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Bradford , Vermont
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March 3, 1982     Journal Opinion
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March 3, 1982
 

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SiT NANPSNIII tyme Orford Phtrmont Hoverhdl Woodsvdle Both VIlIMONT Thet ford Fotrlee West Forlee Orodford Corinth Topthom Newbury Wills River lyegote Groton 25&apos; USp 598340 Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont March3,1982 > !> +,,  Town meeting in Newbury attracted Tuesday. Bradford Academy Building Bradford- BRADFORD-- Bradford taxpayers are looking at a 6.6 percent increase in their town's general fund budget and a 19 percent increase in their highway budget after town meeting held Tuesday at the Bradford Academy Building. This year's Bradford general fund will total $205,450 as compared with $178,438.50 last year. The town's highway fund now stands at $98,150 as compared with $93,250 last year. As a result of Tuesday's vote, this year, the Town of Bradford will raise $132,000 in taxes for their general fund and $57,500 for their highway fund. This represents a total increase of $51,500 over last year, according to town budget figures. The general and highway budgets passed after town- speople questioned the town selectmen on the major budget increases; par- ticularly on $19,246 the selectmen overspent on their budget last year. Selectman P. Charles Brainerd told the roughly 125 townspeople in attendance that the overexpenditure was mainly due to a decision to complete repairs on a section of road on Roger's Hill rather (please turn to page 8) VERMONT MEET3NGS Thetford THETFORD-- Thetford voters met Monday night where they approved a combined $,342,938 town and highway budget and a $1,059,896.99 school budget for the 1982 year at their annual town meeting. This year's town budget, according to Thetford's town report, decreased by 23 percent due to a note on a firetruck that has been at least partially paid off. This year's highway budget is 7.1 percent higher than last year's budget. At the meeting, Thefford voters voted to raise $136,827 for the highway portion of the town's tax -- a 1.6 percent increase. They also approved a $72,595 tax for the town's general fund -- an increase of 18.3 percent over last year. The town and highway budgets passed relatively easily with the addition of only one amendment calling for the town to drop its five cent warrant fee (usually awarded to the town's tr4msurer) regarding delinquent taxes. School Tax Most of the major debate at the meeting centered around the school's budget of $1,059,896.99 and its effect on the taxpayers in Thetford. According to budget figures in the townreport, this year's (please turn to page 8) Fairlee by ESTHER JOHNSON FAIRLEE-- Approximately 100 residents gathered at the Fairlee Town Hall to vote on articles dealing with the town. They approved a budget of $160,573. The amount to he raised this year is $104,290 of which $64,990 is for town ex- penses and $59,300 is to be raised for highway expenses. Voters also appropriated the following amounts of money: -- $1,237 for support of the Community Health Service. -- $2,888 for support of the Upper Valley Regional Emergency Ambulance Service. -- $773 for support of the Orange County Senior Center. The voters also approved a resolution authorizing the town treasurer to collect current and future income from the logging operation in the town forest. These funds would be invested in a separate account and would be applied to capital ex- penditures only after they-are approved by the voters at an annual or special meeting. The selectmen were then authorized to use $2,000 from the logging fund to: a) per- manent marking of the town forest boundaries ($1,000), b) construction work on the Brushwood Road ($1,000). By a 49 to 12 margin, (please turn to page 8) Corinth CORINTH-- Voters in the Town of Corinth have decided not to elect a road com- missioner for this year and have okayed a town budget that is less expensive than last year. But, the town's tax rate could increase because of increases in the Union No. 36 School District budget. Whether or not the town's tax rate will increase or decrease will hinge on the passage of state aid to education bill currently awaiting final approval in the legislature. This year's town budget stands at $113,756 compared to a budget of $133,700 last year. This year's school budget stands at $297,739 as com- pared to $268,383 last year. The amount the town has voted to raise this year in taxes is $411,497 as compared to $402,083 last year. According to town clerk Jack I.armonth, this year's projected tax rate in the town will be about $4.81 per $100 of assessed property value. But, says Learmonth, passage of the state education aid bill in the state legislature will mean a drop of the town's projected tax rate to around $4.33. Last year's tax rate was set at $4.42. (please turn to page 4 ) Topsham TOPSHAM-- Voters in the Town