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February 10, 1982     Journal Opinion
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Smithsonian's Freer Gallery, a late 16th-century volume of ancient, culturally pervasive legend, the Ramayana, reveals painted scenes showing bloody battles, strange creatures adventures. TODAY'S CHUCKLE t Father:"'l'm crazy about my kids. They drtve me that way " , " A quest for the 10-headed demon by SUSAN BLISS Smithsonian News Service Taraka, a huge orange monster, her form speckled with red, her neck, ears and wrists draped in heavy brass jewelry and her green- flanged, golden eyes glowering, has been released from her leather bindings. But there is no cause for concern. It is Taraka's portrait that has been removed from between the leather covers of an Indian manuscript by conservators at the Smithsonian's Freer Gallery of Art seeking to preserve the 383-year-old pages from deterioration. With the manuscript's , pigments refreshed and tiny holes in the paper filled in, Taraka in all her glory appears in a current Freer exhibition of 16th- and 17th-century manuscripts from the imperial courts of India. The monster is one of a seemingly endless collection of demons, heroes and gods who populate the Ramayana, a centuries-old Hindu tale recounting the adventures of the god-man Rama and his beautiful wife, SiLo. The story harbors enough romance and righteous bloodshed to make even the Grimm brothers' fairy tales or Baum's Oz series seem bland by cam- parison, and, indeed theFreer is planning an edition of the Ramayana for American children. A child in India would probably need no printed introduction to the Ramayana. Beginning in infancy, most Indians learn one version or another of this religiom legend. The story's wealth of episodes and cast of colorful characters provide rich material for the imaginations of traditional village story tellers, pup- peteers, actors and script writers in India's prolific film indmtry. "Its pervasiveness and familiarity have no coun- terpart in 20th-century America," according to Dr. Milo C. Beach, a Williams College professor and expert on Indian art who organized the Freer exhibition while serving as a fellow at the Smithsonian. Beach's own children became fascinated with the Ramayana while accompanying their father on a research stint in India, and it was their enthusiasm that eventually stimulated him to adapt the story for young Westerners. As the legend goes, Rama and his three brothers are born following the sup- plications and religious sacrifices performed by their elderly and childless father, Dasartha, king of Ayodhya. Rama is the incarnation of the supreme Hindu god Vishnu, brought to Earth in the gods' efforts to rid the world of the powerful, 10-headed demon, Ravana. Rama, the man, is unaware that he is a god in disguise, but his divinity brings him more than good luck in his continual battles against the forces of evil on Earth. In his first test, he is asked to slay the fear- some demon Taraka, who has taken to disturbing the saintly Vishvamitra during the sage's meditations. The task easily accomplished, Rama is rewarded with a set of magical weapons which he finds useful as the harrowing plot unfolds. He meets the beautiful Sita, whose father, the king of Videha, demands that all prospective suitors lift and bend a bow of such weight that no human being has been able to succeed. To the astonish- ment of all the people of Bideha and to the relief of Sita who has fallen passionately in love with Rama at first sight, our hero accomplishes the task effortlessly. The marriage follows. Soon after, King Dasartha decides to leave his throne. He wishes for Rama to succeed him, but is  foiled by the jealous plot of a secondary wife who wants her own son, Bharat, to rule. Rama and Sita re instead banished to the forest. Ravana, the object of Rama's quest to do away with evil, enters the plot by seizing Sita, whose incomparable qualities have been described to him in detail by his vengeful sister, Soorpanaka, a victim of unrequited love for Rama. Ravana carries Sita off to his golden palace on Lanka (the very