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Bradford , Vermont
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February 10, 1982     Journal Opinion
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February 10, 1982
 

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February I0, 1982-The Journal Opinion-Page 7 R/r/s w/n page 5) first quarter went to an 11 quarter lead as Pratt, Dwyer hit a field and Peterson two, the Olympians rolling. by Oxbow in four minutes of the Hanover up for a I of air, but not the lead. v held a 28-22 halftime Peterson, Dwyer and hit for six, five, and points each in the Dwyer took over the reins in the third coming out of her shooting slump. 4 of 6 field goals and five from the line, quarter lead, by as many as 15. for a big win, or win, the starting of the final Dwyer again showed in eight way to a 23 point night. Peterson managed 13 and a couple of bad after loose scored eight as did Janine Teeter injured starting Dobbins) Angle and Heidi Osgood in three points each rounded out goal. travels to U-32 on Y and Montpelier on in the final two season. hits ge 5) congratulations tes. But, that the last harrah for time for U-32 to be Six foot five inch Tullar and Jim for two points each, Oxbow's lead to three 42-39. Huntington hit another jumper, and Bill Edwards with bringing t/ pointers Raiders one, 44-43. Huntington L Hayward missed Oxbow while Tullar field goal and Slack two puttint i Oxbow urne since ',minute. Olympians took time with less than o NEWSPAPER WATCHDOG-- This alert Piermont terrier is keeping an eye out for the Union Leader delivery man to show him where the paper should go. One more plowing and they may have a problem finding the box! PHOTO BY F. ROBmm Cattani starts early campaign for county state's attorney WEI, I RIVER-- Louis J. Cattani, a Wells River at- torney and former deputy state's attorney in Caledonia County, has announced his candidacy for the position currently held by Orange County State's Attorney James McKnight Cattani, running for the Republican nomination, was a deputy state's attorney in Caledonia County from July, 1977 to March of 1980. After leaving the position, he practiced law in St. Johnsbury until he moved to Wells River in November of 1980. Cattani is a former director of the Vermont State's Attorney's Association and is" a member of the National District Attorney's Association. Cattani said his attendence at seminars on trial techniques, advanced criminal trial tactics and vehicular homocide during his time as prosecutor, give him the knowledge required at the level of County State's Attorney. Cattani's Record Louis J. Cattan[ verdicts. Among these were 1 l DWI jury trials taken to verdicts on the original charge. I obtained guilty verdicts in all II of these trials." In regard to juvenile of- fenders, Cattani said, "There so-called juvenile diversion program." Cattani said he believes that the diversion program "deters juvenile delinquents from becoming adult criminals." Cattani describes himself as a "no-nonsense prosecutor." He said viewing his candidacy that, "l think my record as Caledonia County Deputy State's Attorney speaks for itself. If elected to the position I seek, I pledge myself to an unrelenting enforcement of our criminal laws." Personal Bar, round Cattani is 34 years old and came to Vermont in 1973 to study law at the Vermont Law ,School after an undergraduate education at Wagner College in Staten Island, N.Y. He received his law degree cure iaude from Vermont Law School in 1977, graduating sixth in a class of 121.. He is married to the former Jonnie Crawford of S." Royalton. Cattani and his wife have lived in Wells River since November of 1980 and his wife a half minutes left. "During my term of em- Stever brought Oxbow ployment as deputy state's one on along j umperattorney.', said Cattani, "I ,-tung omy net, tried . minnl jury trials to two turnovers .... went ahead on a jumper from Brian Page had come out go for two points, but the guard surprised making a nice feed through traffic seconds remained, a tenuous one U-32, plagued by the end of did it again and was fouled Pulling down the With the game in the Hayward hit both one and one situation Seconds left. Tullar, Points in the quarter m another two points with 11 seconds was then attempt back into U-32's Huntington hit the game the dishear- Point honors for the to Ron Huntington closely followed by with 17 and Gary with 8. Page, Grant closed out the Oxbow with five, Oxbow bad socks on; hit- of 14 from the free and 20 of 50 from Oxbow Raiders to of 70 shots from the Week Oxbow hosts on Wednesday, make up game) on and Woodstock on afternoon at 1:00 Warren WSCS Meets at Parsonage On Jan. 19, the Women's Society of the United Methodist Church met at the parsonage for its regular meeting. Fourteen were present for the meeting with several others attending later. The first order of business was the election of Officers for the coming year. Those elected to serve were President, Ha'rriet Libby; Vice President, Avis Cushing; Secretary, Lydia Belyea; Treasurer, Estella Ramsay.; Sunshine, Avis Cushing and Lydia Belyea; Work Com- mittee, Dorothy Sprague, Margaret Whitcher and Margery Huckins; and Publicity, Helen Goodwin. Thank you letters were received from many who were recipients of the Christmas baskets. There were 38 singles, nine doubles and two family baskets, or a total of 63 persons remembered as the family baskets included several children in each family. At the annual Christmas Tree 125 gifts were given to children in the community These included grades one to six, pre-schoolers and cradle roll children. At the close of the meeting a stork shower was tendered Mrs. Sandee Snngren. This was a complete surprise and Mrs. Snogren received