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February 25, 1981     Journal Opinion
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February 25, 1981
 

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Page 8-The Journal Opinion-February 25, 1981 + [Sports .+ Olympians not represented in Class I playdown action BRADFORD-For the first their next two games of the time in Oxbow High school's season for playdown action. history the boy's basketball Wednesday there is a home team will not be represented game with St. Johnsbury (19- in Class I ptaydown action. 11 who defeated Oxbow earlier By virtue of their latest loss, in the season, 100-71, and the 75-65, to U-32. the Olympians season finale at BFA Fairfax can put their sneakers and on Friday, sporting a 14-6 uniforms away for another record. Complete details will year. The loss to U-32 was the appear in next week's Journal fourth straight defeat for the Opinion. ()lympians and they must win on BMU - OXBOW 4 WOO DSV I LLE- LI SBON OFF BASKETBALL GAMES  --Cv--- -_.  , J ....... COME IN TOSEEOUR TRAIL and ROAD , ,, i, Oxbow girls competing r Class I champion FIGHTING FOR REBOUNI)--Senor forward Pare Cook (25) Oxbow, fighting for offensive rebound with June Charbonneau of Vcrgennes during (;lass I playdown action at Oxbow last Saturday. Oxbow won the contest 48-46. Woodsville High School The Engineers by RICK McKEAN Woodsy[lie in playoffs Mike Aldrich 13. Robert Barry and Mike Slavlml with 4 each and Ron Magoon and Dave Patten with 2 each. On Friday the boys finished off their season by defeating Mascoma, 89-47, The victory gave the Engineers a 14-4 record and moved them into third place. assuring them of a by in the firsl, playoff roun(i. On the season. Woodsville outscored their opponents by a 1.413-1.012 margin. Perry Davidson led the season's scoring with 270 points, followed by don Mellin 254. ) Mike t ompmn 221, Mike Aldrich 17l. Mike Slayton 160, Dave Patten 116, Robert Barry 78. Shawn McKean and Jim Kinder 42 each. Ron Magoon 34 Paul Woods 10. Laurence Shute 7. Troy Dodge 5, and Dave MacGilvery with 2 points. They now will prepare for playoff action in March lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllk mm .j MOTORCYCLES +,,o tl rotmd plo)off action against F Newmarket, 46-32. The Engineer offense had trouble O - and. could only make one field goal in the first half and only scored l I points. In the third period Wood sville was hot and closed the gap to 4 points, only to lose it in th fourth period, and went home with a 46-32 loss. Congratulations to all the players and Coach Diana Walker on a fine season. Meanwhile the Enginr boys finished off the season in terrific style. They started off by doing a job on Littleton. The Engineers took control right from the start and never looked back in taking a 79-55 victory. don Mellin led the scoring in this game with 20 points, followed by Perry Davidson. 18 points, Mike Pomp[an. 16. RT 10 HAVERHILL, N.H. PHONE 989-3329 Dulmble Jeep CJ. AMERICA'S ORIGINAL GO ANYWHERE, 4WD FU N MACHI =,++0+. : B ST DEALS OF THE deep. YEAR! We wrote the book on 4-wheel ddve. COME IN TO HEAR OUR STORY McNAMARA MOTORS, Inc. : Your Local AMC Dealer Since 1946 80 Main Street, West Lebanon 298-8737 - BI{ADFORI)--One down and just two to go. Only two games are between the Oxbow girls and a Class I Championship by virtue of Saturday's win over the Vergennes Commodores, 48-46 at Oxbow High School, in Class I playdown action. The favored Olympians led throughout the game but nearly squandered a 15-point lead during the final 10 minutes, posting their 16th win of the year against 5 losses. Leading the Olympians to the win were Karin Dwyer, playing a steady all-around game and scoring 13 points. Kathy Peterson, playing less than three quarters because of foul trouble, chipped in 12 points, and was instrumental in building up the 15-point lead I in the third period. Jody Pratt, the third Olympian in double figures with 12 points, was a menace under the defensive boards, hauling down 12 rebounds and blocking a half a dozen shots. Mona Garone, Olympian coach, considered the game a "survival, not a victory+ It was good to win this one. We played hard, intense basketball but the turnovers nearly killed us," she said. Although Oxbow has averaged nearly 30 turnovers a game, it is hard to win many games with a total of 37 miscues. Oxbow jumped into a quick 6-1 lead and