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February 17, 1982     Journal Opinion
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1797, printmakers presented the Savage's print of Washington as a statesman Washington as shown by Edward by his engraving of the Washington family. s Service American," one "is etely misun- George statement, yes, historians would second. Over the concur, layers of -myth have ob- ashington "the but likeness of the trees, the ice on the bitter Forge, the image on the have played a part in forming an over- simplified popular conception of Washington as steadfast military leader, Founding Father and benevolent president--an icon, in effect, that didactic 19th-eentury writers and, some believe, Washington himself helped create. "All through his adult life Washington was to be closely concerned with his reputation," the eminent Washington biographer, Marcus Cunliffe, has written. "In part this was simply an aspect of his canniness--a matter of taking care that there was a written record of what was done to him as well as by him." Beyond this, Cunliffe, the author of George Washington, Man and Monument, contends, "Washington needed the solace of public approval." Today's scholars are determined to discover a George less perfect and monumental than we know him, a man more "xeal" and interesting in character. Washington himself often serves as their guide. It was, after all, the future president who wrote after his Revolutionary War achievements that he found "agricultural pursuits and rural amusements most congenial to my temper." At A 00ure upon the sta00e George Washington Mount Vernon, as his guests often noted, Washington seemed the happiest--tending to his gardening and land- scaping and planning ad- ditions to his home. "He is a never ending source of interest," says historian Margaret Klapthor, curator of a major Smitbsonian exhibition at the National Museum of American History com- memorating the 250th an- niversary of WashingtonYs birth. "We are still learning things .about him. He is still full of surprises for the researcher and is endlessly fascinating. He is multi- face(cal." To begin, there is his ap- pearance. Today, the popular image conveyed by late-life portraits is of a rather stern, short, white-haired gen- tleman, a father figure. But in 1758, when he was 26, Washington was described by a fellow officer as "straight as an Indian, measuring six feet two inches, his frame padded with well-developed muscles, indicating great strength." Why do we recall one look and not another? "The image and character of Washington has taken various forms," according to Klapthor, with each era favoring an ap- pearance related to its own values. As for his demeanor, Abigail Adams once remarked, "He is polite with dignity, affable without familiarity, distant without haughtiness, grave without austerity, modest, wise and good." Strong Sense of Duty From an early age on, like many of his 18th-century peers, the future president saw himself as a "figure upon the stage" playing a role in the "scenes of life," Klapthor and her Smithsonian colleague, By 1800 David Edwin's "Apotheosis of Washington," the Washington portrait was no longer just a likeness: The image of the Founding Father had been transferred to a spiritual realm. Howard Morrison, point out in their catalog related to the exhibition. Washington was ever alert to styles and ap- pearances-the props and costumes, so to speak, needed for his roles. These concerns, coupled with his sense of duty to self, family and com- munity, continued throughout his life--in the Army, on the frontier, at his farm, during the Revolution and as president. "He was always ambitious, but not in the negative sense of the word," says Christine Meadows, curator at Washington's home, Mount Vernon. "He wanted to do the right thing at the right time and was keen--as he put it--on acquiring things that were 'neat and fashionable.' "After his marriage, for example, the young squire ordered many luxuries from England, always of the latest style--furniture, rugs, art, china, glass, silver, fabrics and even a parrot for the children. During his presidency, Washington came to feel that the way he personally presented himself would help the young nation become legitimate in the view of other nations, Klapthor points out. "Washington realized that the respect he attained as an individual would overflow to the nation as a whole." But there would be a price to pay for Washington's con- earn--some historians call it obsession--for duty, form and the recognition he always Most 18th-eentury Americans got a glimpse of George Washington through widely circulated engravings and prints. From 1775 through the 1780s, Washington