many useful gifts for baby-to-he. The shower cake was made by Nancy Bumford and was served with coffee after the meeting. The next meeting will be held on Feb. 17 New members are needed and all will he most welcome. is a special need for a firm and consistent prosecution." lie added that, "In appropriate ca-s. I am committed to the Floyd R. Ray i I 764-9979 Fire Calls The Fire Dept. continues to get work-outs these cold nights and days. A chimney fire in the Marston House North on 25C got them out at 6:00 a.m. last Friday. Wednesday eve at 7:00 p.m., they had to return to the same house--another chimney fire and this one more intense. Thf sparks and fire came out the top of the chimney. Before this was completely extinguished another alarm came in and there was a house fire at the residence of Butch Spencer in the lower village near the fish hatchery. The flames were rising from the structure when the department arrived, but it was soon brought under control, but not before con- siderable damage occurred to the structure. Rumney and Wentworth were called in under Mutual Aide, one truck of Wentworths standing by at the Fire House and Rumney assisting at the fire. Great thing: this Mutual Aide. Auditing Committee The Auditing Committee is nearing completion of their tasks, and the budget com- mittee will finish soon if they are not called out to fires as operates a store in Woodsville. Catlani is a member of the Woodsville-Wells River Rotary Club. NE fopsham Fred Smith has been ill at Ben A. Matthews, 91, noted lawyer dies his home this past week. Marjorie McKay was in Newport this past week visiting her hrother, Mr. and Mrs. Warren Mithell. Mrs. Velmer Frost is taking care of her sister-in-law, Mrs. George Sanborn at her home. ()live Powers entertained on Wednesday evening several of her "friends. Several from town attended the farm show on vm'ions days CORllYrH Mrs. Bruce Thompson, who has been a patient at the Central Vermont Hospital in Berlin for several days, returned home J an. 29. Mrs. Toby Olsen, Sonya, Kristen and Eric of Lon- donderry. N.H. were Friday overnight guests of her parents, Mr. and Mrs Renrick Frost in Topsham and were Saturday overnight guests of Toby's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Olsen Sr. The steeple lighting for the week of Jan. 31 was given by Bill and Rosa Heidenreich in ELY-- Ben A. Matthews of Jamesville, N.Y. and Ely, Vt., formerly of New York City died Monday, Jan. 25, at the home of his son, David L. Matthews. Mr. Matthews was born on April 18, 1890, in Culloden, Ga., the son of Augusta Vaughan and Alphonso Matthews. He was educated in the Culloden and Gainesville schools and graduated from. the Georgetown University Law School in 1913 where he led his class all three years. He was admitted to the Bar in Georgia and the District of Columbia in 1912 and in the State of New York in 1915; also the United States Supreme Court and Federal Courts in New York and Connecticut, the United States Tax Court and various administrative agencies. Mr. Matthews served as Assistant United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York and later as a one-man New York Anti- trust Division with the title of Special Assistant to the Attorney General. In 1921 he went into private practice, joining the firm of Rothwell, Harper and Mat- thews which later became Harper & Matthews. Some of the cases he handled which stand out include the con- demnation of Mammouth Cave of Kentucky for a state park and the successful preservation of the charitable intent of Ella V. yon E. Wendel. When the manipulation of Hopson brought the vast system of the Associated Gas and Electric Company into Chapter X, Mr. Matthews was drafted as counsel to organize a staff to handle the litigation. A member of the Wall Street law firm of Harper & Mat- thews, he became assistant and then chief counsel of the State Crime Commission created in 1951 by Gov. Thomas E. Dewey to follow leads developed in Washington by the Senate's Crime Investigations Com- mittee under Estes Kefauver of Tennessee. Fro two years, the state panel, led by Joseph M. Proskauer, looked into links between organized crime and politicians and judges across the state. The hearings disclosed corruption that Gertrude i.ooge ' 439-5422 t lii past 'eek. Guests at thc Frost home this weekend were Mr. and Mrs. ixslie Frost and family. Thefford. Mr. and Mrs. llugh ()lson and family. Lon- donderry N.lt. Mr, and Mrs. William Sahlman had the misfortune t,) have a chinmey fire on Saturday evening. Ml.x. William llodge visited friends in ('olchesler over the (,kend ella Knapp 439-5762 memory of her mother, Viola McArty Carr. The altar flowers in church Jan. 31 were given in memory Of Marion K Winslow by her grandson and great grandson, Dick and Matthew White. Congratulations The congratulations of this community are extended to Lester Worthley who celebrated his 93rd birthday on Jan. 30 Lester is quite active for his age. When weather permits he walks to the post office and store daily. i l Beth Nelson We s River, ,,, 757-M29 Blue Mountain schools closed on the third due Union School to freezing rain. The Junior High Rotary Basketball Tournament will involved such organized- crime figures as Frank Costeilo and Thomas Luchese. Recommendations written under Mr. Matthews' direc- tion and submitted to the State Legislature prompted the creation in 1953 of the State Commission of Investigations. The hearings also sparked the first full-scale state and Federal investigations into crime and racketeering on the New York-New Jersey waterfront. Mr. Matthews later con- ducted pre-trial hearings into the sinking of the Andrea Doria, which went down in 1956 after colliding with the New York City, who died in 1962. A son, Benjamin Mat- thews