was never headed, even though at times during the contest it looked like they were trying to give the game back to the Com- modores. Junior standout centeroKarin Dwyer opened the game with a basket off glass and Marsha Carbee stole the ball at mid-court, scoring on a driving iayup for a 4-0 lead with a minute and half gone in the quarter. Down 9-3, Vergemles fought back. forcing four quick turnovers with a persistent full court press and tied the game 10-10 with 1:35 renmining. Jody Pratt then connected on the second of four field goals and Pam tlmnphrey canned two foul shots at the :33 second mark, building the lead back to four at the end of the quarter, 14-10. Another small lead, 19-12, couldn't be held as the Commodores kept themselves in the game with three unanswered baskets midway through lhe second quarter. The outside shooting of Joanne Turpin pulled Vergennes within one, 21-20, before Pam Cook closed out the scoring in the half with a turnaround jumper, pulling Oxbow ahead 23-20. Oxbnw fans cheered loud and long for their local team as the Olympians built up a 41- 26 lead with 1:05 remaining in the third period Starring in the point run was Kathy Peterson. but had a strong supporting cast of characters in Jody Pratt and Karin Dwyer. Returning to action the first lime since the final minute of the first quarter, Peterson made her presence felt im- mediately. After Jody Pratt popped in a nice. two-pointer from a feed from Karin ) Dwyer. teterson went to work. Three long field goals from 20 feet in less than a minute and a half widened the Olympian lead to nine, 31-22. Jody Pratt. not to be outdone, sank a field goal and a pair of free throws, then Peterson hit again, extending the lead to 37-23 Peterson and Dwyer took turns missing shots, but came right back, each sinking one, between a field goal and free throw by Vergennes, putting Oxbow in front 41-26. Vergennes wouldn't quit, They oulscored Oxbow 8-1 during the final two minutes of play, pulling within eight, 42-34 with one quarter to go. 'The threesome of Dvyer, Pratt and Peterson accounted for all of Oxbow's fourth quarter points, all in the first Junior High Tournament ? BI,UE MOUNTAIN UNION--Division "B" Boys ('hampions. tiAVEI{lllI,I, JUNIOll lllGlt--Division Champions. ST. JOllNSBUl{Y--Division "A" Girls Champions. OXBOW--Division "A" +, tl ALLTOURNEY--Division A Girls. MOST VAI,UABLE PLAYER--Leslie Dunnells, Jr. is presented MVP trophy by Mickey Poll[ at the Junior Itigh School Basketball Tournament. Thoughts on the ut-of-Doors by Gary W. Moore Salmon experts meet in Brattleboro The big guns of fish and game in New England Feb. 10 at the Howard Johnson Restaurant in They call themselves the Policy and Technical Members for Fisheries Management of the River Basin. In reality they are the people return of the atlantic salmon. The policy committee is made up of the heads of departments in New England and the federal fish wildlife people. Ed Kehoe of Vermont, Charles Barry Hampshire, and Richard Cronin of Massachusetts members and all head the fish and game their respective states. Also on the committee is Jones who is chief of fisheries and represents the commissioner. The feds are represented on the committee by Charles Maloy, U.S. Fish and director and by Robert Hinges, from the National Fisheries. The technical committee is made up primarily of from the states involved and from the federal There were twenty-five at the meeting and most have working on the restoration of salmon for a long time. The total knowledge of fisheries represented by the committees is mind boggling. I was privileged to session and I must say that I was impressed. When and if Massachusetts passes the legislation and joins the Connecticut River Atlantic Commission as the states of Vermont, New ttampshire Connecticut have done the framework for regulating taking of the salmon which the two committees have so hard for will be complete. I say if, because there is in Massachusetts that is very vocal and working "A" Boys scut tie the legislation. At the Feb. meeting of the Vermont Federation Sportsmen's Clubs, Victor Anop representing Massachusetts Sportsmen's Council argued that New ttampshire and Connecticut should reconsider. meeting was often heated as Vermont sportsmen worked hard in support of the salmon and of the commission. The concept has been in the works since 1966 and changes have been made, but things seemed