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March 11, 1981     Journal Opinion
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March 11, 1981
 

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New Hampshire own Meetings .= Budget talks at Piedmont Twice.a.year bil ts dead byL.F. BARNES forms and time periods over theartielegiving$500to PIERMONT--The town available to the homeowner, the Cottage Hospital was N. HAVERtIILL--Voters at "Our forefathers gave us $1,650.52 toward construction charges passed at the annual "'1 think the state is barking, defeated on a voice vote. ttaverhill Town Meeting this system," Kinder said. of (:lass V highways with the Town Meeting arc $50,219. but does not have that much Rev. Robert Robb said, • Tuesday elected Susan F. "We can raise the budget 2O slate appropriating $11,003.45, Combined with the county tax bite," he said. "some folks prefer the more ttolden to the Board of per cent or we can cut it, but and $10,S00 to build an addition and school budget, this makes "For the sake of the $100 intimate style--it's good to Selectman, unseatingsix-year it's a right I don't think we to the town maintenance a total to be raisedby taxes of spent by the town, we could have an alternative hospital•, ;" ii veteran Winthrop W. Klark by should give up." I)uilding to house a wood $338,676.64. The estimated tax have a lot more trouble than If all the communities passed a vote of 385-324 in a four-way The voters agreed with him burning furnace to sup- rateis $3.55. that," said Lewis Veghte. "I over the articles, the hospital / race. Dale Lewis was third in an ovcrwhelming voice vote plement the present oil-fired Ben Gitchell moved the think tbe cxpenditure of $100 is may not be able to stay with 129 votes and Rita rejecting the proposal, which furnace system, article "to appropriate $500 to keeping your options open, afloat." Greenwood Bixby fourth with Klark said was the idea of Voters authorized cx- pay for a public hearing for and is very good insurance." The town voted not to ap- i 13. former Gov. Meldrim penditure of federal revenue the sewer study, and that it be ' In balloting, the article was propriate $500 for manufac- ! i= The approximately 200 Thomson. "tie never lived sharing funds h)taling $45,000. decided by ballot vote." passed, 90-15. A motion to pass (please turn to page l2) t.. voters also overwhelmingly within a five per cent cap," This included the $10,000 for "Why do we need $500 to rejectcd a proposal presented Klark said ofThomson'syears Cottage liospital, $102OO for have a meeting?" asked Cl gh letted elect by Klark to switch from an- in the governorship. "tte will the llaverhilI-Ncwbury Bridge Charles Brown. Selectman OU e  man nual to twice-a-year tax tell you he did, but hedidn't." bond, $10,000 for the grader Freemont Ritchie said, "This billing. Voters approved a total bond, and $15,000 for truck iswhat the state engineers tell BATH-With 94 of ap- On a motion by Executive And they defeated town budget of $648,198.75, replacement, us we need to have. Butweare proximately ll2 ballots cast, Councilor Raymond Burton, Proposition 2 in 1, the state- nearly l0 per cent above last l{eelected were Town Clerk reimbursed $400 by the state Richard Clough was elected they supported an ap- wide advisory article that was year's expenditures, after tlelcn M. Smith, Highway and federal government. This selectman and voters air propriation, decreased from on the ballot inabout 198towns adding $6,272 for t]averhill's Agent Roland McKean, Tax third public hearing is propriated $68,526.54 for the $921.12 to $200 for the support throughout New Hampshire share of repairing the Bath Collector Norma Lavoie. necessary because, atthe first support of their town at the ofTheWhite Mountain Region seeking support for a state covered bridge damaged by Frank Steigler was elected two there was not a recom- Annual Town Meeting here. Association. limit of five per cent a year on ice, and $4,171.25 as thetown's treasurer, Roger Wells was mended solution acceptable to In warrant articles, they An article seeking a $10,000 all tax and spending increases share of White Mountain elected a library trustee and the selectmen, raised $1,000 for the supportof appropriation for the by state, county and local Mental ilcalth services. Roe McI)anolds was reelected "If we don't have this Cottage Hospital; $506 for the reassessment of the town by governments. A motion to take the a trustee of trust funds, hearing, the state will man- North Country Council; $1,064 the New Hampshire Depar- Selectman Richard G. $4.171.25 mental health ap-Evangeline Anderson was date that selectmen order for