Jr., was killed in World War II. In addition to his son, David, he sis survived by a daughter, Mrs. Anne M. Rawson of Swathmore, Pa., eight grandchildren, Vicki M. Eismeier of Brownsville, Vt., Ben Matthews III, of Hingham, Mass., David J. Matthews of Fayettsville, N.Y., Patricia A. Matthews of Potsdam, N.Y., Deborah V. Matthews of Watertown, Mass., Stephen A. Rawson of Ann Arbor, Mi., David M. Rawson of Mt. Ranter, Md., and Susan Rawson of Swath- more, Pa. and four great- I Edith Osmer dies at 65 W. TOPSHAM-- Edith B. Bowley of Bang(), Me.; Osmer, 65 of W. Topsham, Clarence Bowley of Lenox, died Friday evening Feb. 5, in Mass. ; and Harvey Bowley of Central Vermont Hospital, Bennington, Vt.; one sister, Berlin, Vt. Ruth Stark, predeceased her; She was born in Plainfield, several nieces, nephews and N.H., Nov. 21, 1916 the cousins. daughter of Clarence and May Funeral services were held (Lufkin) Bowley. She at- Monday, Feb. 8, at the W. tended schools in East Bar- Topsham Community Church nard and Woodstock, Vt. On with the Rev. Mark Demers Jan. 15, 1936 in Windsor, Vt. officiating. Entombment will she married Harold E. Osmer take place in the Sawyer who died Aug. 29, 1970. Tomb, Bradford pending Mrs. Osmer was a member spring burial and committal of the W. Topsham Corn- services in the family lot in the munity Church where she W Topsham Cemetery. served as organist for several Donations in her memory Stockholm. As he had often done before, he served without paY. Mr. Matthews was a member of the American and New York State Bar Association, the New York County Lawyers Association and the Association of the Bar of the City of New York, serving on many committees in each and President of the New York County Lawyer's Association. In 1970 he received the "50 Year Lawyer" award from the New York State Bar. He was an active member of Christ Church United Methodist (New York City) for over sixty years. He served as President of the New York City Society of the Methodist Church for more than forty years. Mr. Matthews was married to Emilie May Johnston of Frances Weinbaum Frances We/n/mum takes pos/don/n public relations BRADFORD-- Dr. John F. Delaney, President of OCMH Research, Inc., announced that Frances Weinbaum of S. Royalton has been hired as director of Orange County Consultants in Education and Management (OCCEM). Mrs. Weinbaum will conduct a wide range of activities to support mental health and related services in Orange County. She will immediately begin work with Orange County Mental Health Services in fund raising, public relations, and community education. Mrs. Weinbaum was director of Monadnock Retired Senior Volunteer Program in Keene, N.H. prior to joining OCCEM. In Keene she was on the 1981 Campaign Cabinet for Monadnock United Way and was selected Young Career Woman of the Year (1979) by the Keene Business and Professional Women's Club. Mrs Weinbaum received her Master of Arts in Therapeutic Recreation from Michigan State University and a Bachelor of Science in Recreation Administration from the University of New Hampshire in Durham. Programs on mental health, including films and speakers, will he available to com- munity groups Call Frances Weinbaum at 728-9642 or 222- grandchildren, years. She was also a member may be made to the American The funeral was held on of the United Methodist Cancer Society, Leukemia Thursday, Jan. 28 at 10:30 Women and the Grange, both Division, 13 Loomis St., a.m. at Christ Church United of W Topsham. She is sur- Montpelier, Vt., 05602. The Methodist, New York City and rived by. four sons; John Hale Funeral Home of internment was in Woodlawn Osmer of Arlington, Mass.; Bradford, is in charge of Cemetery in the Bronx. Henry Osmer of Gilmanton arrangements. Iron Works, N.H.; Harold Osmer of W. Topsham; and Harry Osmer of Orford; two Holden daughters, Sawnee Gibby of .... Auburn, N.H., and Ruth at 88 Limlaw of Waits River; 18 grandchildren and 3 great FOR RENT-- Large room in BRADFORD-- Annie M. grandchildren; she also private home, Main St., Holden, 88 of Bradford, and leaves three sisters, Marion Newbury. $25 per week. formerly of Dorchester, Norris of Bangor, Me.; Security deposit and Mass., died Sunday, Feb. 7, at Eleanor Clark of Hampton, references. L. Barnes 802-866- Cottage Hospital in Wood- Me.; and Pauline Bowley of 5657. NC sville. Barre, Vt.; six brothers, WANTED-- A responsible She was born May 12, 1893 in Edwin Bowley of Winneport, person to do spare time relief Dorchester, Mass. and lived Me.; Ellsworth Bowley of milking. Miller Farm, 603-787- there for several years. She Levant, Me.; Robert Bowley 6239 2T--2-17-- was married to Walter Holden who died in 1976. For the past three years she resided at Wanda's Rest Home in Bradford. She is survived by one son Walter Holden of N. Weymo*uth, Mass. and four grandchildren. A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated Tuesday at 10:00 a.m. at the Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church in Bradford with the Rev. Father Cannon officiating. Entombment will take place in the Sawyer Tomb, Brad- ford. The Hale Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Debra Rozen dies at 22 FA1RI,EE Dcbra J. Rosen, 22. died Saturday, Jan. 30, at the Mary ttilchcock Memorial ttospital, after a long illness. She is survived by her husband Richard F. and a son, Nicholas Dean, both of Fairl,: her parents, llerman and Nancy Piper of Fairlee; twn brothers, David Piper of Fairlee and Douglas Piper of l'osi Mills: a sister. Donna t;iine of Fairlee; a grand- mnlher. Dorothy Brady of West lehanon. N.1t.: one niece and several nephews. l.'unerai services were held Feb. I at the Fairlee Federated Church. Burial followed at the llighland ('emelery in Lyme. N.II. The (;edfrey Funeral lh)me of Ely as in charge of arrangen}ents. Memorial contributions may Ix, made to the Norris ('oilon Cancer ('enter, Ihmover, N.ll. 03755. of Brewer, Me.; Richard again.' We believe: "In the personal and premillennial and imminent coming of our Lord Jesus Christ and that this 'Blessed Hope' has a vital bearing on the personal life and service of the believer." You will find a group of believers who are eagerly awaiting His coming at: Bradford lvangelical Free Church Worship ,,rvice I 1:00 Sunday Schm)l 9:45 IIOUI'E 5 I,OWEI{ I'i,AIN -- Bill Wick, M. l)iv.. Pastor [ (802) ,,r  ,, , ...