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February 25, 1981     Journal Opinion
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Page 4-The Joui-nal Opinion-February 25, 1981 NORTttEAST PUBLISillNG COMPANY, Inc. Publisher of Jwjrnal i Opinion Weekly newspmpegr IIHpltsl0od hi IDraldford, Vermont. Subscription rus - Vermont ond New Hompsh|re - $9.00 or year; $$.O0 for six months; out ef stete - $12.00 per Vest and $7.00 for six months; Senior citizen oust $2.00. Second ch0ss poslwgo paid at Ilredford, Vermont 05033. Published by Northeost Publishing Compnny, Inc., P.O. hx 171, Ilrqmdfoed. Robert F. ltuminski President & Publisher Bradford   Woodsville 802-222-5281  . 7 603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper t iiii - . I Editorials Epitaph for a Senator A politician could probably ask for no better epitaph than, "He was owned by no one and therefore served as all honorably." That was just one of the many good things said of John Boylan, a powerful figure in Montpelier for many years as chairman of the Senate Appropirations Committee, who died Feb. 14. "He had the respect of every senator. When he got up to speak, people listened," said Lt. Gov. Madeline Kunin, who, as former chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, sometimes clashed with Boylan's line-by-line pruning of state spending budgets. Boylan was a Republican with a working man's background (brotherhood of Railway Clerks) in the old tradition of New England Republicans, and a Yankee who hated to see money wasted. But, according to those who knew him and some who opposed him, he always had time to listen to anyone and everyone and never forgot that a lot of peoples' lives were affected by those figures in the state budget. Sen Gerald Morse, who worked with Boylan in the legislature, called him "a sound thinker who knew the problems he dealt with. Once he made a decision, he stuck to it. His word was always good. He was a great man who did a lot for the legislature." From comments like these, it will • be easy to write a proper epitaph for John Boylan. It won't be easy to replace him. A visit to an oldtime copper mine Condensed from an article chambers a hundred or two on what might be the brink of ia the Bradford Opinion. June hundred feet in extent, and 25 the 'bottomless pit' for aught  1879 quoted in Child's or a0 feet high. All tbe ore and we know. We cast a stone nge County Gazetteer) crihes a tour of the Ely per mine in Vershire (later called Copperfield: "The mine is reached from the village by going straight up the hill about three-fourths of a mile, or by a new wagon road which winds timbers. In one place we saw here... around the hill, a distance L of an immense rock, a portion of about a mile. We took a seat in, the roof which fell some years Miners at work Capt. Thomas Pascoe's wagon and started for the mine... "Arriving at the mouth of the tunnel we make some shift of, clothing, as the inside of the mine is by no means the cleanest place in the world. We get into the iron car which is drawn by a horse over the track through the tunnel. We go in 800 feet on the level, then come toa halt. We have struck the shaft, and right here. 300 feet below the surface on the pitch of the vein. is an 80- horsepower engine, which does the hoisting of the cars up the incline from the bottom of the mine 2000 feet below... "Of course all is total darkness in here, except where the flickering miner's lamps throw an uncertain light into the gloom around.. "The vein is a very rich one, and varies in thickness from two feet to twenty or more, while it spreads out in places to a width of a hundred oriwo feet, and again draws in toanarrow limit... rock has been blasted out of down. and it seems a long time these large chambers and before it strike the bottom: drawnupinlittlecars, and then a miner from way In these places the roof below carries a lamp into the has to be supported, which is bottom of the shaft, and we get done by heavy timbers, or by some idea of depth and .extent columns of What they term of the shaft and the amount of 'poor rock.' kept in place by labor that has been expended ago, which is 100 feet long, 20 "'Soon we begin to hear the to 30 feet wide. and 8 to I0 feet click of the miners' sledges in thickness. But so carefully upon the drills, and presently does the captain of the mine we come UlOn them, They guard against accidents of this work in gangs or 'pairs', three kind. or in fact of any kind. men to a drill, two striking and that we believe only three men one turning the drill. They have been killed in the mine generally work by the light of since it started, a candle set in some soft clay "'As we go along down we and stuck against the wall. It strike off from the main shaft was surprising to see the in places to look into some old rapidity and accuracy with drift or shaft, and the captain which the strikers dealt the calls a halt, holds his lamp blows with the sledge upon the forward, and we are standing (please turn to page 5) :!i 2000 feet underground "With Capt. Pascoe for a guide we start down the shaft, upon the (slanting) And here let us remark anything but sport to your way down this 200 of slippery track by the ps for one and we of our legs before we "As we go along down, some of the way we are shut into a narrow passage where we bare to stoop a little to keep our heads from striking and vast Copper sulphur fumes, running up the hillside. Alcoholism and You with UNCLE M! I,TY Last month, we visitant about CRASH Classes and what they do and don't do. Many people have asked what is AA all abou!. Father Martin says AA works best for most alcoholics for hmg-rangc sobriety. AA'sole Alcoholics Anonymous is a Worldwide fellowship of men and women who help each other maintain sobriety and who offer