the North Country Health tment of Revenue Kinder said the Proposition 2 propriation out of the $10,000 reelected auditor, people from their homes for Agency; $,500 for Cottage Administration or a private in I proposal would take to Cottage ttospital for new Voters also authorized non-compliance, as the study Hospital Ambulance Service; assessing firm was defeated, away some of the rights of equipment wasdefeated, selectmen to sell real estate wasnot completed." and $20O for the Little(on as was the proposed use of the citizens at Town Meeting. Articles approved included (please turn to page 12) Gitchell mentioned legal t{ospital. (please turn to page 12) 3 THE VOTERS-- Susan Holden, (second from right) was declared of the selectmen's contest in Haverhill after a very close race with in- Winthrop Klark. Shown above at the James R. Morrill School are: (l-r) Agent candidate, Ken Davis; campaign volunteer Sylvia Wheeler; Select- t Susan Hoiden; and Selectman candidate Dale Lewis. Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont I r.ps March I1, 1981 RiVER--Officials of Union School a 4O per cent cut in pur- r'm - sttvplies and em in order to meet a :lget cut mandated considers forty percent in supplies and e00pment agriculture program and could damage that program, program by cutting purchases eliminating the noon kin- In biology, for instance, we of oil paints, pastels, etc.," he dergarten bus • to net some have a lot of living specimens and said it a other to reduce school will be discussed and final decision made today at meeting beginning at 4 p.m. Randall said the proposal to and equipment was put forth by A. Keith Ober session of the board after last week's meeting. public meeting, Ober Suggested reducing school eliminating the gets return Board of of the Town of have announced the town has received a return of premium con- nd interest from the New Hampshire Municipal Compensation Fund. checks represent an itial savings to the Town of ,258.38 for being a member the NHMWCF which is a roup self-insurance ,m. According to the Board of Selectmen, the town can et to receive additional in the future. NHM Workers' Com- a group self- created to give members an to reduce the cost their employees Workers' compensation without increasing I. continually coming in throughout the year. if we take 4O per cent out of biology supplies, it's going to hurt that added. $99,238 in budget savings. On the problem of the Under the new proposal of gymnasium roof, Randall reducing purchases of sup- said, "1 don't think a lot of plies ad equipent, the people understand this. A elimination of the kin- program. You can deal with it seam opened and one whole also be in pictures, but you cannot line is flowing down. We have t a picture," Randall gone up there and momen- told the journal Opinion. tartly patched it... The gym Randall said• Kindergarten It also presents a problem in floor is the most expensive pupils would still have a such purchases as pencils and floor in the whole school, a school bus in the morning, but paper, which are mandated by hardwood floor• We don't parents would have to pick the state, and if the art know what is going to happen them upat the school at noon. program is cut 40 per cent, inlitigation." In addition to the budget "You are cutting out the cuts required by the action of school district voters Feb. 24, Fo fac d BMU must also deal with the ur towns are e $25,000 cost of repairing the ith losing of dumps school roof, particularly the W C roof over the gymnasium where leakage threatens the expensive hardwood floor underneath. "If we don't fix our roof, we are going to lose the building underneath," Randall said. The faulty roof is currently the subject of a lawsuit by the school district against GAF, manufacturer of the roofing materials which school of- ficials contend was faulty. The suit, in court in Chelsea, is expected to be decided any day now, and a similar suit is scheduled to follow it in- volving the extensively leaking roof at Oxbow High School. Because the suit appeared close to resolution, BMU of- ficials pulled the $25,000 repair cost out of the budget, but Randall pointed out that if the school does not win damages, the money will have to be sought at a special school district meeting• Even if the school wins the ease, appeals could further delay the final outcome of the suit which has already been underway for some five years• Randall said the proposed cuts in purchases of supplies and equipments would avert the necessity of laying off The four neighboring towns of Bradford, Newbury, Corinth and Topsham are faced with having no place to dump their trash and garbage in the