same as today's Sri Lanka). Inflamed by love for his wife and by his desire to wipe out Ravana and his demons, Rama plans to rescue Sita by seeking help from a monkey army led by a human-scale simian general, Hanuman. "Unlike creatures in the Christian tradition, animals in Hindu stories have just as much divinity as humans," Beach explains. "Generally speaking, monkeys are clever " and known for their ability to hide in trees and eavesdrop." So, it's easy to see why Rama calls upon a monkey army for trusty service in a matter of lifeand death. The monkeys form them- selves into a causeway across the ocean, and Hanuman, making himself tiny, finds the imprisoned Sita and assures her of imminent rescue. At last, Rama and the monkey army meet Ran'ann and his demons in a battle to the death, Rama . using such weapons as "wisdom" against Ravana's spreading "darkness." Rama makes his devastating blow against the enemy with the Brahmasthra, a specia.' weapon to be used only after all else has failed. Rama aims at Ravana's heart which, uialike his l0 heads and 20 arms, the demon has neglected to make in- vulnerable through prayer. At last, Ravana is killed, Sita is rescued and, after 14 years of exile, the royal couple return to Ayodhya where Rama's brother happily relinquishes his throne Filling out this bare outline of a very rich and complicated plot are a host of magical transformations (a demon, for example, becomes a golden deer to entice Rama away from Sita), heroic characters (three mighty eagles aid Rama in battle) and ex- traordinary episodes (the money commander transports an entire mountain of healing herbs to revive Rama's fading army ). Twists of plot and unusual characters provided the 11 Indian artists who worked for II years on the Freer-owned manust:pt with abundant opportuhities to show their inventiveness. The illustrations of demons, for instance, are conceived in an arresting array of colors and sporting a variety of horrible attributes. There is the three- headed creature with fangs and long, curving horns; the goat-headed demon with yellow and red garments and pink skin pocked with dark magenta speckles, and the huge. smoke-breathing, green-skinned monster with red dots, orange and blue wings, huge grey horns and orange eyes. "The demons surely do symbolize evil," Dr. Beach admits, "hut they do so with an enormous sense of humor. There is a tongue-in-cheek quality to their threats. "The appeal this book has for children comes through the illustrations," he believes, "and I think the story would be more frightening if the demons were made to look somber. "Most of the tales of the Ramayana are looked on as sheer entertainment even though their message is religious. The fierce demons (please turn to page 4A) CIRCULATING IS, NEW HAMMHIBE -- tyme, Lyme Center, Orford, Orfordville, Piermont, Haverhill, Haverhill Center, Haverhill Comer, North Haverhill, East Haverhill, Pike, Woodsville, Bath, Monroe, Lisbon, Londoff, Benton. tvman, Warren, Glencliff, Wentworth . , . VEIIMONT - Thefford, East Thefford, Thefford Hill, Thetford Center, North The,ford, Po,t Mills, Foirlee, West Fairlte, Bradford, Bradford Village, Corinth, East Corinth, Topsham) West Topsham, Newbury Village, South Newbury, West Nowbury, Wells River, Groton, Ryngote Comer, East Ryegata, South Ryegate, Peachom, Borne, wJ=t Rnmet. ill i i ill i i .i H i,,i / i " .Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont THIS WEEK'S PRESS RUN 1(),220 i February 10, 1982 career as forester ewbury pilot combines 00ural life with flight i WBURY- ''r'l" '" Rural Living training can best he summed photographer, conservation initiative with personal ' blurts the 'tn'roll'er The Shauger's live a very up from a recent resume. He educator, horticulturist or satisfaction." intercom to aircra!t simple rural life in S. states: "A rewarding career instructor in the biological Grew Up lowly the throttle Is Newbury. Their children in some field of environmental sciences, I would be fulfilling In New Jersey Orward and the $1..2 attend local schools. Jeffrey, science, education or the position in life whieh I seek Flying for the "Green n