"
Newspaper Archive of
Journal Opinion
Bradford , Vermont
Lyft
February 25, 1981     Journal Opinion
PAGE 5     (5 of 12 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 5     (5 of 12 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
February 25, 1981
 

Newspaper Archive of Journal Opinion produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




[ * Over the river {continued from page 4) head of the drill. A mis-stroke f, would crush the hand that turns the drill. "These men are nearly all Cornish miners (from Cor- nwall, England) and have Spent their lives at this business. They work in three shifts of eight hours each... "After looking at the various places where the miners are at work, we start on the ascent, but have not gone far before the captain Orders the 'truck' sent down, and when it arrives we find that it is made specially to ride upon, and we get on, Partly lying down, and with the caution to us to look out for our head and arms. The captain gives the signal to 'hoist away,' and we are !rundled along up the steep and soon reach the "At the mouth of the is the blacksmith shop tere a gang of hands is kept Work day and night shar- sty Penin the drills and repairing d t 0ther-iron work used in the [th Oine, as this business is t ( : terrribly destructive to tools, av ears and machinery, and uses ion UP a vast amount of iron and ibl Steel in the course of a year. lo( The dressing-house the"Upon arriving outside ;to'  Value we meet Capt. R. W. tntJ arrett, who has charge of the ,ext department, where the , ore is weighed, broken up, SOrted and washed by about 115 men and boys. IL E verythmg is arranged to Save labor in handling the re, which moves continually .nhill through the roast il s and furq.ace until it Jllly comes out in a molten ef earn from the mouth of the urnace. h ff Y The roast beds s ,L he space occupied by ae roast beds is about 900 feet I1 o , and a trestle runs over it. ,, e ore is dumped from the 2200 feet below the landing in Copperfield mine. Judging from the white shirts, these men must have been either bosses or visitors. cars onto the beds in piles, over a layer of wood about six inches deep. The wood is set on fire around the edges, and each pile will then burn for two to three months. The sulfur, of which the ore con- tains a large amount, keeps the pile burning, but it emits fumes which one not ac- customed to will get out of as soon as possible after once inhaling. But the men who work here experience no in- convenience from them, and they are not considered in- jurious to the health of the workmen. "Two new desulphurizing ovens have recently been put up upon a new plan, with which they are ex- perimenting, to get rid of the sulphurous acid gas. This gas has killed the trees and vegetation upon the hillsides and valley for a considerable distance around, and not even the Canada thistle can raise its head where the gas strikes the ground. "The company has spent thousands of dollars in trying to get rid of this gas. so that it will do no damage. They have put in a large flue. with pipes from the desulphurizing ovens running into it. which carries the fumes from them to the top of a hill. where a stack 80 feet F on tn of,our winter mereh'andise for MEN, WOMEN AND CHILDREN Woodaviile St. JohnJb.ur) - " :--'-_-'- '-- -2  ...... high has been erected. The smelting works "From the roast beds the ore is wheeled to chutes, dumped into cars and drawn to the smelting works. There are now 24 furnaces, some of which are not yet completed. The ore, coke, and whatever other substances are needed for a 'flux' - which makes the slag run off clean from the ore when melted -- are put into the furnace and the product of this first melting is a 'matte' of about 30 to 35 percent copper. But the sulphur has not all been gotten rid of yet, and this matte is broken up into pieces and taken to desulphurizmg ovens, placed upon wood and set on fire again to eliminate what remains of the sulfur. It stays here burning tor about two weeks. It is then taken to another smaller furnace of different construction, from which they get 'pig' copper of about 95 percent. "The dross or slag from