near future. Elmer Corbeth says he will shut down the Bradford- Newbury dump on his land on the Snake Road on May 1 because he's tired of it and isn't getting enough money for handling the dump. And the Corinth-Topsham dump is scheduled to be closed July 1 by the Vermont Environmental Conservation Agency under a 1979 agreement between Corinth and the state. self puts the benefits =insurance within the school employes, but would present problems of a dif- Cray Energy sells control of stock WOODSVILLE--Cray Energy of N. Walpole, N.H., has tentatively agreed with W.T.A. Associates, Inc•, of Massachusetts on the sale of 80 per cent of the stock of Cray Energy to W.T•S. Associates. P.S. Cray said the reason for the sale of the 00-year-old company was the ever-rising Bradford and Newbury were taken by surprise by news of the planned closing of their dump and no action has been taken so far to find another site• Corinth has had two years and $1,500 in state funds to find another dump site, but has not yet found one. One proposed solution by Corinth Town Clerk Jack Learmonth is to find a single large landfill serving all four towns, although the idea has been discussed only in- formally as yet. Learmonth said if the four towns have to hire private contractors, the total cost could run as high as $50,000 a year. Corinth now pays only $2,000 a year to manage its dump. Newbury Selectman Kevin Alger said Newbury may try to negotiate an agreement to use a dump in some other neighboring town. The problem of buying land for new dumps, officials said, is that adjoining landowners usually don't want a dump next door. "The big problem is time," said Bradrd Selectman John Gibbs. 'With Act 2and all of the state requirements there are now, it could take four or five years to find the right spot." LINE FORMS AT RIGHT-- Orford voters line up during lunch break to cast their ballots at Town Meeting. Lyme voters reject r "" p oposmon LYME--Proposition 2 in 1, a David Bridges, a supporter of statewide proposal to limit the proposition, who also property tax increases and government spending hikes to 5 per cent a year, was resoundingly defeated by voice vote at Lyme's Town Meeting Tuesday. "They're telling us we can't run our own business," was one typical comment opposing an article that would have pointed out that increases above five per cent could still be enacted by local bodies with a two-thirds vote• David Hew(t(, speaking against the proposition, said it was "attractive on the sur- face" and an apparent "easy answer" to curbing spending, but would not allow enough asked state legislators to back flexibility to deal with the the tax and spending limit problems of individual towns. proposal. "It would eliminate the kind "It's a good chance to make of positive, constructive the budget committees discussion we've had here sharpen their pencils and keep today." Hew(t( said. referring spending to a minimum," said (please turn to page 9) Budget approved in Orford by L.F. BARNES ORFORD--At the annual town meeting held in the Orford Town Hall on March 10, the voters approved, the budget prepared by the budget ommittee. The total amount is $121,627.23 which is about $8000 less than last year's budget• The largest reduction is in "town charges" which, at $46,0,50. is $7,750 less than last year. Among additional items, the Town voted $7000 for the grading and reseeding of the Community Field. This project was recommended by a joint meeting of the Fire Department, Parks and Playgrounds and the Con- servation Commission. The Fire Department leases the field from the Community Council for $1 per year (for 99 to stay here and learn spor- tsmanship. We would need some adult committees to do this--so that it wouldn't fall through like a lot of things do•" The article passed by a near-unanimous voice vote. Economic Development Promotion The Town voted $200 for the purpose of economic development and "the selectmen will appoint a committee of five to cooperate with the Selectmen, Planning Board, and Conservation Commission; to develop an economic plan and attract new business; said committee to report to townspeople by letter at least once every six months." Thomas Thomson said, "The tax rate has increased from $5.37 to $6.27 in one year. If we don't move and quickly, we won't be able to entice any industry because of our tax base. "I'm talking about small industries, not large heavy industry. "Businesses are gearing up to move or expand. We've got to move now. We can't just wait for someone to come here. "I've offered printing at no cost for an Orford pamphlet, and help in distributing it•" The Town voted to authorize the selectmen to