EI-57 airplane starts tts age 12, attends Oxbow Junior management. As a park ad- and which will best match my Mountain Boys" seems to tainfffrll'stephenln the pilot'SshaugerSeatof High School and is in the ministrator-naturalist, writer- qualifications, experience and have been the result of cir- Wbury, Vt. He is a seventh grade. Cristine, age cumstances which, in one way 11, is a student at Newbury or another, rules most of our r of the Vermont Air Elementary School, lives. Starting out in life as a aal Guard; one of t.he "Togetherness" is a way of boy in Pompton Plains, New than 700 Green Mountain life for the Shauger's. Doing Jersey, Stephen was a rugged things as a family is as natural individual at 4-years-old. He Ln dl fly an Air Force as eating. An unexpected and then return home visitor might find the family E family. The family in- [ ms Wife Jeryl, his 12- sprawled out on the floor ld son Jeffrey, and hs playing a friendly game of ld daughter Cristine. cards. The house they live in is a [y that a cat or two and large elegant-locking farm [a pig,out in the barn. house which was the old Judge Im auger s live in a quiet Brock house. Most of the in- Newbury at the old ![nroek house which they terior and exterior restoration Sed in 1978. of the home was completed by Stephen and Jeryl. The house en and Jeryi were was said to be "spooked", but i, "' oune of 1968. At the ',trlPhe.n was stationed at the Shanger's haven't had any uninvited ghostly guests, as , )r Force Base in yet. "alls, Texas where he Like most Vermonters and Starthis pilot training. New Hampshirites, the " thereafter, Jeryl Shauger's do many things to ed to Syracuse make a living. Things like Sity to complete her flying Air Force missions for ion. They were re-the Air Guard, building in June of 1969 in contractor, restoration of. g'ra Washington at homes, art and sign painting, Air Force Base. 55 CHEVy aratfford, Vt." -4451 and working at the Toll House .......... bakery. Jeryl is an important part of Stephen's life. She is the butcher, the baker, and the sign maker. She is also the "expert" when it comes to paper-hanging, and spackling walls during restorations. Shauger's education and ,,Coiffures by Carol Ve: haventaVerhiil' N H ea campier line of skin care &6mO3akT::;f?:m =dy Finelle. FREE CONSULTATION Happy Anniversary SANDI &'KING! Your ad, this size, on page 1. of the Second Opinion is only $10.00 THINGS TO COME Captain Shauger stands In front of his new flying machine. He will receive intensive training in the new fighter plane. $125 PAINT SPECIAL ON ANY CAR ) t T $171,'()1t i I('K-[ I TRI.('KS ( includes paint nnaterials) BOD WORK EXTRA o00'00ta LOWER,LA,N5 (802} ?? 44 t FREE ESIIMATES BRADFORD, VT 05033 Happy Valentines, Day TO EACH OF YOU his friends. He mowed lawns, shoveled sidewalks, weeded gardens and a multitude of other chores. At the age of 12, his mother staked him some money to buy a 17-inch power mower. Shauger earned enough money with the lawn mower to pay his mother back and bank about $1,000 toward his education. During his earlier years, Stephen wasn't even thinking '! about flying. In fact, his morn considered him an excellent 'i "wheeler-dealer" businessman. His' mother relates a story about the time was furious. Shauger decided Scholastically, Shauger was to do a little trading, and he considered bright..This, at would up with four wheels times, became a problem for North Boulevard Grammar his room with awful things School. His favorite teacher hanging fromitsmouth. was Miss Clementine Shauger had his first formal "Clemmie" Whitmarsh. One introduction to flying when he morning, young Stephen was 17-years-old. He was showed up at Miss Whit-summering in the North marsh's house and presented Coaway area of New Ham- her with a bouquet of violets, pshire. He went to the local Stephan's young years were airport at North Conway and definitely leaning toward the paid for a scenic flight in a outdoors. While a young man (please turn to page 2At Steve caught a six-pound bass at a private pond. At that i: / .