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February 17, 1982     Journal Opinion
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February 17, 1982
 

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Page 4-The Journal Opinion.February 17, 1982 )RTHEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. Publisher of Journal i Opinion Weeklypr V;mowPePe$t-QQ tPeldbldsls ms   o!  - tlz.w Imr Teer $7.00 let sis meetbo; Uemr ciflxos dlscoent 52.00. Second tess posmp paid ot 8mdfed, Vonnem! OSO)3. pvblisked by Nwtkoost Puldtsbiq Compu, Inc., P.O. Box 378, |dford. Editoria! Papertnaking in Wells River (co'nclmion) Robert F, Huminski (Folowing the early the quality of water pipes through which the bad President & Publisher history of the Adams paper discharged by the mill were batches of stock were being mill in Wells River from its falsified by tampering with dumped into the river. In a ,, ,, beginning in 1810, we come sampling equipment. Also, shed they discovered the idle " _ now to the problems that whenever the State made its anti-pollution equipment in Woodsville finally closed the mill.) annual inspection of the mill, storage. Bradford / 802-222-5281 L "  603-747-2016 it gave a week's notice, and The mill once again was Labor problems the mill was prepared by closed. William Bushey was .... The Adams Paper changing over to kraft pulp taken to court, where he Company employees joined stock, discontinuing the use of pleaded guilty to seven counts An Independent Newspaper the International Paper dyes, and carefully avoiding of pollution law violations and Makers Union in 1941, but dumping anything into the was sentenced to a year in there never were any strikes river, prison, of which nine months until about 1970, when the Coming Fibers had been was suspended. He was also -- management of Wrap-Tures able to buy some of the fined $2500, and the cor .... Gift Wrap refused to required anti-pollution poration, $50,000. SHORT TELEPHONE POLES--- Tbe telephone poles along t-he renegotiate the union contract equipment practically new It will he interesting -- Route 5 appear to be no more than four to six feet high. in reality, they are and was deadlocked with the from a mill that had gone and of great concern to the at a lower level than the tracks. union until the governor in- bankrupt, at about 10 percent people of Wells River -- what terceded, of its original cost, and some becomes of the mill: whether ....... -J A year or so later, when of this equipment had been another papermaker will Sam Lewis was running the installed, but the major item, make a try at it, or whether mill under a lease by the press for extracting the the buildings will he converted RobertsonPaper, hecalledin solid wastes, was stored for some other industry, or I Lett the Edit some of the union men and unused in a shed for two years, whether they will be idle said to them, "My time is The pollution situation at forever, ers to o valuable and so is yours. You Corning Fibers' mill aroused Sources: History of Newbury, Wells (p. 164-6, considerable anger in its come up with something I can Taxes up, revenues down live with for a contract, and competitors, whose own 168); The Weekly News, I'll go along with it." production expenses had been Woodsville, historical and For the past month or so we have been reporting on budget figures, tax rates and projected tax rates in many of the towns in our area. If there can be a common scenario written from this year's area budget scripts, here it is: budgets have been held down (no easy feat) but tax rates continue to climb. This is because surpluses are generally gone and revenues are down. The exceptions to this scenario are hard to find in both area towm and area school districts. State and federal aid cuts have not helped revenues compete with in- flating costs in goods and services. What this means ff this trend con- tinues is that budgets for many school programs and town departments will not only have to be trimmed to the "bare bones" level but, perhaps next year or the year after --dismantled completely. That huge cuts in state and federal programs will save us all money in taxes is beginning to surface at the local level as somewhat of a myth. What needs to he investigated now that government aid cuts have been initiated are ways of funding alter- native sources of revenues. So government program cuts can ac- tually be effective. Town meetings are coming up in March, budget hearings and annual school district meetings are scheduled for the coming weeks in many towns. Town and school of. ficiais are often discouraged by the small number of voters who have turned out for these meetings in the past. But this year should be dif- ferent. Only by asking those officials directly involved with the business of running their towns "what ff anything can be done?" will voters be able to attack the problem. EXE00 COUNCILOR Raymond S. Burton, (R.N.H.) Since 1945 the Vocational College System of New Hampshire has given the Com- munities across our state over 12,000 graduates. These graduates have in turn provided the industrial and commercial complex with needed skills for this state and country. In this year of 1981-82 school year there are 2615 day school students going to classes/each day along with 19,000 night time adults in evening extension classes. Each year the seven Vocational Colleges across this state receive some 5,000 ap- plications for admissions. An increase in tuition for students is the last thing we need to hear about a system that has brought a better life to New Hampshire people. I hope that the General Court and the Governor will get into that State House and vote to fund this system at the level that will make it even more effective for the youth of New Hampshire. Questionnaire Results The final results are now in and com- piled from my December questionnaire. This questionnaire was mailed with my Christmas greeting of 1981 and was also published as my weekly column the first week in January 1982. Frankly I was pleased to receive so many replies that were clipped from the newspapers. The percentages are based on 501 replies returned to me. The following are what these responses said. responses came down as follows: Hugh Gallen 128 John Durkin 70 Maurice Arel 15 Robert Preston 9 Frances Shaine 6 In the Republican Primary for 1982, responses came down as follows: Louise D'Allesandro 131 John Sununu 53 Meldrim Thomson 44 Robert Monier 39 Leigh Bosse 7 John Zeras 3 Do you consider acid rain a problem? Yes-- 84.5 percent No---15,5 percent Do you favor nuclear waste being buried in District One? Yes--6.9 percent NO-.I percent Do you favor casino gambling in Dist. 17 yes19.8 percent No--80,2 percent Do you favor a returnable beetle bill law? Ye-77.o percent Nora.23.0 pereen Do you favor electricity being l)rougo from Canada over transmission lines? Yes.