-.H).I SOIL WORKSHOPS THETFORD CENTER -- The Soil Workshops begin this year with a discussion about Orchard Management by Joe Smillie, an agricultural consultant from Quebec. He will speak on commercial and back-yard sized orchards and preventing disease and pest infestation. The workshop runs from 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 20 at the Thetford Community Center Building located across from the Village Store on Route 113. The workshops cost is $4.00 at the door or $20.00 for a season ticket. For more information call 78,5-4329 or 333-9421. AUCTION Having purchased the cattle and Farm machinery from Paul Robert, we will sell the following at Public Auction at his farm, located just off Rt. 105 between Enosburg and East Berkshire, Vt. on the Boston Post Road. Watch for Auction signs. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 13 you get RAND SOFT [:)RINK MIX A Stick Frozen Suckers Dissolve soft drink mix and Drink Mix, sugar i6 water. Pour into plastic ice-cube trays or small paper cups. Freeze until almost firm. Insert wooden stick or spoon into each Freeze until firm. Makes about 20. Blue Mountain defeated the they have been. Linwood Lumberjacks 84-66 A new family is living in the on Feb 2. previous Pierson place on BMUS was one of the many Swain Hill and a new family is expected at the former Kydd property, Junction of Ore Hill and 25C. Let's welcome them to a good old fashion New England winter. Did you notice any January thaw, I must have missed it somewhere. Not much time left for it, about three days from now. We will have some vacant slots for Town Office this year, file with the Town Clerk by Feb. 8th, 5:00 p.m. and get involved, you'll, be glad you did: maybe. This also goes for the school. You won't get rich, but someone has to do it. Snowmobile Club Asquamchumauke Snowmobile Club had a ride-in Saturday to Wentworth, N. Dorchester, Town Line Pond, Brackett Pond, Mud Pond, Cummings Pond and back home. The weather was grand, a little snow fall here and there and plenty in the woods. The trails were beautiful, having been groomed this week. We met some cross country skiers, and snowmobilers from Bristol, Rumney and assisted and some we did not know where they were from, and I don't think they knew where they were. Twenty degrees, just right for good riding. Eight machines and ten riders. No one broke down, which is always pleasant. Next weekend is the ride-in to Keene and a group from Warren is expected to go from here. This is about 140 miles by machine with a stop over in Claremont. Another couple of inches of snow over the weekend. Temperature warmed way up to 30 degrees for a short period. take place on the sixth at the school. School vacation is the 13th through the 2lst. The Union District 21 annual meeting will be held Feb. 23 at 8:00 p.m. The Annual Reports will be available at the Wells River Savings Bank, Blue Mountain Union School, the E. Ryegate Library, Your Neigh- borhood Grocery, the Ryegate Town Clerk's Office and the Groton Town Clerk's Office. There will be an In-Service Day for teachers on March I. Students will not attend school that day. News Briefs The Senior Citizen's Lunch was cancelled on Feb. 3 due to inclement weather. BEST OF PRESS Good Advice, Don't believe all you hear, unless it's a police car or fire truck siren or a railroad train. -Courier, Ottomwa, is. 4477 for more information. TIlE MIKADO IIAN()VER 1"he ihmover Iiigh S('h,x,I Footlighters will presenl Gilbert and Sullivan's The Mikado in the high st'h(,ol's auditorium on Fel). It. 12, and 13at 8:(10 p.m. The play is I)eing directed I)v I leh,n (;(,dwin. A tree open huse (h't.'ss rehearsal for senior citiz(,ns 'ill Ix, hehl on I"eh. I(, ;it 8: (X| p.m. COMMUNITY HEALTH SERVICES NEWBURY-- A Community ttealth Services Inc., Town Nurse will be at the Bailey Memorial Club on Wednesday, Feb. l0 from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. The nurse will be checking for glaucoma, hypertension and weight problems. WELL DRILLING ROTARY HAMMER DRILLING. 20 YEARS DRILLING EXPERIENCE ( C)MPLE TE WATEI SYSTEMS INSTALLED fOR FRil ISTIMATI CAll OR WRITE The E. BENEDINI Artesian Well Co. B(r rr, V,(,w [:) ve R D Bnrre. V' 475' ,1832 30 YIAR$ IIPIRIIN{i I STARTING AT I0 A.M. 43 HEAD MOSTLY HOLSTEINS ( few colored cows) Consisting of 26 cows -- 5 are fresh, 12 handle, 4 due July, 4 bred heifers, 8 open heifers, 5 yearlings. Cattle blood tested and checked for pregnancy before time of sale. Cattle nasal inoculated. FARM MACHINERY M.F 275 diesel tractor w- loader 580 hrs., MF. 180 diesel tractor w- 1700 hrs., nearly new M.F transport harrow, M.F 3 bottom plow, Kuhn tedder nearly new, MF rake, 3 pt. hitch fertilizer spreader, 3 pt. wood splitter, 48" rotovator, 3 pt. hitch scraper blade, 88 ft. mow conveyor, 16 ft elevator, tank spreader, wheelbarrow, grain bin, Str-Rite milker pump w- 5 H.P. motor, Surge pump, Delaval magnetic vac line, 3 Delaval milkers, 300 Dart Kool bulk tank, hot water heater, SS sink, nearly new gutter cleaner, shute and unit, 250 amp welder, bench grinder, bolt rack & bolts, overhead door, plus all small tools used on a farm of this size. All the Hay in the barn. TERMS CASH OR GOOD CHECK LUNCH ON GROUNDS AUCTIONEERS: C.W. GRAY & SONS. INC. EAST THETFORD. VT. 785-4348 or 785-2161 R. & R. LUSSIER LYNDONVILLE, VT. 626-5448 February I0, 1982-The Journal Opinion-Page 7 R/r/s w/n page 5) first quarter went to an 11 quarter lead as Pratt, Dwyer hit a field and Peterson two, the Olympians rolling. by Oxbow in four minutes of the Hanover up for a I of air, but not the lead. v held a 28-22 halftime Peterson, Dwyer and hit for six, five, and points each in the Dwyer took over the reins in the third coming out of her shooting slump. 