurred, public feed- back convinced us to stay with the reports -- names and all. The majority of the feedback from our readers indicates that the arrest reports are of public record and that people want to and have the right to know this information through the newspaper. Perhaps it would be helpful to establish what the reports are: the police reports are compiled from written accident, incident and arrest releases provided to us by the Haverhill Police Department and the Vermont State Police. The reports do not attest that those who are arrested actually committed a crime. We state that, according to police, a person was arrested, when, what for, and when that person will appear in court to answer the charge. Obviously, someone could con- ceivably be wronged by the police reports ff they are found innocent of their charge at a subsequent court hearing or trial. To avoid this oc- currence we will be offering, within the next three weeks, court reports also. What the issue boils down to in our minds is a question of consistency. If a bank were to be robbed in our area, we as a newspaper would be expected to reveal the name of the bank and those who may havebeen arrested for allegedly robbing it. For lesser crimes, trouble occurs when you question where to draw the line. The line we have drawn is that either we present our readers with all the in- formation" available to us or we will not run the police reports at all. Enlightening experience A visit to the local Red Cross Bloodmobile can be an enlightening experience. It soon becomes apparent who the regular donors are. Policemen, bankers, teachers, housewives, factory workers, students -- people from all walks of life. They come because they know that not everyone can or will give b]. If you are not now a blood donor, think it over. Why aren't you? Remember that only about four Americans in every 100 donate blood. The rest of us are in debt to them for the recovery of our hospitalized fellow citizens. There will he a Red Cross Blood drawing on Thursday, Feb. 18th at the Armory in Woodsville from 12:30 to 5:30. So make the commitment to become a donor. Together we can change things. Letters to the Edit A _ ._ ." Help for the =protected consumer /5-t=,.V. ,:,v_ l'.t ...... -r ....... "-"---1 //[-1E [*"z"'"" To the Edltor: feel the corporation is being been bearable :"  a', i.*M.:a,' BLMDE.i consumer complaint on a car sumer. How does the con- Sussman, the ,-,,,.,r .....  We have recently bad a protected and not the con- office cares. Paperm00king in Wells River (Continuing the history of took 8 hours to do the job that rethreaded through all the the Adams paper mill from its was later done in 35 to 40 rollers by hand, a tedious beginnings in 1810) minutes by the hydropuiper, process, Bigger machines, - The man who ran the like that at East Ryegate, Reminiscences heaters or hydropulper was have a rope that Henry Henderson, now called the beaterman. The automatically carries the end retired and living in Center crew for the paper machine of the paper through the ttaverhill, worked at the paper mill in Wells River for 35 years. Before that. he renmmbers visiting the mill and seeing the old paper machine and cylinder dryer which had been in use since around 1860. Mr. ltenderson's father- in-law, Charles Davis. came here from Cascade Mills in Berlin in 1914 and worked in the Wells River mill for 52 years, serving the last 23 years or so of that time as superintendant of the mill. In describing the papermaking process. Mr., Henderson says that for many years -- until they started using recycled paper -- their stock was virgin kraft pulp (wood fiberL in the form of big thick sheets in bales of 500 to 600 pounds. The pulp or other stock was put into beaters, which were big vats where it was softened in water and other ingredients and beaten into a smooth suspension called stock or sometimes "furnish". In more recent years the beaters were. replaced by the -hydropulper". a giant tub with fins on the inside to shred the pulp as it whirled around, To make paper of the desired color, they added dyes to the mixture, then it passed throUgh a pipe and poured out onto a fine screen at the correct speed to make the desired thickness of paper. The screen shook sideways to dislribule the fibers evenly, also constantly moved for- ward on rollers, and the layer of fibers was picked up by a moving roll of wet felt. Suction boxes and presses dike wringers) removed much of the water, then the continuous itself included the machine tender, the back tender and the third man. Years ago the mill used to burn coal, then it changed over to oil. Tremendous heat was used in the dryers so much that it took 24 hours to heat them up and 16 hours for them to cool off again,. Because of this, when possible the paper machine was kept running around-the-clock. seven days a week, with four shifts of workers and a swing- shift schedule. Henry Henderson says that years ago there was such a small turnover of employees at this mill that when he first came here to work, he was the first new man in 15 years. During the years when most of the output of this mill was Christmas wrappings, the demand was seasonal, so much of the paper was stored locally at places such as the Holbrook Grocery warehouse in Woodsville, another warehouse near Ames Garage (now Gerrity Building Cen- ter). and the Rogers barn below Wells River. Much of it was loaded for shipping in the summer by college students on vacation, This mill. being small, could take care of smaller orders than the bigger mills could afford to bother with, orders of less than 2000 pounds of paper. These small orders kept the Wells River mill going for years. Cleaning out the millpond An episode still remembered locally (and in the Barfs Times-Argus) was the attempt to clean out the paper mill's millpond in July, 1964. After 50 years of ac- sheet of paper passed through cumulation of silted sand, clay a series of steam,heated and,olmed,v..