--66.2 percent No--- 25.0percent ?--8.8 percent Do you favor a sales tax to finance needed state services? Ye--44.0 percent No.-5,0 p,cent Do you favor an income tax to finance needed states services? Yes--.44.7 percent No----55.3 percent In the Democratic Primary for 1982, Pet Peeves on this questionnaire were identified as follows: State not meeting fiscal respon- sibilities-21 responses Legislature is too large--IS responses Legislature mandates programs and places funding on town level--17 responses Inadequate aid to education--15 responses Concord ignores the North Country--12 responses Lack of human services--12 responses Tax structure is peorlo responses Executive lack of leadership--7 responses Bureaucratic mismanagement--7 responses Public Utilities Commlssion--5 responses New Hampshire state government does a good job with > Highways--78 responses State Police--10 responses Fish & Game,--S rpmmes State Employees--J5 responses Environmental issues--4 responses I was interested to see that the towns impacted by the proposed high voltage line in the upper Connecticut River Valley voted via their returned questionnaires on the power line question 70.5 percent against having power brought from Canada as to 19.7 percent in favor with 9.8 percent undecided. A questionnaire such as this is only one of many ways an office holder gains in- formation to make decisions in representing an area and district. I sin- cerely appreciate those who did send in their thoughts to me as this will be helpful in the future. The Governor and Council confirmed by unanimous vote Ruth Wellington of Pike to the Commission on the Stat(ls of New Hampshire Women. I. am personally pleased to see this nomination coming to the northern area and our council district. Another set of items included authorization to enter into a two year lease agreement with the Seven Islands Land Company of Bangor, Me. for 40 miles of Snowmobile trails over 10 parcels of land in the Androscoggin Towns of Cambridge, Success. Errol, and Wentworth. The Council also accepted, with thanks, a gift of a fish finder (valued at $500) from John Dunklee of East Hebron, N.H. Agreements between the state and the Northumberland Citizen's Committee of Greyton and the Mary Hitcbcock Memorial Hospital in Hanover were ap- proved for mental health and drug abuse programs. increased 5 to I0 percent by business supplement, Feb. 19, They did, and he did. When the Wells River the installation and operation 1897; Town of Newbury land Paper Company went of anti-pollution equipment, records and incorporation To the Editor : bankrupt and the mill closed Thus the Wells River mill records; Newbury bicen- In the Warning for Brad- in 1975, the union was could undersell them and steal tennial booklet ; ford's Town Meeting this year dissolved. Clayton Placey, a some of their customers- a reminiscences of Henry are several articles dealing former employee at the mill, situation which resulted in Henderson, Paul Hinman, with tax stabilization. I says that when William numerous complaints to the David Stevens, Edwin believe the voters should give Bushey came in with Coming EPA. Crabtree, Clayton Placey, considerable thought to the Fibers. he asked for six Concerned townspeople Elwin Boyce, Russell Page issue of tax stabilization in months "to get his feet under and employees (including and S. A. Lewis, president of general and these proposed him" before discussing the some of those previouslyfired Robertson Paper Company; agreements specifically. union question. After that time because of union activities) material collected by Personally, I am opposed to had passed, he still refused to became river-watchers and Geraldine Sulham; news tax stabilization agreements recognize the union. By 1979 made frequent reports to the items on pollution in the in general and specifically the the employees had become EPA. Finally, in the spring of Journal Opinion, the Times- one's dealing with The Gar- dissatisfied and they voted on 1981, Federal men came to Argus andthe Burlington Free den, the Colonial Village and whether to join a union -- but Wells River to start secretly Press; Paper-making through the Medical Center. investigating the situation, eighteen centuries, Dard Using the office of Clayton Hunter (first published in Placey as their headquarters, 1930, but information on they took water samples and patents is in a later edition, photographs, and interviewed according to Charles W. some of the mill employees. Hughes). One day, while the Note: We welcome any To begin with, the reasons usually given for tax stabilization agreements are to encourage new business to there was some disagreement as to which union to join, and the vote was split enough so they didn't join any. After a year they were able to vote again. Mr. Placey says that No on tax stabilization loca.te in town for the purpose he picked up by of providing additional em- taxpayers in town. Taxes are always a ployment opportunities and to broaden the tax base. As Bradford has not voted tax stabilization to all new businesses locating here, and as the properties are already built, it is hard to see how voting this stabilization is encouraging them to locate here. As for additional em- ployment opportunities, I doubt that these are being increased much, if any, over what they previously were, except in the construction. In addition, any taxes' forgiven under these tax stabilization agreements must but any business services of a town expect to pay its Property taxes a big enough operating business to make or and if they are, we shouldn't be business to locate anyway. I urge you to vote no, the tax stabilization Arthur t Mutual nuclear arms freeze matters came to a head in Federal men were taking additions, corrections, and To the Editor : arms limitation process. 