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March 11, 1981     Journal Opinion
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March 11, 1981
 

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Page 4-The Journal Opinion-March 11, 1981 iii ii i ] ii i ii ii ii iii )RTHEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. Publisher of Journal I1 Opinion WookJy newspaper pnblhhod hi Oredford, Vermont. Subscription rates • Vermont end New NompobJre • $9.00 per yar; $6.00 for |Jl mons; out Of Stilts - $12.00 per ynr and $7.00 for six months; Senior citizen discennt $L00. Second €less postelle paid at Ilmdford, Vermont 05033, Published by Nertkenst Publishing Company, Inc., P.O. Box 378, Bradford. Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher Bradford / 802-222-5281 / An Independent Newspaper Woodsville 603-747-2016 i L II i[l]l ,.,. , I I ('Editorials A true democracy From all reports there is an in- creasing alienation of citizens around the country who feel their govern- ments are unresponsive. Much of this feeling is undoubtedly true, and therefore Vermont and New Hampshire are uniquely fortunate in retaining their old Town Meeting format for conducting local affairs. Journal Opinion reporters attended and reported on numerous recent Town Meetings in the two states and we were impressed with the good sense and civilized conduct with which even the most hotly debated issues were handled. We agree with Vermont Secretary of State James H Douglas that the Town Meetings are "the last living example of true democracy," despite complaints that attendance in some towns is small. " "Some say the state has absorbed so much power over the y that little is left for towns to decide," Douglas noted, adding that tThat's just plain wrong." While we would disagree with Mr. Douglas to the extent that there are probably many more issues taken over by the state in recent years that citizens could properly handle at the Town Meeting level, we do agree with him that the election of local officers, town and school budgeting, road maintenance and other matters still handled at the annual Town Meetings are "very important•" And as for low turnout, Douglas adds: "Don't believe it. We've had complaints that some towns don't have rooms big enough to contain all the people who want to come to Town Meeting." The Journal ()pinion found that the Town Meetings our reporters covered were generally well-attended, well- run and the issues intelligently debated. Town voters could easily handle much more of their own af- fairs if the federal and state gover- nments gave back some of the powers they have soaked up over the years. But on balance, the Town Meeting system is alive and well in Vermont and New Hampshire. They must he important publtftlti found them worth reporting on the other day. Not all the old traditions work well in modern time and some must inevitably give way to "progress," but the Town Meeting is well worth hanging on to. as Douglas pointed out, because they "keep us free and in- dependent." I Rich histo00; poor historian To the Editor: copy of the deed and use it for Recently a Bradford further research I also paid resident, knowing that I am the $2 minimum fee for one interested in historic copy. In his most recent book preservation and research, about Vermont. historian asked me if I could develop a Charles T Morrissey says he historic abstract on her would like to see more Ver- village residence. Of course reenters develop an interest m developing such an 'abstract the rich history of this state -- requires considerable time, its towns, villages and historic effort, perserverance and architecture. Who can afford several trips to the Town to with rate structures such as Clerk's office to use the land these? records• I would be doing this Joanna Gilbride for fun and further ex- S. Newbury, VT Executive Councilor Raymond S. Burton New Hampshire governmental toll.free telephones In recent years many governmental and private businesses established toll free 800 numbers whereby people may call, without charge, to recei,e information or help. During my first term on the Council, I had printed (at my own expense) an 800 number card which proved very popular in the rural North Country. For many people and many businesses located far from the city of Coocord, toll phone calls can add up very fast. I have again had printed (at my own expense) an up-dated 800 number card which has a map and listing of the towns in District One and 23 toll free 800 numbers which are helpful to those of us living here in the North Country• If anyone would like a free copy of this card, please write or call me--Ray Burton RFD No. 1, Woodsville, NH 03785. Tel: 747-3662 or 271-3632• The following is the list of 23 toll free 800 numbers: Fecest Plenniql 1.800-25|-8994 Mnel Hedt I[mrgml/t-800-852-3323 N.H. Meter Vddcles !.800.852.3738 Amedmn CAncer Infonnefl 1400-562. I l 12 Carrel Cnestl, Shwiff's Office 1-800-552.8960 Consumer Products Safely 1-80.638.8326 Femily Fbmcid Cen:lllng 1-800-852-3585 C,,mfte4 Cowly Skiff's Office 1-800-5$2-0393 Gtbm Sersim Governor's Office 1 400-852-3456 Gore€net's Cnencil on |mrllY 1.80.852-3466 bfo Une Se¢inl Welfwe Cenncil 1 400-852-3311 btenmJ Revenue Service 1-1100-$82-7200 N.H. bcerence Department !-800-852-3416 N.H. Au'n. Foe The Elderly ] -800-852-$4|3 N.H. Stere Police-Emerpncy 1-800-852-34l I Veterm's Administration 1-800-562-5200 AutKap 1.000-852-3305 H.it. Leoel Assistence [Serin] !-800.752.8969 N.H.I.qlel Assistance [Clemmt] 1-800-$62-3994 Sen. Humphrey's Offke !