4 of 6 field goals and five from the line, quarter lead, by as many as 15. for a big win, or win, the starting of the final Dwyer again showed in eight way to a 23 point night. Peterson managed 13 and a couple of bad after loose scored eight as did Janine Teeter injured starting Dobbins) Angle and Heidi Osgood in three points each rounded out goal. travels to U-32 on Y and Montpelier on in the final two season. hits ge 5) congratulations tes. But, that the last harrah for time for U-32 to be Six foot five inch Tullar and Jim for two points each, Oxbow's lead to three 42-39. Huntington hit another jumper, and Bill Edwards with bringing t/ pointers Raiders one, 44-43. Huntington L Hayward missed Oxbow while Tullar field goal and Slack two puttint i Oxbow urne since ',minute. Olympians took time with less than o NEWSPAPER WATCHDOG-- This alert Piermont terrier is keeping an eye out for the Union Leader delivery man to show him where the paper should go. One more plowing and they may have a problem finding the box! PHOTO BY F. ROBmm Cattani starts early campaign for county state's attorney WEI, I RIVER-- Louis J. Cattani, a Wells River at- torney and former deputy state's attorney in Caledonia County, has announced his candidacy for the position currently held by Orange County State's Attorney James McKnight Cattani, running for the Republican nomination, was a deputy state's attorney in Caledonia County from July, 1977 to March of 1980. After leaving the position, he practiced law in St. Johnsbury until he moved to Wells River in November of 1980. Cattani is a former director of the Vermont State's Attorney's Association and is" a member of the National District Attorney's Association. Cattani said his attendence at seminars on trial techniques, advanced criminal trial tactics and vehicular homocide during his time as prosecutor, give him the knowledge required at the level of County State's Attorney. Cattani's Record Louis J. Cattan[ verdicts. Among these were 1 l DWI jury trials taken to verdicts on the original charge. I obtained guilty verdicts in all II of these trials." In regard to juvenile of- fenders, Cattani said, "There so-called juvenile diversion program." Cattani said he believes that the diversion program "deters juvenile delinquents from becoming adult criminals." Cattani describes himself as a "no-nonsense prosecutor." He said viewing his candidacy that, "l think my record as Caledonia County Deputy State's Attorney speaks for itself. If elected to the position I seek, I pledge myself to an unrelenting enforcement of our criminal laws." Personal Bar, round Cattani is 34 years old and came to Vermont in 1973 to study law at the Vermont Law ,School after an undergraduate education at Wagner College in Staten Island, N.Y. He received his law degree cure iaude from Vermont Law School in 1977, graduating sixth in a class of 121.. He is married to the former Jonnie Crawford of S." Royalton. Cattani and his wife have lived in Wells River since November of 1980 and his wife a half minutes left. "During my term of em- Stever brought Oxbow ployment as deputy state's one on along j umperattorney.', said Cattani, "I ,-tung omy net, tried . minnl jury trials to two turnovers .... went ahead on a jumper from Brian Page had come out go for two points, but the guard surprised making a nice feed through traffic seconds remained, a tenuous one U-32, plagued by the end of did it again and was fouled Pulling down the With the game in the Hayward hit both one and one situation Seconds left. Tullar, Points in the quarter m another two points with 11 seconds was then attempt back into U-32's Huntington hit the game the dishear- Point honors for the to Ron Huntington closely followed by with 17 and Gary with 8. Page, Grant closed out the Oxbow with five, Oxbow bad socks on; hit- of 14 from the free and 20 of 50 from Oxbow Raiders to of 70 shots from the Week Oxbow hosts on Wednesday, make up game) on and Woodstock on afternoon at 1:00 Warren WSCS Meets at Parsonage On Jan. 19, the Women's Society of the United Methodist Church met at the parsonage for its regular meeting. Fourteen were present for the meeting with several others attending later. The first order of business was the election of Officers for the coming year. Those elected to serve were President, Ha'rriet Libby; Vice President, Avis Cushing; Secretary, Lydia Belyea; Treasurer, Estella Ramsay.; Sunshine, Avis Cushing and Lydia Belyea; Work Com- mittee, Dorothy Sprague, Margaret Whitcher and Margery Huckins; and Publicity, Helen Goodwin. Thank you letters were received from many who were recipients of the Christmas baskets. There were 38 singles, nine doubles and two family baskets, or a total of 63 persons remembered as the family baskets included several children in each family. At the annual Christmas Tree 125 gifts were given to children in the community These included grades one to six, pre-schoolers and cradle roll children. At the close of the meeting a stork shower was tendered Mrs. Sandee Snngren. This was a complete surprise and Mrs. Snogren received many useful gifts for baby-to-he. The shower cake was made by Nancy Bumford and was served with coffee after the meeting. The next meeting