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Bradford , Vermont
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February 17, 1982     Journal Opinion
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February 17, 1982
 

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7_ _ _ Serv,n___.g Over 48__ Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont in large,scale cocaine oner00_'_o,. [radfo " " " " rd developer linked to investigation rR%T2ename.ofa Msach.usetts State Police the same ferry as Barkett, and Contacting the Special HackettHillRealtyTnmt. [!operL-'- hasrealbeen estate iaendfied radfordlandowner when _volice searched the Investigation unit on Friday, In September, 7,9N:| I0 February 17, 1982 linked Joseph C. Pioggia andhiswife Pioggia vehicle they seized a Vermont L_ a large-scale illegal Belinda as suspects in an number of real estate records [ne trafficking operation investigation that resulted in and "a sizeable amount of rL reportedly has been the arrest of Joseph Barkett, cash," said police involved oUtmg South American Jr. of Springfield, Mass. for with the investigation. r ne throughout New possession of a "substantial Last Wednesday, the d. orities are said to quantity of high quality Vermont State Police's t that profits trom cocaine" while waiting in his Special Investigation unit car for a ferry to Woods Hole issued a report saying that pl drug trafficking may from Martha's Vineyard, they have been assisting lln used to invest in Mass., on Feb.8. Massachusetts State Police in te in Massachusetts The Pioggias were in a large-scale cocaine in- rrrnont, waiting vestigation since November. another car also for 00averhill plans small Dwn budget increase !RHILL-- The Town of $100,000.00. This cost is not is due to a 10 percent increase 'oill Budget Committee reflected in the budget in department salaries, a drop ation for the town s committee's figures, however, in state aid for retirement and COmpleted its recom- If the voters do not approve to the planned purchase of a ;t to be voted on at their the article to pay the state to new police cruiser. 1 town meing in .and the budget they cm.mended is only '. . . percent) higher is( yeai-. I total budget for 1982, as mended by the com- .', stands at $690,138.00 as Irfedge, aw!th last year's , mLqo2.30. ever, due to $15,691.24 revenue this year than e amount the town will o raise in taxes will rise percent. 2ayers in Haverhill this viii vote on approval for Lte.to revaluate property revaluate the property, the town is still required by law to revaluate property in the town this year, according to Haverhill Selectmen's Administrative Assistant, Susan Klark. Last year, the amount the town raised in taxes was $311,980.99. That figure this year stands at $336,407.93. A tax rate will be set after the town's property has been reassessed, said Klark. Ups and Downs This year's recommended Haverhill Police Department budget is up 21.7 percent reflecting an increase of $23,1L56.78 over last year. This The town maintenance portion of the budget was down 12.5 percent, $27,881.60 less than last year's budget. This is mostly due to the fact that last year the town pur- chased a new truck. The amount the town will pay out this year to various area health agencies has dropped by 31 percent of $8,779.47. The Woodsville Fire Department is asking for $4,000.00 more than the Haverhill and N. Haverhill Fire Department. The committee is expected to complete its warning for articles to be voted on at the town's annual meeting in March, sometime next week. " housing plan rests investigators declined to release the names of those involved in the in- vestigation to the Journal Opinion. The only confirmation the Vermont spokesman would offer was that "one of the suspects is a landowner in Central Vermont." Massachusetts trooper Richard Deroche told the Journal Opinion that when Pieggia was brought in for questioning after the raid, he listed his address as "box 111, Bradford, Vt." Deroche said that Pioggia "had recently bought some sort of a house and some land up there (Bradford)." Deroche confirmed that Pioggia had been a suspect in the multi-million dollar cocaine investigation before land. The proposal was ap- Joseph proved by the board and some Pieggia presented a plan for building is said to have begun development of four "vacation on the property. style" homes to sell on Vermont Investigation Hackett Hill valued in the Attorney General John $90,000 to $150,000 price range Easton said last week that at a special meeting of the although his office does not Bradford Planning Board. usually investigate land Development is planned for purchases, he has assigned an a 130-acre section of Pieggia's (please turn to page 8) Budget set for Haverhill schools Articles announced for March lee(inK HAVERHILl.,-- The Haverhill projected amount to be raised Cooperative District School in taxes, after nearly three Board is recommending a hours of debate, was budget of $1,806,328.00 for the $1,099,790.00, an ap- 1982-83 school year--an in- proximate nine percent his car was searched on Feb. 8 crease of approximately five increase over last year's at the Martha's Vineyard percent over last year's figure