contract with a data processing firm for more efficient management of town records. Selectman Horton (please turn to page 12) motivated". It was defeated by one vote, 34-33. Representative Thomson also spoke on a bill she was sponsoring to extend to small towns of under 1000 population, permission to continue with their present method of waste disposal until 1985. She is encouraged by the fact that Wentworth, Warren, and Orford have been studying the problem• The town voted $5,175 for the police department; $6,789 for (please turn to page 12) of many small ferent kind. inflation in prices of c ipalities whose "There are some strong petroleum produets, plusth e years). N quibbling arguing otherwise be feelings there that, depending company's substantial need "The by-laws of the Corn- O or //c on what department] it is, it operationterminalf°r new capitalwhichWhOlesalingtOstartedsupportlastits * ---00,Villa00e ° reoa__ res for __m'b°rmUnitYhaveC°Uncilhis°f nametheStatec°mmunityputthaton anYthe at W entworth mee__00,tln- po e arrest nut fall. te b a-on- 00$ue ,oo., roster by so "This willinsureourvalued, wa'-r requesting. SO the field ac-WARREN--Wentworthhada Representative Glynet{a h We th layi historic customers a better tually belongs to the town," history-making Town Meeting Thomson fielded questions to twor s supply to meet their future said Chester Grecnly. on Tuesday night. According clarify the proposition which where Sadvari was reportedly energy needs," Cray said. byL.F. BARNES water-rate, and the quality watershed area. Plans are to level the area, to long4ime Selectman Harold some thought was "politically William Sullivan, president NEWBURY--The Village and quantity of the water); They will creating a disturbance. New Hampshire detectives had advised the Pennsylvania Police that Sadvari could be in the Incaster area on Feb. 28. He had reportedly been seen in that area, about 140 miles from Johnstown, but managed to elude the police• He is being held in the Lancaster County prison awaiting extradition. Two New Hampshire detectives have gone there to make arrangements. of W.T.S. Associates, said the company's officers would remain the same and that there would be no disruption in business• He said the com- pany's headquarters will remain in the Connecticut Valley area. Sullivan said that throug W.T.S. s extensive other in- terests, Cray Energy will increase its wholesaling operations and 'will expand next spring into a drilling consortium in south Texas. water source citizens; and study by the Water Conlmissioners and Village Trustees.  Now villagers have an opportunity to hear h results of these studies, hnd to determine future ieyelep- ments. A special Village meeting will be held at the Town Hall on Wetdnesday March 11 at 7:30 p.m. As this issue directly effects the voters (in the amount of the supply in- system has been a the trustees have expressed formation on the development of criticism by the hope that as many as of an alternative underground possible of the 260 voters in the water source in the Con- village will be present at the necticut River flood plain. In meeting, the 50's the Village authorized The consulting engineer, test wells to be dug at various and representatives from the sites. According to the reports State Hgalth Department and there is a large underground the Farmers' Home water source east of the Administration will be present Village near the river• to participate. However, the cost to develop The Water Commissioners this would be considerable: will give information on the concrete enclosure and a development of an un- pumphouse above the flood derground source in the (please turn tn page g) making at least two baseball diamonds and a soccer field, and to reseed. "Someday some child in this community is going to have a broken leg playing on that field," said Julia Fifield. "The repairs would be a big ad- dition h) the town of Orford. Go to l,yme and see the ac- tivities on Sunday afternoons. And our field would be drier t ha n the( rs•" Mark Marsh of Parks and Playgrounds said, "Give the young people the opportunity Brown this is the first time the town accepted a presented budget with no arguing and practically no quibbling. The crowd of 133 was well- disposed to all propositions with the exception of Article 25. It sought to have the New Hampshire legislators vote for proposition 2 in 1 which would limit all spending and taxing at all levels of government to no more than five per cent increase except by a two- thirds vote of those present and voting. H--Stephen Sadvari, wanted in the murder of Keefe, here on Feb. apprehended in Pennsylvania, to Colonel Harold of the Pennsylvania he was arrested from justice issued by New State Police. Two State were called to early Friday New Hampshire own Meetings .