= rollers Is complete the drying, collect|rely known as muck " Each successive unit of the - the depth of thewaterin the dryers had a higher tem- perature, the last one being about 220 degrees. At the end of the machine the paper was wound into huge rolls, from 72 to 77 inches wide and weighing 650 to 700 pounds apiece. Mr. tlenderson and Elwin Beyce { who worked here for 40 years) can remember when they were still using water- power in the mill for running two of the beaters, also for cylinder pmnps for moving the stock mixture from the beaters to the screen. Sometime later. Mr. Bidwell installed generators to utilize the waterpower for electric lights for the mill. generating two-thirds of o their own electricity. The old waterpowered beaters were slow-moving and Red Cross is asking for donors therapy, in which one specific part of the blood is removed and the balance returned to the donor or patient in one continuous process. - Education about blood and its medical uses and in blood supply management for the medical profession and the general public. -- A rare donor registry of nearly 9.000 on-call donors nationwide to provide rare blond to meet the needs of special patients. - Blood resource sharing, though which regional blood services nationwide assist each other in maintaining a blood supply adequate to meet every patients needs. Fina neing The Red Cross finances itself by recovering its costs from the uses of its services. It charges hospitals a processing fee to cover the expenses of recruiting donors: collecting, testing. processing and distributing blood and blood products: 'and equipping the service. The fee is based on cost. thmpitals pass the charge on to the patient. The blood itself is never charged for because it is a gift from voluntary donors. Other funding comes from private contributions and from research grants and conlracts. WOODSVILLE-- The Red Cross Bloodmobile will be at the National Guard Armory on Feb. 18 from 12:30 to 5:30 p.m. And according to Red Cross area spokesman AI Guy, a good turnout would be more than appreciated. The Red Cross believes that blood should be available to all who need it, regardless of race, economic status, ability to donate, place of residence. or membership in a specific group, said another group spokesman, The Red CroSs also believes that the only way to ensure that blood will be available for any patient needing it is for an adequate number of a community's volunteer donors to donate regularly, The Red Cross does not assign credits for blood donation or require blood replacement from recipients of blond. There is no need for these com- plex, costly, discriminatory procedures when a blood service s doing its job of furnishing a reliable community blood suppl. And the key to a reliable community blond supply is regular blood donation by the com- munity's caring people who enjoy good health. Community Responsibility The Red Cross asks all healthy individuals in the community to join together as good neighbors in regular voluntary blood Platelet concentrate, used to cohtrol bleeding in patients whose bone marrow produces too few platelets, such as those with leukemia or un- dergoing chemotherapy treatments. In addition, frac- tionation, or the separation of blood plasma into several derivatives, results in- Antihemophillc factor, used to prevent bleeding in patients with hemophilia. Albumin and plasma protein faction, used for the t reatment of shock. -- Immune serum globulin, used to help avert or modify certain viral diseases such as hepatitis and measles. Red ('ross Blood Service To most people, a blood program suggests the donating or receiving of blood. But the Red Cross blood service does much more than collect, process, and distribute blood and blood products. Other areas of service may in- clude-. Technical expertise to aid hospitals and their blood banks and medical staffs with blood iden- tification and management problems. Collection or isolation of specific blood com- ponents by means of pheresis, an increasingly important procedure used in both collection and donation. This joining of individual action in the interest of maintaining a reliable community blood supply is what the Red Cross means by com- munity responsibility in blood service. Anyone between the ages of 17 and 66 who weighs at least 110 pounds and is in good health may donate bleed through the Red Cross, Donating blood is safe and simple, The entire process, including medical check, takes about 45 minutes: the actual donation requires only 6 to 10 minutes. Since the national Red Cross blood service began in 1947, technological advances have greatly increased the uses of blood Today, the components of one unit of blood may help restore several different patients to health. The 57 Red Cross blood regions convert the over 5 million units of whole blood they currently collect into some II million units of com- ponent products. Among the important products extracted from whole blood re Red cells, used for patients such as those who require surgery, lose blood in accidents or have anemia or kidney disease  Plasma used for the treatment of shock and, when clotting defects oc- cur. as in hemophilia or severe liver disease. pond had decreased to only two feet. Even though the pond was no longer being used for waterpower, there still was water needed in the manufacturing process, and what was coming through from the pond was dark- colored and foul-smelling. Also, because of the pond's decreased water capacity, the mill was being flooded every time there was high water. At thai time the mill was being operated by Ben-Mont, and the plant manager, Harvey Wilson. decided to solve the millpond problem by opening the gate on the dam and bulldozing the silt down through it, to create an adequate channel through the pondbed Of course the disturbed muck was carried down- stream, turning the river into a thick, dark syrup -- which caused considerable distur- bance among townspeople, also the State Water Resources Board and the Fish and Game Department. A major concern was the destruction of spawning areas for the Connecticut River trout. At thai time, there were no authoritative anti-pollution laws, but the State Water Resources Board's pollution- control division recommended Ihal the bulldozers stop pushing the silt downstream and inslead shove it up onto the riverbank - a request which was granted. Problems of recycling paper Recycling of paper sounds like a wonderful conservation idea until you come down to the practical problems of working with it in the paper mill. because of the extra things in it which won't disinlegrate in the hydropulper, such as pieces