of $1,009,499.00. ferry terminal, budget. Last year's budget figure Declining to comment on the The school board spent most stood at $1,714,124.00. A five contents of the records that of their Wednesday, Feb. 10 percent increase means an police seized in the Pioggia meeting trying to come up additional $90,204.00 has been with an accurate figure for added to the budget. vehicle,. Derocha. said they projected revenue due from Last-minute Cuts could be considered important to the investigation, the present fiscal year--a Board member Peter Deroche added that besides vague figure to determine at Kimball succeeded in a substantial amount of this time, but nonetheless initiating two last-minute cocaine, Barkett was also needed in order to project the budget cuts Wednesday night carrying about $730,000 in amount the district will have before Monday's district to raise in taxes for the new budget hearing. cash and that Belinda Pioggia budget. The school board approved was carrying $1000 in $20 bills when police searched the Many traditional sources of a $750.00 cut in funds budgeted revenue have been earmarked for athletic trips and also Barker and Pieggia vehicles for cuts this year, according to approved another $4,528.00 cut on Feb. 8. HackettHill district superintendent in funds budgeted towards Realty Trust Norman Mullen. Among those uniforms and sports equip- The Pioggias purchased a revenues that Mullen sees as lent. 200-acre farm in Bradford hard to project this year are The board refused to pass from Earl and Edna Hacker state education aid, child two other budget cuts initiated last July under the name of nutrition aid, tuition income by Kimball--a $%000.00 cut in and revenue from the New funds budgeted towards Hampshire Sweepstakes parking lot repairs and a Lottery. $6,152.00 cut in funds for ex- The amount the school terior building maintenance. board settled on for a (please turn to page 4) uncertain funding future all goes the selectmen as to the future der--to sign a consent to possibly create a few ad- to an admittedly of the potential project, resolution okaying a specific ditional units of rental plato, the Romano said last Monday that number of housing units to he might see "congress will decide within considered. The resolution of four to five the next 45 days whether or allows the New Hampshire m the Woodsville not to scrap available housing Housing Finance Authority to money as proposed by the "sponsor a project for low to Ihich hinges on Reagan Administration." moderate income persons... of federal He said that if the funding (for) substantial rehabilitated was proposed was left untouched, the Town (renovated) housing of 12to15 selectmen last of Haverhill would be a likely units." representative from area for which funding would The resolution, signed by corn- he considered in Concord. the selectmen was required by cor- But Romano stressed that Concord in order to apply for with the the Haverhill proposal was funding, said Romano. Opera Block "very much an effort to get The funding program in m Woodsville, a onto the tail end of a program question is the federally has been that's on its way out." In fact, assisted "Section 8 Sub- partially con- deadline for honsing proposals stantial Rehabilitation housing, for funding in Concord is about program." a housing two weeks away, said Project Goals specialist with Romano. NCIC's goals for the Community Consent Resolution Woodsville project would be: t Corporation Romano convinced the "toimprove and prolong (the of St. Johnsbury, selectmen--Sue Holden, John renovated) buildings' con- few words with Fuller(on and Richard Kin- tribution to the town's tax roll; housing; and to achieve a high degree of energy efficiency.. in buildings whose operating costs are a burden to present owners," according to Romano. NCIC will purchase the properties with the town under no obligation other than to submit approval, he added. NCIC is said to have been instrumental in obtaining financing for the Opera Block project. The Opera Block building now houses 34 senior citizens in renovated housing units. NCIC has had similar projects in St. Johnsbury, Lyndonville, Vt., Newport, Vt., N. Troy, Lisbon, N.H., Ossippee, N.H., and Plain- field, N.H., said Romano. Selectman John Fullerton (please turn to page 8) Orford budget up 11% I ORFORD-- The Town of Orford's budget is expected to increase by 11 percent or $16,101.00 if voters approve the 1982 budget as recommended by the town's budget com- mittee and selectmen. The recommended budget reportedly stands at $167,124.00 as compared to a budget of $151,023.00 last year. If Orford voters approve an article at town meeting fun- ding construction of a second firehouse in Orfordville, the new budget could increase by $20,000--bringing the total budget up to $187,124.00 or a $36,101.00 increase. "This could mean a sub- stantial tax rate increase for the town. Reportedly, last year the town needed to raise only $6,453.00 in taxes due to a relatively large amount of incoming revenue and to a COPELAND'S SAWDUST BARN ON F'IRE--- Six firetrucks and 25 Bradford and Piermont firefighters put out a fire in a sawdust barn at the T. Copeland and Sons Inc. furniture factory in Bradford on Monday in Bradford. Bradford fireman Melvin Benzle said the fire began at around 9:00 a.m. when machinery connecting the main building to the sawdust barn backfired, causing sparks to ignite the sawdust. The main building was said to be untouched by the blaze. Factory owner Tim Copeland said the barn was important to the operation of the factory. The company uses the sawdust to make a kind of particle board. before.