-800-052-3714 Con|. D'Anm.r's Office 1 400-562-3802 Tri-Cawnty Commmity Action 1400-552.4617 Governor's HnedJcapped Cendl 1-800-852-3405 Legislative Report Wayne Kenyon, (D-Vt.) Budgeta00. proposals in Vermont The Vermont House will soon examine tax and budgetary proposals for Fiscal Year 1982 which commences on July 1st of this year. The General Fund which takes care of most state services is now operating on a $244 million budget, reduced from $252 million by a 3 per cent cut earlier this year. The Governor's 1982 proposal is $275 million. Estimated revenues for FY 82 are $260 million according to the Governor. The reality will probably fall about halfway between. The House Appropriations Committee is attempting to shave $5 million from the Governor's proposal. The magnitude and complexity of this task has frustrated the efforts of this carefully chosen and fiscally conservative panel. A proposal of about $271 million will probably be on our desks sometime next week. The Highway Fund currently operates on a $63 million budget. The Governor's 1982 proposal is $70 million• Revenues continue to lag behind needs and ex- pectations. The 10 Year Plan has not yet been trimmed and construction costs continue to rise. With curtailed travel, gas tax revenues are not keeping pace with transportation needs. Despite a $7 million infusion of additional funds, FY 80 fell increased gas tax to take up this slack has become a painful necessity• The current tax is 9 cents per gallon. The choice so far is 9 per cent per gallon proposed by the Transportation Com- mittee or 12 cents a gallon supported by Ways and Means. Both proposals include diesel fuel. The Governor insists upon a per cent increase which would offer ad- ditional revenues as the price of gasoline goes up. The Property Tax Relief Fund has "a balance of $18 million. This includes the FY 79 surplus minus the earned interest in FY 80 and 81 given to the Highway Fund. Letters to the Eight million dollars a year goes for property tax relief for low-income homeowners and renters. A loss of revenue-sharing funds in FY 82 would drop the fund to $11 million and then to $2 million the following year. We obviously need to shore up this fund, and, to com- pensate for inflation, possibly raise the eligibility limits. The Governor wants $10 million from the Property Tax Fund. Seven million dollars would erase the FY 80 General Fund deficit and $3 million would more than redress the FY 80 Highway imbalance. Unless a viable alternative proposal is advanced to remedy the General Fund deficit, the Governor will prevail. He will probably not succeed in obtaining $3 million more for the Highway Fund. State Aid To Education reform continues to be chimeric. The Miller Formula still spews largesse on some communities while searing others with a perverse scorn. A large amount of this inequity results from not feeding the beast properly. Full funding, however, has been beyond our practical means, and remains outside of political grasp. FY 81 has $40 million in fodder, and FY 82 will probably offer about $41.5. Governor Snelling's reform initiative over the business and commercial property, ex- clusive of inventory. The town would continue to tax the dwelling and up to two acres. Following reappraisal, the state would redistribute the increased taxes so that all school pupils would receive an equal amount of assistance. This plan does not have legislative support because it takes away local control of taxation and places an increased burden on those with property. The Governor recently evidenced his frustration with this climate of non- (please turn to page 10) I Editor Good judgement shown /\\; To the Editor: Newbury Town Meeting, their yard. This person em- personal relationships with 1981 could have turned into a phatically stated to the effect Vermonters that a "native" shambles were it not for the that "they would never allow would not have mentioned it. good judgement of all but one such an eyesore in One: most natives are not present. Massachusetts and what did concerned with appearances: As a matter of background; the Planning Commission plan if a man is honest, forthright during the discussion of the to do about this matter". The andhard working, they really Pianning Commission'sreport chairman of the Planning don't care how he dresses. with regard to the com- mission's use of the word "housekeeping" therein, a woman unknown to me stood up and publicly criticized a resident family of Newbury for having too much junk in seem to me, based on my own unassuming, straight forward pride generously laced with honesty, hard work and Commission. Bill Ide, looks, or keeps his yard. They promptly humped the matter judge a man by the man to the selectmen and after a himself, not by appearances. few snickers the meeting Two: most natives (at least preceded, the ones I know) would not My point is this!! It would embarrass a fellow town- perience, no fee. I was quite'familiar with the Senior privileges and re00pon00ibili600 $2 an hour charge for use of these records though I feel To the Editor: it is O.K.. for your child to listening to the voice of the that any taxpayer, or history We are writing to you to have theprivileges, senior class. student for that matter, should inform you that we are getting This letter is to simply let Class of 1981 be able to use these public senior (privileges) as of you know what is going on at Oxbow High School sperson publicly. If they have something to say, they call you on the telephone, or, more likely than not, stop in to see you personally, the latter being true most of the time. Vermont has a special life respect for each other. This attitude expects nothing from you short of being yourself. I think most of these qualities, both individually and collectively, are becoming much too scarce in our society. With all due respect I have 'to say that there are some Vermonters who don't like "flat-landers". That's what they call us-those of us who come from Massachusetts, Connecticut or generally anywhere except Vermont, Maine or New Hampshire. You see, I am a "transplant" (as I prefer to call myself) and The Ely War papers at no charge. How Monday, March9. 