to share their recovery experience freely with others who may have a drinking problem. The program AA suggests consists basically of "Twelve Steps" designed for personal recovery from alcoholism. The Fellowship functions through over 33,000 local groups in 92 countries. Several hundred thousand alcoholics have achieved sobriety in AA, but members recognize that their program is not always effective with all alcoholics and that some may require professional counseling or treatment. AA is concerned solely with the personal recovery and continued sobriety of individual alcoholics who tt/rn to the Fellowship for help. The movement does not engage in alcoholic research or medi cal or psychiatric treatments and does not endorse any causes -- although AA members may participate as individuals. The movement has adopted a policy of "'cooperation but not affiliation" with other organizations concerned with the problem of alcoholism. Alcoholics Anonymous is self-supporting through its own groups and members and declines contributions from outside sources. AA members reserve personal anonymity at the }evel of press, films, and broadcast media. What is Alcoholism? Alcoholism is. in our opimon, progressive illness--spiritual and emotional Ior mental), as well as physical. The alcoholics we know seem to have lost the power to control lheir drinking. How Does AA Work? AA can be described as a method of treating alcoholism in which the members are supportive of each other, sharing with each other a large body of similar experience in suf- feri ng and recovering from alcoholism. What Are AA Meetings? Each group holds regular meetings at which members relate their experiences to each other usually in reJation to "'Twelve Steps," suggested for recovery, and "Twelve Traditions," suggested for relationships within the Fellowship and with the community. There are open meetings for anyone interested and closed meetings for alcoholics only. Who Are AA Members? People who think they have a drinking problem are welcome to attend any AA meeting. They become members simply by deciding they are members. AA members are men and women from all walks of life, from teenagers to 70-year- olds. (ff all races, with all manner of formal religious af- • fill ations and with none at all. Where Cad You Find AA? Look for "Alcoholics Anonymous" ]n any telephone directory• In addition, listed below are our local orga nizat ions: Sunday: Bethany Congregational Church, Randolph, 8:00 p.m. : Monday, Woodstock Group, Universalist Church-Rt. 4, 8:00 p.m.: Wednesday: Bethel Valley Group, Christ Church Parish. While Church - Bethel, ALANON. 8:00 p.m.; Thur- sday, Northfield Group, St. Mary's Episcopal Parish, 8:00 p.m.. Bradford AA. Methodist Church, 8:00 p.m. Friday: Woodsville AA. St. Joseph's Church. Pine Street, 8:30 p.m. AA Telephone Number for this locality: 603-643-4411, What Can Vou Expect from AA? 1 All members help any alcoholic who.dn4!stratos an inttrcst in stying sober. " 2. AA members may call on the alcoholic who wishes help although they may feel it is best for the alcoholic to request such help first. 3. AA may help arrange hospitalization. Local AA offices often know where hospital treatment of alcoholism is available, though AA is not affiliated with any type of trcatmcnt facility. 4. AA members are glad to share their experience with anyone who is interested, either a conversation or at formal gatherings. What Does AA Not Do? AA does not : 1. Solk'it members, or try to persuade anyone o'join 2. Keep memborship records or case histories. 3. Engage in or sponsor research. 4. Join "councils" of social agencies, although AA mem- bers. groups, and service offices frequently cooperate with them. 5. Follow up or try to control members. 6. Make medical or psychological diagnoses or prognoses. 7. Provide drying out or nursing services, hospitalization, drugs, or any medical or psychiatric treatment. 8. Offer religious services. 9. Engage in education or propaganda about alcohol. lo. Provide housing, food, clothing, jobs, money, or other welfare or social scrvict. I I. Provide domestic or vocational counseling. 12. Accept any money for its services or any contributions t ron nnn-AA sources. Nt)TE: An indi,idual AA member may do some of thee things on a private, p(rsonal basis, but this is not a part of his or her AA, membership. Many professionals in the field of aleoholism are also AA mmbers. Their professional work. however, is NOT a part of their AA membership. AA, as such. does not profess competence to perform professional ser- vices such as those listed above. Orange County Mental ttealth Emergency Service Number: 1-800-622-4244. We have a new counselor. Mike Griefen from McLean llospital in Boston. now at our Bradford office. Give him a call at 222-4477. lie'd love to visit with you. See you next Month. UNCLE MII,TY | i Letters to the Editor Congratulations and some advice To the Editor: I planned to go to the Corinth Town Meeting this year but because of arthritis in my hips I can't sit too long at one lime so 1 can't go. 1 wanted to go to ask why the roads were sanded and then plowed the same day or within a week. They should plow and then sand. 