5. In sum, there March, 1980, when Mr. Bushey telephoto pictures of the mill's personal recollections. An epidemic of anti-nuclear Three states have complied, winners in a fired 19 employees who bad discharge pipe, they saw the ..... c i uests for war fever is sweeping the In Vermont, this grass roots Worldwide fallout signed union cards, then he water coming from it siddenly '": " " ' minds of the peoples of the movement is at the town contaiminate much announced that he was closing change from white to brown, assisting fellow historians ............ to meet .......... o  ...... the mill temporarily because Another time, me of, thein- Please l me  ffyou  ' repudia fliihseurity oilffe 2nd, 158 towns  vote on a atmospheric effects help wth enther ot me of ahole in thefelt. When he vestigators climbed down the in the shadow of the referendum endorsing a severely damage reopened the mill after a riverbank by the bridge and following: "mushroom cloud", and mutual nuclear weapons things. month, he rehired all except seven of the men who ap- parently were considered ringleaders in trying to organize the union. These seven took their case to the National Labor Relations Board, and through court action were awarded nearly $19,000 in back pay. The men also had to be offered a chance to return to their jobs, but none of them chose to do so. was taking a water sample in Songs sung by the loggers a glass jar, when a young boy at oldtime logging camps and fishing nearby warned him, log drives. "Don't drink that water, Examples or samples of Mister! There's a paper mill wallpaper used in average up theriver!" local homes or farmhouses Finally in April, after during the 1890 period, also three months of investigation, information about floor the EPA men, augmented by finishes and ceilings. the FBI, conducted a surprise If you have any help to raid on the mill itself, seizing offer, please write me at company records and taking North Haverhill, N.H. 03774 or samples. Inside the mill they telephone 603-787-6315 (Feb. 22 found the illegal discharge orafter). Pollution problems When Corning Fibers arranged to buy the mill from " Haverhill school budget VIDA in 1976, Mr. Bushey (continued from page l) District for a term of three believed that he would he The district officials had a years. allowed a reasonable lengthof hard time agreeing on the -- "To hear reports of the time -- perhaps two years -- amount that the district would School Board, Treasurer and in which to comply with anti- be carrying over from last the Superintendent of Schools pollution regulations, year's budget as a surplus. In and to pass any vote relating However, in the past, other past years, according to thereto. company owners here and Mulln, the school has come -- "To see if the district will elsewhere had used their up with an average of about authorize the School Board to temporary permit period to $70,000, but he warned that make application for and to operate without complying, this year could be different, receive in the name of the then go out of business, so the Kimball argued that his District, such advances, anti-pollution enforcement figures projected an "unen- grants-in-aid or other funds authorities were reluctant to cumbered balance" of for educational purposes as spurring them to action with the knowledge, that by their concerted efforts, they can ensure a world of security and sanity for all mankind. Week after week, our TV screens have displayed the courageous idealism of hundreds of thousands of militant people, in the capitals of the world: Washington to Tokyo, Bombay to Athens to Paris, as they participated in mass demonstrations against nuclear war and the nuclear arms race. "Someday, the demand for disarmament by hundreds of millions, will, I hope, become so universal and so insistent, that no man, no men, can withstand it. We have to mobilize the hundreds of millions; we have to make them understand the choice which is theirs. We have to make the young people see to it, that they need not be the victims of the Third World War." President Dwight freeze by the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. Last year, the town meeting, in 18 towns, voted to support this nuclear weapons freeze. Bradford selectmen have placed this referendum on the town meeting warning as Article 21, and a short ex- plication follows: This referendum is calling for the U.S. to propose to the U.S.S.R. that both countries agree to a mutual freeze on nuclear weapons. Why a freeze? The first step in reversing the arms race is stopping it. A freeze is an agreement to stop. Once a freeze is in effect, there can he agreement on mutual steps toward nuclear disarmament. What's wrong with nuclear weapons? In 1980, 702 doctors and scientists wrote an open letter to the leaders of the U.S. and U.S.S.R. which stated that: 1. Nuclear war, even a "limited" one, would result in death, injury and disease on a scale that has no precedent in the history of human existence. 2. Medical "disaster planning" for a nuclear war is meaningless. 3. There is no effective civil defense. 