of Topsham this year have approved an article to raise $64,500 in town taxes this year at their annual town meeting held on Tuesday. No 1982 total budget figures were made available, but last year's figure for the amount to be raised in taxes for the town was set at $60,300, according to Town Clerk Ruth Morrison. Among the major issues decided by voters at the meeting were appropriations Newbu00. by L.F. BARNES NEWBURY-- Over 140 townspeople gathered for the 1982 Town Meeting. In ad- dition to the annual items of hearing town reports and budget determination, they voted to "appropriate a sum of money not to exceed $6000 from the Newbury Town History Publishing Fund for publication of the Newbury Town Historical Districts Nomination, with proceeds from sales being returned to for various area agencies and the fund." the dismissal by voters at the This publication would meeting of an article calling include photographs and for a mutual United States - descriptions of the 160 plus Soviet Union nuclear arms buildings included in freeze. Among the agenda items said to have received con- siderable debate in Topsham were an appropriation of $1.00 per Topsham resident to go toward the Barre Ambulance Service; an $1143 ap- propria tion'for Orange County Mental Health; a $767 ap- propriation for the Bradford Senior Center; and a $1.60 per resident appropriation for Community Health Services. Newbury's nomination to the National Registry of Historic Places. This includes properties grouped into six districts: S. Newbury, W. Newbury, Wells River Village, Newbury Village, Bailey District (of Newbury Village), and Oxbow District (of Newbury Village). When questioned whether this book would he a town history, Signa Carbee said "It is clearly within the original Town Elections concept of the Town History Officers elected at Publishing Fund." Proceeds Tuesday's Topsham meeting from the sale of these volumes were as follows: Moderator, at $15 each would replenish ,H.B. Otterman Jr.; Town the publishing fund. +Clerk, Ruth Morrison; An article was included in (please turn to page 8) (please turn to page 4) Ryegate by NANCY PERKINS RYEGATE-- In a town meeting which lasted a little over three hours, Ryegate voters approved a budget of $603,234. This figure included a $750 allocation for Northeast Kingdom Mental Health Agency, the result of an amendment proposed by Carl Bayer. Bayer pointed out that 14 persons from the town, 13 of whom were children, were served by that agency during FY 1981. "It's a community service," he said, "available to anyone in Caledonia, Essex and Orleans County." The amendment was passed on a voice vote, as was the amended budget.. Two articles which stimulated a goodly amount of discussion concerned businesses, both those currently in operation within the town and any which might locate here in the future. The first dealt with authorizing the selectmen to enter into con- tract with existing or new owners for the purpose of fixing and maintaining a tax rate. BruEe Beauvais spoke in favor of the article saying, "as a member of the zoning commission, if a big business were interested in coming into town, I feel the selectmen should have some leverage in (please turn to page 8) Voters take a break at their lengthy :Which they decided Z9 articles. Town offices in Ryegate, Vt. 'BRADFORD-- A dispute over the reclassification of Town Road No. 29 from a class three to a class four road has ended with the Bradford selectmen agreeing to rescind their previous vote to reclassify the road. The dispute has apparently ended resulting from an agreement settled on by lawyers representing the town and Howard Pierpont, a property owner with land bordering the disputed road. The selectmen voted at their meeting last Thursday to rescind their Jan. 17 move to reclassify Town Road No. 29. Following the selectmen's vote on Jan. 17, Pierpont had instructed his attorney, William Donahue, of Brad- ford, to seek a court injunction blocking reclassification of the road. The selectmen rescinded their decision to reclassify the road after being assured by their attorney, John Hughes, of Norwich, that if they did, Pierpont would drop his suit against them. Reclassification The selectmen's original decision to reclassify the road was not so much a change in maintenance procedure as a move to "update" the current Selectmen rescind their vote Budget issues and reappraisal to reclassify town road 29 up for vote in Haverhill Articles announced .for town meetin00 status of e road, say town officials. Town Road No. 29 runs from W. Fairlee to Corinth and cuts across a tiny corner of Bradford near its south- western boundaries. Under Vermont law, class four roads are looked upon as "seasonal" and year-round maintenance of class four roads is not required. Pierpont, who selectmen say is not a year-round resident, owns land bordering the Bradford section of the road. But the house he owns on the land is actually in the Town of Corinth, according to Bradford aerial maps. Town administrator Susan