was portrayed as Commander in Chief, with the emphasis on accurate likeness. sought. It was exacted in the 19th century and is still paid today. Washington "has become entombed in his own myth," Cunliffe concludes. "Surely no one else has been so thoroughly venerated and frozen in legend." The consequences caff be viewed at the Smithsonian exhibition, where hundreds of objects in the museum's collections and on loan from 75 sources, show how Americans--foreigners, too-- have placed Washington on a, pedestal and monumentalized the leader. Washington has been used to (please turn to page 2A) TODAY'S CHUCKLE I limit myself to just one drink a day. At the moment, l'm six weeks ahead.,, Number 7 CIRCULATING IH= NEW HAMPSHIRE -tyme, tyme Center, afford, Orfordville, Piermont, Haverhill, Haverhill Center, Haverhill Comer, North Haverhill, East Haverhill, Pike, Woodsville, Bath, Monroe, Lisbon, tandaff, Benton, tyman, Warren, Glencliff, Wentworth . . . EllMOMT -- Thetford, East Thefford, Theffa.rd H ill Thetford Center, North Thetferd, Post Mills, Fatrlee, West Foirlee, Bradford, Bradford Village, Corinth, East Corinth, Topsham, West Topshom, Newbury Village, South Newbury, West Newbury, Wells River, Graton, Ryegate Comer, East Ryegate, South Ryegate, Peactm, Bnrnet, West Bamet. .Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont THIS WEEK'S PRESS RUN 10,220 February 17, 1982 Army National ACTION Biathalon team, in Barre, who served3 years in Civil D fe Preparation for the National the Army, also served in the e rise a00ency Competitions February 20 to Army Reserve in Montpelier, 28, at Camp Ripley, Min-and is an experienced audo her quak nesota, microwave antenna repair- C US a es Ordway, of night firing ranges. support company. Corinth, who served 3 years in Our commanding officer, check the stove pipes to SSG Larry Clark, will he the Navy and worked with Capt. Allen Johnson, has been determine that all of the training at C.E.A.T.S., with aircraft hydraulics., awarded command of the connections are secure, says the Vermont National Guard SP5 Thomas Anderson of Calvary Troop in Lyndonville. the agency. The shocks could Capt. Johnson has done a have also dislodged creosote bY GORDIE GARDNER Company members man. welcome 2nd Lt. David B. PVT. Michael Emerson, of Graham, from Chelsea. Lt. Groton, has no prior service .I.C. SSG Ford Geno and SP5 Graham, will be our 2nd and will be off to Basic and Marshall Laundry Sr. are Platoon leader. Training in the near future. Platoon Sgt., enrolled in a Nuclear, New enlistments for the Our next training weekend promoted to Biological and Chemical month include, SP5 Gene will be March 6 and 7, at the (E7). (N.B.C.) Warfare course. Martin, of Bradford, who Armory in Westminister, VT. Gunsalus, SP5 These classes are conducted served 2=. years in Army Tank crews will practice and SP4 Richard at the Armory in Ludlow, Vt., Artillery. gunnery skills on day and are enrolled in the the home of our combat SP4 Kevin Commissioned at the Camp Site in CONCORD-- Due to the cording to an agency several earth tremors which spokesman. have occurred the New The agency is also Hampshire Civil Defense suggesting that owners of Agency is making several dams. especially in the recommendations to the Franklin area, check the people ofNewHampshire, structural integrity of their Homeowners, especially dams for cracks or those with wood stoves should weakening. check their chimneys for The Corps of Engineers and cracks in the mortar and the Stale of New Hampshire are presently checking their dams in the area, say agency officials. Weston Observatory has asked lhe Civil Defense ARTH NEWS iS a regisiereO trademark of THE MOTHER EARTH NEWS. Int WEATHER TIPS rders, Carols Woods, picked up aoout coping with cold weather e was -8rwing uP in Japan" She pints k-- Japanese houses are not central. t that her winter experiences [V,--- that the Japanese people (who Lure zones comparable to those  "//l!tl1 ' i/, itates) generally manage to llve [\\;c' 'i'" ", riag cold weather.., in homes primarily for summer heat. al mnese winte bed covering is a kakebuton. Ms. Woods de- like a comforter: over each ) of approximately four inches--composed of untold layers- quilt isn't sewn through as a Western one would be. Instead, only an which is not pulled tight--runs from the nylon on one side, filling, to the other cover. This produces, essentially, a big, fiat, warm and families often center their evening activities around a komtsu, :s a heater placed on the floor underneath a traditional Japanese table (llke Japanese restaurants). A special quilt is draped over the top of the table the feet and legs placed beneath it warm, and a second table top is rested -- more closely resembles a