4. Recovery from nuclear war would he impossible. have this happen again. $86,000.00. may now or hereaRer he D.Eisenhower. However. the Federal and After nearly an hour of forthcoming from the United The people of these United State agencies could not come debate, the shool board and States Government, the State States are making their bid to an agreement as to how the district's superintendents of New Hampshire, or any toward disarmament, by long the temporary permit agreed to tenfiatively project a other federal, state or private having their state legislatures should last. To make a long figure of $55,000.00 as their sources, adopt resolutions calling upon story short, Coming Fibers projected surplus. -- "To see if the District will the President to negotiate, did not comply with Moot lsstm vote to authorize the ap- with the Soviet Union, a requirements, and in July of Neither the district's of- plication of any unanticipated mutual arms freeze, as an 1977 it was fined $I0,000 by the ficials nor the district's voters income to expense, introduction to the nuclear Federal Enviromental actually set the amounttobe -- "To see if the district will Protection Agency (EPA). raised in taxes. In New vote to allocate to the Capital In earlier years the Hampshire, taxes are set by Reserve Fund an amount pollution hadnot been serious, the state's Department of equal to 50 percent of the E yen though there was Revenue of Administration in unencumbered balance for the sometimes dye in the water, Concord. The figure is not fiscal year 1981-82, said the fish didn't seem to mind it, actually set until Sep- amount not to exceed in fact they often chose the tember--after the end of the $10,000.00. What about the and our na U.S. has about 30 weapons and about 2O,0OO. Library of Congress minimum nuclear would kill 20 : Americans and an exchange would million Americans. there is no defense nuclear U.S. and the less secure today before. What good referendum do? guarantee that the would agree to a weapons freeze, good indications might. We won't knee moratorium is However, our isn't likely to make proposal until there ficient public pressure is referendum Bradford voters portunit. 157 Vermont towns tinuing this world a safer place generations. raceway pools to live in, in scheol's present fiscal year. -- "To see what sum of spite of the color of the water. Tuition money the District will vote to According to information Tuition in the district is up raise and appropriate for the from townspeople, former "a straight $100.00" acress the support of schools, for the mill employees, and board at the district's four salaries of the School District newspaper reports, the real levels. The board approved Officials and agents and for problems with pollution began the increase Wednesday. the payment of statutory when Corning Fibers came Tuition figures now stand obligations of said District and and began using recycled at: $641.00 for kindergarten; to authorize the application paper as stock, to reduce $1,282.00 for elementary against said appropriation of expenses. This produced so school; $1,605.00 for junior such sums as are estimated to many bad batches of stock high; and $2,025.00 for high be received from the State mixture that it became too school. Foundation Aid and Building expensive to hire a sewage Articles for Aid Funds together with other truck to haul it away, so it was Annual Meeting income; the School Board to dumped onto the floor and The following articles will certify to the Selectmen the washed down drain pipes be voted on at the district's balance between the directly into the river. When annual meeting on March 18, estimated revenue and ap- this was done at night it would at the James Morrill School at propriations, in accordance all pass through the village 7:30p.m.: with the formula adopted by before daylight and wouldn't -- To choose, by non- the Haverhill Cooperative be detected by the local people partisan ballot, a Moderator School District; and the who were watching for it -- for the eruing year. School Bonrdfurther tocertify although sometimes it would "To choose, by non- to the Selectmen the amount gather on riverbanks down- partisan ballot, two members to be raised by taxation by stream and become a of the school board, one from each of the two pre-existing nuisance, the pre-existing Haverhill school districts. Monthly reports to the School District for a term of -- "To transact any other State Water Resources three years, and one from the business that may legally Department and the EPA on pre-existing Woodsville School come before said meeting." A iourm00 Miss Amer00 To the l,litor: "pageants, scheduled for program for women Do you know a single young March, before taking part in world, and has provi lady between 17 and 26 years the state-wide event in May. participants what old, personable, talented, and Becoming Miss Vermont, called the most a resident or student in the she would be awarded at least perience of their lives. $3,. in scholarship and prize money, and wear the crown of her office at state events for a whole year. In September, she would be conveyed to Atlantic City to compete for the $20,000 journey toward becoming first prize as Miss America. Miss America, 1982. She would The Miss America Pageant is first compete in local the largest scholarship State of Vermont? Do her a favor and urge her to send for an application to the Miss Vermont Pageant, Box 150, Middlebury, Vt. 05753. It would be just the start of her Free Red Maple trees given foundation NEBRASKA CITY, NE --The postage paid with enclosed planting instructions at an appropriate time for planting this spring. They are guaranteed to grow, or they will be replaced free by the Foundation. To become a member of the Foundation, and to receive the free trees, a $5.00 membership contribution should be sent to TWO FREE TREES, National Arbor Day Foundation, Arbor Lodge 100, Nebraska City, NE 68410, by February 28, 1982. The Miss Vermont is sponsored by dlebury Lions Club most active Clubs in t The co-directors Pageant, with five successful them. are Mark Tony Neri. who are known Miss America echelons. The Pa have put together as being among tertainment staged in the State mont, as all past and their to. Do yourself and th e Vermont a outstanding gal try for Miss like to make her America ! George National Arbor Day Foun- dation is giving two free Red Maple trees to all new Foundation members joining during February, 1982. The free maple trees are part of the Foundation's effort to promote tree planting during 1982, the tOOth Anniversary of the first ob- servance of Arbor Day in schools. The trees will be three to five feet tall and will be sent Page 4-The Journal Opinion.February 17, 1982 )RTHEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. Publisher of Journal i Opinion Weeklypr V;mowPePe$t-QQ tPeldbldsls ms   o!  - tlz.w Imr Teer $7.00 let sis meetbo; Uemr ciflxos dlscoent 52.00. Second tess posmp paid ot 8mdfed, Vonnem! OSO)3. pvblisked by Nwtkoost Puldtsbiq Compu, Inc., P.O. Box 378, |dford. Editoria! Papertnaking in Wells River (co'nclmion) Robert F, Huminski (Folowing the early the quality of water pipes through which the bad President & Publisher history of the Adams paper discharged by the mill were batches of stock were being mill in Wells River from its falsified by tampering with dumped into the river. In a ,, ,, beginning in 1810, we come sampling equipment. Also, shed they discovered the idle " _ now to the problems that whenever the State made its anti-pollution equipment in Woodsville finally closed the mill.) annual inspection of the mill, storage. Bradford / 802-222-5281 L "  603-747-2016 it gave a week's notice, and The mill once again was Labor problems the mill was prepared by closed. William Bushey was .... The Adams Paper changing over to kraft pulp taken to court, where he Company employees joined stock, discontinuing the use of pleaded guilty to seven counts An Independent Newspaper the International Paper dyes, and carefully avoiding of pollution law violations and Makers Union in 1941, but dumping anything into the was sentenced to a year in there never were any strikes river, prison, of which nine months until about 1970, when the Coming Fibers had been was suspended. He was also -- management of Wrap-Tures able to buy some of the fined $2500, and the cor .... Gift Wrap refused to required anti-pollution poration, $50,000. SHORT TELEPHONE POLES--- Tbe telephone poles along t-he renegotiate the union contract equipment practically new It will he interesting -- Route 5 appear to be no more than four to six feet high. in reality, they are and was deadlocked with the from a mill that had gone and of great concern to the at a lower level than the tracks. union until the governor in- bankrupt, at about 10 percent people of Wells River -- what terceded, of its original cost, and some becomes of the mill: whether ....... -J A year or so later, when of this equipment had been another papermaker will Sam Lewis was running the installed, but the major item, make a try at it, or whether mill under a lease by the press for extracting the the buildings will he converted RobertsonPaper, hecalledin solid wastes, was stored for some other industry, or I Lett the Edit some of the union men and unused in a shed for two years, whether they will be idle said to them, "My time is The pollution situation at forever, ers to o valuable and so is yours. You Corning Fibers' mill aroused Sources: History of Newbury, Wells (p. 164-6, considerable anger in its come up with something I can Taxes up, revenues down live with for a contract, and competitors, whose own 168); The Weekly News, I'll go along with it." production expenses had been Woodsville, historical and For the past month or so we have been reporting on budget figures, tax rates and projected tax rates in many of the towns in our area. If there can be a common scenario written from this year's area budget scripts, here it is: budgets have been held down (no easy feat) but tax rates continue to climb. This is because surpluses are generally gone and revenues are down. The exceptions to this scenario are hard to find in both area towm and area school districts. State and federal aid cuts have not helped revenues compete with in- flating costs in goods and services. What this means ff this trend con- tinues is that budgets for many school programs and town departments will not only have to be trimmed to the "bare bones" level but, perhaps next year or the year after --dismantled completely. That huge cuts in state and federal programs will save us all money in taxes is beginning to surface at the local level as somewhat of a myth. What needs to he investigated now that government aid cuts have been initiated are ways of funding alter- native sources of revenues. So government program cuts can ac- tually be effective. Town meetings are coming up in March, budget hearings and annual school district meetings are scheduled for the coming weeks in many towns. Town and school of. ficiais are often discouraged by the small number of voters who have turned out for these meetings in the past. But this year should be dif- ferent. Only by asking those officials directly involved with the business of running their towns "what ff anything can be done?" will voters be able to attack the problem. EXE00 COUNCILOR Raymond S. Burton, (R.N.H.) Since 1945 the Vocational College System of New Hampshire has given the Com- munities across our state over 12,000 graduates. These graduates have in turn provided the industrial and commercial complex with needed skills for this state and country. In this year of 1981-82 school year there are 2615 day school students going to classes/each day along with 19,000 night time adults in evening extension classes. Each year the seven Vocational Colleges across this state receive some 5,000 ap- plications for admissions. An increase in tuition for students is the last thing we need to hear about a system that has brought a better life to New Hampshire people. I hope that the General Court and the Governor will get into that State House and vote to fund this system at the level that will make it even more effective for the youth of New Hampshire. Questionnaire Results The final results are now in and com- piled from my December questionnaire. This questionnaire was mailed with my Christmas greeting of 1981 and was also published as my weekly column the first week in January 1982. Frankly I was pleased to receive so many replies that were clipped from the newspapers. The percentages are based on 501 replies returned to me. The following are what these responses said. responses came down as follows: Hugh Gallen 128 John Durkin 70 Maurice Arel 15 Robert Preston 9 Frances Shaine 6 In the Republican Primary for 1982, responses came down as follows: Louise D'Allesandro 131 John Sununu 53 Meldrim Thomson 44 Robert Monier 39 Leigh Bosse 7 John Zeras 3 Do you consider acid rain a problem? Yes-- 84.5 percent No---15,5 percent Do you favor nuclear waste being buried in District One? Yes--6.9 percent NO-.I percent Do you favor casino gambling in Dist. 17 yes19.8 percent No--80,2 percent Do you favor a returnable beetle bill law? Ye-77.o percent Nora.23.0 pereen Do you favor electricity being l)rougo from Canada over transmission lines? Yes.