Spaulding said that the Corinth Highway Department plows the road from Corinth and even slightly into the Bradford section of the road in order to turn around. The selectmen-- John Gibbs, Charles Bralnerd and Leonard Dobbins-- had originally decided to reclassify the road with the idea of officially justifying a cost savings that would come with not being required to maintain the road on a year- round basis. Town Plan The selectmen spent much compete .f00,r Wentworth offices N which is being sought by Ed Wentworth, is an operating Plymouth Area High School. Wentworth Cheney, Steven Davis, and room technician at Sceva He attended Boston Technical Speare Memorial Hospital. He School majoring in elec- is a graduate of the New tronics. He is employed by the Hampshire School of Police Standards and Training. In regard to the election he says, "I am proud of my town and I love it. I'd like to help it in any way I can." Steven Davis, born in Rumney, is a graduate of Split Ball-bearing plant in Lebanon. He is a volunteer fireman here. Married to the former Paula King, he is the father of two boys. He calls himself a "conservative Republican." Young Candidate Michael Johnson has lived here since 1971. He was graduated from Wentworth Elementary School, attended Plymouth Area High and graduated from Holderuess School for Boys. He spent a year and a half at Boston University. Leaving school to enter business, he became the co- founder and co-owner of Bellegraphics specializing in quality control and sales. Johnson was co-traaslator of Hoyt's History of Wentworth. He has been active in the Historical Society and on the Bicentennial Committee. He says, "Because I am young (please turn to page 8) more spirited Michael Johnson. Robert SChool board Blodgett has filed again for r than it has Road Agent as have Robert years. Three Farnsworth and Paul King. are open and Ed Cheney has filed for both on the school selectman and police chief. Clinton Hutchins is trying for both the Police Chief and Fire as a Commissioner positions. opened a slot Cheney, a resident of S. T. King Michael Johnson Clint Hutchins < of their Thursday meeting reviewing the proposed new Bradford Town Plan as prepared by the town's planning commission and the Two Rivers-Ottaquechee Regional Planning Com- mission. The new plan has been in the development stages for over two years and the selectmen indicated they will request a number of revisions when they meet with the planning commission on March 9. The selectmen Suggested, among other things, the combining of the two residential zones proposed in the plan into one zone; the classification of historic- residential buildings (said not to he included in the plan); and the complete elimination or revision of at least two sections in the plan-- one concerning itself with natural and cultural resources and another that recommended what selectmen saw as stricter policies regarding transportation, or the town's highway department. Tax raze w/// decrease Oxbow taxpayers approve budget BRADFORD-- Oxbow tax rates in the towns of Bradford and Newbury may drop even lower than had been an- ticipated before the Oxbow district's annual meeting held last Tuesday, Feb. 23. Voters at the meeting ap- proved the district's recommended $1,521,000 budget and agreed to raise the school board's recommended $814,530 amount to he raised in taxes. But, school board chairman Aroline Putnam surprised the approximately 150 voters at the meeting by announcing that about $32,000 in Bradford and $27,000 in Newbury had been raised last year without the school board's knowledge. This money was voted to be raised to pay off part of a $295,000 roof bond that voters approved at a special meeting held last May. Both Putnam and district superintendent John Fontana said that the school board had never actually moved toward raising the money through taxes because they had an- ticipated a settlement with GAF Corporation regarding their leaking roof. Last fall, the school board settled out of court with GAF paying the school $675,000, out of which the attorney representing Oxbow received $100,000. The $575,000 will go toward the bond, roof repairs and anew roof. According to Putnam, the school board was unaware the money bad actually been raised by the towns until the day before the district meeting, Feb. 22. This money, totaling about $59,000, is divided between the two towns in their separate school accounts. Town voters will decide what to do with this "extra" money at their school meetings in June. Of the amount to be raised in (please turn to page 8) N. HAVERHILL--- The adoption of a policy to limit increases in the town's budget, approval of a town- wide property reappraisal and the election of town officers are expected to be the major issues at this year's annual Haverhill Town Meeting to be held next Tuesday, March 9. Haverhill voters will be voting at the meeting on ap- proval of an article that calls for, among other things, the selectmen or an appointed committee, to embark on a study of town