'this last winter they did a good job on the roads plowing and sanding ll's the first time they did it right in the '23 years we have lived in Corinth. Congratulations ! In all of these years, they have only put oil or chloride on the W. Corinth Road five or six times and then graded it off within a week. Why don't they grade the road first and then put on the oil or chloride. It would save money and keep the dust down longer. A Town Taxpayer Agnes A. Carrier Corinth, Vt. 05030 Cynthia Underhill writes To the Editor : am doing very well in my 1 lelh) Everyone, 1 have been in Grand Marais, Minnesota, for l month. So far I have been having a marvelous time. The weather for the first two weeks was in the 50's. but has now gone down to zero and below. There is about 4 ft. of snow here. and the skiing has been alot of fun The family that I'm staying with is the Dick Joynes family, l have a brother Jim. who is 15 and in the 10th grade like me. l also have a sister. Julie, who is 14 and in the 9th grade. My mom's name is Skip, and my Dad's is Dick. So far, I have been getting along fine with them all. and I have found them all robe very nice. The town of Grand Murals is a little bigger than Bradford. and is right on the shore of Lake Superior. It is a nice town. and the people here have all been very nice to me. They have helped a great deal in making me feel welcome. The school has about 100 kids - smaller than Oxbow, and the building itself is much smaller. But the teachers have all been nice, and so far I Volunteerism is working To the Editor: Three cheers for your editorial of February 4, 1981. I am sending copies of it to the Vermont Office on Aging and the Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) to show them the spirit and support we have here in Bradford for volunteers• The Orange East Senior Center would also like to take this opportunity to point out the splendid service that volunteers have given the senior program in this area. We have 16 volunteers at the Wells River U.C.C. meal site who gave 500 hours of service last year. Four office volunteers and four volunteer dri.vers have also aided the program in Bradford. We are soon to launch a drive for volunteers for a Senior Home Companion Program. If we can get the RSVP program in Bradford, we would be able to recruit senior citizens for the town and school help that you mention in your editorial. In the meantime we would be glad to start a list of senior citizens who would like to give a few hours a week to help the community. We hope that others in the community will also respond to your call for "Public Ser- vice Volunteers." Vivian G. Nemhauser Director, O.E.S.C., Bradford, VT To the Editor: In regard to the recent flood scare on Ammonoosuc Street in Woodsville, if the Army ('orp of Engineers had been allowed to build a dam at Bethlehen Junction. we in Woodsville and Lisbon would not have a flood scare every twoor three years The politicians didn't want the dam built because they would have Iosl votes from the folks who lived in Bethlehem Junction because it would have taken valuable property. Robert Kugeiman Woodsville, N.H. Roads/n good shape To the Editor: On February l l, 1981 God honored , our part of the country with almost 3 inches of rain. Some people think he could have caused this to have come down as snow which would have contributed to the local economy in the way of providing our ski resorts with additional inventory. However. this was not the case, We did receive the precipitation as rain and the ground was still frozen. This caused all road crews throughout the state many problems trying to keep the roads open. Here in Warren we are in the center, and the long flue for lucky to have a competent (#ease turn to page 5) courses. I guess I'll really find out hnw well I'm doing when grades come out. The kids have been very nice too. I have made alot of friends, and have participated in four ski team meets. I am playing in the pop band only, and so I've gone to two basketball games here. a gynmastics meet, and one dance. There m another dance tonight. Then I have vacation for a week. Well, school's almost out. Bye for now. The Domestic Program Student Cynthia Underhiil e-o Dick Joynes Box 428 Grand Marais, MN. 55604 I[ I III III I I Suspension of Dean Trombley Tothe Editor: personal life and rumo The suspension of Mr. Dean about him were discusst Trombley from his position as repeatedly and vociferously Varsity Basketball Coach an attempt to make the comes as a complete surprise more important factors thl to me, and that in itself is his experience, ability, pe surprising inasmuch as I was formance record, or cot serving as Chairman of the mitment; and (3) t| Oxbow School Board at the Superintendent of Scboo time he was hired. If I were a denied the Chairman of tl person who wagers, my Board his voting rights in tl money would have been on Personnel Committe non-renewal of Trombley's meeting. contract for the 1981-1982 Each coaching sta school year and that would member of Oxbow Hi$ have been a sure, winning bet School is hired on the sar in my book. Let me explain basis as each member of tt why: teaching staff: the best purse The administration which to do the job. That is exactl suspended Dean Trombley is what the Board did when * the same administration hired Dean Trombley which adamantly opposed Varsity Basketball Coach. Dean Trombley's hiring in the I have a great deal of faith i first place and 'subjected the the Oxbow School Board and Board to a degree of pressure I were a betting person, r unparalled in my mx year money would ride on tenure to keep Mr. Trombley retention of Mr. Tromble off the school payroll, i.e., tl) with full salary pending tb the interview procedure results of a comprehensiv established by the Board was investigation by the Board t changed by the administration determine all the facts and th which required full Board suspension from contract involvement in interviewing any and all persons who hag all candidates for the Varsity failed to abide by Basketball Coach's position of their buss and responsibl rather than the Personnel entity, the Oxbow Schot Committee's decision being Board. relayed to the Board for ac- Vernon Clogst : tion: (2) Mr. Trombley's Corin Executive Councilor r "  Nominations The Governor and Council met in official session on Feb. It and confirmed the following nominations from our district: Edward Mase of Bath and Bonnie Dunton of Milton to the State Historical Com- mission, Roger Peabody of Littleton to the Passenger Tramway Safety Board. Mild Pike of Gilford to the Industrial Development Authority, Kenneth Spritz to the New Hampshire Commission on the Arts. Fred Bailey of Lancaster to the Higher Education and Health Facilities Authority, and John Marro of Littleton to the Sweepstakes Commission. They all had my affirmative vote and congratulations as they take on their new posts and tasks in our state government. In that John Marro was a political opponent and Paul Mayette of Haverhill was a political opponent of mine in 1980, I called Raymond S. Buon Confirmed also confirmed to the New Hampshire Fish and Game Commission. His nomination by law had to remain on the table for 30 days to be considered. Lakes Region Mental Health, Northern New Hampshire Mental Health Center, West Central New Hampshire Community Health Services of Hanover, all received monies for continuation of Title 19 Medicaid Programs m our district. The Belknap Mill in Laconia, the Maxfield Parrish Museum in Plainfield, and the Pemigewasset Choral Society in Plymouth all received by Governor arid Council approved for grants from the NH Com- mission on the Arts. We accepted $56.645 to continue the linkage program of resources between 14 public libraries of which Lit- tleton, Plymouth, Laconia, and Hanover in our district will continue to benefit from. Paul Mayette and stated that should he The Blow Me Down Bridge in Cornish sire tosend me his resume,fl would be_ . cgtie4;I t lP,goth_forstructura!. - i ao to aavance it tor consiueration ny The ..... oFk,-$(2,500 was acceotea and all0Catt Governor and Council for some ap- for theWorld  Ski lffaCes Promotion to propriate board or commission. I should also point out that George Hurst of Laconia completed a term on the State Board of Education and was replaced by someone from outside our district. I would at this time publicly commend George for a most positive term on the State Board and thank him for his help with North Country projects. Lee Waterhouse of Ossipee was complete the 1980 program at Waterville Valley. All in all. it was a productive meeting for District One. If anyone would like to receive a copy of the interim report of the Legislative Commission on the University System of New Hampshire, please contact me at 603-747-3662 or write me a note RFD No. 1. Woodsville, NH 03785. ''. T:. :-.1 Solutions... by Tom Evsl|n Home knitting in Vermont Over the last few weeks, the Inter- commute and that they work under far' national Ladies Garment Workers Union better conditions than most garment seems to have softened its opposition to the workers. home knitting of ski hats in Vermont. To Using homeworkers is efficient, their credit, union officials appear to have however, despite the relatively high listened closely to the testimony given wages. No factory needs to be built. No here and concluded that Vermont is dif- supervision is required. No dditional ferent. In testimony before a Vermont workspace needs to be heated. And House Committee, Paul Winslow of the homeworkers are well motivated and ILGWU said he had no objection to the productive. resolution eventually passed by the When the United State Department of Vermont Legislature supporting home Labor stopped the home crocheting of knitters, infantswear m Maine in the 1950s, But opposition to homework from big American consumers switched to the next business is increasing. Such giants as Levi cheapest supplier -- Japan. If American Strauss and Company have written the U. factory owners succeed in banning the S. Department of Labor in opposition to all home knitting of ski hats, they may also homework. They are openly afraid of the succeed in exporting the jobs of American competition and want government to knitters. protect them We will never succeed in our national I don't think it's the proper role of goal of making America more productive government to protect Levi Strauss and and more competitive in the world if we Company from the competition provided outlaw our most efficient producers to by Mrs. Breen and Mrs. Duffany and the protect less efficient producers. Home other Vermonters who knit at home, I knitters aren't asking for any favors. They think it's a disgrace that businessmen who just want to be allowed tocompete fairly, are always talking about harmful The case of the Vermont knitters shows government regulation are seeking to use what a difficult time the R such regulation to protect themselves Administration will have as it seeks 't° from competition, deregulate America. Oppositi0a to The clothing moguls who oppose deregulation will come from all sorts m 1 ad homework claim that homeworkers are special interests who derive  - underpaid. They, themselves, usually pay vantage from regulation. Unfortunately, the minimum wage. All evidence even businessmen who should know better presented at Labor Department hearings want government to protect them from ]n Burlington and at hearings before a competition. committee of the Vermont legislature The unions deserve some,praise for indieated that Vermont home knitters earn flexibility in this area. The garment more than the minimum wage as well as manufacturers deserve a long lesson in saving the time and money required to free enterprise. Congressional Report James M. leffords Comments on Reagan's budget The overall goals of President Reagan's control. These are necessary tasks. budget message deserve strong support I am among those who also feel the from Congress. The President's program proposed tax,cut is realistic. It is not an is designed to improve management of inflationary financial bonanza for tax - government, to make services more cost payers, It would merely offset the "tax effective, and to bring spending under tplease turn topage':5) Page 4-The Joui-nal Opinion-February 25, 1981 NORTttEAST PUBLISillNG COMPANY, Inc. Publisher of Jwjrnal i Opinion Weekly newspmpegr IIHpltsl0od hi IDraldford, Vermont. Subscription rus - Vermont ond New Hompsh|re - $9.00 or year; $$.O0 for six months; out ef stete - $12.00 per Vest and $7.00 for six months; Senior citizen oust $2.00. Second ch0ss poslwgo paid at Ilredford, Vermont 05033. Published by Northeost Publishing Compnny, Inc., P.O. hx 171, Ilrqmdfoed. Robert F. ltuminski President & Publisher Bradford   Woodsville 802-222-5281  . 