--66.2 percent No--- 25.0percent ?--8.8 percent Do you favor a sales tax to finance needed state services? Ye--44.0 percent No.-5,0 p,cent Do you favor an income tax to finance needed states services? Yes--.44.7 percent No----55.3 percent In the Democratic Primary for 1982, Pet Peeves on this questionnaire were identified as follows: State not meeting fiscal respon- sibilities-21 responses Legislature is too large--IS responses Legislature mandates programs and places funding on town level--17 responses Inadequate aid to education--15 responses Concord ignores the North Country--12 responses Lack of human services--12 responses Tax structure is peorlo responses Executive lack of leadership--7 responses Bureaucratic mismanagement--7 responses Public Utilities Commlssion--5 responses New Hampshire state government does a good job with > Highways--78 responses State Police--10 responses Fish & Game,--S rpmmes State Employees--J5 responses Environmental issues--4 responses I was interested to see that the towns impacted by the proposed high voltage line in the upper Connecticut River Valley voted via their returned questionnaires on the power line question 70.5 percent against having power brought from Canada as to 19.7 percent in favor with 9.8 percent undecided. A questionnaire such as this is only one of many ways an office holder gains in- formation to make decisions in representing an area and district. I sin- cerely appreciate those who did send in their thoughts to me as this will be helpful in the future. The Governor and Council confirmed by unanimous vote Ruth Wellington of Pike to the Commission on the Stat(ls of New Hampshire Women. I. am personally pleased to see this nomination coming to the northern area and our council district. Another set of items included authorization to enter into a two year lease agreement with the Seven Islands Land Company of Bangor, Me. for 40 miles of Snowmobile trails over 10 parcels of land in the Androscoggin Towns of Cambridge, Success. Errol, and Wentworth. The Council also accepted, with thanks, a gift of a fish finder (valued at $500) from John Dunklee of East Hebron, N.H. Agreements between the state and the Northumberland Citizen's Committee of Greyton and the Mary Hitcbcock Memorial Hospital in Hanover were ap- proved for mental health and drug abuse programs. increased 5 to I0 percent by business supplement, Feb. 19, They did, and he did. When the Wells River the installation and operation 1897; Town of Newbury land Paper Company went of anti-pollution equipment, records and incorporation To the Editor : bankrupt and the mill closed Thus the Wells River mill records; Newbury bicen- In the Warning for Brad- in 1975, the union was could undersell them and steal tennial booklet ; ford's Town Meeting this year dissolved. Clayton Placey, a some of their customers- a reminiscences of Henry are several articles dealing former employee at the mill, situation which resulted in Henderson, Paul Hinman, with tax stabilization. I says that when William numerous complaints to the David Stevens, Edwin believe the voters should give Bushey came in with Coming EPA. Crabtree, Clayton Placey, considerable thought to the Fibers. he asked for six Concerned townspeople Elwin Boyce, Russell Page issue of tax stabilization in months "to get his feet under and employees (including and S. A. Lewis, president of general and these proposed him" before discussing the some of those previouslyfired Robertson Paper Company; agreements specifically. union question. After that time because of union activities) material collected by Personally, I am opposed to had passed, he still refused to became river-watchers and Geraldine Sulham; news tax stabilization agreements recognize the union. By 1979 made frequent reports to the items on pollution in the in general and specifically the the employees had become EPA. Finally, in the spring of Journal Opinion, the Times- one's dealing with The Gar- dissatisfied and they voted on 1981, Federal men came to Argus andthe Burlington Free den, the Colonial Village and whether to join a union -- but Wells River to start secretly Press; Paper-making through the Medical Center. investigating the situation, eighteen centuries, Dard Using the office of Clayton Hunter (first published in Placey as their headquarters, 1930, but information on they took water samples and patents is in a later edition, photographs, and interviewed according to Charles W. some of the mill employees. Hughes). One day, while the Note: We welcome any To begin with, the reasons usually given for tax stabilization agreements are to encourage new business to there was some disagreement as to which union to join, and the vote was split enough so they didn't join any. After a year they were able to vote again. Mr. Placey says that No on tax stabilization loca.te in town for the purpose he picked up by of providing additional em- taxpayers in town. Taxes are always a ployment opportunities and to broaden the tax base. As Bradford has not voted tax stabilization to all new businesses locating here, and as the properties are already built, it is hard to see how voting this stabilization is encouraging them to locate here. As for additional em- ployment opportunities, I doubt that these are being increased much, if any, over what they previously were, except in the construction. In addition, any taxes' forgiven under these tax stabilization agreements must but any business services of a town expect to pay its Property taxes a big enough operating business to make or and if they are, we shouldn't be business to locate anyway. I urge you to vote no, the tax stabilization Arthur t Mutual nuclear arms freeze matters came to a head in Federal men were taking additions, corrections, and To the Editor : arms limitation process. 