1981. These many of us can whip through are privileges and respon- those early land deeds with sibilities that remain m sometimes illegible hand- school, but there is one writing? And how many of us privilege) that has todo with can afford to? But rules are the community. This is, that rules, so I paid. any senior with unassigned Whal is more difficult to time may sign out and leave accept, however, is the $1 a school. They must be back in photocopy, $2 minimum fee, time for their next class. This. thai one is faced with should by far. is not a right but a he or she desire a copy of a privilege. particular deed(At $2 an hour The senior class of 1981 has who can afford to copy the earned this privilege and the deeds by hand?L Sincq I principal feels that we are wanted to give my friend a responsible enough to handle it. Of course, responsibility does play a big part. If a senior shows that he or she CORRECTION cannot handle this privilege In a letter to the editor last then the privilege will be week from Anita S. Perry of taken away from him or her. Bradford, there was a We really do feel that we are typographical error in the responsible. We do not want fourth paragraph. It should you (the community) to feel have read as follows : that we, as students, do not With regard to an incident at care about school anymore, a recent ball game involving a because we do. This is simply member of the press, I sin- an issue that the senior class cerely hope I was wrong in works to get and must be thinking that the fans were approved by the principal. applauding that display of We have had a e)uple of sportsmanship and adult meetings to decide what the behavior, privlles would be. You as The headline on the letter parents will get a list of what should have read "Let's talk they are and also have to sign about principles" tnot prin- (if you agree with what they cipals), are) a permission slip saying the school. We thank you for Bradford, Vt. style• A very comfortable, quite frankly I feel a bit of Good malerial for Alice in Wonderland To the Editor: I would like to say a word or hazard just because it hap- nuclear energy would be two about the letter from M pens to be on-line when one relatively easy to come by Nevins, of Etowah, N.C., in turns on anelectriclight• See, for example, The New your paper last week in which Life in Vermont would not England Energy Atlas he said that Corinth residents come to a screeching halt if published in July 1980 by the were either insincere or Vermont Yankee were closed Thayer School of Engineering foolish to have passed an down once and for all. at DartmouthCollege. ordinance which prohibits, (Remember, it's closed down M. Nevins goes on to say among other things, the quite a bit at the best of thatanyonewhodoesnotwant mining and transportation of times.) Because oil-generated a nuclear facility in their town radioactive materials in their electricity was extremely should "at once discontinue town. The logic of his cheap for several decades, we the burning of wood" because argumegts would make good have developed the habit of it contains radioactive carbon. material for an "Alice m using electricity with aban-The miniscule amounts of Wonderland" chapter, don. We use it for such jobs as radioactive carbon released He suggests that anyone heating, for which it is most by burning wood are already who doesn't want a nuclear inappropriate. In 1950 the per in the biosphere. When any facility in their town is capita use of electricity was 50 tree dies and decays, this is hypocritical or unfair if he per cent of what it is today and released into the atmosphere. uses electricity because part I haven't heard that freezing Burning the wood instead of of this electricity is generated in the dark was a widespread letting it rot in no way in- at Vermont Yankee. At least phenomenon 30 years ago. If creases the amount of some of'us who don't want a we were to shut down every radioactivity at large. Wood uranium mine in our town nuclear plant in the country smoke smog As another don't want Vermont Yankee and not replace any of the problem, one whtsesolution is either -- in Vernon or power, we would have to well-known, lnnyease, wood anywhere else -- but it's not reduce our total energy smoke mostly afros us here something we ever were consumption only by about 3 and now ancL ue nuclear consulted about. There is no per cent and our electricity waste, it ' left for moral dilemma involved in use by about 13 per cent. If we generation  the distant refusingAo supply material to did insist on replacing the future to e0with. or take garbage from a power power, many energy experts X-rays are indeed hazar. station which poses a health consider that substitutes for dous and medical people have become increasingly cautious about using them in recent years. People make a voluntary decision about having x-rays, after con- sidering the risks and the benefits. This is quite unlike the indiscriminate dosing to all of us which the nuclear industry provides. I