large vaem or flowerpot made of fired and clay iron than the cooking apparatus called by that name in this country, for the imttsu. Various -ates or tripods can be put over the fire so may be cooked or water boiled on the hibachi. For the most part, a kettle of simmering on the unit to humidify the room. {Such open fires may be Lightly constructed, well-ventilated Japanese structure, but we do not to try it, since an open fire emits dangerous carbon monoxide.) their wooden floors with tatami.., straw mats that are approx- .. inches thick. In especially cold weather, a layer of newspaper is often put the straw mate and the wooden floor for extra insulation. that many Nipponese items of clothing are designed to provide winter A short kimono-type germeut called a/mar/is constructed in manner as the kakebuton, except it's covered on the outside with jackets are worn indoors and out. Under the haor/, the Orientals i layers of sweaters and other garments. memories of her life in Japan concern her late-aoon visits to ,, a sort of hot tub/sauna combination. "After a soak in the ouro," Ms. Woods w ..... be warm for at least a half hour, and if you're staying up for a while, "- nei. as many sweaters as before." At bedtime the Japanese get out the yu- = .ue ve akia to a mete, - hot water bottle, to warm up the bed (futon) before m. Then, when you re ready to slip under the warmed cover," she says, to put your feet against as you drift off cosily to sleep." on etaylng warm or on THE MOTHER EARTH NEWS magazine  Send your $62: "HOw the Jepanese Sey Warm". Mltil to Ooing MORE... With , N.C. PI, or in cawe of this paper. AOTHER EARTH NEWS, Inc. great job with Co: A, building in the chimney, therefore the it from a large deficit of flue should be checked for manpower to its present 102 proper draught, the cleanout percent. Co. A, is proud o door should be opened to Capt. Johnson, and wishes check the amount of residue him well with his new corn- and cleaned, if necessary. mand. A new commander for These simple precautions Co. A has not been announced, could prevent a fire, ac- Thomas Schwartz asded to Fort Sill ORFORD-- Pfc. Thomas R. mechanic, was previously Schwarz, son of George J. and assigned in Mannheim, W. Juanita T. Schwarz of Orford, Germany. has arrived for duty at Fort He is a 1979 graduate of Sill, Okla. Schwarz, a Orford High School. BE A REAL CLEAR.,= VALENTINE Quality Window Washing FROM (US) ME TO YOU TNINtN| HUm BERNARD MANNING 11@2-7|5-2432 '79 JEEP C J7 Renegade Vg--Mlnt Cond. --AM-FM Warn Hubs -- Low Mileage Loaded Must Sell (603) 795-4003 10000 VERMONT WOOL YARN NATURAL CREAMY WHITE 4 OZ. SKEINS with $7 NATURAL DARK SHEEP GRAY natural oils left in. !- 802-2224535 Bob Plants Chase Hollow Rd. Bradford, Vt. Your ad, this size, on page 1 of the Second Opinion is only $10.00 BRADFORD GAME ROOM VIDEO -- PINBALL Supervised (Behind Allen's Western Auto) Monday-Friday-- 3-9 PM  Sat. 1-9 PM Happy Birthday KITTY From J0 Agency to assist them in determining if there was any damage to public or private facilities. Also the ob- servatory would like to know people's impressions of what it felt like. The Civil Defense Agency will have a supply of questionaires which may be used or people may contact Patrick Barosh, Weston Observatory, Concord Rd., Weslon, MA. 02193, phone number 617-889-0950. The New ttampshire Civil Defense Agency has received many calls from citizens on what they should do to protect themselves in an earthquake. To help people understand the safely precautions that should ix, taken, the Civil Defense Agency is offering a pamphlet at no charge to anyone wishing this information. Called, In Time of Emergency, this pamphlet not only gives emergency in- structions on earthquakes, but also other types of disasters such as floods, tornadoes, winte," storms, etc. Land Use Controls AGRICULTURAL LAND PROTF00HON This series, Agricultural Land Protection, has been  by UVM Extension vke Commmb/and Rural Oevllopmmt tt to help citizms increase their knowledge about aoitural land retention techaies. Edited fw pddicotion by Lois M. Fr, RCILD Spec=list. Integrated Programs Controls have been combined to develop an integrated approach to farmland protection. At the heart of Integrated Programs is often found local state Growth Management and Planning. In most areas of the country, local officials make decisions affecting use of land. When, for example, a decision is made to extend sewer-water lines through a rural area, the future use of land in that area is dictated. While local officials are capable of a regional focus in planning for community growth, the state may also play a role in providing direction, incentives or mandates to achieve sound land-use within a region. State. policies, such