the furnaces is taken off into pits shaped like half an egg set upon wheels and is wheeled out and dumped after it has cooled a little. */ Payroll "This company has in its employ at both mines (Ver- shire and Corinth) about 1000 men. and their monthly payroll amounts to about $20,000." ( to be continued) . Letters  {continued from page 4) road agent who left the roads open. In most cases our roads survived the storm as well if nm better than some slate roads. Those ot you who complained about the road emditions, try to remember at'the back roads were there before you and I moved onto them These conditions occur from time to time and it's something youhave to learn to live with. John Rogers Selectman Warren SERVICES AT ORFORD ORFORD--Ash Wednesday service, will be held at the Orfordville Church March 4 at 7:30 p.m with Rev. Robert Robb as pastor. There will be a short Bible Study after, with Rev. Malcolm Grebe. A TTENTION LOGGERS! Homelite Loggers SPECIAl, Ill Homelite Model 750 24" S.P. Regular $ 708.00 Sale W/Trade $550.00 Homelite Model SXL 925 19" Regular $533.00 Sale $460.00 This Sale Ends Feb. 28, 1981 TRY BEFORE YOU BUYI ROUTE 10, NO. HAVERHILL, N.H. Tel. (603) 787-6981 February 25, 1981-The Journal Opinion-Page 5 , Jeffords report (continued from page 4 ) bracket creep" which has afflicted tax- payers in recent years, a phenomenon which has forced taxpayers to give the government higher percentages of their income even when their wages have not risen in real dollars. The tax incentives for business are a venture rote supply-side economics-a theory which certainly deserves to be tried m light of the failure of more conventional economic theories. At a time when new jobs and econornic im- provement are desperately needed in our part ot the country, we can't afford to reject solutious simply because they are innovative. There is, however, a slrong need for fine- tuning of the President's budget cuts. An examination of individual items in the budget shows that in some cases, Vet- reenters would be required to take on a disproportionate share of the burden. And, even from a national perspective, I believe some of the priorities are misplaced. Some of my initial concerns include the following: -The President's energy budget is skewed heavily toward traditional fuels. The emphasis is on fossil fuels and nuclear power, while the government's role in promoting conservation and renewable resources like solar energy is almost wiped out. This policy is potentially disastrous for oil consuming regions, in- cluding New England. The budget-cutting priorities are, to put it bluntly, backward. --In the area of agriculture, two overlapping groups are asked to shoulder nearly the entire burden of budget cuts: dairy farmers and young farmers. Sup- ports for milk would he slashed, jeopar- dizing the future of thousands of small farms, while subsidies for other com- modities, like tobacco, would be virtually untouched. Cuts in the Farmers' Home Administration are in farm ownership loans that are needed by any young person who wants, to enter farming, rather than loans for other types of businesses. I think most Vermonters would agree that these priorities need rearranging. --Elimination of Conrail after Fiscal 1982 could have serious consequences to the Northeast unless the lines are picked up by other rail systems. Vermont's Amtrak line. the Montrealer. is not im- mediately endangered, but might be cequired.4 raise fares to the point where. its long term future could be jeopardized. While the President assured us that the school lunch program would not be ended, funding is cut so deeply that many Vermont school systems may have to eliminate their lunch programs. -The 20 percent cut in federal aid to BELGIUM FUND TOURNAMENT--(above) Mike Ackerman presents trophies to Mike Aldrich, Ist place, and Rich Saffo, 2nd place. (below) Ackerman presents trophies to Trish Demers, Ist place, and Michelle Sullivan, 2nd place following the tournament held on Feb. 7 and 8 at the Racquet Shack in Wood- sville. $500 MINIMUM DEPOSIT (EFFECTIVE ANNUAL YIELD 12.94%) The highest rate available anywhere on 2V-year Certificates of Deposit from