expect many Corinth residents would willingly accept a fair share or better of radioactive wastes from medical treatments and the like. These materials tend to have short half lives anyway. Once nuclear weapons are abolished and nuclear plants are shut down, chances are people everywhere will be eager to help deal with the wastes that have been ac- cumulated. What we now confront is a situation in which all these hazards are being recklessly increased. Almost any sort of protest against such irresponsibility heats doing nothing. We eannot do anything about the radiation from In 1880, the Ely mine in Vershire reached its greatest production of copper -- over three million pounds. tlowever, the Vermont Copper Mining Company was in deep financial trouble with copper prices dropping, new machinery needed, and the copper ore diminishing in richness. Payment of the miners' wages started dropping behind, and by 1882 the company was almost $200,000 in debt. In desperation, Smith Ely sold part of the company to Francis Cazin, a German mining engineer. Cazin had many ideas for modernizing the smelting process, but after an enormous expenditure of money for new equipment, his ideas proved to be im- practical, so the company was in worse shape than ever -- and when Cazin was finally fired, he pressed lawsuits that threatened the complete destruction of the company and the mine. On the brink of bankruptcy in June, 1883, the company could not pay the miners, so for lack of pay the miners would not produce any ore, and for lack of ore no smelting could be done to produce any copper to pay the men. The mine was closed and a notice was posted with a proposition for the miners: that the men work for lower pay, or at least that they keep the smelting works running to smelt the ore that was on hand to raise money tOpay the men. In the meantime, while men were looking for other work, they could live without rent in- the company tenements. Response of the miners Fearful of losing their back wages, the miners presented a united front in refusing to work under either alternative. During the weekend after the closing they became more and more restless, and in the face of their threats to take over the officials on Sunday night hurriedly moved all their valuable records and papers to a safer place. True to their word, on Monday morning when the company store opened at 8:00, Ihe miners swarmed in and emptied out the place, then nmved on to the Ely-Goddard mansion, but there they were persuaded to leave without doing any damage. malice connected to the term "flat-lander". I have been here nine years now and I have worked hard to over- come the name "flat-laader". I LIKE it here. I liked it when we moved here. I like it now. Hopefully we can learn to accept Vermont and her people for what they are and leave them alone instead of trying to remodel them to what we left behind. If the attitude displayed at our town meeting persists I am afraid we (none of us "transplants") cannot ever expect to be fully accepted as Vermonters no .matter hew long we live here. Marlene Gilson S. Newbury, Vermont Vermont granite or other background sources• We probably can't do anything about Vermont Yankee or nuclear weapons either, but these are pegple-made hazards and it i at least theoretically within our power to do away with them. M. Nevins seems to be a proponent of an argument that we haven't heard much of since the days of the Vietnam war: if you get your hand caught in the wringer, you might as well let your whole body go through. The radioactivity given off by a power plant under ideal conditions won't make your hair fall out. No one argues about this• But when one adds to this smallish peril the inevitable leaks into the cooling system, the frequent malfunctions and spurious emissions, the radiation from uranium mining operations and mine railings, the 500 pounds of plutonium produced each year by an average reactor, and the imoluble problem of other radioactive but when -the mi] discovered that the they would be offered wast about 20 percent of what! due, they demanded nothing -- and gave ultimatum that if not paid they would kegs of gunpowder that had taken and blow • mine, besides burning buildings. They set a of 7: 30 p.m. on Sa turday. Calling for help Another drama was Roswell of Bradford, lawyer Vermont Copper Company, who had finished his term as of Vermont. With the of Smith Ely during the at the mines, became acting the company. Wednesday the miners, he met other officers of then sent a letter Barstow, asking him out the state militia miners' deadline on night. In the meantime, nham and other officers met on Thursday company creditors and officials, trying to find to satisfy the a] but they made On Friday, Go Barstow made a call out five compames state militia to bring under his own t The Bradford marched directly to Fairlee, but the companies arrived at Station Saturday 1:30 in a seven-car train, accom Governor Barstow personal staff. The their equipment were into a number of the company's coke wa each man was rounds of ammunition. They were met Lake House near Post Farnham, who Confrontation with Smith Ely Frustrated, the miners milled about until someone suggested a showdown with Smith Ely himself. With this in mind, a group of two or three hundred miners, some of them armed with clubs or knives, marched to West Fairlee and surrounded Mr. Ely's house, shouting "Bread or blood!" and demanding that Mr. Ely come out. When they were told that he was sick in bed, they forced their way through the door and were crowding their way up the stairs -- when ahead of them loomed the imposing figure, of Mr. Ely's friend General Stepheri Thomas, with pistol in hand. In the face of promises and the pistol, they retreated -- then ad- vanced again. This time they complied with a suggestion that a committee of miners meet with Mr. Ely to discuss the matter• His sympathetic words and promises of payment quieted the mob, and persuaded them to retreat to await arrival of the com- pany's financial agent on Wednesday. (Note: Gen. Thomas of West Fairlee was the member of the Vermont legislature who proposed and promoted the raising of one million dollars from the State of Vermont to help finance the Civil War.) A telegram sent to the financial agent by the treasurer of the company, who had been in Mr. Ely's houseat the time of the seige, shows how serious matters had become: "Send all money on both shipments of copper. Fail not. Property in hands of mob all day. They threaten Mr. Ely's life. Have rescued him twice today. They threatened to burn all the property tonight, but have pledged to he quiet till your answer comes. Don't fail to send money . . . The property and Mr. Ely depend on it..." ira: driving Mr. Cazin and his tamity out of the village, they reached harassing them with jeers a.m., saddle horses and threats until they had obtained for the gone beyond West Fairlee. the mile and a half Mr. Ely, feeling that his own the Ely mining life was also in danger, fled begun. from West Fairlee to Brad- The showdown ford, under cover of darkness. The guardsmen The financial agent have been apprehensi I arrived on Wednesday, as they approached the promised, along with some of village, not knowing the other company officers, there would be resistance -- or ambush as they down the open road. As the first houseS into view, the rising just striking their The street showed no T/me to life, but as the tinned into the to coa/? saw a few To the Editor: Dear New Englander: We in West Virginia have a warm message this winter for our neighbors in your area: Coal. If you are watching your thermometer plummet and your utility bills skyrocket, that message should he clear• West Virginia coal is ready to help its neighbors across this nation by providing clean, low-cost energy to ease our foreign oil dependence• We are currently sponsoring a "people-to-people" campaign to get that message into your area. As part of that cam- paign, West Virginians from all walks of life have written letters to their New England neighbors explaining the benefits of coal-fired power; many of those letters soon will appear in a full-page "Boston Globe" advertisement... Sincerely, Allen S. Pack Chairman of the Board West Virginia Coal Association Charleston, W. Va. (Editor's note: see related slory On page 5) wastes, it sure should make your hair stand on cod. Plutonium is a horribly poisonous product which does not occur in nature. It decays so slowly that it will still be one-half as radioactive in 24,400 years as it was when created. And it will have to be kept out of the biosphere by countless generations of people who will derive no benefit from it. Any benefit will have been enjoyed by us, because a nuclear power plant lasts a mere 20 to 40 years. After that it is so con- laminated that no one can work there and it must be shut down. The problem of safely (please turn to pae I I ) drawn back and out" then a few brave cautiously step stared at the army in I midst. Within a short sheriff and his rounded up char the meantime the Guards had of the mine hill, and had taken of the gunpowder miners had Thus the over almost begun to the" everyone• Within minutes the miners families were talking with the "laughing at how had been such a before. The shared their hungry miners, marched back to housewives offered milk and spring water. On Monday, Attorney released prisoners, as he unable to find testify, against them that week, the paid about 20 was due them, but last money give them, and they all had to homes elsewhere, i After five tempting to sell company finally auction and it Mr. Cazin. With a finance the upthe Smelting company' lasted only a it ran out of money. After 1900, the mine briefly (please turn to Page 4-The Journal Opinion-March 11, 1981 iii ii i ] ii i ii ii ii iii )RTHEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. Publisher of Journal I1 Opinion WookJy newspaper pnblhhod hi Oredford, Vermont. Subscription rates • Vermont end New NompobJre • $9.00 per yar; $6.00 for |Jl mons; out Of Stilts - $12.00 per ynr and $7.00 for six months; Senior citizen discennt $L00. Second €less postelle paid at Ilmdford, Vermont 05033, Published by Nertkenst Publishing Company, Inc., P.O. Box 378, Bradford. Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher Bradford / 802-222-5281 / An Independent Newspaper Woodsville 603-747-2016 i L II i[l]l ,.,. , I I ('Editorials A true democracy From all reports there is an in- creasing alienation of citizens around the country who feel their govern- ments are unresponsive. Much of this feeling is undoubtedly true, and therefore Vermont and New Hampshire are uniquely fortunate in retaining their old Town Meeting format for conducting local affairs. Journal Opinion reporters attended and reported on numerous recent Town Meetings in the two states and we were impressed with the good sense and civilized conduct with which even the most hotly debated issues were handled. We agree with Vermont Secretary of State James H Douglas that the Town Meetings are "the last living example of true democracy," despite complaints that attendance in some towns is small. " "Some say the