7 603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper t iiii - . I Editorials Epitaph for a Senator A politician could probably ask for no better epitaph than, "He was owned by no one and therefore served as all honorably." That was just one of the many good things said of John Boylan, a powerful figure in Montpelier for many years as chairman of the Senate Appropirations Committee, who died Feb. 14. "He had the respect of every senator. When he got up to speak, people listened," said Lt. Gov. Madeline Kunin, who, as former chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, sometimes clashed with Boylan's line-by-line pruning of state spending budgets. Boylan was a Republican with a working man's background (brotherhood of Railway Clerks) in the old tradition of New England Republicans, and a Yankee who hated to see money wasted. But, according to those who knew him and some who opposed him, he always had time to listen to anyone and everyone and never forgot that a lot of peoples' lives were affected by those figures in the state budget. Sen Gerald Morse, who worked with Boylan in the legislature, called him "a sound thinker who knew the problems he dealt with. Once he made a decision, he stuck to it. His word was always good. He was a great man who did a lot for the legislature." From comments like these, it will • be easy to write a proper epitaph for John Boylan. It won't be easy to replace him. A visit to an oldtime copper mine Condensed from an article chambers a hundred or two on what might be the brink of ia the Bradford Opinion. June hundred feet in extent, and 25 the 'bottomless pit' for aught  1879 quoted in Child's or a0 feet high. All tbe ore and we know. We cast a stone nge County Gazetteer) crihes a tour of the Ely per mine in Vershire (later called Copperfield: "The mine is reached from the village by going straight up the hill about three-fourths of a mile, or by a new wagon road which winds timbers. In one place we saw here... around the hill, a distance L of an immense rock, a portion of about a mile. We took a seat in, the roof which fell some years Miners at work Capt. Thomas Pascoe's wagon and started for the mine... "Arriving at the mouth of the tunnel we make some shift of, clothing, as the inside of the mine is by no means the cleanest place in the world. We get into the iron car which is drawn by a horse over the track through the tunnel. We go in 800 feet on the level, then come toa halt. We have struck the shaft, and right here. 300 feet below the surface on the pitch of the vein. is an 80- horsepower engine, which does the hoisting of the cars up the incline from the bottom of the mine 2000 feet below... "Of course all is total darkness in here, except where the flickering miner's lamps throw an uncertain light into the gloom around.. "The vein is a very rich one, and varies in thickness from two feet to twenty or more, while it spreads out in places to a width of a hundred oriwo feet, and again draws in toanarrow limit... rock has been blasted out of down. and it seems a long time these large chambers and before it strike the bottom: drawnupinlittlecars, and then a miner from way In these places the roof below carries a lamp into the has to be supported, which is bottom of the shaft, and we get done by heavy timbers, or by some idea of depth and .extent columns of What they term of the shaft and the amount of 'poor rock.' kept in place by labor that has been expended ago, which is 100 feet long, 20 "'Soon we begin to hear the to 30 feet wide. and 8 to I0 feet click of the miners' sledges in thickness. But so carefully upon the drills, and presently does the captain of the mine we come UlOn them, They guard against accidents of this work in gangs or 'pairs', three kind. or in fact of any kind. men to a drill, two striking and that we believe only three men one turning the drill. They have been killed in the mine generally work by the light of since it started, a candle set in some soft clay "'As we go along down we and stuck against the wall. It strike off from the main shaft was surprising to see the in places to look into some old rapidity and accuracy with drift or shaft, and the captain which the strikers dealt the calls a halt, holds his lamp blows with the sledge upon the forward, and we are standing (please turn to page 5) :!i 2000 feet underground "With Capt. Pascoe for a guide we start down the shaft, upon the (slanting) And here let us remark anything but sport to your way down this 200 of slippery track by the ps for one and we of our legs before we "As we go along down, some of the way we are shut into a narrow passage where we bare to stoop a little to keep our heads from striking and vast Copper sulphur fumes, running up the hillside. Alcoholism and You with UNCLE M! I,TY Last month, we visitant about CRASH Classes and what they do and don't do. Many people have asked what is AA all abou!. Father Martin says AA works best for most alcoholics for hmg-rangc sobriety. AA'sole Alcoholics Anonymous is a Worldwide fellowship of men and women who help each other maintain sobriety and who offer to share their recovery experience freely with others who may have a