= Budget talks at Piedmont Twice.a.year bil ts dead byL.F. BARNES forms and time periods over theartielegiving$500to PIERMONT--The town available to the homeowner, the Cottage Hospital was N. HAVERtIILL--Voters at "Our forefathers gave us $1,650.52 toward construction charges passed at the annual "'1 think the state is barking, defeated on a voice vote. ttaverhill Town Meeting this system," Kinder said. of (:lass V highways with the Town Meeting arc $50,219. but does not have that much Rev. Robert Robb said, • Tuesday elected Susan F. "We can raise the budget 2O slate appropriating $11,003.45, Combined with the county tax bite," he said. "some folks prefer the more ttolden to the Board of per cent or we can cut it, but and $10,S00 to build an addition and school budget, this makes "For the sake of the $100 intimate style--it's good to Selectman, unseatingsix-year it's a right I don't think we to the town maintenance a total to be raisedby taxes of spent by the town, we could have an alternative hospital•, ;" ii veteran Winthrop W. Klark by should give up." I)uilding to house a wood $338,676.64. The estimated tax have a lot more trouble than If all the communities passed a vote of 385-324 in a four-way The voters agreed with him burning furnace to sup- rateis $3.55. that," said Lewis Veghte. "I over the articles, the hospital / race. Dale Lewis was third in an ovcrwhelming voice vote plement the present oil-fired Ben Gitchell moved the think tbe cxpenditure of $100 is may not be able to stay with 129 votes and Rita rejecting the proposal, which furnace system, article "to appropriate $500 to keeping your options open, afloat." Greenwood Bixby fourth with Klark said was the idea of Voters authorized cx- pay for a public hearing for and is very good insurance." The town voted not to ap- i 13. former Gov. Meldrim penditure of federal revenue the sewer study, and that it be ' In balloting, the article was propriate $500 for manufac- ! i= The approximately 200 Thomson. "tie never lived sharing funds h)taling $45,000. decided by ballot vote." passed, 90-15. A motion to pass (please turn to page l2) t.. voters also overwhelmingly within a five per cent cap," This included the $10,000 for "Why do we need $500 to rejectcd a proposal presented Klark said ofThomson'syears Cottage liospital, $102OO for have a meeting?" asked Cl gh letted elect by Klark to switch from an- in the governorship. "tte will the llaverhilI-Ncwbury Bridge Charles Brown. Selectman OU e  man nual to twice-a-year tax tell you he did, but hedidn't." bond, $10,000 for the grader Freemont Ritchie said, "This billing. Voters approved a total bond, and $15,000 for truck iswhat the state engineers tell BATH-With 94 of ap- On a motion by Executive And they defeated town budget of $648,198.75, replacement, us we need to have. Butweare proximately ll2 ballots cast, Councilor Raymond Burton, Proposition 2 in 1, the state- nearly l0 per cent above last l{eelected were Town Clerk reimbursed $400 by the state Richard Clough was elected they supported an ap- wide advisory article that was year's expenditures, after tlelcn M. Smith, Highway and federal government. This selectman and voters air propriation, decreased from on the ballot inabout 198towns adding $6,272 for t]averhill's Agent Roland McKean, Tax third public hearing is propriated $68,526.54 for the $921.12 to $200 for the support throughout New Hampshire share of repairing the Bath Collector Norma Lavoie. necessary because, atthe first support of their town at the ofTheWhite Mountain Region seeking support for a state covered bridge damaged by Frank Steigler was elected two there was not a recom- Annual Town Meeting here. Association. limit of five per cent a year on ice, and $4,171.25 as thetown's treasurer, Roger Wells was mended solution acceptable to In warrant articles, they An article seeking a $10,000 all tax and spending increases share of White Mountain elected a library trustee and the selectmen, raised $1,000 for the supportof appropriation for the by state, county and local Mental ilcalth services. Roe McI)anolds was reelected "If we don't have this Cottage Hospital; $506 for the reassessment of the town by governments. A motion to take the a trustee of trust funds, hearing, the state will man- North Country Council; $1,064 the New Hampshire Depar- Selectman Richard G. $4.171.25 mental health ap-Evangeline Anderson was date that selectmen order for the North Country Health tment of Revenue Kinder said the Proposition 2 propriation out of the $10,000 