of cloth, styrofoam cups, and somelimcs an old shoe. Even though the beatermen watch closely what is going into the vat, there is no way they can spot t he worst troublemakers: wel-slrenglh papers thai will nol separate into fibers, but instead soften into a jellylike nmss that plugs the pumps and forms gobs of goo on the tureen, so that oftentimes a whole batch of sleek has to be thrown away. The poorer the materials used. the poorer the quality of paper produced. Every time there is a weak sP0i in the paper it ts apt to tear in the rollers. In the Wells River paper machine, which is over .d; years old, whenever the paper broke il had to be rollers. Of course the newest machines, such as those at International Paper in Jay, Maine, are completely automated run by com- puters and pnshbuttons. Any defective paper can be put back into the beaters and run through again, but this all takes time -- and time is money. Mr. Bidwell used to say that he was glad when he saw the machine tenders sitting around with nothing to do, because that meant the machine was running well and the .company was making money. Wildlife Henry Henderson says that on summer nights the worst problem with the paper machine used to be June bugs and moths. They would fly into the beaters or onto the screen or rollers and get crushed and make quite a mess -- also a weak spot in the paper, so that it would tear off. One night, just before dark. the paper machine bad been going just fine with no trouble -- when all at once the paper went to pieces. The crew all went running up to the wet end of the machine and discovered that a pigeon had come in through the window and gotten caught in one of the overhead wheels. The poor thing was whirling around and around, and feathers were flying all over the place -- seemed like a bushel of them. The men were an hour and a half cleaning up ,the mess and getting the machine going again. Through the years, they have seen all kinds of wild animals from the mill win- dows - deer, beaver, rac- we purchased in Vermont. The car had a defective part which cost a considerable amount of money to repair. It has been a very frustrating problem for us. Not only has it been a financial strain but there is a possibility this company will not reimburse us for repairing the damage the inferior part caused. I am very angry. I feel any defective product bought by consumers, by law, should be liable to the manufacturer. I Excent/ona/ pho00h+ To the Editor: The pholography of F. Itobl)ins is. without a doubt, exceptional and has added a ne di mensinn In your paper. Iler gifted al)ilily in capturing the besl of ht'al scenery on black and while fihn is out- standing, ller photos con- sistantly reveal Ihe abundant heauly of the tipper Valley, renlinding even those toobusy to see for themselves, that there s(qus no finer place to live. Keep publishing her work! We enjoy il so? Mr. & Mrs. Ben Gitchel & Son Piermont Opposed to arms freeze To the Editor: The writer is a member of the American Security ('ouncil. which in turn is af- filiated with the Coalition of t'eace Through Strength. The ('nalition of Peace Through Strength is comprised of 274 Metal)ors of Congress, (a nhljority of Congress) and 126 nalional organizations, of hich the 2',. million member V.F.W. was the iarges.t to join in H$1. Two-hundred and twenty- nine U.S. tepresentatives co- Slmsorod llouse Concurrent lte)lution No. 16,3 calling for a national strategy of Peace Through Strength, in addition to which l0 state legislatures passed the Resolution For coons, skunks, hedgehogs and Peace Through w...d..h....ka Wranuent Strength-eight of which ' ' : :  " " ..... |i (*Oa|lt " ton ; " visitors in'- t Tnfll were .D squirrels, who were eager for TIx, re are those m our midst handouts of peanuts and other goodies. Another visitor was a beaver that would come right into the mill. He came in about twice one summer, between midnight and 2 a.m. For some reason the mill seemed to fascinate him, and he came down the ramp into the machine room, walked the whole length of the room, went up the stairs into the beater room and checked it out, then went do'n into the boiler room - a place you wouldn't think he would go. because of the heal but he went down there and nosed all around the boilers, then went back up and away across the dam. Where the water came into the mill, it ran through a screen, and sometimes fish would gel trapped there. ltenry Powers. who used to work at the mill as a healern|an, bad an old yellow tnmcal that used to follow him h) work. and would sit by that screen by the hour to catch fish. Every time he got one he would bring it up to Henry and drop il at his feet to show itoff. Another place that fish used to congregate was in the raceway, where the water came out through the big old a[cr wheel, and the fish seemed to like the cool. dark pools. Righl over the raceway there was a window, and btide it the nmchine lender's table. One summer day Fred t'ushing was machine tender, Elwin Boyce was back tender and tlenry llenderson the third nmn. Fred was looking out Ihe window, watching the raceway, and when Henry walked by Fred said, "There's something wrong in that raceway. There's no small fish they've all disap- peared, i'll bet there's an awful big fish down there that has scared "out all the little ()nt."" They bad a dung fork there thai they used in ban- dling piles of wasle paper, and Fred took the fork and went down under the mill. llenry and Elwin kept watch out the window, and all of a sudden Fred nmdc a jab with the fork in the water, and the next thing they knew he was out in the water in the raceway --- and somehody besides him was Ihrthing down there. It was a Northern Pike 40 inches hmg they had never seen stwh a big one. Fred took an awful bath to get lhe thing, but bi' gol il. ( t o be c(mt inued ) hn can at best be classified as fear-nlongers. With in- lernat tonal ties of the organizations to which they hehmg. Ihey are seeking to pt'eml tn Ihe world the face of Anlerica as being a fear- ridden face. The strength of America, ,n addilion Is its pl'md backbone, lies in its nuclear weaponry and nuclear and other forms of energy, withnul which wc could not nanufaclure those items needed f,r our defensv These h, ft-wing organizations are seeking to disembowel our gills by deproving us not only of our nuclear weaponry but all other fornm of our defense against the monstrous st rengl h'of the ('omn) unists. l)tu' to its unihlteral intent, I'nl snrc I can speak for the ndllio,ls of gond Americans affiliated with the Coalition of I'eaec Thrnugh Strength ill s;13ing l wouldn't touch that arms freezepetilion wilh a l.