February 19 through March 4. And we're the only bank in Hanover that can give it to you. dartmouth i00an00g s Hanover & Grantham, N.H. Member FDIC Federal regulations reqmre a sobstlntilll penalty for early withdrawal of time poglts education would shift a greater burden to local property taxes, a tax base which is ah'eady strained. The cuts in vocational education funding would affect basic courses in Vermont, while only en- dangering some of the extra, optional courses that exist in many larger school systems. Overall educational quality could suffer, as well as efforts to serve special groups like the handicapped. - Consolidation of educational funding role block grants is a good idea because there would be fewer federal strings at- tached But the change would pose a special problem for small states like Vermont. The present categorical aid programs have funding "floors", which give us more money per capita because our programs inherently have higher administrative and overhead costs. If these floors are eliminated as part of the consolidation effort, federal aid to Ver- mont will be cut by far more than the 20 percent average. --The CETA cuts are severe. In rural areas like Vermont, where job op- portunities in industry are limited, the impact of wiping out all public service employment programs will he more serious than in the larger metropolitan areas. And at a time when we appear to be approaching a recession, this could magnify the economic jolt. --The Medicaid cuts, at least in Vermont, would not save money, but would shift the burden from general taxpayers to sick middle class citizens. Fewer poor people would be able to pay their medical bills, so hospital and in- surance costs would rise. --The President's method of cutting social programs, like food stamps and unemployment compensation, {viii have a harsher impact here than in other areas, particularly the sunbelt. Most of the cuts are in assistanee to the "working poor," who make up a higher proportion of Vermont's population than in most other states. Also, the present system acknowledges that the cost of living is higher here than in the sunbelt, because of higher shelter and heating costs. The Administration proposal makes no allowance for those higher costs. Despite these very serious specific concerns, the President's budget proposal is an excellent starting point and guideline. Congress should do its best to make budget cuts of the overall magnitude proposed by the President. But there are many rough edges, It is the job of Congress to re-work the proposals to make sure the cuts are distributed in as 'fair and reasonable manner as possible. WIle KNOWS? When did a Noveml)er hurri('ane htst hit the tllaJnland'.  Answer on chlssilit'd page. Legislation discussed at Club THETFORD--State Fish and Rooks who is now covering the well organized and financed (ame Commissioner Edward area since the resignation of and that hunters and fisher- F. Kehoe was the featured Warden Schmidt. Rooks and m2n had best beware. speaker at the annual meeting his wife were guests at the "Gary Moore spoke about the of the Upper Valley Fish and dinner, sahnon commission and the Game Club last Wednesday in Kehoe spoke about the many problems that have developed Thetford Center. Also bills now in the legislature in Massachusetts. Hesaidthat speaking was Gary Moore, that concern hunting and unless the legislationpassesin Fish and Game Board fishing, tte urged the mem- Massachusetts, the joint member and newly appointed bers to contact their management of the atlantic representative to the Con- representatives and let them sahnon by the states along the necticut River Atlantic know their views on the river would be very diffieult. Salmon Commission. various pieces of legislation The club is now making The meeting was held at the that effect them. plans for another active year. elementary school and was He also warned that the It is growing rapidly and preceded by a potluck supper, Friends of Animals and the welcomes new members from and venison feed. The venison Defenders of Wildlife are very all over. was furnished by Warden Gillies named to head panel MONTPELIER--Secretary