will be held on Feb. 17 New members are needed and all will he most welcome. is a special need for a firm and consistent prosecution." lie added that, "In appropriate ca-s. I am committed to the Floyd R. Ray i I 764-9979 Fire Calls The Fire Dept. continues to get work-outs these cold nights and days. A chimney fire in the Marston House North on 25C got them out at 6:00 a.m. last Friday. Wednesday eve at 7:00 p.m., they had to return to the same house--another chimney fire and this one more intense. Thf sparks and fire came out the top of the chimney. Before this was completely extinguished another alarm came in and there was a house fire at the residence of Butch Spencer in the lower village near the fish hatchery. The flames were rising from the structure when the department arrived, but it was soon brought under control, but not before con- siderable damage occurred to the structure. Rumney and Wentworth were called in under Mutual Aide, one truck of Wentworths standing by at the Fire House and Rumney assisting at the fire. Great thing: this Mutual Aide. Auditing Committee The Auditing Committee is nearing completion of their tasks, and the budget com- mittee will finish soon if they are not called out to fires as operates a store in Woodsville. Catlani is a member of the Woodsville-Wells River Rotary Club. NE fopsham Fred Smith has been ill at Ben A. Matthews, 91, noted lawyer dies his home this past week. Marjorie McKay was in Newport this past week visiting her hrother, Mr. and Mrs. Warren Mithell. Mrs. Velmer Frost is taking care of her sister-in-law, Mrs. George Sanborn at her home. ()live Powers entertained on Wednesday evening several of her "friends. Several from town attended the farm show on vm'ions days CORllYrH Mrs. Bruce Thompson, who has been a patient at the Central Vermont Hospital in Berlin for several days, returned home J an. 29. Mrs. Toby Olsen, Sonya, Kristen and Eric of Lon- donderry. N.H. were Friday overnight guests of her parents, Mr. and Mrs Renrick Frost in Topsham and were Saturday overnight guests of Toby's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Olsen Sr. The steeple lighting for the week of Jan. 31 was given by Bill and Rosa Heidenreich in ELY-- Ben A. Matthews of Jamesville, N.Y. and Ely, Vt., formerly of New York City died Monday, Jan. 25, at the home of his son, David L. Matthews. Mr. Matthews was born on April 18, 1890, in Culloden, Ga., the son of Augusta Vaughan and Alphonso Matthews. He was educated in the Culloden and Gainesville schools and graduated from. the Georgetown University Law School in 1913 where he led his class all three years. He was admitted to the Bar in Georgia and the District of Columbia in 1912 and in the State of New York in 1915; also the United States Supreme Court and Federal Courts in New York and Connecticut, the United States Tax Court and various administrative agencies. Mr. Matthews served as Assistant United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York and later as a one-man New York Anti- trust Division with the title of Special Assistant to the Attorney General. In 1921 he went into private practice, joining the firm of Rothwell, Harper and Mat- thews which later became Harper & Matthews. Some of the cases he handled which stand out include the con- demnation of Mammouth Cave of Kentucky for a state park and the successful preservation of the charitable intent of Ella V. yon E. Wendel. When the manipulation of Hopson brought the vast system of the Associated Gas and Electric Company into Chapter X, Mr. Matthews was drafted as counsel to organize a staff to handle the litigation. A member of the Wall Street law firm of Harper & Mat- thews, he became assistant and then chief counsel of the State Crime Commission created in 1951 by Gov. Thomas E. Dewey to follow leads developed in Washington by the Senate's Crime Investigations Com- mittee under Estes Kefauver of Tennessee. Fro two years, the state panel, led by Joseph M. Proskauer, looked into links between organized crime and politicians and judges across the state. The hearings disclosed corruption that Gertrude i.ooge ' 439-5422 t lii past 'eek. Guests at thc Frost home this weekend were Mr. and Mrs. ixslie Frost and family. Thefford. Mr. and Mrs. llugh ()lson and family. Lon- donderry N.lt. Mr, and Mrs. William Sahlman had the misfortune t,) have a chinmey fire on Saturday evening. Ml.x. William llodge visited friends in ('olchesler over the (,kend ella Knapp 439-5762 memory of her mother, Viola McArty Carr. The altar flowers in church Jan. 31 were given in memory Of Marion K Winslow by her grandson and great grandson, Dick and Matthew White. Congratulations The congratulations of this community are extended to Lester Worthley who celebrated his 93rd birthday on Jan. 30 Lester is quite active for his age. When weather permits he walks to the post office and store daily. i l Beth Nelson We s River, ,,, 757-M29 Blue Mountain schools closed on the third due Union School to freezing rain. The Junior High Rotary Basketball Tournament will involved such organized- crime figures as Frank Costeilo and Thomas Luchese. Recommendations written under Mr. Matthews' direc- tion and submitted to the State Legislature prompted the creation in 1953 of the State Commission of Investigations. The hearings also sparked the first full-scale state and Federal investigations into crime and racketeering on the New York-New Jersey waterfront. Mr. Matthews later con- ducted pre-trial hearings into the sinking of the Andrea Doria, which went down in 1956 after colliding with the New York City, who died in 1962. A son, Benjamin Mat- thews Jr., was killed in World War II. In addition to his son, David, he sis survived by a daughter, Mrs. Anne M. Rawson of Swathmore, Pa., eight