drinking problem. The program AA suggests consists basically of "Twelve Steps" designed for personal recovery from alcoholism. The Fellowship functions through over 33,000 local groups in 92 countries. Several hundred thousand alcoholics have achieved sobriety in AA, but members recognize that their program is not always effective with all alcoholics and that some may require professional counseling or treatment. AA is concerned solely with the personal recovery and continued sobriety of individual alcoholics who tt/rn to the Fellowship for help. The movement does not engage in alcoholic research or medi cal or psychiatric treatments and does not endorse any causes -- although AA members may participate as individuals. The movement has adopted a policy of "'cooperation but not affiliation" with other organizations concerned with the problem of alcoholism. Alcoholics Anonymous is self-supporting through its own groups and members and declines contributions from outside sources. AA members reserve personal anonymity at the }evel of press, films, and broadcast media. What is Alcoholism? Alcoholism is. in our opimon, progressive illness--spiritual and emotional Ior mental), as well as physical. The alcoholics we know seem to have lost the power to control lheir drinking. How Does AA Work? AA can be described as a method of treating alcoholism in which the members are supportive of each other, sharing with each other a large body of similar experience in suf- feri ng and recovering from alcoholism. What Are AA Meetings? Each group holds regular meetings at which members relate their experiences to each other usually in reJation to "'Twelve Steps," suggested for recovery, and "Twelve Traditions," suggested for relationships within the Fellowship and with the community. There are open meetings for anyone interested and closed meetings for alcoholics only. Who Are AA Members? People who think they have a drinking problem are welcome to attend any AA meeting. They become members simply by deciding they are members. AA members are men and women from all walks of life, from teenagers to 70-year- olds. (ff all races, with all manner of formal religious af- • fill ations and with none at all. Where Cad You Find AA? Look for "Alcoholics Anonymous" ]n any telephone directory• In addition, listed below are our local orga nizat ions: Sunday: Bethany Congregational Church, Randolph, 8:00 p.m. : Monday, Woodstock Group, Universalist Church-Rt. 4, 8:00 p.m.: Wednesday: Bethel Valley Group, Christ Church Parish. While Church - Bethel, ALANON. 8:00 p.m.; Thur- sday, Northfield Group, St. Mary's Episcopal Parish, 8:00 p.m.. Bradford AA. Methodist Church, 8:00 p.m. Friday: Woodsville AA. St. Joseph's Church. Pine Street, 8:30 p.m. AA Telephone Number for this locality: 603-643-4411, What Can Vou Expect from AA? 1 All members help any alcoholic who.dn4!stratos an inttrcst in stying sober. " 2. AA members may call on the alcoholic who wishes help although they may feel it is best for the alcoholic to request such help first. 3. AA may help arrange hospitalization. Local AA offices often know where hospital treatment of alcoholism is available, though AA is not affiliated with any type of trcatmcnt facility. 4. AA members are glad to share their experience with anyone who is interested, either a conversation or at formal gatherings. What Does AA Not Do? AA does not : 1. Solk'it members, or try to persuade anyone o'join 2. Keep memborship records or case histories. 3. Engage in or sponsor research. 4. Join "councils" of social agencies, although AA mem- bers. groups, and service offices frequently cooperate with them. 5. Follow up or try to control members. 6. Make medical or psychological diagnoses or prognoses. 7. Provide drying out or nursing services, hospitalization, drugs, or any medical or psychiatric treatment. 8. Offer religious services. 9. Engage in education or propaganda about alcohol. lo. Provide housing, food, clothing, jobs, money, or other welfare or social scrvict. I I. Provide domestic or vocational counseling. 12. Accept any money for its services or any contributions t ron nnn-AA sources. Nt)TE: An indi,idual AA member may do some of thee things on a private, p(rsonal basis, but this is not a part of his or her AA, membership. Many professionals in the field of aleoholism are also AA mmbers. Their professional work. however, is NOT a part of their AA membership. AA, as such. does not profess competence to perform professional ser- vices such as those listed above. Orange County Mental ttealth Emergency Service Number: 1-800-622-4244. We have a new counselor. Mike Griefen from McLean llospital in Boston. now at our Bradford office. Give him a call at 222-4477. lie'd love to visit with you. See you next Month. UNCLE MII,TY | i Letters to the Editor Congratulations and some advice To the Editor: I planned to go to the Corinth Town Meeting this year but because of arthritis in my hips I can't sit too long at one lime so 1 can't go. 1 wanted to go to ask why the roads were sanded and then plowed the same day or within a week. They should plow and then sand. 