of State James H. Douglas has announced the appointment of Paul S. Gillies as chairman of the Appeals Panel, the quasi- judicial panel that serves as the first line of appeal for people who are not satisfied with a decision of a licensing lx)ard. ' INSIDE- 0UTSIDE i FREE ESTIMATES!I i 222-4742 Bradford Vt. MID.SEASON SALE 540 .. ORMSBY'S WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY SALI I.A.BRATION I I LAST WEEK Sale Ends Feb, 28th SUPER TAPE SALE 25%0FF Faus Names like TDK & Maxell "maxBII T C TDK {;60 D s2- s 2- Sl- uii] sc98 S7" MAC60 Ule SONY AM/FM Portable with energy-efficient Power Plus and FM Memory Station preset tuning, only so NY Video Blank Tapes & Movies ic il i  6. versatile, Inomlcal -- wilh $20.95 1,750 Beta Tape $14.95 ,,, a touch of listening $16.95 1,500 Beta Tape $12.95 katury...  ). $21.95 Tt2o VilS Tape $13.95 51 1 J8a r, , 'i ....... We have movies available SONY o,.=o.Sem,..,...,.=..,,, v , ':'!1 SONY to tackle light notes or long meres... S , 8.8 1 SAVE SONY S sO ' Tee'miSSalS.8 A trim lake-.ong, thi= ca..e-corder hi flldy SAVESS0.00 ,I SAVE  I '| $ 5 pIONEER AMPS $31.90 av,,,: O-KYO i ...-4wa....s:--o-2-....s PIONEER Cassette Decks s-6'ge: SAVE $ 88 $ 88 cTesO .ee:'*s no.S|  Ssl,.eS 178,.,. = 128,.,.,= c,,,, ,..,,. .,.  S4S O0 OFF" ,,eO UNE FISHER SPEAKER SPECIALS s1280000 s 1---,,, ALBUMS & TAPES , for  THIS O[4JPO ONLY ,a 0 '"''' *o.,.,o,,,,, ,,, SAVE OVER Buy one M$117 fo t$9,  the |aund f' only '10 -- REg. 'IN** : SYSTEM 1 0"' 0" "''" ', " ,""', FISH ER '10-- g. 11 u. MT6117 ,  .-------------' TURNTABLE ,.,,,..,.-,...,..==..  SYSTEM 2 s.,'so ' ,,.,m 9995==  r=h st s., a Hill Ju_-- This system t| Idt ,rou t R STRff25 S Te, InOudtng o  .-   -- MT6H't Pldl;'tng NP/A7 Cartrtci. -  28 Wilts flM$ INK ,, ,. . o.,. ,- .-. -- ="'- "=" SYSTEM 3 ,.=.,. ,,. o..o u= W'run, tot only.:, Sijp 5 wflh Fishet'S SR310 Satrv-$kila Tune,- 3-way Sllakm -- Amplifier, rMId It ,.a add the 27 watts RMS per SAVeOVeRS;2S .,0.,.M 0--.-.,,. f Turn,ibis/Chimer cl, crisp power dth AOC Z31 Ca, lrtdOe lw the Fmu$ -- all this I0 o AR25 2*way Spuk|r $499" ,v,- ,-,,,0 -- iavt'200 -- m wtth ORMSBY'S Etlnded 5-yo Syslom Wmlnty the now 0NKYO CP1010A " " -'-., Iow-m|ssstrtarm m i 61N0THMAINST.,IARI:E476.6644 .,..,-.,..,.......,..,.,,,,,, [ * Over the river {continued from page 4) head of the drill. A mis-stroke f, would crush the hand that turns the drill. "These men are nearly all Cornish miners (from Cor- nwall, England) and have Spent their lives at this business. They work in three shifts of eight hours each... "After looking at the various places where the miners are at work, we start on the ascent, but have not gone far before the captain Orders the 'truck' sent down, and when it arrives we find that it is made specially to ride upon, and we get on, Partly lying down, and with the caution to us to look out for our head and arms. The captain gives the signal to 'hoist away,' and we are !rundled along up the steep and soon reach the "At the mouth of the is the blacksmith shop tere a gang of hands is kept Work day and night shar- sty Penin the drills and repairing d t 0ther-iron work used in the [th Oine, as this business is t ( : terrribly destructive to tools, av ears and machinery, and uses ion UP a vast amount of iron and ibl Steel in the course of a year. lo( The dressing-house the"Upon arriving outside ;to'  Value we meet Capt. R. W. tntJ arrett, who has charge of the ,ext department, where the , ore is weighed, broken up, SOrted and washed by about 115 men and boys. IL E verythmg is arranged to Save labor in handling the re, which moves continually .nhill through the roast il s and furq.ace until it Jllly comes out in a molten ef earn from the mouth of the urnace. h ff Y The roast beds s ,L he space occupied by ae roast beds is about 900 feet I1 o , and a trestle runs over it. ,, e ore is dumped from the 2200 feet below the landing in Copperfield mine. Judging from the white shirts, these men must have been either bosses or visitors. cars onto the beds in piles, over a layer of wood about six inches deep. The wood is set on fire around the edges, and each pile will then burn for two to three months. The