salaries "and how these salaries could be put in better relationship." The article, number 10 on the town's warning, also calls for a similar committee to develop a formula for "equitable" distribution of town funds between its three fire departments. Responding to a large number of property assessment complaints, mostly from property owners in the Haverhill district of Mountain Lakes, the town has been ordered by the New Hampshire Department of Revenue Administration to reassess property in the town this year. Voters will be asked to raise about $100,000 for a contract with the Department of Revenue Administration to conduct the reappraisal. This figure is not included in the town's recommended budget. New Budget The budget that the town's budget committee has recommended for this year is only 1.3 percent, or $9,735.70, higher than the 1981 Haverhill town budget. But due to a $15,691.24 drop in revenue this year, the amount the town will have to raise in taxes will rise by 7.8 percent. This year's recommended budget stands at $690,138.00 compared to a $681,402.30 budget in 1981. Town Officers Among the Haverhill town offices up for election this year are Richard Kinder's three-year selectmen's seat and Roland McKean's position as town road agent. Other offices up for election this year are: town clerk, one year; tax collector, one year; trustee of trust funds, three years; town treasurer, one year; library trustee, three years; cemetery com- missioner, four years; cemetery commissioner, five years; and auditor, for one year. Town Articles Haverhill voters will cast their ballots Tuesday from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. to vote on article one, or the election of town officers. Voting and the town meeting will take place at the James Morrill School in N. Haverhill. After the polls close at 6:05 p.m., the town meeting will convene at 8:00 p.m. where voters will be asked to decide on the following articles: -- "To announce the results of the balloting on Article 1. -- "To choose one or more auditors for a term of one (1) year, two Cemetery Corn- (please turn to pag$ 8) Oxbow girls basketball team Division m Champ+s OXBOW HIGH SCHOOL, DIVISION Iii, STATE BASKETBALL CHAMPS-- Back row, (i to r) : Tracy Ottina and Annette Brooks, managers, Janine Teeter, Doreen Smith, Angle Dobbins, Jedy Pratt, Heidi Osgood, Karin Dwyer, Suzie Pierson, coach Mona Garone. Front Row, (! to r): Terry Ottina, manager, Kathy Peterson, Wendy Cook, Renee Gautreau, Martha Dobbins, Samantha Maxwell, Penny Cook, Becky Ledwlth and Brenda Peterson. Not pic, tared--Sharon Pnshee assistant coach. Story and more pictures on sports page. SiT NANPSNIII tyme Orford Phtrmont Hoverhdl Woodsvdle Both VIlIMONT Thet ford Fotrlee West Forlee Orodford Corinth Topthom Newbury Wills River lyegote Groton 25' USp 598340 Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont March3,1982 > !> +,,  Town meeting in Newbury attracted Tuesday. Bradford Academy Building Bradford- BRADFORD-- Bradford taxpayers are looking at a 6.6 percent increase in their town's general fund budget and a 19 percent increase in their highway budget after town meeting held Tuesday at the Bradford Academy Building. This year's Bradford general fund will total $205,450 as compared with $178,438.50 last year. The town's highway fund now stands at $98,150 as compared with $93,250 last year. As a result of Tuesday's vote, this year, the Town of Bradford will raise $132,000 in taxes for their general fund and $57,500 for their highway fund. This represents a total increase of $51,500 over last year, according to town budget figures. The general and highway budgets passed after town- speople questioned the town selectmen on the major budget increases; par- ticularly on $19,246 the selectmen overspent on their budget last year. Selectman P. Charles Brainerd told the roughly 125 townspeople in attendance that the overexpenditure was mainly due to a decision to complete repairs on a section of road on Roger's Hill rather (please turn to page 8) VERMONT MEET3NGS Thetford THETFORD-- Thetford voters met Monday night where they approved a combined $,342,938 town and highway budget and a $1,059,896.99 school budget for the 1982 year at their annual town meeting. This year's town budget, according to Thetford's town report, decreased by 23 percent due to a note on a firetruck that has been at least partially paid off. This year's highway budget is 7.1 percent higher than last year's budget. At the meeting, Thefford voters voted to raise $136,827 for the highway portion of the town's tax -- a 1.6 percent increase. They also approved a $72,595 tax for the town's general fund -- an increase of 18.3 percent over last year. The town and highway budgets passed relatively easily with the addition of only one amendment calling for the town to drop its five cent warrant fee (usually awarded to the town's tr4msurer) regarding delinquent taxes. School Tax Most of the major debate at the meeting centered around the school's budget of $1,059,896.99 and its effect on the taxpayers in Thetford. According to budget figures in the townreport, this year's (please turn to page 8) Fairlee by ESTHER JOHNSON FAIRLEE-- Approximately 100 residents gathered at the Fairlee Town Hall to vote on articles dealing with the town. They approved a budget of $160,573. The amount to he raised this year is $104,290 of which $64,990 is for town ex- penses and $59,300 is to be raised for highway expenses. Voters also appropriated the following amounts of money: -- $1,237 for support of the Community Health Service. -- $2,888 for support of the Upper Valley Regional Emergency Ambulance Service. -- $773 for support of the Orange County Senior Center. The voters also approved a resolution authorizing the town treasurer to collect current and future income from the logging operation in the town forest. These funds would be invested in a separate account and would be applied to capital ex- penditures only after they-are approved by the voters at an annual or special meeting. The selectmen were then authorized to use $2,000 from the logging fund to: a) per- manent marking of the town forest boundaries ($1,000), b) construction work on the Brushwood Road ($1,000). By a 49 to 12 margin, (please turn to page 8) Corinth CORINTH-- Voters in the Town of Corinth have decided not to elect a road com- missioner for this year and have okayed a town budget that is less expensive than last year. But, the town's tax rate could increase because of increases in the Union No. 36 School District budget. Whether or not the town's tax rate will increase or decrease will hinge on the passage of state aid to education bill currently awaiting final approval in the legislature. This year's town budget stands at $113,756 compared to a budget of $133,700 last year. This year's school budget stands at $297,739 as com- pared to $268,383 last year. The amount the town has voted to raise this year in taxes is $411,497 as compared to $402,083 last year. According to town clerk Jack I.armonth, this year's projected tax rate in the town will be about $4.81 per $100 of assessed property value. But, says Learmonth, passage of the state education aid bill in the state legislature will mean a drop of the town's projected tax rate to around $4.33. Last year's tax rate was set at $4.42. (please turn to page 4 ) Topsham TOPSHAM-- Voters in the Town of Topsham this year have approved an article to raise $64,500 in town taxes this year at their annual town meeting held on Tuesday. No 1982 total budget figures were made available, but last year's figure for the amount to be raised in taxes for the town was set at $60,300, according to Town Clerk Ruth Morrison. Among the major issues decided by voters at the meeting were appropriations Newbu00. by L.F. BARNES NEWBURY-- Over 140 townspeople gathered for the 1982 Town Meeting. In ad- dition to the annual items of hearing town reports and budget determination, they voted to "appropriate a sum of money not to exceed $6000 from the Newbury Town History Publishing Fund for publication of the Newbury Town Historical Districts Nomination, with proceeds from sales being returned to for various area agencies and the fund." the dismissal by voters at the This publication would meeting of an article calling include photographs and for a mutual United States - descriptions of the 160 plus Soviet Union nuclear arms buildings included in freeze. Among the agenda items said to have received con- siderable debate in Topsham were an appropriation of $1.00 per Topsham resident to go toward the Barre Ambulance Service; an $1143 ap- propria tion'for Orange County Mental Health; a $767 ap- propriation for the Bradford Senior Center; and a $1.60 per resident appropriation for Community Health Services. Newbury's nomination to the National Registry of Historic Places. This includes properties grouped into six districts: S. Newbury, W. Newbury, Wells River Village, Newbury Village, Bailey District (of Newbury Village), and Oxbow District (of Newbury Village). When questioned whether this book would he a town history, Signa Carbee said "It is clearly within the original Town Elections concept of the Town History Officers elected at Publishing Fund." Proceeds Tuesday's Topsham meeting from the sale of these volumes were as follows: Moderator, at $15 each would replenish ,H.B. Otterman Jr.; Town the publishing fund. +Clerk, Ruth Morrison; An article was included in (please turn to page 8) (please turn to page 4) Ryegate by NANCY PERKINS RYEGATE-- In a town meeting which lasted a little over three hours, Ryegate voters approved a budget of $603,234. This figure included a $750 allocation for Northeast Kingdom Mental Health Agency, the result of an amendment proposed by Carl Bayer. Bayer pointed out that 14 persons from the town, 13 of whom were children, were served by that agency during FY 1981. "It's a community service," he said, "available to anyone in Caledonia, Essex and Orleans County." The amendment was passed on a voice vote, as was the amended budget.. Two articles which stimulated a goodly amount of discussion concerned businesses, both those currently in operation within the town and any which might locate here in the future. The first dealt with authorizing the selectmen to enter into con- tract with existing or new owners for the purpose of fixing and maintaining a tax rate. BruEe Beauvais spoke in favor of the article saying, "as a member of the zoning commission, if a big business were interested in coming into town, I feel the selectmen should have some leverage in (please turn to page 8) Voters take a break at their lengthy :Which they decided Z9 articles. Town offices in Ryegate, Vt. 