- time, Stephan's mother worked at the local Post BUYING ANTIOUES they went to the local fair. Stephen was eight at the time and he had one dollar in his pocket. He managed to get lost. So, without the watchful eye of his mother, Stephen SHEEPSKIN 15% WHILE THEY LAST MP Great for rugs. car seats, making vests, etc. HANOVER COBBLER ALLEN ST. HMO_V  CHECKING THINGS OVER-- Shauger pre-filghts his lane before takeoff. ROUND AND SQUARE DANCE Saturday, Feb. 13--Tin(e: 8:1)O to II :IH| at Orhwdville Town Ilall With"Fiddling Dick Wilson and the Country Folks." Your ad, this size, on page 1 of the Second Opinion is only $5.00 LUCIEN L. BOURBEAU ' INSURANCE AGENCY 802-333-9224 O11| IIOIIllt Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 12 nonn to 4:30 PM" Thursday, 2 PM - 6 PM PERSONAL AND Friday, 1 ? noon. 4:30 PM BUSINESS INSURANCE Office. Shauger, a man of few words, walked into the Post Oak roll top desks, tables, Office and asked mother to bureaus, chests, tools weigh the fish. He later you name it... mounted the head of the fish 1-603-272-5864 JIM MUSTY on a board. Years later, when F ' - 7 OR VALENTINE S 00'm00'--/t3tandard Rams s32.50 dz. (boxed)0000' 7200Sweetheart Noses '22.50 dz. (boxed)0000-00 vStHEARER'S GREENHOUSES Bradford, 802-2224424 CARD SHOWER 50TII WEDDING ANNIVERSARY Mr. & Mrs. l,loyd Kidder Bradford, Vermont February It, 1982 __ HAPPY 75th BIRTHDAY GRANDPA Love, Julie, John, and Jody and Lloyd spent his dollar on a horned (which heeventually made him, as he had time to in- mother visited her son at lizard. When mother finally into a hot rod) for the terfere with his fellow Syracuse University, the fish found out about the lizard, she "outlaw" lizard, classmates. He attended was hanging over the door of was a fixer and an out- doersman. He lived to take things apart and then put back together again. As a youngster, Stephen always got a job. In fact, he mually got more jobs than he could FAMILY LIFE-- A daily game of "hearts" is part of handle, and he would have to the rural family life in South Newbury for the farm some of the jobs out to ,Shauger's. Shown above (left-to-right) Steve, daughter Cristine (back to camera), son Jeff, and wife Jeryl. The current champion of this daily card game is Crlstine. Smithsonian's Freer Gallery, a late 16th-century volume of ancient, culturally pervasive legend, the Ramayana, reveals painted scenes showing bloody battles, strange creatures adventures. TODAY'S CHUCKLE t Father:"'l'm crazy about my kids. They drtve me that way " , " A quest for the 10-headed demon by SUSAN BLISS Smithsonian News Service Taraka, a huge orange monster, her form speckled with red, her neck, ears and wrists draped in heavy brass jewelry and her green- flanged, golden eyes glowering, has been released from her leather bindings. But there is no cause for concern. It is Taraka's portrait that has been removed from between the leather covers of an Indian manuscript by conservators at the Smithsonian's Freer Gallery of Art seeking to preserve the 383-year-old pages from deterioration. With the manuscript's , pigments refreshed and tiny holes in the paper filled in, Taraka in all her glory appears in a current Freer exhibition of 16th- and 17th-century manuscripts from the imperial courts of India. The monster is one of a seemingly endless collection of demons, heroes and gods who populate the Ramayana, a centuries-old Hindu tale recounting the adventures of the god-man Rama and his beautiful wife, SiLo. The story harbors enough romance and righteous bloodshed to make even the Grimm brothers' fairy tales or Baum's Oz series seem bland by cam- parison, and, indeed theFreer is planning an edition of the Ramayana for American children. A child in India would probably need no printed introduction to the Ramayana. Beginning in infancy, most Indians learn one version or another of this religiom legend. The story's wealth of episodes and cast of colorful characters provide rich material for the imaginations of traditional village story tellers, pup- peteers, actors and script writers in India's prolific film indmtry. "Its pervasiveness and familiarity have no coun- terpart in 20th-century America," according to Dr. Milo C. Beach, a Williams College professor and expert on