sulfur, of which the ore con- tains a large amount, keeps the pile burning, but it emits fumes which one not ac- customed to will get out of as soon as possible after once inhaling. But the men who work here experience no in- convenience from them, and they are not considered in- jurious to the health of the workmen. "Two new desulphurizing ovens have recently been put up upon a new plan, with which they are ex- perimenting, to get rid of the sulphurous acid gas. This gas has killed the trees and vegetation upon the hillsides and valley for a considerable distance around, and not even the Canada thistle can raise its head where the gas strikes the ground. "The company has spent thousands of dollars in trying to get rid of this gas. so that it will do no damage. They have put in a large flue. with pipes from the desulphurizing ovens running into it. which carries the fumes from them to the top of a hill. where a stack 80 feet F on tn of,our winter mereh'andise for MEN, WOMEN AND CHILDREN Woodaviile St. JohnJb.ur) - " :--'-_-'- '-- -2  ...... high has been erected. The smelting works "From the roast beds the ore is wheeled to chutes, dumped into cars and drawn to the smelting works. There are now 24 furnaces, some of which are not yet completed. The ore, coke, and whatever other substances are needed for a 'flux' - which makes the slag run off clean from the ore when melted -- are put into the furnace and the product of this first melting is a 'matte' of about 30 to 35 percent copper. But the sulphur has not all been gotten rid of yet, and this matte is broken up into pieces and taken to desulphurizmg ovens, placed upon wood and set on fire again to eliminate what remains of the sulfur. It stays here burning tor about two weeks. It is then taken to another smaller furnace of different construction, from which they get 'pig' copper of about 95 percent. "The dross or slag from the furnaces is taken off into pits shaped like half an egg set upon wheels and is wheeled out and dumped after it has cooled a little. */ Payroll "This company has in its employ at both mines (Ver- shire and Corinth) about 1000 men. and their monthly payroll amounts to about $20,000." ( to be continued) . Letters  {continued from page 4) road agent who left the roads open. In most cases our roads survived the storm as well if nm better than some slate roads. Those ot you who complained about the road emditions, try to remember at'the back roads were there before you and I moved onto them These conditions occur from time to time and it's something youhave to learn to live with. John Rogers Selectman Warren SERVICES AT ORFORD ORFORD--Ash Wednesday service, will be held at the Orfordville Church March 4 at 7:30 p.m with Rev. Robert Robb as pastor. There will be a short Bible Study after, with Rev. Malcolm Grebe. A TTENTION LOGGERS! Homelite Loggers SPECIAl, Ill Homelite Model 750 24" S.P. Regular $ 708.00 Sale W/Trade $550.00 Homelite Model SXL 925 19" Regular $533.00 Sale $460.00 This Sale Ends Feb. 28, 1981 TRY BEFORE YOU BUYI ROUTE 10, NO. HAVERHILL, N.H. Tel. (603) 787-6981 February 25, 1981-The Journal Opinion-Page 5 , Jeffords report (continued from page 4 ) bracket creep" which has afflicted tax- payers in recent years, a phenomenon which has forced taxpayers to give the government higher percentages of their income even when their wages have not risen in real dollars. The tax incentives for business are a venture rote supply-side economics-a theory which certainly deserves to be tried m light of the failure of more conventional economic theories. At a time when new jobs and econornic im- provement are desperately needed in our part ot the country, we can't afford to reject solutious simply because they are innovative. There is, however, a slrong need for fine- tuning of the President's budget cuts. An examination of individual items in the budget shows that in some cases, Vet- reenters would be required to take on a disproportionate share of the burden. And, even from a national perspective, I believe some of the priorities are misplaced. Some of my initial concerns include the following: -The President's energy budget is skewed