as the Vermont and Illinois Executive Orders affecting farmland, may sol the stage for local action. Another integrated prograw of 4ncentives and land-us controls, found in the private sector, involves Land Trusts The Internal Revenue Code provides for deductions from a person's income and estate for charitable donations of land (or interests in land) to a public body or qualified private organization, such as a land trust. A land trust is a In some states Incentive administer its use through similar to purchase, transfer Programs and Land-Use direct ownership or lease or donation of development arrangements. Preservation rights programs, with the governmental or corporate body empowered to acquire land or rights to land, and t( LUCIEN L. BOURBEAU INSURANCE AGENCY MAIN STRKT OiCi Illl$: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 12 noon to 4:30 PM' Thursday, 2 PM- 6 PM PERSONAL AND Friday, 12 noon - 4:30 PM. BUSIN INRAN( Your ad, this size, on page 1 of the Second Opinion is only $5.00 31 DAYS , SPRING CARD SHOWER of farmland is only one of government intervening as several purposes of a trust, land purchaser of all property which provides a legal interests, or rights. Gover- mechanism for donation (or nment units may also buy purchase) of land. agricultural lands outright One final example of an and then lease them back to integrated program to protect farm operators. farmland is known as Pur- For more information about chase and Leaseback. When farmland retention programs incentive or other regulatory in Vermont, contact your approaches fail to achieve the County Extension Service objective of farmland office. protection, a governmental body might simply exercise its right of eminent domain or purchase such land on the BEffrOFPRES8 market. Once ownership 4s Helpful obtained, certain restrictions, In a way, the Russians are such as those against quite helpful. Ifwedi&-t'thave development of the parcel, them, how would we know if may be imposed and then the we were ahead m. behind' parcel may be resold on the market. This approach is -Tlger, U.S.S. Barry. Auti-mrized VOLKSWAGEN A UDI--MAZDA Sales & Service CROSSWAY MOTORS Barre-Montpelier Rd. 802-223-3434 ' SuPport A Woman's Right to Choose NARAL/VT. Offers a Winter Getaway for Two to Bahamas plus $200.00 Tickets $3.00 I'awing 2125182 Coil 333-9750 Coil soon, Coiffures by Carol No. Haverhill, N.H. 603-787-6950 Complete line of Hair Care for the Whole Family. TUESDAY TtlRU SATURDAY BEE JAY'S TROPICAL FISH CENTER NEW: BIRDS & LITTLE CRITTERS o Doily 0:30- 6 Thurs. & Fri 'til 6 PM urda : I 0:00 - 6=00 139 Central St. (Rt, 302) Woodeville, N.H. Sundw; =00- S:0OP .... Closed Wednesday $125 PAINT SPECIAL ON ANY CAR $150 FOR PICK-Up TIILI('KS includes paint materials) OOY WORK EXTRA (t0?) 727441 FIE ESTIMATES BRADFORD. VT 05033 HAPPY 90TH BIRTHDAY MARION "BIRD" CALDERWOOD Atkinson Residence Newbury, Vt. FEBRUARY 21, 1982 1797, printmakers presented the Savage's print of Washington as a statesman Washington as shown by Edward by his engraving of the Washington family. s Service American," one "is etely misun- George statement, yes, historians would second. Over the concur, layers of -myth have ob- ashington "the but likeness of the trees, the ice on the bitter Forge, the image on the have played a part in forming an over- simplified popular conception of Washington as steadfast military leader, Founding Father and benevolent president--an icon, in effect, that didactic 19th-eentury writers and, some believe, Washington himself helped create. "All through his adult life Washington was to be closely concerned with his reputation," the eminent Washington biographer, Marcus Cunliffe, has written. "In part this was simply an aspect of his canniness--a matter of taking care that there was a written record of what was done to him as well as by him." Beyond this, Cunliffe, the author of George Washington, Man and Monument, contends, "Washington needed the solace of public approval." Today's scholars are determined to discover a George less perfect and monumental than we know him, a man more "xeal" and interesting in character. Washington himself often serves as their guide. It was, after all, the future president who wrote after his Revolutionary War achievements that he found "agricultural pursuits and rural amusements most congenial to my temper." At A 00ure upon the sta00e George Washington Mount Vernon, as his guests often noted, Washington seemed the happiest--tending to his gardening and land- scaping and planning ad- ditions to his home. "He is a never ending source of interest," says historian Margaret Klapthor, curator of a major Smitbsonian exhibition at the National Museum of American History com- memorating