Indian art who organized the Freer exhibition while serving as a fellow at the Smithsonian. Beach's own children became fascinated with the Ramayana while accompanying their father on a research stint in India, and it was their enthusiasm that eventually stimulated him to adapt the story for young Westerners. As the legend goes, Rama and his three brothers are born following the sup- plications and religious sacrifices performed by their elderly and childless father, Dasartha, king of Ayodhya. Rama is the incarnation of the supreme Hindu god Vishnu, brought to Earth in the gods' efforts to rid the world of the powerful, 10-headed demon, Ravana. Rama, the man, is unaware that he is a god in disguise, but his divinity brings him more than good luck in his continual battles against the forces of evil on Earth. In his first test, he is asked to slay the fear- some demon Taraka, who has taken to disturbing the saintly Vishvamitra during the sage's meditations. The task easily accomplished, Rama is rewarded with a set of magical weapons which he finds useful as the harrowing plot unfolds. He meets the beautiful Sita, whose father, the king of Videha, demands that all prospective suitors lift and bend a bow of such weight that no human being has been able to succeed. To the astonish- ment of all the people of Bideha and to the relief of Sita who has fallen passionately in love with Rama at first sight, our hero accomplishes the task effortlessly. The marriage follows. Soon after, King Dasartha decides to leave his throne. He wishes for Rama to succeed him, but is  foiled by the jealous plot of a secondary wife who wants her own son, Bharat, to rule. Rama and Sita re instead banished to the forest. Ravana, the object of Rama's quest to do away with evil, enters the plot by seizing Sita, whose incomparable qualities have been described to him in detail by his vengeful sister, Soorpanaka, a victim of unrequited love for Rama. Ravana carries Sita off to his golden palace on Lanka (the very same as today's Sri Lanka). Inflamed by love for his wife and by his desire to wipe out Ravana and his demons, Rama plans to rescue Sita by seeking help from a monkey army led by a human-scale simian general, Hanuman. "Unlike creatures in the Christian tradition, animals in Hindu stories have just as much divinity as humans," Beach explains. "Generally speaking, monkeys are clever " and known for their ability to hide in trees and eavesdrop." So, it's easy to see why Rama calls upon a monkey army for trusty service in a matter of lifeand death. The monkeys form them- selves into a causeway across the ocean, and Hanuman, making himself tiny, finds the imprisoned Sita and assures her of imminent rescue. At last, Rama and the monkey army meet Ran'ann and his demons in a battle to the death, Rama . using such weapons as "wisdom" against Ravana's spreading "darkness." Rama makes his devastating blow against the enemy with the Brahmasthra, a specia.' weapon to be used only after all else has failed. Rama aims at Ravana's heart which, uialike his l0 heads and 20 arms, the demon has neglected to make in- vulnerable through prayer. At last, Ravana is killed, Sita is rescued and, after 14 years of exile, the royal couple return to Ayodhya where Rama's brother happily relinquishes his throne Filling out this bare outline of a very rich and complicated plot are a host of magical transformations (a demon, for example, becomes a golden deer to entice Rama away from Sita), heroic characters (three mighty eagles aid Rama in battle) and ex- traordinary episodes (the money commander transports an entire mountain of healing herbs to revive Rama's fading army ). Twists of plot and unusual characters provided the 11 Indian artists who worked for II years on the Freer-owned manust:pt with abundant opportuhities to show their inventiveness. The illustrations of demons, for instance, are conceived in an arresting array of colors and sporting a variety of horrible attributes. There is the three- headed creature with fangs and long, curving horns; the goat-headed demon with yellow and red garments and pink skin pocked with dark magenta speckles, and