heavily toward traditional fuels. The emphasis is on fossil fuels and nuclear power, while the government's role in promoting conservation and renewable resources like solar energy is almost wiped out. This policy is potentially disastrous for oil consuming regions, in- cluding New England. The budget-cutting priorities are, to put it bluntly, backward. --In the area of agriculture, two overlapping groups are asked to shoulder nearly the entire burden of budget cuts: dairy farmers and young farmers. Sup- ports for milk would he slashed, jeopar- dizing the future of thousands of small farms, while subsidies for other com- modities, like tobacco, would be virtually untouched. Cuts in the Farmers' Home Administration are in farm ownership loans that are needed by any young person who wants, to enter farming, rather than loans for other types of businesses. I think most Vermonters would agree that these priorities need rearranging. --Elimination of Conrail after Fiscal 1982 could have serious consequences to the Northeast unless the lines are picked up by other rail systems. Vermont's Amtrak line. the Montrealer. is not im- mediately endangered, but might be cequired.4 raise fares to the point where. its long term future could be jeopardized. While the President assured us that the school lunch program would not be ended, funding is cut so deeply that many Vermont school systems may have to eliminate their lunch programs. -The 20 percent cut in federal aid to BELGIUM FUND TOURNAMENT--(above) Mike Ackerman presents trophies to Mike Aldrich, Ist place, and Rich Saffo, 2nd place. (below) Ackerman presents trophies to Trish Demers, Ist place, and Michelle Sullivan, 2nd place following the tournament held on Feb. 7 and 8 at the Racquet Shack in Wood- sville. $500 MINIMUM DEPOSIT (EFFECTIVE ANNUAL YIELD 12.94%) The highest rate available anywhere on 2V-year Certificates of Deposit from February 19 through March 4. And we're the only bank in Hanover that can give it to you. dartmouth i00an00g s Hanover & Grantham, N.H. Member FDIC Federal regulations reqmre a sobstlntilll penalty for early withdrawal of time poglts education would shift a greater burden to local property taxes, a tax base which is ah'eady strained. The cuts in vocational education funding would affect basic courses in Vermont, while only en- dangering some of the extra, optional courses that exist in many larger school systems. Overall educational quality could suffer, as well as efforts to serve special groups like the handicapped. - Consolidation of educational funding role block grants is a good idea because there would be fewer federal strings at- tached But the change would pose a special problem for small states like Vermont. The present categorical aid programs have funding "floors", which give us more money per capita because our programs inherently have higher administrative and overhead costs. If these floors are eliminated as part of the consolidation effort, federal aid to Ver- mont will be cut by far more than the 20 percent average. --The CETA cuts are severe. In rural areas like Vermont, where job op- portunities in industry are limited, the impact of wiping out all public service employment programs will he more serious than in the larger metropolitan areas. And at a time when we appear to be approaching a recession, this could magnify the economic jolt. --The Medicaid cuts, at least in Vermont, would not save money, but would shift the burden from general taxpayers to sick middle class citizens. Fewer poor people would be able to pay their medical bills, so hospital and in- surance costs would rise. --The President's method of cutting social programs, like food stamps and unemployment compensation, {viii have a harsher impact here than in other areas, particularly the sunbelt. Most of the cuts are in assistanee to the "working poor," who make up a higher proportion of Vermont's population than in most other states. Also, the present system acknowledges that the cost of living is higher here than in the sunbelt, because of higher shelter and heating costs. The Administration proposal makes no allowance for those higher costs. Despite these very serious specific concerns, the President's budget proposal is an excellent starting point and guideline. Congress should do its best to make budget cuts of the overall magnitude proposed by the President. But there are many rough edges, It is the job of Congress to re-work the proposals to make sure the cuts are distributed in as 'fair and reasonable manner as possible. WIle KNOWS? When did a Noveml)er hurri('ane htst hit the tllaJnland'.  