grandchildren, Vicki M. Eismeier of Brownsville, Vt., Ben Matthews III, of Hingham, Mass., David J. Matthews of Fayettsville, N.Y., Patricia A. Matthews of Potsdam, N.Y., Deborah V. Matthews of Watertown, Mass., Stephen A. Rawson of Ann Arbor, Mi., David M. Rawson of Mt. Ranter, Md., and Susan Rawson of Swath- more, Pa. and four great- I Edith Osmer dies at 65 W. TOPSHAM-- Edith B. Bowley of Bang(), Me.; Osmer, 65 of W. Topsham, Clarence Bowley of Lenox, died Friday evening Feb. 5, in Mass. ; and Harvey Bowley of Central Vermont Hospital, Bennington, Vt.; one sister, Berlin, Vt. Ruth Stark, predeceased her; She was born in Plainfield, several nieces, nephews and N.H., Nov. 21, 1916 the cousins. daughter of Clarence and May Funeral services were held (Lufkin) Bowley. She at- Monday, Feb. 8, at the W. tended schools in East Bar- Topsham Community Church nard and Woodstock, Vt. On with the Rev. Mark Demers Jan. 15, 1936 in Windsor, Vt. officiating. Entombment will she married Harold E. Osmer take place in the Sawyer who died Aug. 29, 1970. Tomb, Bradford pending Mrs. Osmer was a member spring burial and committal of the W. Topsham Corn- services in the family lot in the munity Church where she W Topsham Cemetery. served as organist for several Donations in her memory Stockholm. As he had often done before, he served without paY. Mr. Matthews was a member of the American and New York State Bar Association, the New York County Lawyers Association and the Association of the Bar of the City of New York, serving on many committees in each and President of the New York County Lawyer's Association. In 1970 he received the "50 Year Lawyer" award from the New York State Bar. He was an active member of Christ Church United Methodist (New York City) for over sixty years. He served as President of the New York City Society of the Methodist Church for more than forty years. Mr. Matthews was married to Emilie May Johnston of Frances Weinbaum Frances We/n/mum takes pos/don/n public relations BRADFORD-- Dr. John F. Delaney, President of OCMH Research, Inc., announced that Frances Weinbaum of S. Royalton has been hired as director of Orange County Consultants in Education and Management (OCCEM). Mrs. Weinbaum will conduct a wide range of activities to support mental health and related services in Orange County. She will immediately begin work with Orange County Mental Health Services in fund raising, public relations, and community education. Mrs. Weinbaum was director of Monadnock Retired Senior Volunteer Program in Keene, N.H. prior to joining OCCEM. In Keene she was on the 1981 Campaign Cabinet for Monadnock United Way and was selected Young Career Woman of the Year (1979) by the Keene Business and Professional Women's Club. Mrs Weinbaum received her Master of Arts in Therapeutic Recreation from Michigan State University and a Bachelor of Science in Recreation Administration from the University of New Hampshire in Durham. Programs on mental health, including films and speakers, will he available to com- munity groups Call Frances Weinbaum at 728-9642 or 222- grandchildren, years. She was also a member may be made to the American The funeral was held on of the United Methodist Cancer Society, Leukemia Thursday, Jan. 28 at 10:30 Women and the Grange, both Division, 13 Loomis St., a.m. at Christ Church United of W Topsham. She is sur- Montpelier, Vt., 05602. The Methodist, New York City and rived by. four sons; John Hale Funeral Home of internment was in Woodlawn Osmer of Arlington, Mass.; Bradford, is in charge of Cemetery in the Bronx. Henry Osmer of Gilmanton arrangements. Iron Works, N.H.; Harold Osmer of W. Topsham; and Harry Osmer of Orford; two Holden daughters, Sawnee Gibby of .... Auburn, N.H., and Ruth at 88 Limlaw of Waits River; 18 grandchildren and 3 great FOR RENT-- Large room in BRADFORD-- Annie M. grandchildren; she also private home, Main St., Holden, 88 of Bradford, and leaves three sisters, Marion Newbury. $25 per week. formerly of Dorchester, Norris of Bangor, Me.; Security deposit and Mass., died Sunday, Feb. 7, at Eleanor Clark of Hampton, references. L. Barnes 802-866- Cottage Hospital in Wood- Me.; and Pauline Bowley of 5657. NC sville. Barre, Vt.; six brothers, WANTED-- A responsible She was born May 12, 1893 in Edwin Bowley of Winneport, person to do spare time relief Dorchester, Mass. and lived Me.; Ellsworth Bowley of milking. Miller Farm, 603-787- there for several years. She Levant, Me.; Robert Bowley 6239 2T--2-17-- was married to Walter Holden who died in 1976. For the past three years she resided at Wanda's Rest Home in Bradford. She is survived by one son Walter Holden of N. Weymo*uth, Mass. and four grandchildren. A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated Tuesday at 10:00 a.m. at the Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church in Bradford with the Rev. Father Cannon officiating. Entombment will take place in the Sawyer Tomb, Brad- ford. The Hale Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Debra Rozen dies at 22 FA1RI,EE Dcbra J. Rosen, 22. died Saturday, Jan. 30, at the Mary ttilchcock Memorial ttospital, after a long illness. She is survived by her husband Richard F. and a son, Nicholas Dean, both of Fairl,: her parents, llerman and Nancy Piper of Fairlee; twn brothers, David Piper of Fairlee and Douglas Piper of l'osi Mills: a sister. Donna t;iine of Fairlee; a grand- mnlher. Dorothy Brady of West lehanon. N.1t.: one niece and several nephews. l.'unerai services were held Feb. I at the Fairlee Federated Church. Burial followed at the llighland ('emelery in Lyme. N.II. The (;edfrey Funeral lh)me of Ely as in charge of arrangen}ents. Memorial contributions may Ix, made to the Norris ('oilon Cancer ('enter, Ihmover, N.ll. 03755. of Brewer, Me.; Richard again.' We believe: "In the personal and premillennial and imminent coming of our Lord Jesus Christ and that this 'Blessed Hope' has a vital bearing on the personal life and service of the believer." You will find a group of believers who are eagerly awaiting His coming at: Bradford lvangelical Free Church Worship ,,rvice I 1:00 Sunday Schm)l 9:45 IIOUI'E 5 I,OWEI{ I'i,AIN -- Bill Wick, M. l)iv.. Pastor [ (802) ,,r  ,, , ...