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March 3, 1982     Journal Opinion
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The MMT Sports six eyes Odd.looking telescope set style .for .future by JAMES CORNELL and DAN BROCIOUS Smithsonian News Service AMADO, ARIZ. -- Sporting six eyes, a computer brain, an electric road and a spinning building with its own snowplows, the Multiple Mirror Telescope may be the world's strangest-looking astronomical instrument. Yet many scientists now think that the unconventional MMT, as it is called, may well be the look of the future. To reach this odd-looking telescope perched more than 8,500 feet above the Sonoran Desert on the summit of Mt. Hopkins 35 miles south of Tucson, astronomers must negotiate 18 miles of narrow, winding, dirt road that grows more precipitous as it nears the top. The last 400 feet are so steep that the road is con- structed like a giant electric blanket, with heating coils embedded in the concrete to melt away ice and snow. On the breezy mountaintop, the world's third largest telescope is housed iuside a boxy, barn-like structure that turns with the telescope during normal observations. To clear a path through winter snows, the five-story, 500-ton building has little snowplows attached to its four corners. The most extraordinary thing about this instrument, however, is not its rotating building, but the optical system inside, for the MMT is a response to and possibly the resolution of a problem that has plagued astronomers for years. To extend the boundaries of the known universe, ever larger telescopes are needed to reveal ever fainter and more distant celestial objects. But simply scaling up the size of existing instruments is not practical because mirrors and their support systems even- tually reach a point where they collapse under their own weight. So, instead of one large mirror, the MMT uses an array of six individual 72-inch- diameter reflecting telescopes linked by a computer- controlled optical arrangement to produce the equivalent light-gathering power of a single 176-inch mirror. As an added bonus, the MMT was built at about a third the cost of a conventional 176-inch telescope. Astronomers using the MMT nightly observe the light from distant stars, galaxies and quasars as part of the search for clues to un- derstanding the universe. The facility is the first of its kind, the working prototype for a new generation of even larger telescopes based on concepts first tested here. Because of its radical departure in design, which combines the light received from six independent telescopes into a single stable image, some people initially questioned whether the MMT, once built, would work at all. "There is no question now," says Jacques Beckers, director of the Multiple Mirror Telescope  Observatory, a joint facility of the University of Arizona and the Smithsonian Institution. "The MlVIT outperforms most other large telescopes and its out- standing image quality and state-of-the-art in- strumentation results in unparalleled observations of the universe. "We definitely have a winner," he claims proudly. The most recent im- provement to the MMT's winning ways has been the development of an electronic telescope alignment system in which a video camera watches for blurring of the images and a computer adjusts the telescope's movable optics to achieve maximum sharpness. 1979--the MMT was already Even before these latest making important con- improvements--and even tributions to astronomy, before its official dedication in (please turn to page 5A) 3 r Z if) b o a0 :3" o O Perched more than 8,500 feet above the Sonoran Desert on the summit of Mr. Hopkins south of Tucson, the Multiple Mirror Telescope is a new breed of in- strument and the world's third largest telescope. TODAY'S CHUCKLE The"trouble with the Younger generation is that too many of us don't belong to it anymore. CIKULATIIlG IN: NEW IIAMIIIIRE - tyme, Lyme Center, Orford, Orfordville, Piermont, Haverhill, Haverhill Center, Haverhill Corner, North Haverhill, East Haverhill, Pike, Woodsville, Both, Monroe, Lisbon, Landaff, Benton. tvman, Warren, Glencliff, Wentworth . . . VIRMOMT - Thetford, East Thefford, Thefford Hill, Thetford Center, North Thetford, Post