$40'000 surplus frm the year Worker falls from dam No Surplus This year the town has no Pu//ed by crm00 from/cy surplus and not much more in BRADFORD-- A construction about 11:00 a.m. on Monday, through the air. expected revenue. The worker fell last week from the Feb. 8. According to the Powers fell off the edge of selectmen are said to he ex- top rim of the Bradford hydro- Bancroft spokesman, Powers pecting a drop in revenue, dam into the icy water some 50 The largest increase in this feet below after sliding down year's budget (not including the side of the dam's ice- the proposed firehouse) is covered falls. reflected in a $6,000 increase in the town's highway budget A spokesman for Bancroft due to aging equipment. Contracting Company (the S. In addition, the cemetery Paris, Me. company con- budget is said to be up $1,500 tracted for the dam's and the parks and recreation renovation)identified the man budget is up $1,100 to cover the as Richard Powers, 30, of Ely, cost of taking over the Orford Vt. Community Field if the voters Powers was listed in agree in March. satisfactory condition at Mary The budget includes a $5,000 Hitchcock Memorial Hospital cut in town officer salaries due in Hanover, last Friday, mostly to bookkeeping duties suffering from back injuries taken over by the town clerk, he received from the fall. The incident occurred at was standing on the edge of the dam installing flash boards (boards set up to prevent flooding and to control the river) when one of the boards fell. The board reportedly hit him in the shins causing him to fall over the edge. Crane Rescue Fortunately, the fall oc- curred just to the right of the center of the dare--where ice- covered rock from the falls juts out some 30 feet from the vertical face. Powers did not actually fall the equivalent of the entire height of the dam the dam, through the air for about 15 feet, hitting the icy falls from which he slid the rest of the way into the water below. Thanks to some quick thinking from a group of fellow workmen, who were standing by when he went over the edge, Powers was rescued with the use of one of the company's cranes that was at the top of the dam at the time. Foreman Dana Morgan and laborer AI Siewerstien were lowered down to Powers by the crane operated by Carl Berry, said the Bancroft (please turn to page 8) of the Oxbow mural-- by Bradford illustrator Bert Dedson. Oxbow mural project Molds are east with student models BRADFORIY- Students from the eighth through 12th grades at Oxbow High School are taking part in a unique experiment in art and sculpture this spring and the end result of their efforts will he displayed in an eight by 17-foot mural- sculpture to be attached to a wall in the school's lobby near the end of the year. The mural is described as a four piece fiberglass sculpture in high relief, by its chief composer--Oxbow art teacher Joseph Hadley. It is planned to be made of four, four by eight-foot panels arranged vertically and spaced four inches apart. The white fiberglass mural will be belted by students to the dark red- dish brown lobby wall after the four mural segments are completed. What makes the sculp. ture so unique is that it will be made from molds cast from live student models. Piaster, Sheets and Tubes When eighth grade student Mary Duquette says the project is "really interesting because we've never done anything like this before;" you can bet she is not alone. Eighth graders last Thursday were at the school making "test molds" of faces in order to devise ways of bringing out more detail in the casts. It is the kind of messy, hands-on project that most kids love. "It's mostly the excitement of a school project," says Yvonne Ayala, "because everyone's going to see it.. that's what makes it exciting." It is also a huge un- dertaking requiring many hands. The fiberglass mural will be made from casts made by draping large sheets of fabric dipped in Plaster of Paris over live student models lying on four platforms (for the four segments). The platforms will he designed to provide "escape" from underneath the mold after it has dried. Student models will breath from plastic tubes while the thick wet plaster mold is drying. The students are con- sidering applying an extra layer of wet plaster directly to the face of the models before the sheets are dropped over them in order to provide more detail. Eighth grader Paul Drew likes his job of mixing up plaster better than if he were a model. But he smiles a wide grin when he says he likes to watch the models being covered with the slushy plaster. Fiberglass Casts Hadley stresses that no fiberglass is being applied to the student models. When the plaster molds have dried, the fiberglass resins are applied to the molds--not the models. The final casting of the