- ld ixfle? I apphlud lhese who refused to pill it on the Imlhd and Io th|, forccd to vote the quest ion Town Meet ing Day I slrenuously urgc its rejection. I, this Opporlmsily Io vote Ior il st I'l)n Alnerica . Frauk I,. Cutler Bridport, Yermont sumer communicate directly Attorney General,4 with a large corporation? it is clear there One way is through Attorney fighting for the General John Easton's consumer. Consumer Complaint Division. My frustration has Academy summer To the Editor: Fairiee, Thank you so much for is$250. Vershire giving such complete included in this coverage to the Thetford have left it out. Academy Summer School. It make the is greatly appreciated, next issue? There is one omission, probably inadvertantly -- under costs-- we mention that the tuition for Thetford, W. lack of To the Editor: It was not intended to be a theft. Lack of communication, yes ! between Melvin Couillard and a gas attendant in Woodsville, N.H. When each pumped $3.00 worth of gas in the tank, unbeknown to each other; and only one pumping got paid for at the time of pumping. Unaware this had happened, it was called to my attention at a later date by a Woodsville officer, which I then paid for the extra $3.00 gas seemed officer how it could place. There was $100 paid. I want you to do not steal, not a thief. I working recommendations. never belittle my $3.00 at anytime. We and God know man. We love you ] To the Editor: Mr. and We and God know, son and brother, that you are an honest, kind, thoughtful, helpful, and a hard-working Comm-il to review school Oxbow school will 00ive " committee' a (continued from page 1 ) "front office" was responsible for the problem. However, the teachers now have cooled on their blame of the administration and say what they are seeking is a more consistent policy lacking much of the "gray area" that is presently built into the system. District superintendent john Fontana-e situation as he sees it from an administrative stance, "The principal is the one you are paying to make the decisions and when be makes a decision it gives everyone else the opportunity to second-guess him." He pointed out that the present policy of more "gray area decisions" for the principal to make is a result of the past failure of a more "black and white" or rigid policy. Fontana warned the board that although the school's administration might actually "have it a lot easier with black and white policy because the decisions are already made," the board could be opening itself up to more problems in the future by opting for a rigid set of rules with no margin for flexibility. "I don't think you can say Dick Rothenberg (the school's principal) is responsible for discipline problems at Oxbow," said Fontana. "When you instill a con- sistency of enforcement in everyone," be said, "then I think you can solve the 'problem." Renberg said that since the January school board meeting, he and assistant principal Charles Ottina had worked to down on the students that tending their said regarding discipline at what I believe is situation." School board Aroline Putnam bothers me that New USDA interest rates annom00ced The USDA Agricultural after April 1, 1981, and Stabilization and Con- servation Service has an- nouncod that its February interest rate for silo and commodity loans will be 14.0 percent. The new rate, up from 12.25 percent in January, reflects the interest rate charged to the Commodity Credit Cor- poration by the U.S. Treasury in February. George T. Hart, State Executive Director for ASCS, said; "The new rate will apply to all loans approved on or disbursed during February 1982. The rates on these loam will again be adjusted bn each succeeding Jan. 1 in order to reflect current economic conditions." ASCS announced ,s "floating" interest rate pdcy in April of 1981. Interest rates for all new loans will change monthly under the new system. Outstanding loans will have their interest rate adjusted once each year on Jan. 1. Bradford man gets Naw promolion BRADFORD-- Navy demonstrated professional Machinist's Mate 3rd Class abilities,, according to a U.S. Frank C. Furman, son of Don Navy spokesman. C. and Lucy L. Furman of Bradford, has been meritoriously promoted to his present rank while serving aboard the destroyer USS Vogelgesang homeported in Newport. R.I. He received the accelerated promotion in recognition of outstanding performance, duty proficiency and added that, the be solved a Oxbow Association Croteau, in Handbook C proposal, committee be review and adopt i that it meet for monthly review problem is solved. Fontana called t "the forum to some kind of upon a solution." The postpone any discipline until Committee meetS The committee is members school board ministration, students. Contract Also at the board contract teachers at year. Only two denied renewal tracts because absence. The be returning to fill-in while t Oxbow art Hadley with of his plans to and eighth construct a foot sculpture attached to a of the high The fiberglass z constructed Plaster of student models. story on the week's Journal . Nuclear given his proposal in Republicans and James spoke in favor arms limitation at a Washington, limitations McCoster. INTERESTING FACT Theflrst steamship to cross the Atlantic, the S.S. Modesty: The Savannah, traveled from others are Savannah, GA. to Liverpool, for themselves England, on 1819. The voyage you are. took 29 days. -Tower, Page 4-The Journal Opinion-February 10, 1982 LEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. Publisher of Journal I1 Opinion Weekly oowspepor published in Ibodford, Vornent. $ob0criptteo rotes - Vornent lid Now ltmRpshk, e - $/.00 If 1met; S$.90 for sir 0heaths; out of stets . SI2.00 per yeor end ST.00 for six memtks; Seude citizee dtlcou $2.N. SnceRd less pos0mle peld ot IIredferd, orment 0$O$3. PvbHshed by Nertkust PubUskiq Compoaff, Inc., P.O. Box 378, Ilmdford, Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher .w 4 v Bradford ,;   Woodsville ;02-T22-528 i  :,: 603-747-20 ! 