-.H).I SOIL WORKSHOPS THETFORD CENTER -- The Soil Workshops begin this year with a discussion about Orchard Management by Joe Smillie, an agricultural consultant from Quebec. He will speak on commercial and back-yard sized orchards and preventing disease and pest infestation. The workshop runs from 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 20 at the Thetford Community Center Building located across from the Village Store on Route 113. The workshops cost is $4.00 at the door or $20.00 for a season ticket. For more information call 78,5-4329 or 333-9421. AUCTION Having purchased the cattle and Farm machinery from Paul Robert, we will sell the following at Public Auction at his farm, located just off Rt. 105 between Enosburg and East Berkshire, Vt. on the Boston Post Road. Watch for Auction signs. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 13 you get RAND SOFT [:)RINK MIX A Stick Frozen Suckers Dissolve soft drink mix and Drink Mix, sugar i6 water. Pour into plastic ice-cube trays or small paper cups. Freeze until almost firm. Insert wooden stick or spoon into each Freeze until firm. Makes about 20. Blue Mountain defeated the they have been. Linwood Lumberjacks 84-66 A new family is living in the on Feb 2. previous Pierson place on BMUS was one of the many Swain Hill and a new family is expected at the former Kydd property, Junction of Ore Hill and 25C. Let's welcome them to a good old fashion New England winter. Did you notice any January thaw, I must have missed it somewhere. Not much time left for it, about three days from now. We will have some vacant slots for Town Office this year, file with the Town Clerk by Feb. 8th, 5:00 p.m. and get involved, you'll, be glad you did: maybe. This also goes for the school. You won't get rich, but someone has to do it. Snowmobile Club Asquamchumauke Snowmobile Club had a ride-in Saturday to Wentworth, N. Dorchester, Town Line Pond, Brackett Pond, Mud Pond, Cummings Pond and back home. The weather was grand, a little snow fall here and there and plenty in the woods. The trails were beautiful, having been groomed this week. We met some cross country skiers, and snowmobilers from Bristol, Rumney and assisted and some we did not know where they were from, and I don't think they knew where they were. Twenty degrees, just right for good riding. Eight machines and ten riders. No one broke down, which is always pleasant. Next weekend is the ride-in to Keene and a group from Warren is expected to go from here. This is about 140 miles by machine with a stop over in Claremont. Another couple of inches of snow over the weekend. Temperature warmed way up to 30 degrees for a short period. take place on the sixth at the school. School vacation is the 13th through the 2lst. The Union District 21 annual meeting will be held Feb. 23 at 8:00 p.m. The Annual Reports will be available at the Wells River Savings Bank, Blue Mountain Union School, the E. Ryegate Library, Your Neigh- borhood Grocery, the Ryegate Town Clerk's Office and the Groton Town Clerk's Office. There will be an In-Service Day for teachers on March I. Students will not attend school that day. News Briefs The Senior Citizen's Lunch was cancelled on Feb. 3 due to inclement weather. BEST OF PRESS Good Advice, Don't believe all you hear, unless it's a police car or fire truck siren or a railroad train. -Courier, Ottomwa, is. 4477 for more information. TIlE MIKADO IIAN()VER 1"he ihmover Iiigh S('h,x,I Footlighters will presenl Gilbert and Sullivan's The Mikado in the high st'h(,ol's auditorium on Fel). It. 12, and 13at 8:(10 p.m. The play is I)eing directed I)v I leh,n (;(,dwin. A tree open huse (h't.'ss rehearsal for senior citiz(,ns 'ill Ix, hehl on I"eh. I(, ;it 8: (X| p.m. COMMUNITY HEALTH SERVICES NEWBURY-- A Community ttealth Services Inc., Town Nurse will be at the Bailey Memorial Club on Wednesday, Feb. l0 from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. The nurse will be checking for glaucoma, hypertension and weight problems. WELL DRILLING ROTARY HAMMER DRILLING. 20 YEARS DRILLING EXPERIENCE ( C)MPLE TE WATEI SYSTEMS INSTALLED fOR FRil ISTIMATI CAll OR WRITE The E. BENEDINI Artesian Well Co. B(r rr, V,(,w [:) ve R D Bnrre. V' 475' ,1832 30 YIAR$ IIPIRIIN{i I STARTING AT I0 A.M. 43 HEAD MOSTLY HOLSTEINS ( few colored cows) Consisting of 26 cows -- 5 are fresh, 12 handle, 4 due July, 4 bred heifers, 8 open heifers, 5 yearlings. Cattle blood tested and checked for pregnancy before time of sale. Cattle nasal inoculated. FARM MACHINERY M.F 275 diesel tractor w- loader 580 hrs., MF. 180 diesel tractor w- 1700 hrs., nearly new M.F transport harrow, M.F 3 bottom plow, Kuhn tedder nearly new, MF rake, 3 pt. hitch fertilizer spreader, 3 pt. wood splitter, 48" rotovator, 3 pt. hitch scraper blade, 88 ft. mow conveyor, 16 ft elevator, tank spreader, wheelbarrow, grain bin, Str-Rite milker pump w- 5 H.P. motor, Surge pump, Delaval magnetic vac line, 3 Delaval milkers, 300 Dart Kool bulk tank, hot water heater, SS sink, nearly new gutter cleaner, shute and unit, 250 amp welder, bench grinder, bolt rack & bolts, overhead door, plus all small tools used on a farm of this size. All the Hay in the barn. TERMS CASH OR GOOD CHECK LUNCH ON GROUNDS AUCTIONEERS: C.W. GRAY & SONS. INC. EAST THETFORD. VT. 785-4348 or 785-2161 R. & R. LUSSIER LYNDONVILLE, VT. 626-5448