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March 3, 1982     Journal Opinion
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March 3, 1982-The Journal Opinion-Page 7 u-A'-U-'cT'I o N .Vocational skills d00splc00yed at Oxbow - , ENERGY SOURCE---Bob Jones (center) explains the Forestry to interested parents while students from his class repair and sharpen DOES YOUR GARDEN GRoW--Joe Button, program instructor, with George Humphrey and Barry Ordway, Oxbow FFA members. the House, the Oxbow Chapter was presented with a Plaque for the Contest. &T WORK--Greg Hines and Nancy LePan, of the 10th grade Pre-Vocational class work project. elf Robbins and Mark Grimes demon- residential wiring component of the Elec- MEN--Joel Moore, program instructor with Gene Eastman, and Doug Fifteen nurses complete Ida Ellis, 70, had I course at Cotta=e lived in Groton Obituaries BURLINGTON-- Ida A. Ellis, She was predeceased by her ;' r ' WOODSVILLE--North McGuigan, Jean McGovern of 70 ' of 13 BelvEdere St., St. hushand Glenn Ellis in t976. Rachelle nln n mt"--c'c"'e Country Nursing Education Littleton; Sandy Ruka of Johnsbury, died Friday Feb. A memorial service was Consortium (NCNEC) Memorial; and Frederick Foy 26, at the Medical Center held Sunday at the Calder- representatives held their of Northeastern Vermont Hospital of Vermont in wood Memorial Chapel. second recognition ceremony honoring 15 nurses as graduates of their two educational efforts on Friday, Feb. 19 at Cottage Hospital, which hosted the two courses. NCNEC was formed in the fall of 1980 to address the need of nursing education at the five North Country hospitals including: Memorial Hospital, North Conway; Cottage Hospital, Woodsville; Weeks Memorial Hospital, Lan- caster; Littieton Hospital, Littleton; and Androscoggin Valley Hospital, Berlin. Marion Whitney, R.N., Ore- Service Education Coor- dinator, and Patricia King, R.N., Director of Nursing Service, Cottage Hospital, served as coordinators for these NCNEC courses. Patricia King and Edward Loranger, Administrator at Cottage, presided over the ceremony. Certificates for completion of a four-week, 84 your arrhythmia course were awarded by Melinda Laflamme, R.N., staff nurse in the Special Care Unit and one of the instructors too: Merilda Curtis, Carlene English, Mary Lou Fit- zgibbons, Jonathan Oakes, Marlene Wohlforth from Cottage and Mary Cassidy from Littleton. Patricia King, R.N., awarded certificates to students who completed a four-week, 114 hour course in Coronary Nursing which in- volved complications, treatment and prevention of heart disease. Students in- cluded: Nancy Bolton, Mary Ann Cloutier, Da,ltl Eames, Carolyn Pecor of Cottage; Mary Estabrooks, Susan Regional Hospital. Courses were team-taught by representatives of the Consortium including: Terrie Judge, R.N., Cardiology Coordinator at Littleton Hospital, John Colbath, R.N., Assistant Administrator at Memorial Hospital, Melinda Laflamme, R.N., Staff Nurse in the Special Care Unit at Androscoggin Valley Hospital, Diane White, R.N., In-Service Education Coordinator, AVH, Ann Wiggett, R.N., In-Service Education Coordinator, Littleton Hospital, Marion Whitney. R.N., In-Service Education Coordinator, Burlington. She was born in Groton, Jan. 20, 1912, daughter of Andrew and Mabel (Welch) Ashford. She is survived by two sons, Durward C. and Keith P., both of St. Johnsbury; two sisters, Mrs. Ben (Treasa) Berwick of East Peacham and Mrs. Leo (Stella) Berwick of South Peacham; three grand- children; and several nieces and nephews. Burial will be in the spring at the Robinson Cemetery in Calais. In lieu of flowers, those who wish may make contributions to the Vermont Lung Association, 30 Farrel St., South Burlington 05401. Calderwood Memorial Service, 56 Eastern Ave., St. Johnsbury was in charge of arrangements. Gerald Hutchins dies after long illness Cottage Hospital, andPatricia WENTWORTH-- Gerald F. King, R.N., Director of Hutchins, 70, died Friday at Nursing Service at Cottage his home aftera long illness. Hospital. He was born in Wentworth and was a lifelong resident of that town. Mr. Hutchins was a farmer j- iI 11  Ii conferences tw/d ost of his life and served in several town offices. He was a for Vermont town officers BURLINGTON-- The UVM Extension Service has an- nounced the following dates for their 37th Annual Town Officers Educational Con- ferences: March 17, South Burlington; March 18, Fairlee; March 23, Brat- tleboro; March 24, Rutland; March 25, Lyndonville. The program offers a variety of sessions for town clerks, treasurers, listers, collectors of taxes, selectmen and auditors. Topics will include the open meeting law: impact of Orange Count00, Mental Health mant00ement course just a few of life's inevitables, course will start in Bradford Try to prepare for them as on Tuesday, March 9, 1982. much as possible, and allow Victor Manzon, Adult and opportunities to relieve the Family Counselor at Orange stress. County Mental Health Ser- -- Eat right, get enough vice, will give information