6 An Independent Newspaper Editorial Police reports The police reports, a recently begun regular feature in the Journal Opinion, have been a topic of con- siderable discussion within our office since we initiated them last month, From e start, we realized that there were risks involved with run- ning such a feature and its affect on our small communities. We have debated its problems when they have surfaced on a number of occasions, and in fact, one week we did not run the names of those cited in the police reports because of that debate. When this occurred, public feed- back convinced us to stay with the reports -- names and all. The majority of the feedback from our readers indicates that the arrest reports are of public record and that people want to and have the right to know this information through the newspaper. Perhaps it would be helpful to establish what the reports are: the police reports are compiled from written accident, incident and arrest releases provided to us by the Haverhill Police Department and the Vermont State Police. The reports do not attest that those who are arrested actually committed a crime. We state that, according to police, a person was arrested, when, what for, and when that person will appear in court to answer the charge. Obviously, someone could con- ceivably be wronged by the police reports ff they are found innocent of their charge at a subsequent court hearing or trial. To avoid this oc- currence we will be offering, within the next three weeks, court reports also. What the issue boils down to in our minds is a question of consistency. If a bank were to be robbed in our area, we as a newspaper would be expected to reveal the name of the bank and those who may havebeen arrested for allegedly robbing it. For lesser crimes, trouble occurs when you question where to draw the line. The line we have drawn is that either we present our readers with all the in- formation" available to us or we will not run the police reports at all. Enlightening experience A visit to the local Red Cross Bloodmobile can be an enlightening experience. It soon becomes apparent who the regular donors are. Policemen, bankers, teachers, housewives, factory workers, students -- people from all walks of life. They come because they know that not everyone can or will give b]. If you are not now a blood donor, think it over. Why aren't you? Remember that only about four Americans in every 100 donate blood. The rest of us are in debt to them for the recovery of our hospitalized fellow citizens. There will he a Red Cross Blood drawing on Thursday, Feb. 18th at the Armory in Woodsville from 12:30 to 5:30. So make the commitment to become a donor. Together we can change things. Letters to the Edit A _ ._ ." Help for the =protected consumer /5-t=,.V. ,:,v_ l'.t ...... -r ....... "-"---1 //[-1E [*"z"'"" To the Edltor: feel the corporation is being been bearable :"  a', i.*M.:a,' BLMDE.i consumer complaint on a car sumer. How does the con- Sussman, the ,-,,,.,r .....  We have recently bad a protected and not the con- office cares. Paperm00king in Wells River (Continuing the history of took 8 hours to do the job that rethreaded through all the the Adams paper mill from its was later done in 35 to 40 rollers by hand, a tedious beginnings in 1810) minutes by the hydropuiper, process, Bigger machines, - The man who ran the like that at East Ryegate, Reminiscences heaters or hydropulper was have a rope that Henry Henderson, now called the beaterman. The automatically carries the end retired and living in Center crew for the paper machine of the paper through the ttaverhill, worked at the paper mill in Wells River for 35 years. Before that. he renmmbers visiting the mill and seeing the old paper machine and cylinder dryer which had been in use since around 1860. Mr. ltenderson's father- in-law, Charles Davis. came here from Cascade Mills in Berlin in 1914 and worked in the Wells River mill for 52 years, serving the last 23 years or so of that time as superintendant of the mill. In describing the papermaking process. Mr., Henderson says that for many years -- until they started using recycled paper -- their stock was virgin kraft pulp (wood fiberL in the form of big thick sheets in bales of 500 to 600 pounds. The pulp or other stock was put into beaters, which were big vats where it was softened in water and other ingredients and beaten into a smooth suspension called stock or sometimes "furnish". In more recent years the beaters were. replaced by the -hydropulper". a giant tub with fins on the inside to shred the pulp as it whirled around, To make paper of the desired color, they added dyes to the mixture, then it passed t hroUgh a pipe and poured out onto a fine screen at the correct speed to make the desired thickness of paper. The screen shook sideways to dislribule the fibers evenly, also constantly moved for- ward on rollers, and the layer of fibers was picked up by a moving roll of wet felt. Suction boxes and presses dike wringers) removed much of the water, then the continuous itself included the machine tender, the back tender and the third man. Years ago the mill used to burn coal, then it changed over to oil. Tremendous heat was used in the dryers so much that it took 24 hours to heat them up and 16 hours for them to cool off again,. Because of this, when possible the paper machine was kept running around-the-clock. seven days a week, with four shifts of workers and a swing- shift schedule. Henry Henderson says that years ago there was such a small turnover of employees at this mill that when he first came here to work, he was the first new man in 15 years. During the years when most of the output of this mill was Christmas wrappings, the demand was seasonal, so much of the paper was stored locally at places such as the Holbrook Grocery warehouse in Woodsville, another warehouse near Ames Garage (now Gerrity Building Cen- ter). and the Rogers barn below Wells River. Much of it was loaded for shipping in the summer by college students on vacation, This mill. being small, could take care of smaller orders than the bigger mills could afford to bother with, orders of less than 2000 pounds of paper. These small orders kept the Wells River mill going for years. Cleaning out the millpond An episode still remembered locally (and in the Barfs Times-Argus) was the attempt to clean out the paper mill's millpond in July, 1964. After 50 years of ac- sheet of paper passed through cumulation of silted sand, clay a series of steam,heated and,olmed,v..