'this last winter they did a good job on the roads plowing and sanding ll's the first time they did it right in the '23 years we have lived in Corinth. Congratulations ! In all of these years, they have only put oil or chloride on the W. Corinth Road five or six times and then graded it off within a week. Why don't they grade the road first and then put on the oil or chloride. It would save money and keep the dust down longer. A Town Taxpayer Agnes A. Carrier Corinth, Vt. 05030 Cynthia Underhill writes To the Editor : am doing very well in my 1 lelh) Everyone, 1 have been in Grand Marais, Minnesota, for l month. So far I have been having a marvelous time. The weather for the first two weeks was in the 50's. but has now gone down to zero and below. There is about 4 ft. of snow here. and the skiing has been alot of fun The family that I'm staying with is the Dick Joynes family, l have a brother Jim. who is 15 and in the 10th grade like me. l also have a sister. Julie, who is 14 and in the 9th grade. My mom's name is Skip, and my Dad's is Dick. So far, I have been getting along fine with them all. and I have found them all robe very nice. The town of Grand Murals is a little bigger than Bradford. and is right on the shore of Lake Superior. It is a nice town. and the people here have all been very nice to me. They have helped a great deal in making me feel welcome. The school has about 100 kids - smaller than Oxbow, and the building itself is much smaller. But the teachers have all been nice, and so far I Volunteerism is working To the Editor: Three cheers for your editorial of February 4, 1981. I am sending copies of it to the Vermont Office on Aging and the Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) to show them the spirit and support we have here in Bradford for volunteers• The Orange East Senior Center would also like to take this opportunity to point out the splendid service that volunteers have given the senior program in this area. We have 16 volunteers at the Wells River U.C.C. meal site who gave 500 hours of service last year. Four office volunteers and four volunteer dri.vers have also aided the program in Bradford. We are soon to launch a drive for volunteers for a Senior Home Companion Program. If we can get the RSVP program in Bradford, we would be able to recruit senior citizens for the town and school help that you mention in your editorial. In the meantime we would be glad to start a list of senior citizens who would like to give a few hours a week to help the community. We hope that others in the community will also respond to your call for "Public Ser- vice Volunteers." Vivian G. Nemhauser Director, O.E.S.C., Bradford, VT To the Editor: In regard to the recent flood scare on Ammonoosuc Street in Woodsville, if the Army ('orp of Engineers had been allowed to build a dam at Bethlehen Junction. we in Woodsville and Lisbon would not have a flood scare every twoor three years The politicians didn't want the dam built because they would have Iosl votes from the folks who lived in Bethlehem Junction because it would have taken valuable property. Robert Kugeiman Woodsville, N.H. Roads/n good shape To the Editor: On February l l, 1981 God honored , our part of the country with almost 3 inches of rain. Some people think he could have caused this to have come down as snow which would have contributed to the local economy in the way of providing our ski resorts with additional inventory. However. this was not the case, We did receive the precipitation as rain and the ground was still frozen. This caused all road crews throughout the state many problems trying to keep the roads open. Here in Warren we are in the center, and the long flue for lucky to have a competent (#ease turn to page 5) courses. I guess I'll really find out hnw well I'm doing when grades come out. The kids have been very nice too. I have made alot of friends, and have participated in four ski team meets. I am playing in the pop band only, and so I've gone to two basketball games here. a gynmastics meet, and one dance. There m another dance tonight. Then I have vacation for a week. Well, school's almost out. Bye for now. The Domestic Program Student Cynthia Underhiil e-o Dick Joynes Box 428 Grand Marais, MN. 55604 I[ I III III I I Suspension of Dean Trombley Tothe Editor: personal life and rumo The suspension of Mr. Dean about him were discusst Trombley from his position as repeatedly and vociferously Varsity Basketball Coach an attempt to make the comes as a complete surprise more important factors thl to me, and that in itself is his experience, ability, pe surprising inasmuch as I was formance record, or cot serving as Chairman of the mitment; and (3) t| Oxbow School Board at the Superintendent of Scboo time he was hired. If I were a denied the Chairman of tl person who wagers, my Board his voting rights in tl money would have been on Personnel Committe non-renewal of Trombley's meeting. contract for the 1981-1982 Each coaching sta school year and that would member of Oxbow Hi$ have been a sure, winning bet School is hired on the sar in my book. Let me explain basis as each member of tt why: teaching staff: the best purse The administration which to do the job. That is exactl suspended Dean Trombley is what the Board did when * the same administration hired Dean Trombley which adamantly opposed Varsity Basketball Coach. Dean Trombley's hiring in the I have a great deal of faith i first place and 'subjected the the Oxbow School Board and Board to a degree of pressure I were a betting person, r unparalled in my mx year money would ride on tenure to keep Mr. Trombley retention of Mr. Tromble off the school payroll, i.e., tl) with full salary pending tb the interview procedure results of a comprehensiv established by the Board was investigation by the Board t changed by the administration determine all the facts and th which required full Board suspension from contract involvement in interviewing any and all persons who hag all candidates for the Varsity failed to abide by Basketball Coach's position of their buss and responsibl rather than the Personnel entity, the Oxbow Schot Committee's decision being Board. relayed to the Board for ac- Vernon Clogst : tion: (2) Mr. Trombley's Corin Executive Councilor r "  Nominations The Governor and Council met in official session on Feb. It and confirmed the following nominations from our district: Edward Mase of Bath and Bonnie Dunton of Milton to the State Historical