state has absorbed so much power over the y that little is left for towns to decide," Douglas noted, adding that tThat's just plain wrong." While we would disagree with Mr. Douglas to the extent that there are probably many more issues taken over by the state in recent years that citizens could properly handle at the Town Meeting level, we do agree with him that the election of local officers, town and school budgeting, road maintenance and other matters still handled at the annual Town Meetings are "very important•" And as for low turnout, Douglas adds: "Don't believe it. We've had complaints that some towns don't have rooms big enough to contain all the people who want to come to Town Meeting." The Journal ()pinion found that the Town Meetings our reporters covered were generally well-attended, well- run and the issues intelligently debated. Town voters could easily handle much more of their own af- fairs if the federal and state gover- nments gave back some of the powers they have soaked up over the years. But on balance, the Town Meeting system is alive and well in Vermont and New Hampshire. They must he important publtftlti found them worth reporting on the other day. Not all the old traditions work well in modern time and some must inevitably give way to "progress," but the Town Meeting is well worth hanging on to. as Douglas pointed out, because they "keep us free and in- dependent." I Rich histo00; poor historian To the Editor: copy of the deed and use it for Recently a Bradford further research I also paid resident, knowing that I am the $2 minimum fee for one interested in historic copy. In his most recent book preservation and research, about Vermont. historian asked me if I could develop a Charles T Morrissey says he historic abstract on her would like to see more Ver- village residence. Of course reenters develop an interest m developing such an 'abstract the rich history of this state -- requires considerable time, its towns, villages and historic effort, perserverance and architecture. Who can afford several trips to the Town to with rate structures such as Clerk's office to use the land these? records• I would be doing this Joanna Gilbride for fun and further ex- S. Newbury, VT Executive Councilor Raymond S. Burton New Hampshire governmental toll.free telephones In recent years many governmental and private businesses established toll free 800 numbers whereby people may call, without charge, to recei,e information or help. During my first term on the Council, I had printed (at my own expense) an 800 number card which proved very popular in the rural North Country. For many people and many businesses located far from the city of Coocord, toll phone calls can add up very fast. I have again had printed (at my own expense) an up-dated 800 number card which has a map and listing of the towns in District One and 23 toll free 800 numbers which are helpful to those of us living here in the North Country• If anyone would like a free copy of this card, please write or call me--Ray Burton RFD No. 1, Woodsville, NH 03785. Tel: 747-3662 or 271-3632• The following is the list of 23 toll free 800 numbers: Fecest Plenniql 1.800-25|-8994 Mnel Hedt I[mrgml/t-800-852-3323 N.H. Meter Vddcles !.800.852.3738 Amedmn CAncer Infonnefl 1400-562. I l 12 Carrel Cnestl, Shwiff's Office 1-800-552.8960 Consumer Products Safely 1-80.638.8326 Femily Fbmcid Cen:lllng 1-800-852-3585 C,,mfte4 Cowly Skiff's Office 1-800-5$2-0393 Gtbm Sersim Governor's Office 1 400-852-3456 Gore€net's Cnencil on |mrllY 1.80.852-3466 bfo Une Se¢inl Welfwe Cenncil 1 400-852-3311 btenmJ Revenue Service 1-1100-$82-7200 N.H. bcerence Department !-800-852-3416 N.H. Au'n. Foe The Elderly ] -800-852-$4|3 N.H. Stere Police-Emerpncy 1-800-852-34l I Veterm's Administration 1-800-562-5200 AutKap 1.000-852-3305 H.it. Leoel Assistence [Serin] !-800.752.8969 N.H.I.qlel Assistance [Clemmt] 1-800-$62-3994 Sen. Humphrey's Offke !-800-052-3714 Con|. D'Anm.r's Office 1 400-562-3802 Tri-Cawnty Commmity Action 1400-552.4617 Governor's HnedJcapped Cendl 1-800-852-3405 Legislative Report Wayne Kenyon, (D-Vt.) Budgeta00. proposals in Vermont The Vermont House will soon examine tax and budgetary proposals for Fiscal Year 1982 which commences on July 1st of this year. The General Fund which takes care of most state services is now operating on a $244 million budget, reduced from $252 million by a 3 per cent cut earlier this year. The Governor's 1982 proposal is $275 million. Estimated revenues for FY 82 are $260 million according to the Governor. The reality will probably fall about halfway between. The House Appropriations Committee is attempting to shave $5 million from the Governor's proposal. The magnitude and complexity of this task has frustrated the efforts of this carefully chosen and fiscally conservative panel. A proposal of about $271 million will probably be on our desks sometime next week. The Highway Fund currently operates on a $63 million budget. The Governor's 1982 proposal is $70 million• Revenues continue to lag behind needs and ex- pectations. The 10 Year Plan has not yet been trimmed and construction costs continue to rise. With curtailed travel, gas tax revenues are not keeping pace with transportation needs. Despite a $7 million infusion of additional funds, FY 80 fell increased gas tax to take up this slack has become a painful necessity• The current tax is 9 cents per gallon. The choice so far is 9 per cent per gallon proposed by the Transportation Com- mittee or 12 cents a gallon supported by Ways and Means. Both proposals include diesel fuel. The Governor