the huge. smoke-breathing, green-skinned monster with red dots, orange and blue wings, huge grey horns and orange eyes. "The demons surely do symbolize evil," Dr. Beach admits, "hut they do so with an enormous sense of humor. There is a tongue-in-cheek quality to their threats. "The appeal this book has for children comes through the illustrations," he believes, "and I think the story would be more frightening if the demons were made to look somber. "Most of the tales of the Ramayana are looked on as sheer entertainment even though their message is religious. The fierce demons (please turn to page 4A) CIRCULATING IS, NEW HAMMHIBE -- tyme, Lyme Center, Orford, Orfordville, Piermont, Haverhill, Haverhill Center, Haverhill Comer, North Haverhill, East Haverhill, Pike, Woodsville, Bath, Monroe, Lisbon, Londoff, Benton. tvman, Warren, Glencliff, Wentworth . , . VEIIMONT - Thefford, East Thefford, Thefford Hill, Thetford Center, North The,ford, Po,t Mills, Foirlee, West Fairlte, Bradford, Bradford Village, Corinth, East Corinth, Topsham) West Topsham, Newbury Village, South Newbury, West Nowbury, Wells River, Groton, Ryngote Comer, East Ryegata, South Ryegate, Peachom, Borne, wJ=t Rnmet. ill i i ill i i .i H i,,i / i " .Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont THIS WEEK'S PRESS RUN 1(),220 i February 10, 1982 career as forester ewbury pilot combines 00ural life with flight i WBURY- ''r'l" '" Rural Living training can best he summed photographer, conservation initiative with personal ' blurts the 'tn'roll'er The Shauger's live a very up from a recent resume. He educator, horticulturist or satisfaction." intercom to aircra!t simple rural life in S. states: "A rewarding career instructor in the biological Grew Up lowly the throttle Is Newbury. Their children in some field of environmental sciences, I would be fulfilling In New Jersey Orward and the $1..2 attend local schools. Jeffrey, science, education or the position in life whieh I seek Flying for the "Green n EI-57 airplane starts tts age 12, attends Oxbow Junior management. As a park ad- and which will best match my Mountain Boys" seems to tainfffrll'stephenln the pilot'SshaugerSeatof High School and is in the ministrator-naturalist, writer- qualifications, experience and have been the result of cir- Wbury, Vt. He is a seventh grade. Cristine, age cumstances which, in one way 11, is a student at Newbury or another, rules most of our r of the Vermont Air Elementary School, lives. Starting out in life as a aal Guard; one of t.he "Togetherness" is a way of boy in Pompton Plains, New than 700 Green Mountain life for the Shauger's. Doing Jersey, Stephen was a rugged things as a family is as natural individual at 4-years-old. He Ln dl fly an Air Force as eating. An unexpected and then return home visitor might find the family E family. The family in- [ ms Wife Jeryl, his 12- sprawled out on the floor ld son Jeffrey, and hs playing a friendly game of ld daughter Cristine. cards. The house they live in is a [y that a cat or two and large elegant-locking farm [a pig,out in the barn. house which was the old Judge Im auger s live in a quiet Brock house. Most of the in- Newbury at the old ![nroek house which they terior and exterior restoration Sed in 1978. of the home was completed by Stephen and Jeryl. The house en and Jeryi were was said to be "spooked", but i, "' oune of 1968. At the ',trlPhe.n was stationed at the Shanger's haven't had any uninvited ghostly guests, as , )r Force Base in yet. "alls, Texas where he Like most Vermonters and Starthis pilot training. New Hampshirites, the " thereafter, Jeryl Shauger's do many things to ed to Syracuse make a living. Things like Sity to complete her flying Air Force missions for ion. They were re-the Air Guard, building in June of 1969 in contractor, restoration of. g'ra Washington at homes, art and sign painting, Air Force Base. 55 CHEVy aratfford, Vt." -4451 and working at the Toll House .......... bakery. Jeryl is an important part of Stephen's life. She is the butcher, the baker, and the sign maker. She is also the "expert" when it comes to paper-hanging, and spackling walls during restorations. Shauger's education and ,,Coiffures by Carol Ve: haventaVerhiil' N H ea campier line of skin care &6mO3akT::;f?:m =dy Finelle. FREE CONSULTATION Happy Anniversary SANDI &'KING! Your ad, this size, on page 1. of the Second Opinion is only $10.00 THINGS TO COME Captain Shauger stands In front of his new flying machine. He will receive intensive training in the new fighter plane. $125 PAINT SPECIAL ON ANY CAR ) t T $171,'()1t i I('K-[ I TRI.