sleep. Exercise can relieve about the causes and effects of some every day tensions, stress, discuss how to prevent -- Talk to someone. A friend harmful stress, and show can help, but built-up stress ways to relieve built up ten- may require the skills of a sions. professional therapist. The course will be held at -- Do something nice for Oxbow High School and run somebody else. Give yourself for 6 weeks, Tuesday evenings that pat on the back. from 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Stress is responsible for its Pre registration is required. share of Olympic Gold Medals Cost is $35 for the entire and great pieces of art, but course. stress may also be responsible Arrangements for in- for depression, child abuse terested people unable to pay and heart disease. Learn to the full fee can be made with work on stress before it works OCMHS. Call Victor Manzon on you. at 222-9090 to register or for A stress management information. Ryegate ,ancY584.361Perkins, BlaeMountain Grange Thursday, Feb. 18, Rev. and Blue Mountain Grange No.. Mrs. Eric Tougher of Sutton, 263 held its regular meeting Mass., and Mr. and Mrs. Monday evening, Feb. 22, with Harry Ritchie. 21 members present. Master Mrs. Wendell Clark William Nelson installed Gall returned home Monday, Feb. Nelson as Lady Assistant 22, from Cottage Hospital in Steward and Jennifer Nelson Woodsville where she had as Pomona. The program been hospitalized for six days consisted of a slide show by following a fall on the ice Fremont and Marsha Nelson which resulted in seven of slides taken on their recent broken ribs. She is now able to trip to Florida. The next be back at her job in the meeting will be March 9 with Ryegate Corner Post Office. the program in charge of the Presbyterian Women AgriculturalCommittee. The United Presbyterian Mr. and Mrs. GenePerkins, Women's Group held its Gene Jr. and Gordon were monthly meeting Thursday Sunday dinner guests Feb. 21 evening, Feb. 18, at the home of his brother and sister-in-law of Mrs. Harold Nelson, with 19 Mr. and Mrs. Richard Perkins present. Mrs. Stewart White in Sutton. led devotions and introduced The Town Auditors --the guest speakers Mrs. Isabelle Whitehill, Alice Stanford Blankenship and Zambon, and Jennifer Nelson Jenny Greene, who spoke of =-- completed their work on the their work with Caledonia Town Reports Wednesday, Home Health Care Agency, in Feb. 17, and all copies have particular with Hospice. A been distributed to residents, question and answer period Grange Card Party followed. At the business Blue Mountain Grange No. meeting President Florence 263 sponsored a card party at Kinerson distributed copies of the Grange Hall Friday proposed by-laws for the evening, Feb. 19, with six group. Members are asked to tables in play. Prizes were study them over for discussion awarded as follows: Ladies' at a future meeting. Copies of High-- Mary Frost; Men's the Presbyterial By-laws are High-- Gordon Perkins; also available for review. Ladies' Low-- Marsha Announcement was made of Nelson; Men's Low--Jack the Spring Presbyterial Kinerson; and Floating Meeting scheduled for May 1 + Prize-- Mary Frost. The in Lawrence, Mass. Refresh- committee in charge of ments were served by planning the evening con- Florence Kinerson, Eleanor sisted of Mr. and Mrs. James Johnson, and Vera Nelson. Kinerson, Mr. and Mrs. Stewart White, Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Fortier, Ellsworth Frost, Jack Kiuerson, and Darryl Perkins. Town Topics Mrs. Gale Knull, Morgan and Brandy from Saratoga Springs, N.Y., were guests Tuesday through Sunday, Feb. 16-21, of her parents Mr. and Mrs. Howard Nelson. Mr. and Mrs. Harold Nelson had as luncheon guests sets stress Beatrice; three sons, Charles A., Raymond F. of Wentworth and Maurice S. of Lebanon; a daughter, Miss Ida Hutchins of Wentworth; ten grand- children, a niece and two nephews. Funeral services were held at the LaFontaine Funeral BRADFORD-- Take your average caveman; put him face-to-face with a saber toothed tiger and what do you get? Rapid heartbeat, dilated eyes, tensed muscles and a digestive system that's stopped in its tracks. The caveman is under stress. What does he do? He either picks up a rock and fights, or he takes to the hills. Now take modern man and woman and put them in a gas line. They are under stress. Eyes dilate, pulse quickens, stomach churns. But here's a difference. They can't throw a rock at the car in front of them, nor can they flee because they need to buy some gasoline. What do they do? Both may do what many normal 20th century human beings do: grind their teeth, get a headache and feed an ulcer. What exactly is stress? Dr. Hans Selye, the grandfather of stress theory, says stress is anything that causes the body to respond. Being kissed and being fired are both stressful. One, however, is healthy stress (eustress),. and the other is unhealthy stress (distress). Unhealthy stress can come from too much of a good thing or a had thing. A whirlwind vacation, a long-hours, no- reward job, and endless