reelected auditor, people from their homes for Agency; $,500 for Cottage Administration or a private in I proposal would take to Cottage ttospital for new Voters also authorized non-compliance, as the study Hospital Ambulance Service; assessing firm was defeated, away some of the rights of equipment wasdefeated, selectmen to sell real estate wasnot completed." and $20O for the Little(on as was the proposed use of the citizens at Town Meeting. Articles approved included (please turn to page 12) Gitchell mentioned legal t{ospital. (please turn to page 12) 3 THE VOTERS-- Susan Holden, (second from right) was declared of the selectmen's contest in Haverhill after a very close race with in- Winthrop Klark. Shown above at the James R. Morrill School are: (l-r) Agent candidate, Ken Davis; campaign volunteer Sylvia Wheeler; Select- t Susan Hoiden; and Selectman candidate Dale Lewis. Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont I r.ps March I1, 1981 RiVER--Officials of Union School a 4O per cent cut in pur- r'm - sttvplies and em in order to meet a :lget cut mandated considers forty percent in supplies and e00pment agriculture program and could damage that program, program by cutting purchases eliminating the noon kin- In biology, for instance, we of oil paints, pastels, etc.," he dergarten bus • to net some have a lot of living specimens and said it a other to reduce school will be discussed and final decision made today at meeting beginning at 4 p.m. Randall said the proposal to and equipment was put forth by A. Keith Ober session of the board after last week's meeting. public meeting, Ober Suggested reducing school eliminating the gets return Board of of the Town of have announced the town has received a return of premium con- nd interest from the New Hampshire Municipal Compensation Fund. checks represent an itial savings to the Town of ,258.38 for being a member the NHMWCF which is a roup self-insurance ,m. According to the Board of Selectmen, the town can et to receive additional in the future. NHM Workers' Com- a group self- created to give members an to reduce the cost their employees Workers' compensation without increasing I. continually coming in throughout the year. if we take 4O per cent out of biology supplies, it's going to hurt that added. $99,238 in budget savings. On the problem of the Under the new proposal of gymnasium roof, Randall reducing purchases of sup- said, "1 don't think a lot of plies ad equipent, the people understand this. A elimination of the kin- program. You can deal with it seam opened and one whole also be in pictures, but you cannot line is flowing down. We have t a picture," Randall gone up there and momen- told the journal Opinion. tartly patched it... The gym Randall said• Kindergarten It also presents a problem in floor is the most expensive pupils would still have a such purchases as pencils and floor in the whole school, a school bus in the morning, but paper, which are mandated by hardwood floor• We don't parents would have to pick the state, and if the art know what is going to happen them upat the school at noon. program is cut 40 per cent, inlitigation." In addition to the budget "You are cutting out the cuts required by the action of school district voters Feb. 24, Fo fac d BMU must also deal with the ur towns are e $25,000 cost of repairing the ith losing of dumps school roof, particularly the W C roof over the gymnasium where leakage threatens the expensive hardwood floor underneath. "If we don't fix our roof, we are going to lose the building underneath," Randall said. The faulty roof is currently the subject of a lawsuit by the school district against GAF, manufacturer of the roofing materials which school of- ficials contend was faulty. The suit, in court in Chelsea, is expected to be decided any day now, and a similar suit is scheduled to follow it in- volving the extensively leaking roof at Oxbow High School. Because the suit appeared close to resolution, BMU of- ficials pulled the $25,000 repair cost out of the budget, but Randall pointed out that if the school does not win damages, the money will have to be sought at a special school district meeting• Even if the school wins the ease, appeals could further delay the final outcome of the suit which has already been underway for some five years• Randall said the proposed cuts in purchases of supplies and equipments would avert the necessity of laying off The four neighboring towns of Bradford, Newbury, Corinth and Topsham are faced with having no place to dump their trash and garbage in the near future. Elmer Corbeth says he will shut down the Bradford- Newbury dump on his land on the Snake Road