Mills, Fairlee, West Fairlee, Bradford, Bradford Village, Corinth, East Corinth, Topsham, West Topsham, Newbury Village, South Newbury, West Newbury, Wells River, Groton, Ryegate Corner, East Ryegote, South Ryegate, Peacharn, Barrier, West Bomet. THIS WEEK'S PRESS RUN 10,220 Number don't have to live in Vermont to tap for maple t The following hardwoods {at least one of which found just about anywhere in the U.S. or Can- all proved to be reliable producers of sap us- sYrup-making: Maple {Acer platanoides). Bigleaf Maple Rod Maple (Acer rubrumk Black Silver Maple (Acer saccharinumk (Acer negundoL Canyon Maple (Acer grandi- (Acer saccarumk Florida Ma- I. Sweet Birch (Betula lentaL know that "sap's up" when freezing nights are by warm--and usually sunny--days. Choose at least 10" in diameter for single taps, taps, and 22" or more for three taps. The called spites} can be made from sections of bamboo, willow, or mullein stem removed.., or you can use crimped rod or lengths of plastic tubing. 3/4 "-diameter hole from 2" to 3" deep on the of each tree. Be sure you bore at a slightly so the sap can drain downward, and that at a convenient height. tclean, rust-free bucket, a plastic milk jug, or to five-gallon container securely under sure it's adequately covered to keep dirt, etc. Roughly speaking, you can ex- gallons of sap a season from each tree, and 40 gallons to make 1 gallon of syrup. easily im warm weather, which means you frequently.., keep it cool while it's be- and boil it up as soon as possible. Clean cans, set in the chilly outdoors, make the syrup outside, on a fireplace made of blocks or a metal drum. Construct the so that the flames lick the bottom of your Container .. but don't let smoke come in con- as it'll affect the syrup's taste and your boiler, and keep the con- two inches deep ... slowly adding fresh From time to time. skim off the foam top of the syrup. with no apparent change, the suddenly thicken very quickly ... and it Stwr ched careful] durra this crm edandwat y " g " "'- When the temperature reaches 7 degrees ;, or when the liquid runs off a ladle in thin is done. Strain your natural sweeten- still warm. through a heavy felt bag. Re- 160F . and pack it in sterilized containers where it will keep indefinitely! iUonal information on sugar syrups Or on THE MOTHER your name and address and ask for Re. Crumb Molasses Cake". Matl to DoingMORE... Box 70 Hendersonville, N.C. 28791, or care of thle ad, this size, on page l of the Second Opinion is 0nly $10.00 .Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont PROUDLY THEY FLY-- Eight B-57 Canberras fly a tight formation. This was the last time the squadron flew together. The futtll*e . . . F/no/f00ht March 3, 1982 Bye-Bye 'Black Birds' before assignment to Viet- nam. Finally, on April 11, 1978, the B-57 was received by the Vermont Air National Guard. 1 On August 20, 1981, Lt. Col. Dave Hurlbut piloted B-57 aircraft number 499 to the Air Force Museum at Wright Patterson Air Force Base m Ohio. It became the first of the B-57s to part the Green Mountain State. All of the B-57s are gone now except for aircraft number 500, which the unit kept for static display. At the final launching of the aircraft, the ground crews were heard remarking, "we could keep those birds going another 30 years, if we had to." BURLINGTON-- And now letters received, and they're gone! An era has definitely recalled in the passed and the Vermont Air memories of all the "Green Guard has added to its list of Mountain Boys" who con- accomplishments and tributed to the mission. memories. The performance The B-57s were taken on of everyone concerned with their last flight by Lt. Cols. the mission of the B-57s can be Goyette and Kinney, and seen in the awards won, the Majors Hamilton and THE CHIEF--Lt. Colonel Ed Goyette, Wallace. Lt. Col. Ed Goyette, incidentally, was the first "Green Mountain Boy" checked out in the B-57. The B-57 Canberra was built by Glenn L. Martin Company and accepted by the Air Force on September 15, 1954. In 1967 the aircraft was inspected and given a complete check-up # New mission.., new plane , Air Guard recruitment , headed by Sgt. Rousseau BURLINGTON-- Almost 20 guinea pig for the new lazer tactical fighter-bomber. years after delivery of the and