the 250th an- niversary of WashingtonYs birth. "We are still learning things .about him. He is still full of surprises for the researcher and is endlessly fascinating. He is multi- face(cal." To begin, there is his ap- pearance. Today, the popular image conveyed by late-life portraits is of a rather stern, short, white-haired gen- tleman, a father figure. But in 1758, when he was 26, Washington was described by a fellow officer as "straight as an Indian, measuring six feet two inches, his frame padded with well-developed muscles, indicating great strength." Why do we recall one look and not another? "The image and character of Washington has taken various forms," according to Klapthor, with each era favoring an ap- pearance related to its own values. As for his demeanor, Abigail Adams once remarked, "He is polite with dignity, affable without familiarity, distant without haughtiness, grave without austerity, modest, wise and good." Strong Sense of Duty From an early age on, like many of his 18th-century peers, the future president saw himself as a "figure upon the stage" playing a role in the "scenes of life," Klapthor and her Smithsonian colleague, By 1800 David Edwin's "Apotheosis of Washington," the Washington portrait was no longer just a likeness: The image of the Founding Father had been transferred to a spiritual realm. Howard Morrison, point out in their catalog related to the exhibition. Washington was ever alert to styles and ap- pearances-the props and costumes, so to speak, needed for his roles. These concerns, coupled with his sense of duty to self, family and com- munity, continued throughout his life--in the Army, on the frontier, at his farm, during the Revolution and as president. "He was always ambitious, but not in the negative sense of the word," says Christine Meadows, curator at Washington's home, Mount Vernon. "He wanted to do the right thing at the right time and was keen--as he put it--on acquiring things that were 'neat and fashionable.' "After his marriage, for example, the young squire ordered many luxuries from England, always of the latest style--furniture, rugs, art, china, glass, silver, fabrics and even a parrot for the children. During his presidency, Washington came to feel that the way he personally presented himself would help the young nation become legitimate in the view of other nations, Klapthor points out. "Washington realized that the respect he attained as an individual would overflow to the nation as a whole." But there would be a price to pay for Washington's con- earn--some historians call it obsession--for duty, form and the recognition he always Most 18th-eentury Americans got a glimpse of George Washington through widely circulated engravings and prints. From 1775 through the 1780s, Washington was portrayed as Commander in Chief, with the emphasis on accurate likeness. sought. It was exacted in the 19th century and is still paid today. Washington "has become entombed in his own myth," Cunliffe concludes. "Surely no one else has been so thoroughly venerated and frozen in legend." The consequences caff be viewed at the Smithsonian exhibition, where hundreds of objects in the museum's collections and on loan from 75 sources, show how Americans--foreigners, too-- have placed Washington on a, pedestal and monumentalized the leader. Washington has been used to (please turn to page 2A) TODAY'S CHUCKLE I limit myself to just one drink a day. At the moment, l'm six weeks ahead.,, Number 7 CIRCULATING IH= NEW HAMPSHIRE - tyme, tyme Center, afford, Orfordville, Piermont, Haverhill, Haverhill Center, Haverhill Comer, North Haverhill, East Haverhill, Pike, Woodsville, Bath, Monroe, Lisbon, tandaff, Benton, tyman, Warren, Glencliff, Wentworth . . . EllMOMT -- Thetford, East Thefford, Theffa.rd H ill Thetford Center, North Thetferd, Post Mills, Fatrlee, West Foirlee, Bradford, Bradford Village, Corinth, East Corinth, Topsham, West Topshom, Newbury Village, South Newbury, West Newbury, Wells River, Graton, Ryegate Comer, East Ryegate, South Ryegate, Peactm, Bnrnet, West Bamet. .Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont THIS WEEK'S PRESS RUN 10,220 February 17, 1982 Army National ACTION Biathalon team, in Barre, who served3 years in Civil D fe Preparation for the National the Army, also served in the e rise a00ency Competitions February 20 to Army Reserve in Montpelier, 28, at Camp Ripley, Min-and is an experienced audo her quak nesota, microwave antenna repair- C US a es Ordway, of night firing ranges. support company. Corinth, who served 3 years in Our commanding officer, check the stove pipes to SSG Larry Clark, will he the Navy and worked with Capt. Allen Johnson, has been determine that all of the training at C.E.A.T.S., with aircraft hydraulics., awarded command of the connections are secure, says the Vermont National Guard SP5 Thomas Anderson of Calvary Troop in Lyndonville. the agency. The shocks could Capt. Johnson has done a have also dislodged creosote bY GORDIE GARDNER Company members man. welcome 2nd Lt. David B. PVT. Michael Emerson, of Graham, from Chelsea. Lt. Groton, has no prior service .I.C. SSG Ford Geno and SP5 Graham, will be our 2nd and will be off to Basic and Marshall Laundry Sr. are Platoon leader. Training in the near future. Platoon Sgt., enrolled in a Nuclear, New enlistments for the Our next training weekend promoted to Biological and Chemical month include, SP5 Gene will be March 6 and 7, at the (E7). (N.B.C.) Warfare course. Martin, of Bradford, who Armory in Westminister, VT. Gunsalus, SP5 These classes are conducted served 2=. years in Army Tank crews will practice and SP4 Richard at the Armory in Ludlow, Vt., Artillery. gunnery skills on day and are enrolled in the the home of our combat SP4 Kevin Commissioned at the Camp Site in CONCORD-- Due to the cording to an agency several earth tremors which spokesman. have occurred the New The agency is also Hampshire Civil Defense suggesting that owners of Agency is making several dams. especially in the recommendations to the Franklin area, check the people ofNewHampshire, structural integrity of their Homeowners, especially dams for cracks or those with wood stoves should weakening. check their chimneys for The Corps of Engineers and cracks in the mortar and the Stale of New Hampshire are presently checking their dams in the area, say agency officials. Weston Observatory has asked lhe Civil Defense ARTH NEWS iS a regisiereO trademark of THE MOTHER EARTH NEWS. Int WEATHER TIPS rders, Carols Woods, picked up aoout coping with cold weather e was -8rwing uP in Japan" She pints k-- Japanese houses are not central. t that her winter experiences [V,--- that the Japanese people (who Lure zones comparable to those  "//l!tl1 ' i/, itates) generally manage to llve [\\;c' 'i'" ", riag cold weather.., in homes primarily for summer heat. al mnese winte bed covering is a kakebuton. Ms. Woods de- like a comforter: over each ) of approximately four inches--composed of untold layers- quilt isn't sewn through as a Western one would be. Instead, only an which is not pulled tight--runs from the nylon on one side, filling, to the other cover. This produces, essentially, a big, fiat, warm and families often center their evening activities around a komtsu, :s a heater placed on the floor underneath a traditional Japanese table (llke Japanese restaurants). A special quilt is draped over the top of the table the feet and legs placed beneath it warm, and a second table top is rested -- more closely resembles a large vaem or flowerpot made of fired and clay iron than the cooking apparatus called by that name in this country, for the imttsu. Various -ates or tripods can be put over the fire so may be cooked or water boiled on the hibachi. For the most part, a kettle of simmering on the unit to humidify the room. {Such open fires may be Lightly constructed, well-ventilated Japanese structure, but we do not to try it, since an open fire emits dangerous carbon monoxide.) their wooden floors with tatami.., straw mats that are approx- .. inches thick. In especially cold weather, a layer of newspaper is often put the straw mate and the wooden floor for extra insulation. that many Nipponese items of clothing are designed to provide winter A short kimono-type germeut called a/mar/is constructed in manner as the kakebuton, except it's covered on the outside with jackets are worn indoors and out. Under the haor/, the Orientals i layers of sweaters and other garments. memories of her life in Japan concern her late-aoon visits to ,, a sort of hot tub/sauna combination. "After a soak in the ouro," Ms. Woods w ..... be warm for at least a half hour, and if you're staying up for a while, "- nei. as many sweaters as before." At bedtime the Japanese get out the yu- = .ue ve akia to a mete, - hot water bottle, to warm up the bed (futon) before m. Then, when you re ready to slip under the warmed cover," she says, to put your feet against as you drift off cosily to sleep." on etaylng warm or on THE MOTHER EARTH NEWS magazine  Send your $62: "HOw the Jepanese Sey Warm". Mltil to Ooing MORE... With , N.C. PI, or in cawe of this paper. AOTHER EARTH NEWS, Inc. great job with Co: A, building in the chimney, therefore the it from a large deficit of flue should be checked for manpower to its present 102 proper draught, the cleanout percent. Co. A, is proud o door should be opened to Capt. Johnson, and wishes check the amount of residue him well with his new corn- and