to go , : smoothly. It seems ironic that those who remained long suddenly become vocal when we are so Dave Egan, president of the Connecticut S Alliance and that state's member on the that the Massachusetts Council had distorted the bill. Kehoe agreed and asked why the group took so long make its feelings known. : : I don't think Anop changed his mind. but he must have go  [i' back home knowing just where he stood in Vermont. At the Brattleboro meeting the status of the Massachusetts and Anop's group were discussed. Many frustrated that the opposition seemed so misinfm read the legislation in its entirety and also Anop's 30 point,' clisagreement and I must agree with most of lhose s at both meetings about his attempt to prevent passage "nitpieking." The concerns he expresses are most seem silly to say the least. I am left wondering what real motives are. Much of what transpired at the Brattleboro meetin bit too technical to make good reading. Each state and feds reported on the status of the salmon eggs taken in The reports and numbers are very significant but do much meaning for the average angler like myself. Also discussed was the proposed trucking and trapping adult salmon this year. Another topic was the facilities in Connecticut and the status of the Fish al Wjldlffe Se, l:vicea,soarch for another site. They two presently. The topic I found most interesting was a bit different as i affects the Connecticut River indirectly. Four prmctpals New England Fish Farming Enterprises were about their operation and how they hope to operate. The group has a hatchery in Bristol, New Ham where it hopes to raise salmon for the commercial They propose to hatch the fish in Bristol and raise them smolt stage when they would be transferred to salt .pens along the coast where they would be raised to vestable sizes. The reason that they were at the meeting is salmon eggs which the states and feds have. the public would be the return of 40 per cent of t restoration programs. The commercial operation has developed technology they have used in Scotland and Norway that allows for growth of the salmon in cold water. The technology would a boon to the New England states as the high cost of has made heating water in rearing tanks a significant drance to providing  necessary numbers of salmon. ivil The trade, if appro ed by all parties, could have long te ,r advantages for the fishermen. r Winnsaukee Derby unsful Despite severely deteriorating ce conditions and very  etS, weather the Great Winnipesaukee Fishing Derby turm:d 0L ,, to be quite successful. Over 120 fish were entered for the .ty] urll day event with the biggest, an eight pound lake trout wirmt" $150. + T The big money was reserved for tagged trout of which ,I __ one was taken. Four tagged trout were taken previous to t.__ derby and were thus ineligible and one was taken that tagged for last year s derby.  One lucky angler took a cusk that was just a pound u the state record. ' (please turn to page 3) JUST ARRIVED THE 1981 ] T ...... : l?' I The Gunsmoke ... heated & open for inspection ... 14x69 WOODBURNING STOVE. DELUXE DECOR $1000 OFF ON Exclusively Offered Mon.-Sat., 9-5 )UR 4 REMAINING Evenings by appt. I.q80 MODELS By... Benton Road Mobile Homes Formerly of N. Haverhill Financing Available Ends of Sykes Ave. 802-295-7104 White River JoL WINNIPESAuKEE DERBY---Only part of catch taken from the lake last Saturday. The Rotary Club did a good job under trying all those I spoke with were happy despite the weather. were 1583 entrants who were competing for the There was open water along much of the made it difficult to reach the solid ice. Several vehicles through, but luckily no people drowned. I took p ducks swimming in the open water near shore, an sight this time of year. My wife and I went down to Meredith Saturda detour as the road from Plymouth to Holderness was due to flooding. The Baker and Pemigewasset Rivers raging torrents as were most streams in Vermont and Hampshire. Dangerous ice With the continued warm weather and rain over the two weeks the ice on mot lakes has become There is open water around the edges of many lakeS anglers are having trouble getting their bobhouses off the Those who placed the shantys near springs or stream are in deep trouble. ttopefully we will have some cold weather that will al freeze the lakes and allow for the safe removal of I well remember two years ago whenI had to use hi and a life jacket to get to my shanty on Harve) Dragging a bobhouse off under those conditions is no furl. Page 8-The Journal Opinion-February 25, 1981 + [Sports .