television-guided The combined combat flying weapons, f or instance, hours on F-4s exceeds 2.5 The 58,000 pound aircraft million, according to Captain has never been the fastest -- John Messinger, F-4 main- but at Mach2 ( twice the speed tenance and engineering of sound) it was fast enough to branch chief. shoot down 277 Migs over TAC (Tactical Air Corn-" Vietnam. mand) has an inventory of AIR FORCE ADVISOR ARRIVES-- Major Kenneth With a range of 1,300 miles more than 600 F-4s; a figure R. Ritt next to the F-4 Phantom which he just flew in. (including a typical tactical changing almost daily, as load andfuel),theF-4hasa more F-4sareshiftedtothe Air advisor arrives flight ceiling of over 60,000 Air Force Reserve and Air feet. National Guard inventory. The primary function of the F-4s are currently serving BURLINGTON-- Major Kenneth R. Ritt arrived at the F-4 is listed as an all-weather (please turn to page CA) Vermont Air National Guard complex recently as the Air Force Advisor during tran- sition to the new supersonic F- 4 aircraft. As the Air Advisor, Major Ritt's role is to assist the Guard in their new air Your ad, this size, on page ] of the Second Opini0n is only $5.00 ST. JOHNSBURY -- Recruiting is a basic part of the Vermont Air National Guard. The Vermont Guard seeks out only those in- dividuals who have a com- mitment to the organization. Today's Guard is nearly always at 100 percent strength because of their training programs and excellent pay during weekend drills ac- cording to recruiting mission. Ritt has logged over representatives from the 3,300 hours of flying time in the F-4. As a senior pilot, Ritt has flown the aircraft since 1967. During the period of tran- sition, Major Ritt's extensive F-4 experience will be valuable to the unit and it's new mission. THANK YOU! Residents of South Road who saw a breaking and entering in progress last Wednesday PM and reported it to the owner of the house. Vid Roe Carolyn Jefts Vermont Guard. However, there is always a need for special skills and for this reason the Guard is usually over 100 percent of strength. This area's recruiting of- ficer is TSgt Carroll Rousseau. He had been selected to fill that duty last February, and after attending recruiting school at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas, Sgt. Rousseau assumed his " (please turn to page 2A) ROUND AND SQUARE DANCE Every Saturday Night-- Time: 8-11:00 P.M. at Orford v Mile Town.I I a II With "Fiddling IHck Wilson and the Country Folks." BEE JAY'S TROPICAL FISH CENTER WATCH FOR WALK-IN SPECIALS Open Daily 10,30- 6 - Thurs. & Eri 'til 8 PM $oturdoy: 10=00 - b:O0 139 Central St. ( Rt. 302) WoocLville, N.H. Sdoy= 1 =00. So0 PM Closed Wednday i .... $125 PAINT SPECIAL ON ANY CAR $150FO1{I I('K-Ui TIIU('KS (inc ludes paint materials) BODY WORK EXTRA [802) 227 441,! FREE ESTIMATES BRADFORD. VT 05033 GOOD-BYE FLORIDA . . . HELLO VERMONT-- Another Phantom jet taxies onto Green Mountain turf. first F-4 to the Air Force in 1963, the "workhorse of the command" is still going strong. In fact, the Vermont Air Guard received their first F-4, replacing the phased out B-57, last October. The second and third aircraft arrived a short time later. All of the F-4s will be from the 56th Tactical Fighter Wing at MacDill Air Force Base near Tampa, Florida. The rest of the unit's F-4s will arrive at the rate of about four per month.  bee F-4. Phantom has long known as the most versatlle, of all the fighters. Recently, the F-16 Fighting Falcon and F-15 Eagle have been crowding the "old timer" in that light, but many a pilot throughout the Tactical Air Command will gladly argue the point. Suffice it to say, however; the F-4 has seen every type of tactical air combat mission the Air Force has played a role in, not to mention Navy, Marine and foreign service missions. Practically every weapons system and navigational aid in the Air Force inventory got its first test attached to an F-4. The Phantom served as the BRADFORD GAME ROOM VIDEO-- PINBALL Supervised (Behind Allen s Western Auto) Monday-Friday -- 3-9 PM-- Sat. 1-9 PM " 17 I LUCIEN L. BOURB00U Thursday, 2 PM- 6 PM PERSONAL AND SPRINGJ OIFFIC| NOUB$, Monday. l"uesday. Wednesday, | 2 noon to 4:30 pM' _ . Friday, 12 noo- 4:30 PM BUSINESS tNSURANC[ Happy Birthday MARK DOCKHAM Happy Bmrthday RAYMOND PARIGO II I Love YIt The MMT Sports six eyes Odd.looking telescope set style .for .future by JAMES CORNELL and DAN BROCIOUS Smithsonian News Service AMADO, ARIZ. -- Sporting six eyes, a computer brain, an electric road and a spinning building with its own snowplows, the Multiple Mirror Telescope may be the world's strangest-looking astronomical instrument. Yet many scientists now think that the unconventional MMT, as it is called, may well be the look of the future. To reach this odd-looking telescope perched more than 8,500 feet above the Sonoran Desert on the summit of Mt. Hopkins 35 miles south of Tucson, astronomers must negotiate 18 miles of narrow, winding, dirt road that grows more precipitous as it nears the top. The last 400 feet are so steep that the road is con- structed like a giant electric blanket, with heating coils embedded in the concrete to melt away ice and snow. On the breezy mountaintop, the world's third largest telescope is housed iuside a boxy, barn-like structure that turns with the telescope during normal observations. To clear a path through winter snows, the five-story, 500-ton building has little snowplows attached to its four corners. The most extraordinary thing about this instrument, however, is not its rotating building, but the optical system inside, for the MMT is a response to and possibly the resolution of a problem that has plagued astronomers for years. To extend the boundaries of the known universe, ever larger telescopes are needed to reveal ever fainter and more distant celestial objects. But simply scaling up the size of existing instruments is not practical because mirrors and their support systems even- tually reach a point where they collapse under their own weight. So, instead of one large mirror, the MMT uses an array of six individual 72-inch- diameter reflecting telescopes linked by a computer- controlled optical arrangement to produce the equivalent light-gathering power of a single 176-inch mirror. As an added bonus, the MMT was built at about a third the cost of a conventional 176-inch telescope. Astronomers using the MMT nightly observe the light from distant stars, galaxies and quasars as part of the search for clues to un- derstanding the universe. The facility is the first of its kind, the working prototype for a new generation of even larger telescopes based on concepts first tested here. Because of its radical departure in design, which combines the light received from six independent telescopes into a single stable image, some people initially questioned whether the MMT, once built, would work at all. "There is no question now," says Jacques Beckers, director of the Multiple Mirror Telescope  Observatory, a joint facility of the University of Arizona and the Smithsonian Institution. "The MlVIT outperforms most other large telescopes and its out- standing image quality and state-of-the-art in- strumentation results in unparalleled observations of the universe. "We definitely have a winner," he claims proudly. The most recent im- provement to the MMT's winning ways has been the development of an electronic telescope alignment system in which a video camera watches for blurring of the images and a computer adjusts the telescope's movable optics to achieve maximum sharpness. 1979--the MMT was already Even before these latest making important con- improvements--and even tributions to astronomy, before its official dedication in (please turn to page 5A) 3 r Z if) b o a0 :3" o O Perched more than 8,500 feet above the Sonoran Desert on the summit of Mr. Hopkins south of Tucson, the Multiple Mirror Telescope is a new breed of in- strument and the world's third largest telescope. TODAY'S CHUCKLE The"trouble with the Younger generation is that too many of us don't belong to it anymore. CIKULATIIlG IN: NEW IIAMIIIIRE - tyme, Lyme Center, Orford, Orfordville, Piermont, Haverhill, Haverhill Center, Haverhill Corner, North Haverhill, East Haverhill, Pike, Woodsville, Both, Monroe, Lisbon, Landaff, Benton. tvman, Warren, Glencliff, Wentworth . . . VIRMOMT - Thetford, East Thefford, Thefford Hill, Thetford Center, North Thetford, Post Mills, Fairlee, West Fairlee, Bradford, Bradford Village, Corinth, East