insists upon a per cent increase which would offer ad- ditional revenues as the price of gasoline goes up. The Property Tax Relief Fund has "a balance of $18 million. This includes the FY 79 surplus minus the earned interest in FY 80 and 81 given to the Highway Fund. Letters to the Eight million dollars a year goes for property tax relief for low-income homeowners and renters. A loss of revenue-sharing funds in FY 82 would drop the fund to $11 million and then to $2 million the following year. We obviously need to shore up this fund, and, to com- pensate for inflation, possibly raise the eligibility limits. The Governor wants $10 million from the Property Tax Fund. Seven million dollars would erase the FY 80 General Fund deficit and $3 million would more than redress the FY 80 Highway imbalance. Unless a viable alternative proposal is advanced to remedy the General Fund deficit, the Governor will prevail. He will probably not succeed in obtaining $3 million more for the Highway Fund. State Aid To Education reform continues to be chimeric. The Miller Formula still spews largesse on some communities while searing others with a perverse scorn. A large amount of this inequity results from not feeding the beast properly. Full funding, however, has been beyond our practical means, and remains outside of political grasp. FY 81 has $40 million in fodder, and FY 82 will probably offer about $41.5. Governor Snelling's reform initiative over the business and commercial property, ex- clusive of inventory. The town would continue to tax the dwelling and up to two acres. Following reappraisal, the state would redistribute the increased taxes so that all school pupils would receive an equal amount of assistance. This plan does not have legislative support because it takes away local control of taxation and places an increased burden on those with property. The Governor recently evidenced his frustration with this climate of non- (please turn to page 10) I Editor Good judgement shown /\\; To the Editor: Newbury Town Meeting, their yard. This person em- personal relationships with 1981 could have turned into a phatically stated to the effect Vermonters that a "native" shambles were it not for the that "they would never allow would not have mentioned it. good judgement of all but one such an eyesore in One: most natives are not present. Massachusetts and what did concerned with appearances: As a matter of background; the Planning Commission plan if a man is honest, forthright during the discussion of the to do about this matter". The andhard working, they really Pianning Commission'sreport chairman of the Planning don't care how he dresses. with regard to the com- mission's use of the word "housekeeping" therein, a woman unknown to me stood up and publicly criticized a resident family of Newbury for having too much junk in seem to me, based on my own unassuming, straight forward pride generously laced with honesty, hard work and Commission. Bill Ide, looks, or keeps his yard. They promptly humped the matter judge a man by the man to the selectmen and after a himself, not by appearances. few snickers the meeting Two: most natives (at least preceded, the ones I know) would not My point is this!! It would embarrass a fellow town- perience, no fee. I was quite'familiar with the Senior privileges and re00pon00ibili600 $2 an hour charge for use of these records though I feel To the Editor: it is O.K.. for your child to listening to the voice of the that any taxpayer, or history We are writing to you to have theprivileges, senior class. student for that matter, should inform you that we are getting This letter is to simply let Class of 1981 be able to use these public senior (privileges) as of you know what is going on at Oxbow High School sperson publicly. If they have something to say, they call you on the telephone, or, more likely than not, stop in to see you personally, the latter being true most of the time. Vermont has a special life respect for each other. This attitude expects nothing from you short of being yourself. I think most of these qualities, both individually and collectively, are becoming much too scarce in our society. With all due respect I have 'to say that there are some Vermonters who don't like "flat-landers". That's what they call us-those of us who come from Massachusetts, Connecticut or generally anywhere except Vermont, Maine or New Hampshire. You see, I am a "transplant" (as I prefer to call myself) and The Ely War papers at no charge. How Monday, March9. 1981. These many of us can whip through are privileges and respon- those early land deeds with sibilities that remain m sometimes illegible hand- school, but there is one writing? And how many of us privilege) that has todo with can afford to? But rules are the community. This is, that rules, so I paid. any senior with unassigned Whal is more difficult to time may sign out and leave accept, however, is the $1 a school. They must be back in photocopy, $2 minimum fee, time for their next class. This. thai one is faced with should by far. is not a right but a he or she desire a copy of a privilege. particular deed(At $2 an hour The senior class of 1981 has who can afford to copy the earned this privilege and the deeds by hand?L Sincq I principal feels that we are wanted to give my friend a responsible enough to handle it. Of course, responsibility does play a big part. If a senior shows that he or she CORRECTION cannot handle this privilege In a letter to the editor last then the privilege will be week from Anita S. Perry of taken away from him or