broing days all can cause stress. Learning to cope with unhealthy stress must be a priority item. Stress can kill. When the body responds to stress without any letup, in- ternal complications arise. Coronary disease, headaches, alcoholism and depression are just a few effects of unrelieved stress. Everyone reacts differently to stress. Some people have learned how to release stress in socially acceptable and useful ways' others turn stress inward and get sick. Recognizing stress is the first step to reducing it. Some symptoms of stress may be the following: -- heacaches -- stomach problems -- lack of concentration -- depression -- loss of or sudden gain of appetite -- inability to handle minor disappointments -- vague anxiety, especially about the future -- insomnia Ways of dealing with stress include the following: -- Be honest with yourself in identifying the real source of stress. It's not the job you dislike, it's that loud-mouthed manager. Eliminate the source if possible, or at least decide how to keep it from getting the best of you. -- Accept what you can't control Death and taxes are member of the Wentworth Congregational Church and a 57-year member of the Baker River Grange. Mr. Hutchins held many positions in town including several terms as selectman. At the time of his death he was a supervisor of the checklist. He is survived by his widow, Home in Plymouth. The Rev. David Waiters and the Rev. John Haggerty officiated. Burial will be in the Foster Cemetery in Wentworth. Memorial contributions may be made to the Baker River Grange, in care of Evelyn Ray, Rumney, N.H., 03266. Harlan Haskins dies ST. JOHNSBURY-- Harlan D. Haskins, 72, of 14 Winter St., died on Feb. 23 at his home, unexpectedly, after a lingering illness. He was born Sept. 23, 1909, in St. Johnsbury, the son of He is survived by his son, and his wife, David and Gabrielle Haskins, Konigsfeld, W. Germany; two granddaughters; one sister, Miss Alice Haskins, St. Johnsbun'y. federal and state dollar Agustus and Alice (Reed) losses: public relations; tax Haskins. His wife, Harriett sales; elections; takeover of "Pat" (Puffer) predeceased town highways; and vital him in 1954. statistics. Mr. Haskins retired from Fairbanks as a draftsman eight years ago. A 1927 graduate of St. Johnsbury Academy he attended the Art Student's League in New York City. He was well known in the area as an art teacher and commonly exhibited his work throughout New England. Mr. Haskins was a World War II veteran, having been a sergeant in the Medical Corps. Memorial services were held Saturday at the Desrochers and Sayles Funeral Home, with the Rev. Scudder Parker officiating. Interment will be in the spring at the convenience of the family. Memorial contributions may be directed to the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, c-o Mrs. Jean Marcy, Main St., St. Johnsbury. Desrochers and Sayles Funeral Home, 68 Summer St., was in charge of arrangements. More Ryegate News Mrs. Eileen LeBlanc of Troy spent Monday through Wednesday, Feb. 15-17 with her daughter and family Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Nelson, Curtis, Andrea, and James. Mr. and Mrs. James Kinerson were overnight guests Saturday, Feb. 13, of their daughter and family, Mr. and Mrs. Terry Steele, Heidi and Jonathan in Groton, Conn. On Sunday, they at- tended the dedication of Jonathan at the Groton Heights Baptist Church. On the way home they called on her brother Mr. and Mrs. George Randall in Lebanon, Ct. Mr. and Mrs. Guy Labounty, Mr. and Mrs. Alex Meyette, Mr. and Mrs. David InglEs, and Mr. and Mrs. Wes Gobel of Newbury dined together Sunday, Feb. 21, at Warner's Gallery. Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Nelson, Curtis, Andrea, and James had as overnight guests Thursday, Feb. 18, Kimberly and Jared McLure. Christopher and Kelly Collins visited their grand- parents Mr. and Mrs. John Maguire in Lynn, Mass., Saturday through Wednesday, Feb. 13-17. They attended a presentation of "Disney on Ice" and visited cousins in the area. Mr. and Mrs. Larry Harju, Sarah, Amy, Beth, and Hannah, and their babysitter Christine-- all'from Mid- dlehoro, Mass., spent Thur- sday, Feb. 18, with Mr. and Mrs. William Nelson, Grant, Hannah, Andrew, and Betsey, and went snowmobiling. On Friday they were guests of the Nelsons for lunch, and that evening, the two couples dined at the Happy Hour Restaurant in Wells River. Mr. and Mrs. Reginald White and Vincent Hilyer attended the annual meeting and dinner of R, C, and D at the Charlemont Restaurant in Morrisville Thursday evening, Feb. 18. Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Whitehill were Sunday dinner guests Feb. 21 of.their son and family, Mr. and Mrs. Winston 24 HOUR EMERGENCY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICE Oronge County Mental HHIth TOLL FREE 1.800-622-4244 Currier, April and Danny in Monroe, N.H., in celebration of April's 17th birthday. + Mr. and Mrs. Harold Nelson were guests for breakfast Saturday, Feb. 20, of their son and family Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Nelson, Curtis, Andrea, and James. Eight members and guests from the Youth Fellowship Group, accompanied by Rev. Marion Redding and Miss Jeanette McLure, enjoyed a day of skiing at Monteau Ski Area in Swiftwater, N.H., Friday, Feb. 19. Arthur Whitehill, Denzil Whitehill, and Norman Lowe attended funeral services for Ted Farrow in Peacham Sunday afternoon, Feb. 21. Mr. and Mrs. Leroy Nelson were luncheon guests of their daughter Mrs. John Melahn in Bradford Wednesday, Feb. 24. Mrs. Guy Labounty, Mrs. Alex Meyette, Mrs. David InglEs, Mrs. William Nelson, Mrs. Gene Perkins, and Mrs. James Arnosky of S. Ryegate were among those from this area who attended the meeting of Christian Women's Fellowship in St. Johnsbury Wednesday, Feb. 24. OXBOW SCHOOL BOARD BRADFORD-- There will be a meeting of the Unified District No. 30 School Board on Thursday, March 4 at 7:30 p.m. It will be held at the Oxbow High School. WELL DRILLING ROTARY HAMMER DRILLING. 20 YEARS DRILLING EXPERIENCE ( (&/',Ptl: IF WIxT[ SYSI [/AS ti$TAll[ D FOR FREE ESTIMATE CALL OR WRITE The E. BENEDINI Artesian Well Co. [ D Borre. Vt a;'6 4832 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE had lived in Lyme LYME--Rachelle Shacklette in the Lyme Congregational Hinchcliffe, 80, a former Church, the Utility Club of resident, died Feb. 2 in Lymeand theLyme Library. Toronto, Canada. She is survived by her two She was born in Kentucky, daughters, Priscilla Freeman and lived for serea essin and Nancy Butler, both of ndiniiccnnri aeoRico, New Ontario; six grandchildren; a York (2ity and Toronto. sister, Lois Groves of She and her late husband, Nokomis, FI.; several nieces George Frederick Hinchcliffe, and nephews. moved to Lyme in 1956, after A memorial service was at his retirement. Following his the Christ Church Deer Park death in 1970, she stayed in Anglican Church in Toronto. Lyme until 1973 when she Interment willbeinKentucky. moved to Louisville, Ky. In Memorial contributions 1978 she returned to Toronto to may be made to the Lyme join her two daughters. Congregational Church, or to Mrs. Hinchcliffe was active the Lyme Library. Gu00" G. Smith, 82, was dairy inspector E. THETFORD-- Guy G. W. of Orford, N.H.; a sister, Smith, 82, died Friday, Feb. 26 Gladys Rowell of Fairlee; two at his home here after a brief grandchildren, two great- illness, grandsons; nieces, nephews He was born Dec. 21, 1899 in and cousins. Bradford, the son of George Funeral services were held and Lilla (Welton) Smith. He at the Fairlee Federated attended school in Fairlee. Church with the Rev. Arthur In 1921 he married Laura M. Bagley officiating. Burial will Willis of Orford. They lived in he in the spring in the Fairlee Fairlee for several years, Cemetery. moving to E. Thetford in 1968. In lieu of flowers, con- Mr. Smith was a dairy in- tributions may be made to the spector for the Whiting Milk East Thetford FAST Squad or Company at the time of his the American Heart retirement. Association. He was a member of the The Godfrey Funeral Home Fairlee Federated Church. was in charge of He is survived by a son, Guy arrangements. Anna (Rust} Barley, 94. ta00ht at Peachmn PEACHAM-- Anna (Rust) of the Peacham Congre- Bayley, 94, died Feb. 28 at the gational Church. Northeast Vermont Regional She is survived locally by a Hospital in St. Johnsbury. daughter, Katherine White of She was born Oct. 3, 1887 in Bradford; 13 grandchildren Granhy, Mass. She graduated and 21 great-grandchildren. from Middlebury College in Funeral services were held 1909, and was one of the first at the Peacham Congre- women to receive the Phi gational Church. Burial will Betta Kappa pin. be at a later date in Peacham Mrs. Bayley lived most of Cemetery. her life in Peacham, and was a Memorial contributions teacher at the Peacham may he made to the Peacham Academy. She also taught in Library, or the Danville Windsor Locks, Conn. She was Rescue Squad, Danville, Vt. a housemother at the The Ricker Funeral Home University of Vermont for of Woodsviile, N.H. was in several years, charge of arrangements. Mrs. Barley was a member AT THE END OF YOUR I A course on facts about stress I J and ways to prevent it. Tuesdays 6: 30-8:00 PM March 9 thru April 13 at Oxbow High School 835-6 sessions Advance Registration & Information: Victor Manzon 222-4090 or sign up the first session. GRAY'S AUCTION CALENDAR SATURDAY, MAltCIi 6--- for Virginia Manning, ()range Cir., Vt. Selling 40 llead Jerseys and all Farm Machinery+ 10 AM. Hay. FltIDAY, MARCil 2(;--- for Susan and Dana Leonard, Haverhill, N.tt. Selling 80 Head Holsteins, 32 are Registered, Farm Machinery and Crops. 11 AM. SATUIII)AY. APRIl, 10-.- for Mrs. Asa Waterman, Woodsville, N.Ii. Selling all Farm Machinery, 10 AM. SATURI)AY. APRIl, 24-- the annual Farm Machinery Sale for McLaren's Inc. Passumpsic, Vt. SATURDAY, MAY I-- the New England Jersey Breeder's Sale to be held at the Rutland, Vt. Fairgrounds. Auction each and every Monday at the East Thetford Corn mission  les Barn. East Thetford, Vt. Auctioneers : ('.W. (;ray & Sons, hlc. East Thetford, Vt. 78.