Corinth, Topsham, West Topsham, Newbury Village, South Newbury, West Newbury, Wells River, Groton, Ryegate Corner, East Ryegote, South Ryegate, Peacharn, Barrier, West Bomet. THIS WEEK'S PRESS RUN 10,220 Number don't have to live in Vermont to tap for maple t The following hardwoods {at least one of which found just about anywhere in the U.S. or Can- all proved to be reliable producers of sap us- sYrup-making: Maple {Acer platanoides). Bigleaf Maple Rod Maple (Acer rubrumk Black Silver Maple (Acer saccharinumk (Acer negundoL Canyon Maple (Acer grandi- (Acer saccarumk Florida Ma- I. Sweet Birch (Betula lentaL know that "sap's up" when freezing nights are by warm--and usually sunny--days. Choose at least 10" in diameter for single taps, taps, and 22" or more for three taps. The called spites} can be made from sections of bamboo, willow, or mullein stem removed.., or you can use crimped rod or lengths of plastic tubing. 3/4 "-diameter hole from 2" to 3" deep on the of each tree. Be sure you bore at a slightly so the sap can drain downward, and that at a convenient height. tclean, rust-free bucket, a plastic milk jug, or to five-gallon container securely under sure it's adequately covered to keep dirt, etc. Roughly speaking, you can ex- gallons of sap a season from each tree, and 40 gallons to make 1 gallon of syrup. easily im warm weather, which means you frequently.., keep it cool while it's be- and boil it up as soon as possible. Clean cans, set in the chilly outdoors, make the syrup outside, on a fireplace made of blocks or a metal drum. Construct the so that the flames lick the bottom of your Container .. but don't let smoke come in con- as it'll affect the syrup's taste and your boiler, and keep the con- two inches deep ... slowly adding fresh From time to time. skim off the foam top of the syrup. with no apparent change, the suddenly thicken very quickly ... and it Stwr ched careful] durra this crm edandwat y " g " "'- When the temperature reaches 7 degrees ;, or when the liquid runs off a ladle in thin is done. Strain your natural sweeten- still warm. through a heavy felt bag. Re- 160F . and pack it in sterilized containers where it will keep indefinitely! iUonal information on sugar syrups Or on THE MOTHER your name and address and ask for Re. Crumb Molasses Cake". Matl to DoingMORE... Box 70 Hendersonville, N.C. 28791, or care of thle ad, this size, on page l of the Second Opinion is 0nly $10.00 .Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont PROUDLY THEY FLY-- Eight B-57 Canberras fly a tight formation. This was the last time the squadron flew together. The futtll*e . . . F/no/f00ht March 3, 1982 Bye-Bye 'Black Birds' before assignment to Viet- nam. Finally, on April 11, 1978, the B-57 was received by the Vermont Air National Guard. 1 On August 20, 1981, Lt. Col. Dave Hurlbut piloted B-57 aircraft number 499 to the Air Force Museum at Wright Patterson Air Force Base m Ohio. It became the first of the B-57s to part the Green Mountain State. All of the B-57s are gone now except for aircraft number 500, which the unit kept for static display. At the final launching of the aircraft, the ground crews were heard remarking, "we could keep those birds going another 30 years, if we had to." BURLINGTON-- And now letters received, and they're gone! An era has definitely recalled in the passed and the Vermont Air memories of all the "Green Guard has added to its list of Mountain Boys" who con- accomplishments and tributed to the mission. memories. The performance The B-57s were taken on of everyone concerned with their last flight by Lt. Cols. the mission of the B-57s can be Goyette and Kinney, and seen in the awards won, the Majors Hamilton and THE CHIEF--Lt. Colonel Ed Goyette, Wallace. Lt. Col. Ed Goyette, incidentally, was the first "Green Mountain Boy" checked out in the B-57. The B-57 Canberra was built by Glenn L. Martin Company and accepted by the Air Force on September 15, 1954. In 1967 the aircraft was inspected and given a complete check-up # New mission.., new plane , Air Guard recruitment , headed by Sgt. Rousseau BURLINGTON-- Almost 20 guinea pig for the new lazer tactical fighter-bomber. years after delivery of the and television-guided The combined combat flying weapons, f or instance, hours