Com- mission, Roger Peabody of Littleton to the Passenger Tramway Safety Board. Mild Pike of Gilford to the Industrial Development Authority, Kenneth Spritz to the New Hampshire Commission on the Arts. Fred Bailey of Lancaster to the Higher Education and Health Facilities Authority, and John Marro of Littleton to the Sweepstakes Commission. They all had my affirmative vote and congratulations as they take on their new posts and tasks in our state government. In that John Marro was a political opponent and Paul Mayette of Haverhill was a political opponent of mine in 1980, I called Raymond S. Buon Confirmed also confirmed to the New Hampshire Fish and Game Commission. His nomination by law had to remain on the table for 30 days to be considered. Lakes Region Mental Health, Northern New Hampshire Mental Health Center, West Central New Hampshire Community Health Services of Hanover, all received monies for continuation of Title 19 Medicaid Programs m our district. The Belknap Mill in Laconia, the Maxfield Parrish Museum in Plainfield, and the Pemigewasset Choral Society in Plymouth all received by Governor arid Council approved for grants from the NH Com- mission on the Arts. We accepted $56.645 to continue the linkage program of resources between 14 public libraries of which Lit- tleton, Plymouth, Laconia, and Hanover in our district will continue to benefit from. Paul Mayette and stated that should he The Blow Me Down Bridge in Cornish sire tosend me his resume,fl would be_ . cgtie4;I t lP,goth_forstructura!. - i ao to aavance it tor consiueration ny The ..... oFk,-$(2,500 was acceotea and all0Catt Governor and Council for some ap- for theWorld  Ski lffaCes Promotion to propriate board or commission. I should also point out that George Hurst of Laconia completed a term on the State Board of Education and was replaced by someone from outside our district. I would at this time publicly commend George for a most positive term on the State Board and thank him for his help with North Country projects. Lee Waterhouse of Ossipee was complete the 1980 program at Waterville Valley. All in all. it was a productive meeting for District One. If anyone would like to receive a copy of the interim report of the Legislative Commission on the University System of New Hampshire, please contact me at 603-747-3662 or write me a note RFD No. 1. Woodsville, NH 03785. ''. T:. :-.1 Solutions... by Tom Evsl|n Home knitting in Vermont Over the last few weeks, the Inter- commute and that they work under far' national Ladies Garment Workers Union better conditions than most garment seems to have softened its opposition to the workers. home knitting of ski hats in Vermont. To Using homeworkers is efficient, their credit, union officials appear to have however, despite the relatively high listened closely to the testimony given wages. No factory needs to be built. No here and concluded that Vermont is dif- supervision is required. No dditional ferent. In testimony before a Vermont workspace needs to be heated. And House Committee, Paul Winslow of the homeworkers are well motivated and ILGWU said he had no objection to the productive. resolution eventually passed by the When the United State Department of Vermont Legislature supporting home Labor stopped the home crocheting of knitters, infantswear m Maine in the 1950s, But opposition to homework from big American consumers switched to the next business is increasing. Such giants as Levi cheapest supplier -- Japan. If American Strauss and Company have written the U. factory owners succeed in banning the S. Department of Labor in opposition to all home knitting of ski hats, they may also homework. They are openly afraid of the succeed in exporting the jobs of American competition and want government to knitters. protect them We will never succeed in our national I don't think it's the proper role of goal of making America more productive government to protect Levi Strauss and and more competitive in the world if we Company from the competition provided outlaw our most efficient producers to by Mrs. Breen and Mrs. Duffany and the protect less efficient producers. Home other Vermonters who knit at home, I knitters aren't asking for any favors. They think it's a disgrace that businessmen who just want to be allowed tocompete fairly, are always talking about harmful The case of the Vermont knitters shows government regulation are seeking to use what a difficult time the R such regulation to protect themselves Administration will have as it seeks 't° from competition, deregulate America. Oppositi0a to The clothing moguls who oppose deregulation will come from all sorts m 1 ad homework claim that homeworkers are special interests who derive  - underpaid. They, themselves, usually pay vantage from regulation. Unfortunately, the minimum wage. All evidence even businessmen who should know better presented at Labor Department hearings want government to protect them from ]n Burlington and at hearings before a competition. committee of the Vermont legislature The unions deserve some,praise for indieated that Vermont home knitters earn flexibility in this area. The garment more than the minimum wage as well as manufacturers deserve a long lesson in saving the time and money required to free enterprise. Congressional Report James M. leffords Comments on Reagan's budget The overall goals of President Reagan's control. These are necessary tasks. budget message deserve strong support I am among those who also feel the from Congress. The President's program proposed tax,cut is realistic. It is not an is designed to improve management of inflationary financial bonanza for tax - government, to make services more cost payers, It would merely offset the "tax effective, and to bring spending under tplease turn topage':5)