+ Olympians not represented in Class I playdown action BRADFORD-For the first their next two games of the time in Oxbow High school's season for playdown action. history the boy's basketball Wednesday there is a home team will not be represented game with St. Johnsbury (19- in Class I ptaydown action. 11 who defeated Oxbow earlier By virtue of their latest loss, in the season, 100-71, and the 75-65, to U-32. the Olympians season finale at BFA Fairfax can put their sneakers and on Friday, sporting a 14-6 uniforms away for another record. Complete details will year. The loss to U-32 was the appear in next week's Journal fourth straight defeat for the Opinion. ()lympians and they must win on BMU - OXBOW 4 WOO DSV I LLE- LI SBON OFF BASKETBALL GAMES  --Cv--- -_.  , J ....... COME IN TOSEEOUR TRAIL and ROAD , ,, i, Oxbow girls competing r Class I champion FIGHTING FOR REBOUNI)--Senor forward Pare Cook (25) Oxbow, fighting for offensive rebound with June Charbonneau of Vcrgennes during (;lass I playdown action at Oxbow last Saturday. Oxbow won the contest 48-46. Woodsville High School The Engineers by RICK McKEAN Woodsy[lie in playoffs Mike Aldrich 13. Robert Barry and Mike Slavlml with 4 each and Ron Magoon and Dave Patten with 2 each. On Friday the boys finished off their season by defeating Mascoma, 89-47, The victory gave the Engineers a 14-4 record and moved them into third place. assuring them of a by in the firsl, playoff roun(i. On the season. Woodsville outscored their opponents by a 1.413-1.012 margin. Perry Davidson led the season's scoring with 270 points, followed by don Mellin 254. ) Mike t ompmn 221, Mike Aldrich 17l. Mike Slayton 160, Dave Patten 116, Robert Barry 78. Shawn McKean and Jim Kinder 42 each. Ron Magoon 34 Paul Woods 10. Laurence Shute 7. Troy Dodge 5, and Dave MacGilvery with 2 points. They now will prepare for playoff action in March lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllk mm .j MOTORCYCLES +,,o tl rotmd plo)off action against F Newmarket, 46-32. The Engineer offense had trouble O - and. could only make one field goal in the first half and only scored l I points. In the third period Wood sville was hot and closed the gap to 4 points, only to lose it in th fourth period, and went home with a 46-32 loss. Congratulations to all the players and Coach Diana Walker on a fine season. Meanwhile the Enginr boys finished off the season in terrific style. They started off by doing a job on Littleton. The Engineers took control right from the start and never looked back in taking a 79-55 victory. don Mellin led the scoring in this game with 20 points, followed by Perry Davidson. 18 points, Mike Pomp[an. 16. RT 10 HAVERHILL, N.H. PHONE 989-3329 Dulmble Jeep CJ. AMERICA'S ORIGINAL GO ANYWHERE, 4WD FU N MACHI =,++0+. : B ST DEALS OF THE deep. YEAR! We wrote the book on 4-wheel ddve. COME IN TO HEAR OUR STORY McNAMARA MOTORS, Inc. : Your Local AMC Dealer Since 1946 80 Main Street, West Lebanon 298-8737 - BI{ADFORI)--One down and just two to go. Only two games are between the Oxbow girls and a Class I Championship by virtue of Saturday's win over the Vergennes Commodores, 48-46 at Oxbow High School, in Class I playdown action. The favored Olympians led throughout the game but nearly squandered a 15-point lead during the final 10 minutes, posting their 16th win of the year against 5 losses. Leading the Olympians to the win were Karin Dwyer, playing a steady all-around game and scoring 13 points. Kathy Peterson, playing less than three quarters because of foul trouble, chipped in 12 points, and was instrumental in building up the 15-point lead I in the third period. Jody Pratt, the third Olympian in double figures with 12 points, was a menace under the defensive boards, hauling down 12 rebounds and blocking a half a dozen shots. Mona Garone, Olympian coach, considered the game a "survival, not a victory+ It was good to win this one. We played hard, intense basketball but the turnovers nearly killed us," she said. Although Oxbow has averaged nearly 30 turnovers a game, it is hard to win many games with a total of 37 miscues. Oxbow jumped into a quick 6-1 lead and was never headed, even though at times during the contest it looked like they were trying to give the game back