'BRADFORD-- A dispute over the reclassification of Town Road No. 29 from a class three to a class four road has ended with the Bradford selectmen agreeing to rescind their previous vote to reclassify the road. The dispute has apparently ended resulting from an agreement settled on by lawyers representing the town and Howard Pierpont, a property owner with land bordering the disputed road. The selectmen voted at their meeting last Thursday to rescind their Jan. 17 move to reclassify Town Road No. 29. Following the selectmen's vote on Jan. 17, Pierpont had instructed his attorney, William Donahue, of Brad- ford, to seek a court injunction blocking reclassification of the road. The selectmen rescinded their decision to reclassify the road after being assured by their attorney, John Hughes, of Norwich, that if they did, Pierpont would drop his suit against them. Reclassification The selectmen's original decision to reclassify the road was not so much a change in maintenance procedure as a move to "update" the current Selectmen rescind their vote Budget issues and reappraisal to reclassify town road 29 up for vote in Haverhill Articles announced .for town meetin00 status of e road, say town officials. Town Road No. 29 runs from W. Fairlee to Corinth and cuts across a tiny corner of Bradford near its south- western boundaries. Under Vermont law, class four roads are looked upon as "seasonal" and year-round maintenance of class four roads is not required. Pierpont, who selectmen say is not a year-round resident, owns land bordering the Bradford section of the road. But the house he owns on the land is actually in the Town of Corinth, according to Bradford aerial maps. Town administrator Susan Spaulding said that the Corinth Highway Department plows the road from Corinth and even slightly into the Bradford section of the road in order to turn around. The selectmen-- John Gibbs, Charles Bralnerd and Leonard Dobbins-- had originally decided to reclassify the road with the idea of officially justifying a cost savings that would come with not being required to maintain the road on a year- round basis. Town Plan The selectmen spent much compete .f00,r Wentworth offices N which is being sought by Ed Wentworth, is an operating Plymouth Area High School. Wentworth Cheney, Steven Davis, and room technician at Sceva He attended Boston Technical Speare Memorial Hospital. He School majoring in elec- is a graduate of the New tronics. He is employed by the Hampshire School of Police Standards and Training. In regard to the election he says, "I am proud of my town and I love it. I'd like to help it in any way I can." Steven Davis, born in Rumney, is a graduate of Split Ball-bearing plant in Lebanon. He is a volunteer fireman here. Married to the former Paula King, he is the father of two boys. He calls himself a "conservative Republican." Young Candidate Michael Johnson has lived here since 1971. He was graduated from Wentworth Elementary School, attended Plymouth Area High and graduated from Holderuess School for Boys. He spent a year and a half at Boston University. Leaving school to enter business, he became the co- founder and co-owner of Bellegraphics specializing in quality control and sales. Johnson was co-traaslator of Hoyt's History of Wentworth. He has been active in the Historical Society and on the Bicentennial Committee. He says, "Because I am young (please turn to page 8) more spirited Michael Johnson. Robert SChool board Blodgett has filed again for r than it has Road Agent as have Robert years. Three Farnsworth and Paul King. are open and Ed Cheney has filed for both on the school selectman and police chief. Clinton Hutchins is trying for both the Police Chief and Fire as a Commissioner positions. opened a slot Cheney, a resident of S. T. King Michael Johnson Clint Hutchins < of their Thursday meeting reviewing the proposed new Bradford Town Plan as prepared by the town's planning commission and the Two Rivers-Ottaquechee Regional Planning Com- mission. The new plan has been in the development stages for over two years and the selectmen indicated they will request a number of revisions when they meet with the planning commission on March 9. The selectmen Suggested, among other things, the combining of the two residential zones proposed in the plan into one zone; the classification of historic- residential buildings (said not to he included in the plan); and the complete elimination or revision of at least two sections in the plan-- one concerning itself with natural and cultural resources and another that recommended what selectmen saw as stricter policies regarding transportation, or the town's highway department. Tax raze w/// decrease Oxbow taxpayers approve budget BRADFORD-- Oxbow tax rates in the towns of Bradford and Newbury may drop even lower than had been an- ticipated before the Oxbow district's annual meeting held last Tuesday, Feb. 23. Voters at the meeting ap- proved the district's recommended $1,521,000 budget and agreed to raise the school board's recommended $814,530 amount to he raised in taxes. But, school board chairman Aroline Putnam surprised the approximately 150 voters at the meeting by announcing that about $32,000 in Bradford and $27,000 in Newbury had been raised last year without the school board's knowledge. This money was voted to be raised to pay off part of a $295,000 roof bond that voters approved at a special meeting held last May. Both Putnam and district superintendent John Fontana said that the school board had never actually moved toward raising the money through taxes because they had an- ticipated a settlement with GAF Corporation regarding their leaking roof. Last fall, the school board settled out of court with GAF paying the school $675,000, out of which the attorney representing Oxbow received $100,000. The $575,000 will go toward the bond, roof repairs and anew roof. According to Putnam, the school board was unaware the money bad actually been raised by the towns until the day before the district meeting, Feb. 22. This money, totaling about $59,000, is divided between the two towns in their separate school accounts. Town voters will decide what to do with this "extra" money at their school meetings in June. Of the amount to be raised in (please turn to page 8) N. HAVERHILL--- The adoption of a policy to limit increases in the town's budget, approval of a town- wide property reappraisal and the election of town officers are expected to be the major issues at this year's annual Haverhill Town Meeting to be held next Tuesday, March 9. Haverhill voters will be voting at the meeting on ap- proval of an article that calls for, among other things, the selectmen or an appointed committee, to embark on a study of town salaries "and how these salaries could be put in better relationship." The article, number 10 on the town's warning, also calls for a similar committee to develop a formula for "equitable" distribution of town funds between its three fire departments. Responding to a large number of property assessment complaints, mostly from property owners in the Haverhill district of Mountain Lakes, the town has been ordered by the New Hampshire Department of Revenue Administration to reassess property in the town this year. Voters will be asked to raise about $100,000 for a contract with the Department of Revenue Administration to conduct the reappraisal. This figure is not included in the town's recommended budget. New Budget The budget that the town's budget committee has recommended for this year is only 1.3 percent, or $9,735.70, higher than the 1981 Haverhill town budget. But due to a $15,691.24 drop in revenue this year, the amount the town will have to raise in taxes will rise by 7.8 percent. This year's recommended budget stands at $690,138.00 compared to a $681,402.30 budget in 1981. Town Officers Among the Haverhill town offices up for election this year are Richard Kinder's three-year selectmen's seat and Roland McKean's position as town road agent. Other offices up for election this year are: town clerk, one year; tax collector, one year; trustee of trust funds, three years; town treasurer, one year; library trustee, three years; cemetery com- missioner, four years; cemetery commissioner, five years; and auditor, for one year. Town Articles Haverhill voters will cast their ballots Tuesday from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. to vote on article one, or the election of town officers. Voting and the town meeting will take place at the James Morrill School in N. Haverhill. After the polls close at 6:05 p.m., the town meeting will convene at 8:00 p.m. where voters will be asked to decide on the following articles: -- "To announce the results of the balloting on Article 1. -- "To choose one or more auditors for a term of one (1) year, two Cemetery Corn- (please turn to pag$ 8) Oxbow girls basketball team Division m Champ+s OXBOW HIGH SCHOOL, DIVISION Iii, STATE BASKETBALL CHAMPS-- Back row, (i to r) : Tracy Ottina and Annette Brooks, managers, Janine Teeter, Doreen Smith, Angle Dobbins, Jedy Pratt, Heidi Osgood, Karin Dwyer, Suzie Pierson, coach Mona Garone. Front Row, (! to r): Terry Ottina, manager, Kathy Peterson, Wendy Cook, Renee Gautreau, Martha Dobbins, Samantha Maxwell, Penny Cook, Becky Ledwlth and Brenda Peterson. Not pic, tared--Sharon Pnshee assistant coach. Story and more pictures on sports page.