%,1348 or 785-2161 March 3, 1982-The Journal Opinion-Page 7 u-A'-U-'cT'I o N .Vocational skills d00splc00yed at Oxbow - , ENERGY SOURCE---Bob Jones (center) explains the Forestry to interested parents while students from his class repair and sharpen DOES YOUR GARDEN GRoW--Joe Button, program instructor, with George Humphrey and Barry Ordway, Oxbow FFA members. the House, the Oxbow Chapter was presented with a Plaque for the Contest. &T WORK--Greg Hines and Nancy LePan, of the 10th grade Pre-Vocational class work project. elf Robbins and Mark Grimes demon- residential wiring component of the Elec- MEN--Joel Moore, program instructor with Gene Eastman, and Doug Fifteen nurses complete Ida Ellis, 70, had I course at Cotta=e lived in Groton Obituaries BURLINGTON-- Ida A. Ellis, She was predeceased by her ;' r ' WOODSVILLE--North McGuigan, Jean McGovern of 70 ' of 13 BelvEdere St., St. hushand Glenn Ellis in t976. Rachelle nln n mt"--c'c"'e Country Nursing Education Littleton; Sandy Ruka of Johnsbury, died Friday Feb. A memorial service was Consortium (NCNEC) Memorial; and Frederick Foy 26, at the Medical Center held Sunday at the Calder- representatives held their of Northeastern Vermont Hospital of Vermont in wood Memorial Chapel. second recognition ceremony honoring 15 nurses as graduates of their two educational efforts on Friday, Feb. 19 at Cottage Hospital, which hosted the two courses. NCNEC was formed in the fall of 1980 to address the need of nursing education at the five North Country hospitals including: Memorial Hospital, North Conway; Cottage Hospital, Woodsville; Weeks Memorial Hospital, Lan- caster; Littieton Hospital, Littleton; and Androscoggin Valley Hospital, Berlin. Marion Whitney, R.N., Ore- Service Education Coor- dinator, and Patricia King, R.N., Director of Nursing Service, Cottage Hospital, served as coordinators for these NCNEC courses. Patricia King and Edward Loranger, Administrator at Cottage, presided over the ceremony. Certificates for completion of a four-week, 84 your arrhythmia course were awarded by Melinda Laflamme, R.N., staff nurse in the Special Care Unit and one of the instructors too: Merilda Curtis, Carlene English, Mary Lou Fit- zgibbons, Jonathan Oakes, Marlene Wohlforth from Cottage and Mary Cassidy from Littleton. Patricia King, R.N., awarded certificates to students who completed a four-week, 114 hour course in Coronary Nursing which in- volved complications, treatment and prevention of heart disease. Students in- cluded: Nancy Bolton, Mary Ann Cloutier, Da,ltl Eames, Carolyn Pecor of Cottage; Mary Estabrooks, Susan Regional Hospital. Courses were team-taught by representatives of the Consortium including: Terrie Judge, R.N., Cardiology Coordinator at Littleton Hospital, John Colbath, R.N., Assistant Administrator at Memorial Hospital, Melinda Laflamme, R.N., Staff Nurse in the Special Care Unit at Androscoggin Valley Hospital, Diane White, R.N., In-Service Education Coordinator, AVH, Ann Wiggett, R.N., In-Service Education Coordinator, Littleton Hospital, Marion Whitney. R.N., In-Service Education Coordinator, Burlington. She was born in Groton, Jan. 20, 1912, daughter of Andrew and Mabel (Welch) Ashford. She is survived by two sons, Durward C. and Keith P., both of St. Johnsbury; two sisters, Mrs. Ben (Treasa) Berwick of East Peacham and Mrs. Leo (Stella) Berwick of South Peacham; three grand- children; and several nieces and nephews. Burial will be in the spring at the Robinson Cemetery in Calais. In lieu of flowers, those who wish may make contributions to the Vermont Lung Association, 30 Farrel St., South Burlington 05401. Calderwood Memorial Service, 56 Eastern Ave., St. Johnsbury was in charge of arrangements. Gerald Hutchins dies after long illness Cottage Hospital, andPatricia WENTWORTH-- Gerald F. King, R.N., Director of Hutchins, 70, died Friday at Nursing Service at Cottage his home aftera long illness. Hospital. He was born in Wentworth and was a lifelong resident of that town. Mr. Hutchins was a farmer j- iI 11  Ii conferences tw/d ost of his life and served in several town offices. He was a for Vermont town officers BURLINGTON-- The UVM Extension Service has an- nounced the following dates for their 37th Annual Town Officers Educational Con- ferences: March 17, South Burlington; March 18, Fairlee; March 23, Brat- tleboro; March 24, Rutland; March 25, Lyndonville. The program offers a variety of sessions for town clerks, treasurers, listers, collectors of taxes, selectmen and auditors. Topics will include the open meeting law: impact of Orange Count00, Mental Health mant00ement course just a few of life's inevitables, course will start in Bradford Try to prepare for them as on Tuesday, March 9, 1982. much as possible, and allow Victor Manzon, Adult and opportunities to relieve the Family Counselor at Orange stress. County Mental Health Ser- -- Eat right, get enough vice, will give information sleep. Exercise can relieve about the causes and effects of some every day