to the Com- modores. Junior standout centeroKarin Dwyer opened the game with a basket off glass and Marsha Carbee stole the ball at mid-court, scoring on a driving iayup for a 4-0 lead with a minute and half gone in the quarter. Down 9-3, Vergemles fought back. forcing four quick turnovers with a persistent full court press and tied the game 10-10 with 1:35 renmining. Jody Pratt then connected on the second of four field goals and Pam tlmnphrey canned two foul shots at the :33 second mark, building the lead back to four at the end of the quarter, 14-10. Another small lead, 19-12, couldn't be held as the Commodores kept themselves in the game with three unanswered baskets midway through lhe second quarter. The outside shooting of Joanne Turpin pulled Vergennes within one, 21-20, before Pam Cook closed out the scoring in the half with a turnaround jumper, pulling Oxbow ahead 23-20. Oxbnw fans cheered loud and long for their local team as the Olympians built up a 41- 26 lead with 1:05 remaining in the third period Starring in the point run was Kathy Peterson. but had a strong supporting cast of characters in Jody Pratt and Karin Dwyer. Returning to action the first lime since the final minute of the first quarter, Peterson made her presence felt im- mediately. After Jody Pratt popped in a nice. two-pointer from a feed from Karin ) Dwyer. teterson went to work. Three long field goals from 20 feet in less than a minute and a half widened the Olympian lead to nine, 31-22. Jody Pratt. not to be outdone, sank a field goal and a pair of free throws, then Peterson hit again, extending the lead to 37-23 Peterson and Dwyer took turns missing shots, but came right back, each sinking one, between a field goal and free throw by Vergennes, putting Oxbow in front 41-26. Vergennes wouldn't quit, They oulscored Oxbow 8-1 during the final two minutes of play, pulling within eight, 42-34 with one quarter to go. 'The threesome of Dvyer, Pratt and Peterson accounted for all of Oxbow's fourth quarter points, all in the first Junior High Tournament ? BI,UE MOUNTAIN UNION--Division "B" Boys ('hampions. tiAVEI{lllI,I, JUNIOll lllGlt--Division Champions. ST. JOllNSBUl{Y--Division "A" Girls Champions. OXBOW--Division "A" +, tl ALLTOURNEY--Division A Girls. MOST VAI,UABLE PLAYER--Leslie Dunnells, Jr. is presented MVP trophy by Mickey Poll[ at the Junior Itigh School Basketball Tournament. Thoughts on the ut-of-Doors by Gary W. Moore Salmon experts meet in Brattleboro The big guns of fish and game in New England Feb. 10 at the Howard Johnson Restaurant in They call themselves the Policy and Technical Members for Fisheries Management of the River Basin. In reality they are the people return of the atlantic salmon. The policy committee is made up of the heads of departments in New England and the federal fish wildlife people. Ed Kehoe of Vermont, Charles Barry Hampshire, and Richard Cronin of Massachusetts members and all head the fish and game their respective states. Also on the committee is Jones who is chief of fisheries and represents the commissioner. The feds are represented on the committee by Charles Maloy, U.S. Fish and director and by Robert Hinges, from the National Fisheries. The technical committee is made up primarily of from the states involved and from the federal There were twenty-five at the meeting and most have working on the restoration of salmon for a long time. The total knowledge of fisheries represented by the committees is mind boggling. I was privileged to session and I must say that I was impressed. When and if Massachusetts passes the legislation and joins the Connecticut River Atlantic Commission as the states of Vermont, New ttampshire Connecticut have done the framework for regulating taking of the salmon which the two committees have so hard for will be complete. I say if, because there is in Massachusetts that is very vocal and working "A" Boys scut tie the legislation. At the Feb. meeting of the Vermont Federation Sportsmen's Clubs, Victor Anop representing Massachusetts Sportsmen's Council argued that New ttampshire and Connecticut should reconsider. meeting was often heated as Vermont sportsmen worked hard in support of the salmon and of the commission. The concept has been in the works since 1966 and changes have been made, but things seemed to go , : smoothly. It seems ironic that those who remained long suddenly become vocal when we are so Dave