5. In sum, there March, 1980, when Mr. Bushey telephoto pictures of the mill's personal recollections. An epidemic of anti-nuclear Three states have complied, winners in a fired 19 employees who bad discharge pipe, they saw the ..... c i uests for war fever is sweeping the In Vermont, this grass roots Worldwide fallout signed union cards, then he water coming from it siddenly '": " " ' minds of the peoples of the movement is at the town contaiminate much announced that he was closing change from white to brown, assisting fellow historians ............ to meet .......... o  ...... the mill temporarily because Another time, me of, thein- Please l me  ffyou  ' repudia fliihseurity oilffe 2nd, 158 towns  vote on a atmospheric effects help wth enther ot me of ahole in thefelt. When he vestigators climbed down the in the shadow of the referendum endorsing a severely damage reopened the mill after a riverbank by the bridge and following: "mushroom cloud", and mutual nuclear weapons things. month, he rehired all except seven of the men who ap- parently were considered ringleaders in trying to organize the union. These seven took their case to the National Labor Relations Board, and through court action were awarded nearly $19,000 in back pay. The men also had to be offered a chance to return to their jobs, but none of them chose to do so. was taking a water sample in Songs sung by the loggers a glass jar, when a young boy at oldtime logging camps and fishing nearby warned him, log drives. "Don't drink that water, Examples or samples of Mister! There's a paper mill wallpaper used in average up theriver!" local homes or farmhouses Finally in April, after during the 1890 period, also three months of investigation, information about floor the EPA men, augmented by finishes and ceilings. the FBI, conducted a surprise If you have any help to raid on the mill itself, seizing offer, please write me at company records and taking North Haverhill, N.H. 03774 or samples. Inside the mill they telephone 603-787-6315 (Feb. 22 found the illegal discharge orafter). Pollution problems When Corning Fibers arranged to buy the mill from " Haverhill school budget VIDA in 1976, Mr. Bushey (continued from page l) District for a term of three believed that he would he The district officials had a years. allowed a reasonable lengthof hard time agreeing on the -- "To hear reports of the time -- perhaps two years -- amount that the district would School Board, Treasurer and in which to comply with anti- be carrying over from last the Superintendent of Schools pollution regulations, year's budget as a surplus. In and to pass any vote relating However, in the past, other past years, according to thereto. company owners here and Mulln, the school has come -- "To see if the district will elsewhere had used their up with an average of about authorize the School Board to temporary permit period to $70,000, but he warned that make application for and to operate without complying, this year could be different, receive in the name of the then go out of business, so the Kimball argued that his District, such advances, anti-pollution enforcement figures projected an "unen- grants-in-aid or other funds authorities were reluctant to cumbered balance" of for educational purposes as spurring them to action with the knowledge, that by their concerted efforts, they can ensure a world of security and sanity for all mankind. Week after week, our TV screens have displayed the courageous idealism of hundreds of thousands of militant people, in the capitals of the world: Washington to Tokyo, Bombay to Athens to Paris, as they participated in mass demonstrations against nuclear war and the nuclear arms race. "Someday, the demand for disarmament by hundreds of millions, will, I hope, become so universal and so insistent, that no man, no men, can withstand it. We have to mobilize the hundreds of millions; we have to make them understand the choice which is theirs. We have to make the young people see to it, that they need not be the victims of the Third World War." President Dwight freeze by the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. Last year, the town meeting, in 18 towns, voted to support this nuclear weapons freeze. Bradford selectmen have placed this referendum on the town meeting warning as Article 21, and a short ex- plication follows: This referendum is calling for the U.S. to propose to the U.S.S.R. that both countries agree to a mutual freeze on nuclear weapons. Why a freeze? The first step in reversing the arms race is stopping it. A freeze is an agreement to stop. Once a freeze is in effect, there can he agreement on mutual steps toward nuclear disarmament. What's wrong with nuclear weapons? In 1980, 702 doctors and scientists wrote an open letter to the leaders of the U.S. and U.S.S.R. which stated that: 1. Nuclear war, even a "limited" one, would result in death, injury and disease on a scale that has no precedent in the history of human existence. 2. Medical "disaster planning" for a nuclear war is meaningless. 3. There is no effective civil defense. 