= rollers Is complete the drying, collect|rely known as muck " Each successive unit of the - the depth of thewaterin the dryers had a higher tem- perature, the last one being about 220 degrees. At the end of the machine the paper was wound into huge rolls, from 72 to 77 inches wide and weighing 650 to 700 pounds apiece. Mr. tlenderson and Elwin Beyce { who worked here for 40 years) can remember when they were still using water- power in the mill for running two of the beaters, also for cylinder pmnps for moving the stock mixture from the beaters to the screen. Sometime later. Mr. Bidwell installed generators to utilize the waterpower for electric lights for the mill. generating two-thirds of o their own electricity. The old waterpowered beaters were slow-moving and Red Cross is asking for donors therapy, in which one specific part of the blood is removed and the balance returned to the donor or patient in one continuous process. - Education about blood and its medical uses and in blood supply management for the medical profession and the general public. -- A rare donor registry of nearly 9.000 on-call donors nationwide to provide rare blond to meet the needs of special patients. - Blood resource sharing, though which regional blood services nationwide assist each other in maintaining a blood supply adequate to meet every patients needs. Fina neing The Red Cross finances itself by recovering its costs from the uses of its services. It charges hospitals a processing fee to cover the expenses of recruiting donors: collecting, testing. processing and distributing blood and blood products: 'and equipping the service. The fee is based on cost. thmpitals pass the charge on to the patient. The blood itself is never charged for because it is a gift from voluntary donors. Other funding comes from private contributions and from research grants and conlracts. WOODSVILLE-- The Red Cross Bloodmobile will be at the National Guard Armory on Feb. 18 from 12:30 to 5:30 p.m. And according to Red Cross area spokesman AI Guy, a good turnout would be more than appreciated. The Red Cross believes that blood should be available to all who need it, regardless of race, economic status, ability to donate, place of residence. or membership in a specific group, said another group spokesman, The Red CroSs also believes that the only way to ensure that blood will be available for any patient needing it is for an adequate number of a community's volunteer donors to donate regularly, The Red Cross does not assign credits for blood donation or require blood replacement from recipients of blond. There is no need for these com- plex, costly, discriminatory procedures when a blood service s doing its job of furnishing a reliable community blood suppl. And the key to a reliable community blond supply is regular blood donation by the com- munity's caring people who enjoy good health. Community Responsibility The Red Cross asks all healthy individuals in the community to join together as good neighbors in regular voluntary blood Platelet concentrate, used to cohtrol bleeding in patients whose bone marrow produces too few platelets, such as those with leukemia or un- dergoing chemotherapy treatments. In addition, frac- tionation, or the separation of blood plasma into several derivatives, results in- Antihemophillc factor, used to prevent bleeding in patients with hemophilia. Albumin and plasma protein faction, used for the treatment of shock. -- Immune serum globulin, used to help avert or modify certain viral diseases such as hepatitis and measles. Red ('ross Blood Service To most people, a blood program suggests the donating or receiving of blood. But the Red Cross blood service does much more than collect, process, and distribute blood and blood products. Other areas of service may in- clude-. Technical expertise to aid hospitals and their blood banks and medical staffs with blood iden- tification and management problems. Collection or isolation of specific blood com- ponents by means of pheresis, an increasingly important procedure used in both collection and donation. This joining of individual action in the interest of maintaining a reliable community blood supply is what the Red Cross means by com- munity responsibility in blood service. Anyone between the ages of 17 and 66 who weighs at least 110 pounds and is in good health may donate bleed through the Red Cross, Donating blood is safe and simple, The entire process, including medical check, takes about 45 minutes: the actual donation requires only 6 to 10 minutes. Since the national Red Cross blood service began in 1947, technological advances have greatly increased the uses of blood Today, the components of one unit of blood may help restore several different patients to health. The 57 Red Cross blood regions convert the over 5 million units of whole blood they currently collect into some II million units of com- ponent products. Among the important products extracted from whole blood re Red cells, used for patients such as those who require surgery, lose blood in accidents or have anemia or kidney disease  Plasma used for the treatment of shock and, when clotting defects oc- cur. as in hemophilia or severe liver disease. pond had decreased to only two feet. Even though the pond was no longer being used for waterpower, there still was water needed in the manufacturing process, and what was coming through from the pond was dark- colored and foul-smelling. Also, because of the pond's decreased water capacity, the mill was being flooded every time there was high water. At thai time the mill was being operated by Ben-Mont, and the plant manager, Harvey Wilson. decided to solve the millpond problem by opening the gate on the dam and bulldozing the silt down through it, to create an adequate channel through the pondbed Of course the disturbed muck was carried down- stream, turning the river into a thick, dark syrup -- which caused considerable distur- bance among townspeople, also the State Water Resources Board and the Fish and Game Department. A major concern was the destruction of spawning