on May 1 because he's tired of it and isn't getting enough money for handling the dump. And the Corinth-Topsham dump is scheduled to be closed July 1 by the Vermont Environmental Conservation Agency under a 1979 agreement between Corinth and the state. self puts the benefits =insurance within the school employes, but would present problems of a dif- Cray Energy sells control of stock WOODSVILLE--Cray Energy of N. Walpole, N.H., has tentatively agreed with W.T.A. Associates, Inc•, of Massachusetts on the sale of 80 per cent of the stock of Cray Energy to W.T•S. Associates. P.S. Cray said the reason for the sale of the 00-year-old company was the ever-rising Bradford and Newbury were taken by surprise by news of the planned closing of their dump and no action has been taken so far to find another site• Corinth has had two years and $1,500 in state funds to find another dump site, but has not yet found one. One proposed solution by Corinth Town Clerk Jack Learmonth is to find a single large landfill serving all four towns, although the idea has been discussed only in- formally as yet. Learmonth said if the four towns have to hire private contractors, the total cost could run as high as $50,000 a year. Corinth now pays only $2,000 a year to manage its dump. Newbury Selectman Kevin Alger said Newbury may try to negotiate an agreement to use a dump in some other neighboring town. The problem of buying land for new dumps, officials said, is that adjoining landowners usually don't want a dump next door. "The big problem is time," said Bradrd Selectman John Gibbs. 'With Act 2and all of the state requirements there are now, it could take four or five years to find the right spot." LINE FORMS AT RIGHT-- Orford voters line up during lunch break to cast their ballots at Town Meeting. Lyme voters reject r "" p oposmon LYME--Proposition 2 in 1, a David Bridges, a supporter of statewide proposal to limit the proposition, who also property tax increases and government spending hikes to 5 per cent a year, was resoundingly defeated by voice vote at Lyme's Town Meeting Tuesday. "They're telling us we can't run our own business," was one typical comment opposing an article that would have pointed out that increases above five per cent could still be enacted by local bodies with a two-thirds vote• David Hew(t(, speaking against the proposition, said it was "attractive on the sur- face" and an apparent "easy answer" to curbing spending, but would not allow enough asked state legislators to back flexibility to deal with the the tax and spending limit problems of individual towns. proposal. "It would eliminate the kind "It's a good chance to make of positive, constructive the budget committees discussion we've had here sharpen their pencils and keep today." Hew(t( said. referring spending to a minimum," said (please turn to page 9) Budget approved in Orford by L.F. BARNES ORFORD--At the annual town meeting held in the Orford Town Hall on March 10, the voters approved, the budget prepared by the budget ommittee. The total amount is $121,627.23 which is about $8000 less than last year's budget• The largest reduction is in "town charges" which, at $46,0,50. is $7,750 less than last year. Among additional items, the Town voted $7000 for the grading and reseeding of the Community Field. This project was recommended by a joint meeting of the Fire Department, Parks and Playgrounds and the Con- servation Commission. The Fire Department leases the field from the Community Council for $1 per year (for 99 to stay here and learn spor- tsmanship. We would need some adult committees to do this--so that it wouldn't fall through like a lot of things do•" The article passed by a near-unanimous voice vote. Economic Development Promotion The Town voted $200 for the purpose of economic development and "the selectmen will appoint a committee of five to cooperate with the Selectmen, Planning Board, and Conservation Commission; to develop an economic plan and attract new business; said committee to report to townspeople by letter at least once every six months." Thomas Thomson said, "The tax rate has increased from $5.37 to $6.27 in one year. If we don't move and quickly, we won't be able to entice any industry because of our tax base. "I'm talking about small industries, not large heavy industry. "Businesses are gearing up to move or expand. We've got to move now. We can't just wait for someone to come here. "I've offered printing at no cost for an Orford pamphlet, and help in distributing it•" The Town voted to authorize the selectmen to contract with a data processing firm for more efficient management of town records. Selectman Horton (please