models, complete with platforms, plastic tubes, dipping vats, fabric sheets, and one hundred or so student volunteers, has (please turn to page 8) 7_ _ _ Serv,n___.g Over 48__ Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont in large,scale cocaine oner00_'_o,. [radfo " " " " rd developer linked to investigation rR%T2ename.ofa Msach.usetts State Police the same ferry as Barkett, and Contacting the Special HackettHillRealtyTnmt. [!operL-'- hasrealbeen estate iaendfied radfordlandowner when _volice searched the Investigation unit on Friday, In September, 7,9N:| I0 February 17, 1982 linked Joseph C. Pioggia andhiswife Pioggia vehicle they seized a Vermont L_ a large-scale illegal Belinda as suspects in an number of real estate records [ne trafficking operation investigation that resulted in and "a sizeable amount of rL reportedly has been the arrest of Joseph Barkett, cash," said police involved oUtmg South American Jr. of Springfield, Mass. for with the investigation. r ne throughout New possession of a "substantial Last Wednesday, the d. orities are said to quantity of high quality Vermont State Police's t that profits trom cocaine" while waiting in his Special Investigation unit car for a ferry to Woods Hole issued a report saying that pl drug trafficking may from Martha's Vineyard, they have been assisting lln used to invest in Mass., on Feb.8. Massachusetts State Police in te in Massachusetts The Pioggias were in a large-scale cocaine in- rrrnont, waiting vestigation since November. another car also for 00averhill plans small Dwn budget increase !RHILL--- The Town of $100,000.00. This cost is not is due to a 10 percent increase 'oill Budget Committee reflected in the budget in department salaries, a drop ation for the town s committee's figures, however, in state aid for retirement and COmpleted its recom- If the voters do not approve to the planned purchase of a ;t to be voted on at their the article to pay the state to new police cruiser. 1 town meing in .and the budget they cm.mended is only '. . . percent) higher is( yeai-. I total budget for 1982, as mended by the com- .', stands at $690,138.00 as Irfedge, aw!th last year's , mLqo2.30. ever, due to $15,691.24 revenue this year than e amount the town will o raise in taxes will rise percent. 2ayers in Haverhill this viii vote on approval for Lte.to revaluate property revaluate the property, the town is still required by law to revaluate property in the town this year, according to Haverhill Selectmen's Administrative Assistant, Susan Klark. Last year, the amount the town raised in taxes was $311,980.99. That figure this year stands at $336,407.93. A tax rate will be set after the town's property has been reassessed, said Klark. Ups and Downs This year's recommended Haverhill Police Department budget is up 21.7 percent reflecting an increase of $23,1L56.78 over last year. This The town maintenance portion of the budget was down 12.5 percent, $27,881.60 less than last year's budget. This is mostly due to the fact that last year the town pur- chased a new truck. The amount the town will pay out this year to various area health agencies has dropped by 31 percent of $8,779.47. The Woodsville Fire Department is asking for $4,000.00 more than the Haverhill and N. Haverhill Fire Department. The committee is expected to complete its warning for articles to be voted on at the town's annual meeting in March, sometime next week. " housing plan rests investigators declined to release the names of those involved in the in- vestigation to the Journal Opinion. The only confirmation the Vermont spokesman would offer was that "one of the suspects is a landowner in Central Vermont." Massachusetts trooper Richard Deroche told the Journal Opinion that when Pieggia was brought in for questioning after the raid, he listed his address as "box 111, Bradford, Vt." Deroche said that Pioggia "had recently bought some sort of a house and some land up there (Bradford)." Deroche confirmed that Pioggia had been a suspect in the multi-million dollar cocaine investigation before land. The proposal was ap- Joseph proved by the board and some Pieggia presented a plan for building is said to have begun development of four "vacation on the property. style" homes to sell on Vermont Investigation Hackett Hill valued in the Attorney General John $90,000 to $150,000 price range Easton said last week that at a special meeting of the although his office does not Bradford Planning Board. usually investigate land Development is planned for purchases, he has assigned an a 130-acre section of Pieggia's (please turn to page 8) Budget set for Haverhill schools Articles announced for March lee(inK HAVERHILl.,-- The Haverhill projected amount to be raised Cooperative District School in taxes, after nearly three Board is recommending a hours of debate, was budget of $1,806,328.00 for the $1,099,790.00, an ap- 1982-83 school year--an in- proximate nine percent his car was searched on Feb. 8 crease of approximately five increase over last year's at the Martha's Vineyard percent over last year's figure of $1,009,499.00. ferry terminal, budget. Last year's budget figure Declining to comment on the The school board spent most stood at $1,714,124.00. A