tensions, stress, discuss how to prevent -- Talk to someone. A friend harmful stress, and show can help, but built-up stress ways to relieve built up ten- may require the skills of a sions. professional therapist. The course will be held at -- Do something nice for Oxbow High School and run somebody else. Give yourself for 6 weeks, Tuesday evenings that pat on the back. from 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Stress is responsible for its Pre registration is required. share of Olympic Gold Medals Cost is $35 for the entire and great pieces of art, but course. stress may also be responsible Arrangements for in- for depression, child abuse terested people unable to pay and heart disease. Learn to the full fee can be made with work on stress before it works OCMHS. Call Victor Manzon on you. at 222-9090 to register or for A stress management information. Ryegate ,ancY584.361Perkins, BlaeMountain Grange Thursday, Feb. 18, Rev. and Blue Mountain Grange No.. Mrs. Eric Tougher of Sutton, 263 held its regular meeting Mass., and Mr. and Mrs. Monday evening, Feb. 22, with Harry Ritchie. 21 members present. Master Mrs. Wendell Clark William Nelson installed Gall returned home Monday, Feb. Nelson as Lady Assistant 22, from Cottage Hospital in Steward and Jennifer Nelson Woodsville where she had as Pomona. The program been hospitalized for six days consisted of a slide show by following a fall on the ice Fremont and Marsha Nelson which resulted in seven of slides taken on their recent broken ribs. She is now able to trip to Florida. The next be back at her job in the meeting will be March 9 with Ryegate Corner Post Office. the program in charge of the Presbyterian Women AgriculturalCommittee. The United Presbyterian Mr. and Mrs. GenePerkins, Women's Group held its Gene Jr. and Gordon were monthly meeting Thursday Sunday dinner guests Feb. 21 evening, Feb. 18, at the home of his brother and sister-in-law of Mrs. Harold Nelson, with 19 Mr. and Mrs. Richard Perkins present. Mrs. Stewart White in Sutton. led devotions and introduced The Town Auditors --the guest speakers Mrs. Isabelle Whitehill, Alice Stanford Blankenship and Zambon, and Jennifer Nelson Jenny Greene, who spoke of =-- completed their work on the their work with Caledonia Town Reports Wednesday, Home Health Care Agency, in Feb. 17, and all copies have particular with Hospice. A been distributed to residents, question and answer period Grange Card Party followed. At the business Blue Mountain Grange No. meeting President Florence 263 sponsored a card party at Kinerson distributed copies of the Grange Hall Friday proposed by-laws for the evening, Feb. 19, with six group. Members are asked to tables in play. Prizes were study them over for discussion awarded as follows: Ladies' at a future meeting. Copies of High-- Mary Frost; Men's the Presbyterial By-laws are High-- Gordon Perkins; also available for review. Ladies' Low-- Marsha Announcement was made of Nelson; Men's Low--Jack the Spring Presbyterial Kinerson; and Floating Meeting scheduled for May 1 + Prize-- Mary Frost. The in Lawrence, Mass. Refresh- committee in charge of ments were served by planning the evening con- Florence Kinerson, Eleanor sisted of Mr. and Mrs. James Johnson, and Vera Nelson. Kinerson, Mr. and Mrs. Stewart White, Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Fortier, Ellsworth Frost, Jack Kiuerson, and Darryl Perkins. Town Topics Mrs. Gale Knull, Morgan and Brandy from Saratoga Springs, N.Y., were guests Tuesday through Sunday, Feb. 16-21, of her parents Mr. and Mrs. Howard Nelson. Mr. and Mrs. Harold Nelson had as luncheon guests sets stress Beatrice; three sons, Charles A., Raymond F. of Wentworth and Maurice S. of Lebanon; a daughter, Miss Ida Hutchins of Wentworth; ten grand- children, a niece and two nephews. Funeral services were held at the LaFontaine Funeral BRADFORD-- Take your average caveman; put him face-to-face with a saber toothed tiger and what do you get? Rapid heartbeat, dilated eyes, tensed muscles and a digestive system that's stopped in its tracks. The caveman is under stress. What does he do? He either picks up a rock and fights, or he takes to the hills. Now take modern man and woman and put them in a gas line. They are under stress. Eyes dilate, pulse quickens, stomach churns. But here's a difference. They can't throw a rock at the car in front of them, nor can they flee because they need to buy some gasoline. What do they do? Both may do what many normal 20th century human beings do: grind their teeth, get a headache and feed an ulcer. What exactly is stress? Dr. Hans Selye, the grandfather of stress theory, says stress is anything that causes the body to respond. Being kissed and being fired are both stressful. One, however, is healthy stress (eustress),. and the other is unhealthy stress (distress). Unhealthy stress can come from too much of a good thing or a had thing. A whirlwind vacation, a long-hours, no- reward job, and endless broing days all can cause stress. Learning to cope with unhealthy stress