cleaned, if necessary. mand. A new commander for These simple precautions Co. A has not been announced, could prevent a fire, ac- Thomas Schwartz asded to Fort Sill ORFORD-- Pfc. Thomas R. mechanic, was previously Schwarz, son of George J. and assigned in Mannheim, W. Juanita T. Schwarz of Orford, Germany. has arrived for duty at Fort He is a 1979 graduate of Sill, Okla. Schwarz, a Orford High School. BE A REAL CLEAR.,= VALENTINE Quality Window Washing FROM (US) ME TO YOU TNINtN| HUm BERNARD MANNING 11@2-7|5-2432 '79 JEEP C J7 Renegade Vg--Mlnt Cond. --AM-FM Warn Hubs -- Low Mileage Loaded Must Sell (603) 795-4003 10000 VERMONT WOOL YARN NATURAL CREAMY WHITE 4 OZ. SKEINS with $7 NATURAL DARK SHEEP GRAY natural oils left in. !- 802-2224535 Bob Plants Chase Hollow Rd. Bradford, Vt. Your ad, this size, on page 1 of the Second Opinion is only $10.00 BRADFORD GAME ROOM VIDEO -- PINBALL Supervised (Behind Allen's Western Auto) Monday-Friday-- 3-9 PM  Sat. 1-9 PM Happy Birthday KITTY From J0 Agency to assist them in determining if there was any damage to public or private facilities. Also the ob- servatory would like to know people's impressions of what it felt like. The Civil Defense Agency will have a supply of questionaires which may be used or people may contact Patrick Barosh, Weston Observatory, Concord Rd., Weslon, MA. 02193, phone number 617-889-0950. The New ttampshire Civil Defense Agency has received many calls from citizens on what they should do to protect themselves in an earthquake. To help people understand the safely precautions that should ix, taken, the Civil Defense Agency is offering a pamphlet at no charge to anyone wishing this information. Called, In Time of Emergency, this pamphlet not only gives emergency in- structions on earthquakes, but also other types of disasters such as floods, tornadoes, winte," storms, etc. Land Use Controls AGRICULTURAL LAND PROTF00HON This series, Agricultural Land Protection, has been  by UVM Extension vke Commmb/and Rural Oevllopmmt tt to help citizms increase their knowledge about aoitural land retention techaies. Edited fw pddicotion by Lois M. Fr, RCILD Spec=list. Integrated Programs Controls have been combined to develop an integrated approach to farmland protection. At the heart of Integrated Programs is often found local state Growth Management and Planning. In most areas of the country, local officials make decisions affecting use of land. When, for example, a decision is made to extend sewer-water lines through a rural area, the future use of land in that area is dictated. While local officials are capable of a regional focus in planning for community growth, the state may also play a role in providing direction, incentives or mandates to achieve sound land-use within a region. State. policies, such as the Vermont and Illinois Executive Orders affecting farmland, may sol the stage for local action. Another integrated prograw of 4ncentives and land-us controls, found in the private sector, involves Land Trusts The Internal Revenue Code provides for deductions from a person's income and estate for charitable donations of land (or interests in land) to a public body or qualified private organization, such as a land trust. A land trust is a In some states Incentive administer its use through similar to purchase, transfer Programs and Land-Use direct ownership or lease or donation of development arrangements. Preservation rights programs, with the governmental or corporate body empowered to acquire land or rights to land, and t( LUCIEN L. BOURBEAU INSURANCE AGENCY MAIN STRKT OiCi Illl$: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 12 noon to 4:30 PM' Thursday, 2 PM- 6 PM PERSONAL AND Friday, 12 noon - 4:30 PM. BUSIN INRAN( Your ad, this size, on page 1 of the Second Opinion is only $5.00 31 DAYS , SPRING CARD SHOWER of farmland is only one of government intervening as several purposes of a trust, land purchaser of all property which provides a legal interests, or rights. Gover- mechanism for donation (or nment units may also buy purchase) of land. agricultural lands outright One final example of an and then lease them back to integrated program to protect farm operators. farmland is known as Pur- For more information about chase and Leaseback. When farmland retention programs incentive or other regulatory in Vermont, contact your approaches fail to achieve the County Extension Service objective of farmland office. protection, a governmental body might simply exercise its right of eminent domain or purchase such land on the BEffrOFPRES8 market. Once ownership 4s Helpful obtained, certain restrictions, In a way, the Russians are such as those against quite helpful. 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