five contents of the records that of their Wednesday, Feb. 10 percent increase means an police seized in the Pioggia meeting trying to come up additional $90,204.00 has been with an accurate figure for added to the budget. vehicle,. Derocha. said they projected revenue due from Last-minute Cuts could be considered important to the investigation, the present fiscal year--a Board member Peter Deroche added that besides vague figure to determine at Kimball succeeded in a substantial amount of this time, but nonetheless initiating two last-minute cocaine, Barkett was also needed in order to project the budget cuts Wednesday night carrying about $730,000 in amount the district will have before Monday's district to raise in taxes for the new budget hearing. cash and that Belinda Pioggia budget. The school board approved was carrying $1000 in $20 bills when police searched the Many traditional sources of a $750.00 cut in funds budgeted revenue have been earmarked for athletic trips and also Barker and Pieggia vehicles for cuts this year, according to approved another $4,528.00 cut on Feb. 8. HackettHill district superintendent in funds budgeted towards Realty Trust Norman Mullen. Among those uniforms and sports equip- The Pioggias purchased a revenues that Mullen sees as lent. 200-acre farm in Bradford hard to project this year are The board refused to pass from Earl and Edna Hacker state education aid, child two other budget cuts initiated last July under the name of nutrition aid, tuition income by Kimball--a $%000.00 cut in and revenue from the New funds budgeted towards Hampshire Sweepstakes parking lot repairs and a Lottery. $6,152.00 cut in funds for ex- The amount the school terior building maintenance. board settled on for a (please turn to page 4) uncertain funding future all goes the selectmen as to the future der--to sign a consent to possibly create a few ad- to an admittedly of the potential project, resolution okaying a specific ditional units of rental plato, the Romano said last Monday that number of housing units to he might see "congress will decide within considered. The resolution of four to five the next 45 days whether or allows the New Hampshire m the Woodsville not to scrap available housing Housing Finance Authority to money as proposed by the "sponsor a project for low to Ihich hinges on Reagan Administration." moderate income persons... of federal He said that if the funding (for) substantial rehabilitated was proposed was left untouched, the Town (renovated) housing of 12to15 selectmen last of Haverhill would be a likely units." representative from area for which funding would The resolution, signed by corn- he considered in Concord. the selectmen was required by cor- But Romano stressed that Concord in order to apply for with the the Haverhill proposal was funding, said Romano. Opera Block "very much an effort to get The funding program in m Woodsville, a onto the tail end of a program question is the federally has been that's on its way out." In fact, assisted "Section 8 Sub- partially con- deadline for honsing proposals stantial Rehabilitation housing, for funding in Concord is about program." a housing two weeks away, said Project Goals specialist with Romano. NCIC's goals for the Community Consent Resolution Woodsville project would be: t Corporation Romano convinced the "toimprove and prolong (the of St. Johnsbury, selectmen--Sue Holden, John renovated) buildings' con- few words with Fuller(on and Richard Kin- tribution to the town's tax roll; housing; and to achieve a high degree of energy efficiency.. in buildings whose operating costs are a burden to present owners," according to Romano. NCIC will purchase the properties with the town under no obligation other than to submit approval, he added. NCIC is said to have been instrumental in obtaining financing for the Opera Block project. The Opera Block building now houses 34 senior citizens in renovated housing units. NCIC has had similar projects in St. Johnsbury, Lyndonville, Vt., Newport, Vt., N. Troy, Lisbon, N.H., Ossippee, N.H., and Plain- field, N.H., said Romano. Selectman John Fullerton (please turn to page 8) Orford budget up 11% I ORFORD-- The Town of Orford's budget is expected to increase by 11 percent or $16,101.00 if voters approve the 1982 budget as recommended by the town's budget com- mittee and selectmen. The recommended budget reportedly stands at $167,124.00 as compared to a budget of $151,023.00 last year. If Orford voters approve an article at town meeting fun- ding construction of a second firehouse in Orfordville, the new budget could increase by $20,000--bringing the total budget up to $187,124.00 or a $36,101.00 increase. "This could mean a sub- stantial tax rate increase for the town. Reportedly, last year the town needed to raise only $6,453.00 in taxes due to a relatively large amount of incoming revenue and to a COPELAND'S SAWDUST BARN ON F'IRE--- Six firetrucks and 25 Bradford and Piermont firefighters put out a fire in a sawdust barn at the T. Copeland and Sons Inc. furniture factory in Bradford on Monday in Bradford. Bradford fireman Melvin Benzle said the fire began at around 9:00 a.m. when machinery connecting the main building to the sawdust barn backfired, causing sparks to ignite the sawdust. The main building was said to be untouched by the blaze. Factory owner Tim Copeland said the barn was important to the operation of the factory. The company uses the sawdust to make a kind of particle board. before.