areas for the Connecticut River trout. At thai time, there were no authoritative anti-pollution laws, but the State Water Resources Board's pollution- control division recommended Ihal the bulldozers stop pushing the silt downstream and inslead shove it up onto the riverbank - a request which was granted. Problems of recycling paper Recycling of paper sounds like a wonderful conservation idea until you come down to the practical problems of working with it in the paper mill. because of the extra things in it which won't disinlegrate in the hydropulper, such as pieces of cloth, styrofoam cups, and somelimcs an old shoe. Even though the beatermen watch closely what is going into the vat, there is no way they can spot t he worst troublemakers: wel-slrenglh papers thai will nol separate into fibers, but instead soften into a jellylike nmss that plugs the pumps and forms gobs of goo on the tureen, so that oftentimes a whole batch of sleek has to be thrown away. The poorer the materials used. the poorer the quality of paper produced. Every time there is a weak sP0i in the paper it ts apt to tear in the rollers. In the Wells River paper machine, which is over .d; years old, whenever the paper broke il had to be rollers. Of course the newest machines, such as those at International Paper in Jay, Maine, are completely automated run by com- puters and pnshbuttons. Any defective paper can be put back into the beaters and run through again, but this all takes time -- and time is money. Mr. Bidwell used to say that he was glad when he saw the machine tenders sitting around with nothing to do, because that meant the machine was running well and the .company was making money. Wildlife Henry Henderson says that on summer nights the worst problem with the paper machine used to be June bugs and moths. They would fly into the beaters or onto the screen or rollers and get crushed and make quite a mess -- also a weak spot in the paper, so that it would tear off. One night, just before dark. the paper machine bad been going just fine with no trouble -- when all at once the paper went to pieces. The crew all went running up to the wet end of the machine and discovered that a pigeon had come in through the window and gotten caught in one of the overhead wheels. The poor thing was whirling around and around, and feathers were flying all over the place -- seemed like a bushel of them. The men were an hour and a half cleaning up ,the mess and getting the machine going again. Through the years, they have seen all kinds of wild animals from the mill win- dows - deer, beaver, rac- we purchased in Vermont. The car had a defective part which cost a considerable amount of money to repair. It has been a very frustrating problem for us. Not only has it been a financial strain but there is a possibility this company will not reimburse us for repairing the damage the inferior part caused. I am very angry. I feel any defective product bought by consumers, by law, should be liable to the manufacturer. I Excent/ona/ pho00h+ To the Editor: The pholography of F. Itobl)ins is. without a doubt, exceptional and has added a ne di mensinn In your paper. Iler gifted al)ilily in capturing the besl of ht'al scenery on black and while fihn is out- standing, ller photos con- sistantly reveal Ihe abundant heauly of the tipper Valley, renlinding even those toobusy to see for themselves, that there s(qus no finer place to live. Keep publishing her work! We enjoy il so? Mr. & Mrs. Ben Gitchel & Son Piermont Opposed to arms freeze To the Editor: The writer is a member of the American Security ('ouncil. which in turn is af- filiated with the Coalition of t'eace Through Strength. The ('nalition of Peace Through Strength is comprised of 274 Metal)ors of Congress, (a nhljority of Congress) and 126 nalional organizations, of hich the 2',. million member V.F.W. was the iarges.t to join in H$1. Two-hundred and twenty- nine U.S. tepresentatives co- Slmsorod llouse Concurrent lte)lution No. 16,3 calling for a national strategy of Peace Through Strength, in addition to which l0 state legislatures passed the Resolution For coons, skunks, hedgehogs and Peace Through w...d..h....ka Wranuent Strength-eight of which ' ' : :  " " ..... |i (*Oa|lt " ton ; " visitors in'- t Tnfll were .D squirrels, who were eager for TIx, re are those m our midst handouts of peanuts and other goodies. Another visitor was a beaver that would come right into the mill. He came in about twice one summer, between midnight and 2 a.m. For some reason the mill seemed to fascinate him, and he came down the ramp into the machine room, walked the whole length of the room, went up the stairs into the beater room and checked it out, then went do'n into the boiler room - a place you wouldn't think he would go. because of the heal but he went down there and nosed all around the boilers, then went back up and away across the dam. Where the water came into the mill, it ran through a screen, and sometimes fish would gel trapped there. ltenry Powers. who used to work at the mill as a healern|an, bad an old yellow tnmcal that used to follow him h) work. and would sit by that screen by the hour to catch fish. Every time he got one he would bring it up to Henry and drop il at his feet to show itoff. Another place that fish used to congregate was in the raceway, where the water came out through the big old a[cr wheel, and the fish seemed to like the cool. dark pools. Righl over the raceway there was a window, and btide it the nmchine lender's table. One summer day Fred t'ushing was machine tender, Elwin Boyce was back tender and tlenry llenderson the third nmn. Fred was looking out Ihe window, watching the raceway, and when Henry walked by Fred said, "There's something wrong in that raceway. There's no small fish they've all disap- peared, i'll bet there's an awful big fish down there that has scared "out all the little ()nt."" They bad a dung fork there thai they used in ban- dling piles of wasle paper, and Fred took the fork and went down under the mill. llenry and Elwin kept watch out the window, and all of a sudden Fred nmdc a jab with the fork in the water, and the next thing they knew he was out in the water in the raceway --- and somehody besides him was Ihrthing down there. It was a Northern Pike 40 inches hmg they had never seen stwh a big one. Fred took an awful bath to get lhe thing, but bi' gol il. ( t o be c(mt inued ) hn can at best be classified as fear-nlongers. With in- lernat tonal ties of the organizations to which they hehmg. Ihey are seeking to pt'eml tn Ihe world the face of Anlerica as being a fear- ridden face. The strength of America, ,n addilion Is its pl'md backbone, lies in its nuclear weaponry and nuclear and other forms of energy, withnul which wc could not nanufaclure those items needed f,r our defensv These h, ft-wing organizations are seeking to disembowel our gills by deproving us not only of our nuclear weaponry but all other fornm of our defense against the monstrous st rengl h'of the ('omn) unists. l)tu' to its unihlteral intent, I'nl snrc I can speak for the ndllio,ls of gond Americans affiliated with the Coalition of I'eaec Thrnugh Strength ill s;13ing l wouldn't touch that arms freezepetilion wilh a l.