on F-4s exceeds 2.5 The 58,000 pound aircraft million, according to Captain has never been the fastest -- John Messinger, F-4 main- but at Mach2 ( twice the speed tenance and engineering of sound) it was fast enough to branch chief. shoot down 277 Migs over TAC (Tactical Air Corn-" Vietnam. mand) has an inventory of AIR FORCE ADVISOR ARRIVES-- Major Kenneth With a range of 1,300 miles more than 600 F-4s; a figure R. Ritt next to the F-4 Phantom which he just flew in. (including a typical tactical changing almost daily, as load andfuel),theF-4hasa more F-4sareshiftedtothe Air advisor arrives flight ceiling of over 60,000 Air Force Reserve and Air feet. National Guard inventory. The primary function of the F-4s are currently serving BURLINGTON-- Major Kenneth R. Ritt arrived at the F-4 is listed as an all-weather (please turn to page CA) Vermont Air National Guard complex recently as the Air Force Advisor during tran- sition to the new supersonic F- 4 aircraft. As the Air Advisor, Major Ritt's role is to assist the Guard in their new air Your ad, this size, on page ] of the Second Opini0n is only $5.00 ST. JOHNSBURY -- Recruiting is a basic part of the Vermont Air National Guard. The Vermont Guard seeks out only those in- dividuals who have a com- mitment to the organization. Today's Guard is nearly always at 100 percent strength because of their training programs and excellent pay during weekend drills ac- cording to recruiting mission. Ritt has logged over representatives from the 3,300 hours of flying time in the F-4. As a senior pilot, Ritt has flown the aircraft since 1967. During the period of tran- sition, Major Ritt's extensive F-4 experience will be valuable to the unit and it's new mission. THANK YOU! Residents of South Road who saw a breaking and entering in progress last Wednesday PM and reported it to the owner of the house. Vid Roe Carolyn Jefts Vermont Guard. However, there is always a need for special skills and for this reason the Guard is usually over 100 percent of strength. This area's recruiting of- ficer is TSgt Carroll Rousseau. He had been selected to fill that duty last February, and after attending recruiting school at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas, Sgt. Rousseau assumed his " (please turn to page 2A) ROUND AND SQUARE DANCE Every Saturday Night-- Time: 8-11:00 P.M. at Orford v Mile Town.I I a II With "Fiddling IHck Wilson and the Country Folks." BEE JAY'S TROPICAL FISH CENTER WATCH FOR WALK-IN SPECIALS Open Daily 10,30- 6 - Thurs. & Eri 'til 8 PM $oturdoy: 10=00 - b:O0 139 Central St. ( Rt. 302) WoocLville, N.H. Sdoy= 1 =00. So0 PM Closed Wednday i .... $125 PAINT SPECIAL ON ANY CAR $150FO1{I I('K-Ui TIIU('KS (includes paint materials) BODY WORK EXTRA [802) 227 441,! FREE ESTIMATES BRADFORD. VT 05033 GOOD-BYE FLORIDA . . . HELLO VERMONT-- Another Phantom jet taxies onto Green Mountain turf. first F-4 to the Air Force in 1963, the "workhorse of the command" is still going strong. In fact, the Vermont Air Guard received their first F-4, replacing the phased out B-57, last October. The second and third aircraft arrived a short time later. All of the F-4s will be from the 56th Tactical Fighter Wing at MacDill Air Force Base near Tampa, Florida. The rest of the unit's F-4s will arrive at the rate of about four per month.  bee F-4. Phantom has long known as the most versatlle, of all the fighters. Recently, the F-16 Fighting Falcon and F-15 Eagle have been crowding the "old timer" in that light, but many a pilot throughout the Tactical Air Command will gladly argue the point. Suffice it to say, however; the F-4 has seen every type of tactical air combat mission the Air Force has played a role in, not to mention Navy, Marine and foreign service missions. Practically every weapons system and navigational aid in the Air Force inventory got its first test attached to an F-4. The Phantom served as the BRADFORD GAME ROOM VIDEO-- PINBALL Supervised (Behind Allen s Western Auto) Monday-Friday -- 3-9 PM-- Sat. 1-9 PM " 17 I LUCIEN L. BOURB00U Thursday, 2 PM- 6 PM PERSONAL AND SPRINGJ OIFFIC| NOUB$, Monday. l"uesday. Wednesday, | 2 noon to 4:30 pM' _ . Friday, 12 noo- 4:30 PM BUSINESS tNSURANC[ Happy Birthday MARK DOCKHAM Happy Bmrthday RAYMOND PARIGO II I Love YIt