turn to page 12) motivated". It was defeated by one vote, 34-33. Representative Thomson also spoke on a bill she was sponsoring to extend to small towns of under 1000 population, permission to continue with their present method of waste disposal until 1985. She is encouraged by the fact that Wentworth, Warren, and Orford have been studying the problem• The town voted $5,175 for the police department; $6,789 for (please turn to page 12) of many small ferent kind. inflation in prices of c ipalities whose "There are some strong petroleum produets, plusth e years). N quibbling arguing otherwise be feelings there that, depending company's substantial need "The by-laws of the Corn- O or //c on what department] it is, it operationterminalf°r new capitalwhichWhOlesalingtOstartedsupportlastits * ---00,Villa00e ° reoa__ res for __m'b°rmUnitYhaveC°Uncilhis°f nametheStatec°mmunityputthaton anYthe at W entworth mee__00,tln- po e arrest nut fall. te b a-on- 00$ue ,oo., roster by so "This willinsureourvalued, wa'-r requesting. SO the field ac-WARREN--Wentworthhada Representative Glynet{a h We th layi historic customers a better tually belongs to the town," history-making Town Meeting Thomson fielded questions to twor s supply to meet their future said Chester Grecnly. on Tuesday night. According clarify the proposition which where Sadvari was reportedly energy needs," Cray said. byL.F. BARNES water-rate, and the quality watershed area. Plans are to level the area, to long4ime Selectman Harold some thought was "politically William Sullivan, president NEWBURY--The Village and quantity of the water); They will creating a disturbance. New Hampshire detectives had advised the Pennsylvania Police that Sadvari could be in the Incaster area on Feb. 28. He had reportedly been seen in that area, about 140 miles from Johnstown, but managed to elude the police• He is being held in the Lancaster County prison awaiting extradition. Two New Hampshire detectives have gone there to make arrangements. of W.T.S. Associates, said the company's officers would remain the same and that there would be no disruption in business• He said the com- pany's headquarters will remain in the Connecticut Valley area. Sullivan said that throug W.T.S. s extensive other in- terests, Cray Energy will increase its wholesaling operations and 'will expand next spring into a drilling consortium in south Texas. water source citizens; and study by the Water Conlmissioners and Village Trustees.  Now villagers have an opportunity to hear h results of these studies, hnd to determine future ieyelep- ments. A special Village meeting will be held at the Town Hall on Wetdnesday March 11 at 7:30 p.m. As this issue directly effects the voters (in the amount of the supply in- system has been a the trustees have expressed formation on the development of criticism by the hope that as many as of an alternative underground possible of the 260 voters in the water source in the Con- village will be present at the necticut River flood plain. In meeting, the 50's the Village authorized The consulting engineer, test wells to be dug at various and representatives from the sites. According to the reports State Hgalth Department and there is a large underground the Farmers' Home water source east of the Administration will be present Village near the river• to participate. However, the cost to develop The Water Commissioners this would be considerable: will give information on the concrete enclosure and a development of an un- pumphouse above the flood derground source in the (please turn tn page g) making at least two baseball diamonds and a soccer field, and to reseed. "Someday some child in this community is going to have a broken leg playing on that field," said Julia Fifield. "The repairs would be a big ad- dition h) the town of Orford. Go to l,yme and see the ac- tivities on Sunday afternoons. And our field would be drier t ha n the( rs•" Mark Marsh of Parks and Playgrounds said, "Give the young people the opportunity Brown this is the first time the town accepted a presented budget with no arguing and practically no quibbling. The crowd of 133 was well- disposed to all propositions with the exception of Article 25. It sought to have the New Hampshire legislators vote for proposition 2 in 1 which would limit all spending and taxing at all levels of government to no more than five per cent increase except by a two- thirds vote of those present and voting. H--Stephen Sadvari, wanted in the murder of Keefe, here on Feb. apprehended in Pennsylvania, to Colonel Harold of the Pennsylvania he was arrested from justice issued by New State Police. Two State were called to early Friday