- ld ixfle? I apphlud lhese who refused to pill it on the Imlhd and Io th|, forccd to vote the quest ion Town Meet ing Day I slrenuously urgc its rejection. I, this Opporlmsily Io vote Ior il st I'l)n Alnerica . Frauk I,. Cutler Bridport, Yermont sumer communicate directly Attorney General,4 with a large corporation? it is clear there One way is through Attorney fighting for the General John Easton's consumer. Consumer Complaint Division. My frustration has Academy summer To the Editor: Fairiee, Thank you so much for is$250. Vershire giving such complete included in this coverage to the Thetford have left it out. Academy Summer School. It make the is greatly appreciated, next issue? There is one omission, probably inadvertantly -- under costs-- we mention that the tuition for Thetford, W. lack of To the Editor: It was not intended to be a theft. Lack of communication, yes ! between Melvin Couillard and a gas attendant in Woodsville, N.H. When each pumped $3.00 worth of gas in the tank, unbeknown to each other; and only one pumping got paid for at the time of pumping. Unaware this had happened, it was called to my attention at a later date by a Woodsville officer, which I then paid for the extra $3.00 gas seemed officer how it could place. There was $100 paid. I want you to do not steal, not a thief. I working recommendations. never belittle my $3.00 at anytime. We and God know man. We love you ] To the Editor: Mr. and We and God know, son and brother, that you are an honest, kind, thoughtful, helpful, and a hard-working Comm-il to review school Oxbow school will 00ive " committee' a (continued from page 1 ) "front office" was responsible for the problem. However, the teachers now have cooled on their blame of the administration and say what they are seeking is a more consistent policy lacking much of the "gray area" that is presently built into the system. District superintendent john Fontana-e situation as he sees it from an administrative stance, "The principal is the one you are paying to make the decisions and when be makes a decision it gives everyone else the opportunity to second-guess him." He pointed out that the present policy of more "gray area decisions" for the principal to make is a result of the past failure of a more "black and white" or rigid policy. Fontana warned the board that although the school's administration might actually "have it a lot easier with black and white policy because the decisions are already made," the board could be opening itself up to more problems in the future by opting for a rigid set of rules with no margin for flexibility. "I don't think you can say Dick Rothenberg (the school's principal) is responsible for discipline problems at Oxbow," said Fontana. "When you instill a con- sistency of enforcement in everyone," be said, "then I think you can solve the 'problem." Renberg said that since the January school board meeting, he and assistant principal Charles Ottina had worked to down on the students that tending their said regarding discipline at what I believe is situation." School board Aroline Putnam bothers me that New USDA interest rates annom00ced The USDA Agricultural after April 1, 1981, and Stabilization and Con- servation Service has an- nouncod that its February interest rate for silo and commodity loans will be 14.0 percent. The new rate, up from 12.25 percent in January, reflects the interest rate charged to the Commodity Credit Cor- poration by the U.S. Treasury in February. George T. Hart, State Executive Director for ASCS, said; "The new rate will apply to all loans approved on or disbursed during February 1982. The rates on these loam will again be adjusted bn each succeeding Jan. 1 in order to reflect current economic conditions." ASCS announced ,s "floating" interest rate pdcy in April of 1981. Interest rates for all new loans will change monthly under the new system. Outstanding loans will have their interest rate adjusted once each year on Jan. 1. Bradford man gets Naw promolion BRADFORD-- Navy demonstrated professional Machinist's Mate 3rd Class abilities,, according to a U.S. Frank C. Furman, son of Don Navy spokesman. C. and Lucy L. Furman of Bradford, has been meritoriously promoted to his present rank while serving aboard the destroyer USS Vogelgesang homeported in Newport. R.I. He received the accelerated promotion in recognition of outstanding performance, duty proficiency and added that, the be solved a Oxbow Association Croteau, in Handbook C proposal, committee be review and adopt i that it meet for monthly review problem is solved. Fontana called t "the forum to some kind of upon a solution." The postpone any discipline until Committee meetS The committee is members school board ministration, students. Contract Also at the board contract teachers at year. Only two denied renewal tracts because absence. The be returning to fill-in while t Oxbow art Hadley with of his plans to and eighth construct a foot sculpture attached to a of the high The fiberglass z constructed Plaster of student models. story on the week's Journal . Nuclear given his proposal in Republicans and James spoke in favor arms limitation at a Washington, limitations McCoster. INTERESTING FACT Theflrst steamship to cross the Atlantic, the S.S. Modesty: The Savannah, traveled from others are Savannah, GA. to Liverpool, for themselves England, on 1819. The voyage you are. took 29 days. -Tower,