$40'000 surplus frm the year Worker falls from dam No Surplus This year the town has no Pu//ed by crm00 from/cy surplus and not much more in BRADFORD-- A construction about 11:00 a.m. on Monday, through the air. expected revenue. The worker fell last week from the Feb. 8. According to the Powers fell off the edge of selectmen are said to he ex- top rim of the Bradford hydro- Bancroft spokesman, Powers pecting a drop in revenue, dam into the icy water some 50 The largest increase in this feet below after sliding down year's budget (not including the side of the dam's ice- the proposed firehouse) is covered falls. reflected in a $6,000 increase in the town's highway budget A spokesman for Bancroft due to aging equipment. Contracting Company (the S. In addition, the cemetery Paris, Me. company con- budget is said to be up $1,500 tracted for the dam's and the parks and recreation renovation)identified the man budget is up $1,100 to cover the as Richard Powers, 30, of Ely, cost of taking over the Orford Vt. Community Field if the voters Powers was listed in agree in March. satisfactory condition at Mary The budget includes a $5,000 Hitchcock Memorial Hospital cut in town officer salaries due in Hanover, last Friday, mostly to bookkeeping duties suffering from back injuries taken over by the town clerk, he received from the fall. The incident occurred at was standing on the edge of the dam installing flash boards (boards set up to prevent flooding and to control the river) when one of the boards fell. The board reportedly hit him in the shins causing him to fall over the edge. Crane Rescue Fortunately, the fall oc- curred just to the right of the center of the dare--where ice- covered rock from the falls juts out some 30 feet from the vertical face. Powers did not actually fall the equivalent of the entire height of the dam the dam, through the air for about 15 feet, hitting the icy falls from which he slid the rest of the way into the water below. Thanks to some quick thinking from a group of fellow workmen, who were standing by when he went over the edge, Powers was rescued with the use of one of the company's cranes that was at the top of the dam at the time. Foreman Dana Morgan and laborer AI Siewerstien were lowered down to Powers by the crane operated by Carl Berry, said the Bancroft (please turn to page 8) of the Oxbow mural-- by Bradford illustrator Bert Dedson. Oxbow mural project Molds are east with student models BRADFORIY- Students from the eighth through 12th grades at Oxbow High School are taking part in a unique experiment in art and sculpture this spring and the end result of their efforts will he displayed in an eight by 17-foot mural- sculpture to be attached to a wall in the school's lobby near the end of the year. The mural is described as a four piece fiberglass sculpture in high relief, by its chief composer--Oxbow art teacher Joseph Hadley. It is planned to be made of four, four by eight-foot panels arranged vertically and spaced four inches apart. The white fiberglass mural will be belted by students to the dark red- dish brown lobby wall after the four mural segments are completed. What makes the sculp. ture so unique is that it will be made from molds cast from live student models. Piaster, Sheets and Tubes When eighth grade student Mary Duquette says the project is "really interesting because we've never done anything like this before;" you can bet she is not alone. Eighth graders last Thursday were at the school making "test molds" of faces in order to devise ways of bringing out more detail in the casts. It is the kind of messy, hands-on project that most kids love. "It's mostly the excitement of a school project," says Yvonne Ayala, "because everyone's going to see it.. that's what makes it exciting." It is also a huge un- dertaking requiring many hands. The fiberglass mural will be made from casts made by draping large sheets of fabric dipped in Plaster of Paris over live student models lying on four platforms (for the four segments). The platforms will he designed to provide "escape" from underneath the mold after it has dried. Student models will breath from plastic tubes while the thick wet plaster mold is drying. The students are con- sidering applying an extra layer of wet plaster directly to the face of the models before the sheets are dropped over them in order to provide more detail. Eighth grader Paul Drew likes his job of mixing up plaster better than if he were a model. But he smiles a wide grin when he says he likes to watch the models being covered with the slushy plaster. Fiberglass Casts Hadley stresses that no fiberglass is being applied to the student models. When the plaster molds have dried, the fiberglass resins are applied to the molds--not the models. The final casting of the models, complete with platforms, plastic tubes, dipping vats, fabric sheets, and one hundred or so student volunteers, has (please turn to page 8)