4. Recovery from nuclear war would he impossible. have this happen again. $86,000.00. may now or hereaRer he D.Eisenhower. However. the Federal and After nearly an hour of forthcoming from the United The people of these United State agencies could not come debate, the shool board and States Government, the State States are making their bid to an agreement as to how the district's superintendents of New Hampshire, or any toward disarmament, by long the temporary permit agreed to tenfiatively project a other federal, state or private having their state legislatures should last. To make a long figure of $55,000.00 as their sources, adopt resolutions calling upon story short, Coming Fibers projected surplus. -- "To see if the District will the President to negotiate, did not comply with Moot lsstm vote to authorize the ap- with the Soviet Union, a requirements, and in July of Neither the district's of- plication of any unanticipated mutual arms freeze, as an 1977 it was fined $I0,000 by the ficials nor the district's voters income to expense, introduction to the nuclear Federal Enviromental actually set the amounttobe -- "To see if the district will Protection Agency (EPA). raised in taxes. In New vote to allocate to the Capital In earlier years the Hampshire, taxes are set by Reserve Fund an amount pollution hadnot been serious, the state's Department of equal to 50 percent of the E yen though there was Revenue of Administration in unencumbered balance for the sometimes dye in the water, Concord. The figure is not fiscal year 1981-82, said the fish didn't seem to mind it, actually set until Sep- amount not to exceed in fact they often chose the tember--after the end of the $10,000.00. What about the and our na U.S. has about 30 weapons and about 2O,0OO. Library of Congress minimum nuclear would kill 20 : Americans and an exchange would million Americans. there is no defense nuclear U.S. and the less secure today before. What good referendum do? guarantee that the would agree to a weapons freeze, good indications might. We won't knee moratorium is However, our isn't likely to make proposal until there ficient public pressure is referendum Bradford voters portunit. 157 Vermont towns tinuing this world a safer place generations. raceway pools to live in, in scheol's present fiscal year. -- "To see what sum of spite of the color of the water. Tuition money the District will vote to According to information Tuition in the district is up raise and appropriate for the from townspeople, former "a straight $100.00" acress the support of schools, for the mill employees, and board at the district's four salaries of the School District newspaper reports, the real levels. The board approved Officials and agents and for problems with pollution began the increase Wednesday. the payment of statutory when Corning Fibers came Tuition figures now stand obligations of said District and and began using recycled at: $641.00 for kindergarten; to authorize the application paper as stock, to reduce $1,282.00 for elementary against said appropriation of expenses. This produced so school; $1,605.00 for junior such sums as are estimated to many bad batches of stock high; and $2,025.00 for high be received from the State mixture that it became too school. Foundation Aid and Building expensive to hire a sewage Articles for Aid Funds together with other truck to haul it away, so it was Annual Meeting income; the School Board to dumped onto the floor and The following articles will certify to the Selectmen the washed down drain pipes be voted on at the district's balance between the directly into the river. When annual meeting on March 18, estimated revenue and ap- this was done at night it would at the James Morrill School at propriations, in accordance all pass through the village 7:30p.m.: with the formula adopted by before daylight and wouldn't -- To choose, by non- the Haverhill Cooperative be detected by the local people partisan ballot, a Moderator School District; and the who were watching for it -- for the eruing year. School Bonrdfurther tocertify although sometimes it would "To choose, by non- to the Selectmen the amount gather on riverbanks down- partisan ballot, two members to be raised by taxation by stream and become a of the school board, one from each of the two pre-existing nuisance, the pre-existing Haverhill school districts. Monthly reports to the School District for a term of -- "To transact any other State Water Resources three years, and one from the business that may legally Department and the EPA on pre-existing Woodsville School come before said meeting." A iourm00 Miss Amer00 To the l,litor: "pageants, scheduled for program for women Do you know a single young March, before taking part in world, and has provi lady between 17 and 26 years the state-wide event in May. participants what old, personable, talented, and Becoming Miss Vermont, called the most a resident or student in the she would be awarded at least perience of their lives. $3,. in scholarship and prize money, and wear the crown of her office at state events for a whole year. In September, she would be conveyed to Atlantic City to compete for the $20,000 journey toward becoming first prize as Miss America. Miss America, 1982. She would The Miss America Pageant is first compete in local the largest scholarship State of Vermont? Do her a favor and urge her to send for an application to the Miss Vermont Pageant, Box 150, Middlebury, Vt. 05753. It would be just the start of her Free Red Maple trees given foundation NEBRASKA CITY, NE --The postage paid with enclosed planting instructions at an appropriate time for planting this spring. They are guaranteed to grow, or they will be replaced free by the Foundation. To become a member of the Foundation, and to receive the free trees, a $5.00 membership contribution should be sent to TWO FREE TREES, National Arbor Day Foundation, Arbor Lodge 100, Nebraska City, NE 68410, by February 28, 1982. The Miss Vermont is sponsored by dlebury Lions Club most active Clubs in t The co-directors Pageant, with five successful them. are Mark Tony Neri. who are known Miss America echelons. The Pa have put together as being among tertainment staged in the State mont, as all past and their to. Do yourself and th e Vermont a outstanding gal try for Miss like to make her America ! George National Arbor Day Foun- dation is giving two free Red Maple trees to all new Foundation members joining during February, 1982. The free maple trees are part of the Foundation's effort to promote tree planting during 1982, the tOOth Anniversary of the first ob- servance of Arbor Day in schools. The trees will be three to five feet tall and will be sent