Answer on chlssilit'd page. Legislation discussed at Club THETFORD--State Fish and Rooks who is now covering the well organized and financed (ame Commissioner Edward area since the resignation of and that hunters and fisher- F. Kehoe was the featured Warden Schmidt. Rooks and m2n had best beware. speaker at the annual meeting his wife were guests at the "Gary Moore spoke about the of the Upper Valley Fish and dinner, sahnon commission and the Game Club last Wednesday in Kehoe spoke about the many problems that have developed Thetford Center. Also bills now in the legislature in Massachusetts. Hesaidthat speaking was Gary Moore, that concern hunting and unless the legislationpassesin Fish and Game Board fishing, tte urged the mem- Massachusetts, the joint member and newly appointed bers to contact their management of the atlantic representative to the Con- representatives and let them sahnon by the states along the necticut River Atlantic know their views on the river would be very diffieult. Salmon Commission. various pieces of legislation The club is now making The meeting was held at the that effect them. plans for another active year. elementary school and was He also warned that the It is growing rapidly and preceded by a potluck supper, Friends of Animals and the welcomes new members from and venison feed. The venison Defenders of Wildlife are very all over. was furnished by Warden Gillies named to head panel MONTPELIER--Secretary of State James H. Douglas has announced the appointment of Paul S. Gillies as chairman of the Appeals Panel, the quasi- judicial panel that serves as the first line of appeal for people who are not satisfied with a decision of a licensing lx)ard. ' INSIDE- 0UTSIDE i FREE ESTIMATES!I i 222-4742 Bradford Vt. MID.SEASON SALE 540 .. ORMSBY'S WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY SALI I.A.BRATION I I LAST WEEK Sale Ends Feb, 28th SUPER TAPE SALE 25%0FF Faus Names like TDK & Maxell "maxBII T C TDK {;60 D s2- s 2- Sl- uii] sc98 S7" MAC60 Ule SONY AM/FM Portable with energy-efficient Power Plus and FM Memory Station preset tuning, only so NY Video Blank Tapes & Movies ic il i  6. versatile, Inomlcal -- wilh $20.95 1,750 Beta Tape $14.95 ,,, a touch of listening $16.95 1,500 Beta Tape $12.95 katury...  ). $21.95 Tt2o VilS Tape $13.95 51 1 J8a r, , 'i ....... We have movies available SONY o,.=o.Sem,..,...,.=..,,, v , ':'!1 SONY to tackle light notes or long meres... S , 8.8 1 SAVE SONY S sO ' Tee'miSSalS.8 A trim lake-.ong, thi= ca..e-corder hi flldy SAVESS0.00 ,I SAVE  I '| $ 5 pIONEER AMPS $31.90 av,,,: O-KYO i ...-4wa....s:--o-2-....s PIONEER Cassette Decks s-6'ge: SAVE $ 88 $ 88 cTesO .ee:'*s no.S|  Ssl,.eS 178,.,. = 128,.,.,= c,,,, ,..,,. .,.  S4S O0 OFF" ,,eO UNE FISHER SPEAKER SPECIALS s1280000 s 1---,,, ALBUMS & TAPES , for  THIS O[4JPO ONLY ,a 0 '"''' *o.,.,o,,,,, ,,, SAVE OVER Buy one M$117 fo t$9,  the |aund f' only '10 -- REg. 'IN** : SYSTEM 1 0"' 0" "''" ', " ,""', FISH ER '10-- g. 11 u. MT6117 ,  .-------------' TURNTABLE ,.,,,..,.-,...,..==..  SYSTEM 2 s.,'so ' ,,.,m 9995==  r=h st s., a Hill Ju_-- This system t| Idt ,rou t R STRff25 S Te, InOudtng o  .-   -- MT6H't Pldl;'tng NP/A7 Cartrtci. -  28 Wilts flM$ INK ,, ,. . o.,. ,- .-. -- ="'- "=" SYSTEM 3 ,.=.,. ,,. o..o u= W'run, tot only.:, Sijp 5 wflh Fishet'S SR310 Satrv-$kila Tune,- 3-way Sllakm -- Amplifier, rMId It ,.a add the 27 watts RMS per SAVeOVeRS;2S .,0.,.M 0--.-.,,. f Turn,ibis/Chimer cl, crisp power dth AOC Z31 Ca, lrtdOe lw the Fmu$ -- all this I0 o AR25 2*way Spuk|r $499" ,v,- ,-,,,0 -- iavt'200 -- m wtth ORMSBY'S Etlnded 5-yo Syslom Wmlnty the now 0NKYO CP1010A " " -'-., Iow-m|ssstrtarm m i 61N0THMAINST.,IARI:E476.6644 .,..,-.,..,.......,..,.,,,,,,