must be a priority item. Stress can kill. When the body responds to stress without any letup, in- ternal complications arise. Coronary disease, headaches, alcoholism and depression are just a few effects of unrelieved stress. Everyone reacts differently to stress. Some people have learned how to release stress in socially acceptable and useful ways' others turn stress inward and get sick. Recognizing stress is the first step to reducing it. Some symptoms of stress may be the following: -- heacaches -- stomach problems -- lack of concentration -- depression -- loss of or sudden gain of appetite -- inability to handle minor disappointments -- vague anxiety, especially about the future -- insomnia Ways of dealing with stress include the following: -- Be honest with yourself in identifying the real source of stress. It's not the job you dislike, it's that loud-mouthed manager. Eliminate the source if possible, or at least decide how to keep it from getting the best of you. -- Accept what you can't control Death and taxes are member of the Wentworth Congregational Church and a 57-year member of the Baker River Grange. Mr. Hutchins held many positions in town including several terms as selectman. At the time of his death he was a supervisor of the checklist. He is survived by his widow, Home in Plymouth. The Rev. David Waiters and the Rev. John Haggerty officiated. Burial will be in the Foster Cemetery in Wentworth. Memorial contributions may be made to the Baker River Grange, in care of Evelyn Ray, Rumney, N.H., 03266. Harlan Haskins dies ST. JOHNSBURY-- Harlan D. Haskins, 72, of 14 Winter St., died on Feb. 23 at his home, unexpectedly, after a lingering illness. He was born Sept. 23, 1909, in St. Johnsbury, the son of He is survived by his son, and his wife, David and Gabrielle Haskins, Konigsfeld, W. Germany; two granddaughters; one sister, Miss Alice Haskins, St. Johnsbun'y. federal and state dollar Agustus and Alice (Reed) losses: public relations; tax Haskins. His wife, Harriett sales; elections; takeover of "Pat" (Puffer) predeceased town highways; and vital him in 1954. statistics. Mr. Haskins retired from Fairbanks as a draftsman eight years ago. A 1927 graduate of St. Johnsbury Academy he attended the Art Student's League in New York City. He was well known in the area as an art teacher and commonly exhibited his work throughout New England. Mr. Haskins was a World War II veteran, having been a sergeant in the Medical Corps. Memorial services were held Saturday at the Desrochers and Sayles Funeral Home, with the Rev. Scudder Parker officiating. Interment will be in the spring at the convenience of the family. Memorial contributions may be directed to the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, c-o Mrs. Jean Marcy, Main St., St. Johnsbury. Desrochers and Sayles Funeral Home, 68 Summer St., was in charge of arrangements. More Ryegate News Mrs. Eileen LeBlanc of Troy spent Monday through Wednesday, Feb. 15-17 with her daughter and family Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Nelson, Curtis, Andrea, and James. Mr. and Mrs. James Kinerson were overnight guests Saturday, Feb. 13, of their daughter and family, Mr. and Mrs. Terry Steele, Heidi and Jonathan in Groton, Conn. On Sunday, they at- tended the dedication of Jonathan at the Groton Heights Baptist Church. On the way home they called on her brother Mr. and Mrs. George Randall in Lebanon, Ct. Mr. and Mrs. Guy Labounty, Mr. and Mrs. Alex Meyette, Mr. and Mrs. David InglEs, and Mr. and Mrs. Wes Gobel of Newbury dined together Sunday, Feb. 21, at Warner's Gallery. Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Nelson, Curtis, Andrea, and James had as overnight guests Thursday, Feb. 18, Kimberly and Jared McLure. Christopher and Kelly Collins visited their grand- parents Mr. and Mrs. John Maguire in Lynn, Mass., Saturday through Wednesday, Feb. 13-17. They attended a presentation of "Disney on Ice" and visited cousins in the area. Mr. and Mrs. Larry Harju, Sarah, Amy, Beth, and Hannah, and their babysitter Christine-- all'from Mid- dlehoro, Mass., spent Thur- sday, Feb. 18, with Mr. and Mrs. William Nelson, Grant, Hannah, Andrew, and Betsey, and went snowmobiling. On Friday they were guests of the Nelsons for lunch, and that evening, the two couples dined at the Happy Hour Restaurant in Wells River. Mr. and Mrs. Reginald White and Vincent Hilyer attended the annual meeting and dinner of R, C, and D at the Charlemont Restaurant in Morrisville Thursday evening, Feb. 18. Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Whitehill were Sunday dinner guests Feb. 21 of.their son and family, Mr. and Mrs. Winston 24 HOUR EMERGENCY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICE Oronge County Mental HHIth TOLL FREE 1.800-622-4244 Currier, April and Danny in Monroe, N.H., in celebration of April's 17th birthday. + Mr. and Mrs. Harold Nelson were guests for breakfast Saturday, Feb. 20, of their son and family Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Nelson, Curtis, Andrea, and James. Eight members and guests from the Youth Fellowship Group, accompanied by Rev. Marion Redding and Miss Jeanette McLure, enjoyed a day of skiing at Monteau Ski Area in Swiftwater, N.H., Friday, Feb. 19. Arthur Whitehill, Denzil Whitehill, and Norman Lowe attended funeral services for Ted Farrow in Peacham Sunday afternoon, Feb. 21. Mr. and Mrs. Leroy Nelson were luncheon guests of their daughter Mrs. John Melahn in Bradford Wednesday, Feb. 24. Mrs. Guy Labounty, Mrs. Alex Meyette, Mrs. David InglEs, Mrs. William Nelson, Mrs. Gene Perkins, and Mrs. James Arnosky of S. Ryegate were among those from this area who attended the meeting of Christian Women's Fellowship in St. Johnsbury Wednesday, Feb. 24. OXBOW SCHOOL BOARD BRADFORD-- There will be a meeting of the Unified District No. 30 School Board on Thursday, March 4 at 7:30 p.m. It will be held at the Oxbow High School. WELL DRILLING ROTARY HAMMER DRILLING. 20 YEARS DRILLING EXPERIENCE ( (&/',Ptl: IF WIxT[ SYSI [/AS ti$TAll[ D FOR FREE ESTIMATE CALL OR WRITE The E. BENEDINI Artesian Well Co. [ D Borre. Vt a;'6 4832 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE had lived in Lyme LYME--Rachelle Shacklette in the Lyme Congregational Hinchcliffe, 80, a former Church, the Utility Club of resident, died Feb. 2 in Lymeand theLyme Library. Toronto, Canada. She is survived by her two She was born in Kentucky, daughters, Priscilla Freeman and lived for serea essin and Nancy Butler, both of ndiniiccnnri aeoRico, New Ontario; six grandchildren; a York (2ity and Toronto. sister, Lois Groves of She and her late husband, Nokomis, FI.; several nieces George Frederick Hinchcliffe, and nephews. moved to Lyme in 1956, after A memorial service was at his retirement. Following his the Christ Church Deer Park death in 1970, she stayed in Anglican Church in Toronto. Lyme until 1973 when she Interment willbeinKentucky. moved to Louisville, Ky. In Memorial contributions 1978 she returned to Toronto to may be made to the Lyme join her two daughters. Congregational Church, or to Mrs. Hinchcliffe was active the Lyme Library. Gu00" G. Smith, 82, was dairy inspector E. THETFORD-- Guy G. W. of Orford, N.H.; a sister, Smith, 82, died Friday, Feb. 26 Gladys Rowell of Fairlee; two at his home here after a brief grandchildren, two great- illness, grandsons; nieces, nephews He was born Dec. 21, 1899 in and cousins. Bradford, the son of George Funeral services were held and Lilla (Welton) Smith. He at the Fairlee Federated attended school in Fairlee. Church with the Rev. Arthur In 1921 he married Laura M. Bagley officiating. Burial will Willis of Orford. They lived in he in the spring in the Fairlee Fairlee for several years, Cemetery. moving to E. Thetford in 1968. In lieu of flowers, con- Mr. Smith was a dairy in- tributions may be made to the spector for the Whiting Milk East Thetford FAST Squad or Company at the time of his the American Heart retirement. Association. He was a member of the The Godfrey Funeral Home Fairlee Federated Church. was in charge of He is survived by a son, Guy arrangements. Anna (Rust} Barley, 94. ta00ht at Peachmn PEACHAM-- Anna (Rust) of the Peacham Congre- Bayley, 94, died Feb. 28 at the gational Church. Northeast Vermont Regional She is survived locally by a Hospital in St. Johnsbury. daughter, Katherine White of She was born Oct. 3, 1887 in Bradford; 13 grandchildren Granhy, Mass. She graduated and 21 great-grandchildren. from Middlebury College in Funeral services were held 1909, and was one of the first at the Peacham Congre- women to receive the Phi gational Church. Burial will Betta Kappa pin. be at a later date in Peacham Mrs. Bayley lived most of Cemetery. her life in Peacham, and was a Memorial contributions teacher at the Peacham may he made to the Peacham Academy. She also taught in Library, or the Danville Windsor Locks, Conn. She was Rescue Squad, Danville, Vt. a housemother at the The Ricker Funeral Home University of Vermont for of Woodsviile, N.H. was in several years, charge of arrangements. Mrs. Barley was a member AT THE END OF YOUR I A course on facts about stress I J and ways to prevent it. Tuesdays 6: 30-8:00 PM March 9 thru April 13 at Oxbow High School 835-6 sessions Advance Registration & Information: Victor Manzon 222-4090 or sign up the first session. GRAY'S AUCTION CALENDAR SATURDAY, MAltCIi 6--- for Virginia Manning, ()range Cir., Vt. Selling 40 llead Jerseys and all Farm Machinery+ 10 AM. Hay. FltIDAY, MARCil 2(;--- for Susan and Dana Leonard, Haverhill, N.tt. Selling 80 Head Holsteins, 32 are Registered, Farm Machinery and Crops. 11 AM. SATUIII)AY. APRIl, 10-.- for Mrs. Asa Waterman, Woodsville, N.Ii. Selling all Farm Machinery, 10 AM. SATURI)AY. APRIl, 24-- the annual Farm Machinery Sale for McLaren's Inc. Passumpsic, Vt. SATURDAY, MAY I-- the New England Jersey Breeder's Sale to be held at the Rutland, Vt. Fairgrounds. Auction each and every Monday at the East Thetford Corn mission  les Barn. East Thetford, Vt. Auctioneers : ('.W. (;ray & Sons, hlc. East Thetford, Vt. 78.%,1348 or 785-2161