('KS ( includes paint nnaterials) BOD WORK EXTRA o00'00ta LOWER,LA,N5 (802} ?? 44 t FREE ESIIMATES BRADFORD, VT 05033 Happy Valentines, Day TO EACH OF YOU his friends. He mowed lawns, shoveled sidewalks, weeded gardens and a multitude of other chores. At the age of 12, his mother staked him some money to buy a 17-inch power mower. Shauger earned enough money with the lawn mower to pay his mother back and bank about $1,000 toward his education. During his earlier years, Stephen wasn't even thinking '! about flying. In fact, his morn considered him an excellent 'i "wheeler-dealer" businessman. His' mother relates a story about the time was furious. Shauger decided Scholastically, Shauger was to do a little trading, and he considered bright..This, at would up with four wheels times, became a problem for North Boulevard Grammar his room with awful things School. His favorite teacher hanging fromitsmouth. was Miss Clementine Shauger had his first formal "Clemmie" Whitmarsh. One introduction to flying when he morning, young Stephen was 17-years-old. He was showed up at Miss Whit-summering in the North marsh's house and presented Coaway area of New Ham- her with a bouquet of violets, pshire. He went to the local Stephan's young years were airport at North Conway and definitely leaning toward the paid for a scenic flight in a outdoors. While a young man (please turn to page 2At Steve caught a six-pound bass at a private pond. At that i: / .- time, Stephan's mother worked at the local Post BUYING ANTIOUES they went to the local fair. Stephen was eight at the time and he had one dollar in his pocket. He managed to get lost. So, without the watchful eye of his mother, Stephen SHEEPSKIN 15% WHILE THEY LAST MP Great for rugs. car seats, making vests, etc. HANOVER COBBLER ALLEN ST. HMO_V  CHECKING THINGS OVER-- Shauger pre-filghts his lane before takeoff. ROUND AND SQUARE DANCE Saturday, Feb. 13--Tin(e: 8:1)O to II :IH| at Orhwdville Town Ilall With"Fiddling Dick Wilson and the Country Folks." Your ad, this size, on page 1 of the Second Opinion is only $5.00 LUCIEN L. BOURBEAU ' INSURANCE AGENCY 802-333-9224 O11| IIOIIllt Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 12 nonn to 4:30 PM" Thursday, 2 PM - 6 PM PERSONAL AND Friday, 1 ? noon. 4:30 PM BUSINESS INSURANCE Office. Shauger, a man of few words, walked into the Post Oak roll top desks, tables, Office and asked mother to bureaus, chests, tools weigh the fish. He later you name it... mounted the head of the fish 1-603-272-5864 JIM MUSTY on a board. Years later, when F ' - 7 OR VALENTINE S 00'm00'--/t3tandard Rams s32.50 dz. (boxed)0000' 7200Sweetheart Noses '22.50 dz. (boxed)0000-00 vStHEARER'S GREENHOUSES Bradford, 802-2224424 CARD SHOWER 50TII WEDDING ANNIVERSARY Mr. & Mrs. l,loyd Kidder Bradford, Vermont February It, 1982 __ HAPPY 75th BIRTHDAY GRANDPA Love, Julie, John, and Jody and Lloyd spent his dollar on a horned (which heeventually made him, as he had time to in- mother visited her son at lizard. When mother finally into a hot rod) for the terfere with his fellow Syracuse University, the fish found out about the lizard, she "outlaw" lizard, classmates. He attended was hanging over the door of was a fixer and an out- doersman. He lived to take things apart and then put back together again. As a youngster, Stephen always got a job. In fact, he mually got more jobs than he could FAMILY LIFE-- A daily game of "hearts" is part of handle, and he would have to the rural family life in South Newbury for the farm some of the jobs out to ,Shauger's. Shown above (left-to-right) Steve, daughter Cristine (back to camera), son Jeff, and wife Jeryl. The current champion of this daily card game is Crlstine.