Egan, president of the Connecticut S Alliance and that state's member on the that the Massachusetts Council had distorted the bill. Kehoe agreed and asked why the group took so long make its feelings known. : : I don't think Anop changed his mind. but he must have go  [i' back home knowing just where he stood in Vermont. At the Brattleboro meeting the status of the Massachusetts and Anop's group were discussed. Many frustrated that the opposition seemed so misinfm read the legislation in its entirety and also Anop's 30 point,' clisagreement and I must agree with most of lhose s at both meetings about his attempt to prevent passage "nitpieking." The concerns he expresses are most seem silly to say the least. I am left wondering what real motives are. Much of what transpired at the Brattleboro meetin bit too technical to make good reading. Each state and feds reported on the status of the salmon eggs taken in The reports and numbers are very significant but do much meaning for the average angler like myself. Also discussed was the proposed trucking and trapping adult salmon this year. Another topic was the facilities in Connecticut and the status of the Fish al Wjldlffe Se, l:vicea,soarch for another site. They two presently. The topic I found most interesting was a bit different as i affects the Connecticut River indirectly. Four prmctpals New England Fish Farming Enterprises were about their operation and how they hope to operate. The group has a hatchery in Bristol, New Ham where it hopes to raise salmon for the commercial They propose to hatch the fish in Bristol and raise them smolt stage when they would be transferred to salt .pens along the coast where they would be raised to vestable sizes. The reason that they were at the meeting is salmon eggs which the states and feds have. the public would be the return of 40 per cent of t restoration programs. The commercial operation has developed technology they have used in Scotland and Norway that allows for growth of the salmon in cold water. The technology would a boon to the New England states as the high cost of has made heating water in rearing tanks a significant drance to providing  necessary numbers of salmon. ivil The trade, if appro ed by all parties, could have long te ,r advantages for the fishermen. r Winnsaukee Derby unsful Despite severely deteriorating ce conditions and very  etS, weather the Great Winnipesaukee Fishing Derby turm:d 0L ,, to be quite successful. Over 120 fish were entered for the .ty] urll day event with the biggest, an eight pound lake trout wirmt" $150. + T The big money was reserved for tagged trout of which ,I __ one was taken. Four tagged trout were taken previous to t.__ derby and were thus ineligible and one was taken that tagged for last year s derby.  One lucky angler took a cusk that was just a pound u the state record. ' (please turn to page 3) JUST ARRIVED THE 1981 ] T ...... : l?' I The Gunsmoke ... heated & open for inspection ... 14x69 WOODBURNING STOVE. DELUXE DECOR $1000 OFF ON Exclusively Offered Mon.-Sat., 9-5 )UR 4 REMAINING Evenings by appt. I.q80 MODELS By... Benton Road Mobile Homes Formerly of N. Haverhill Financing Available Ends of Sykes Ave. 802-295-7104 White River JoL WINNIPESAuKEE DERBY---Only part of catch taken from the lake last Saturday. The Rotary Club did a good job under trying all those I spoke with were happy despite the weather. were 1583 entrants who were competing for the There was open water along much of the made it difficult to reach the solid ice. Several vehicles through, but luckily no people drowned. I took p ducks swimming in the open water near shore, an sight this time of year. My wife and I went down to Meredith Saturda detour as the road from Plymouth to Holderness was due to flooding. The Baker and Pemigewasset Rivers raging torrents as were most streams in Vermont and Hampshire. Dangerous ice With the continued warm weather and rain over the two weeks the ice on mot lakes has become There is open water around the edges of many lakeS anglers are having trouble getting their bobhouses off the Those who placed the shantys near springs or stream are in deep trouble. ttopefully we will have some cold weather that will al freeze the lakes and allow for the safe removal of I well remember two years ago whenI had to use hi and a life jacket to get to my shanty on Harve) Dragging a bobhouse off under those conditions is no furl.