her. Bradford, there was a We really do feel that we are typographical error in the responsible. We do not want fourth paragraph. It should you (the community) to feel have read as follows : that we, as students, do not With regard to an incident at care about school anymore, a recent ball game involving a because we do. This is simply member of the press, I sin- an issue that the senior class cerely hope I was wrong in works to get and must be thinking that the fans were approved by the principal. applauding that display of We have had a e)uple of sportsmanship and adult meetings to decide what the behavior, privlles would be. You as The headline on the letter parents will get a list of what should have read "Let's talk they are and also have to sign about principles" tnot prin- (if you agree with what they cipals), are) a permission slip saying the school. We thank you for Bradford, Vt. style• A very comfortable, quite frankly I feel a bit of Good malerial for Alice in Wonderland To the Editor: I would like to say a word or hazard just because it hap- nuclear energy would be two about the letter from M pens to be on-line when one relatively easy to come by Nevins, of Etowah, N.C., in turns on anelectriclight• See, for example, The New your paper last week in which Life in Vermont would not England Energy Atlas he said that Corinth residents come to a screeching halt if published in July 1980 by the were either insincere or Vermont Yankee were closed Thayer School of Engineering foolish to have passed an down once and for all. at DartmouthCollege. ordinance which prohibits, (Remember, it's closed down M. Nevins goes on to say among other things, the quite a bit at the best of thatanyonewhodoesnotwant mining and transportation of times.) Because oil-generated a nuclear facility in their town radioactive materials in their electricity was extremely should "at once discontinue town. The logic of his cheap for several decades, we the burning of wood" because argumegts would make good have developed the habit of it contains radioactive carbon. material for an "Alice m using electricity with aban-The miniscule amounts of Wonderland" chapter, don. We use it for such jobs as radioactive carbon released He suggests that anyone heating, for which it is most by burning wood are already who doesn't want a nuclear inappropriate. In 1950 the per in the biosphere. When any facility in their town is capita use of electricity was 50 tree dies and decays, this is hypocritical or unfair if he per cent of what it is today and released into the atmosphere. uses electricity because part I haven't heard that freezing Burning the wood instead of of this electricity is generated in the dark was a widespread letting it rot in no way in- at Vermont Yankee. At least phenomenon 30 years ago. If creases the amount of some of'us who don't want a we were to shut down every radioactivity at large. Wood uranium mine in our town nuclear plant in the country smoke smog As another don't want Vermont Yankee and not replace any of the problem, one whtsesolution is either -- in Vernon or power, we would have to well-known, lnnyease, wood anywhere else -- but it's not reduce our total energy smoke mostly afros us here something we ever were consumption only by about 3 and now ancL ue nuclear consulted about. There is no per cent and our electricity waste, it ' left for moral dilemma involved in use by about 13 per cent. If we generation  the distant refusingAo supply material to did insist on replacing the future to e0with. or take garbage from a power power, many energy experts X-rays are indeed hazar. station which poses a health consider that substitutes for dous and medical people have become increasingly cautious about using them in recent years. People make a voluntary decision about having x-rays, after con- sidering the risks and the benefits. This is quite unlike the indiscriminate dosing to all of us which the nuclear industry provides. I expect many Corinth residents would willingly accept a fair share or better of radioactive wastes from medical treatments and the like. These materials tend to have short half lives anyway. Once nuclear weapons are abolished and nuclear plants are shut down, chances are people everywhere will be eager to help deal with the wastes that have been ac- cumulated. What we now confront is a situation in which all these hazards are being recklessly increased. Almost any sort of protest against such irresponsibility heats doing nothing. We eannot do anything about the radiation from In 1880, the Ely mine in Vershire reached its greatest production of copper -- over three million pounds. tlowever, the Vermont Copper Mining Company was in deep financial trouble with copper prices dropping, new machinery needed, and the copper ore diminishing in richness. Payment of the miners' wages started dropping behind, and by 1882 the company was almost $200,000 in debt. In desperation, Smith Ely sold part of the company to Francis Cazin, a German mining engineer. Cazin had many ideas for modernizing the smelting process, but after an enormous expenditure of money for new equipment, his ideas proved to be im- practical, so the company was in worse shape than ever -- and when Cazin was finally fired, he pressed lawsuits that threatened the complete destruction of the company and the mine. On the brink of bankruptcy in June, 1883, the company could not pay the miners, so for lack of pay the miners would not produce any ore, and for lack of ore no smelting could be done to produce any copper to pay the men. The mine was closed and a notice was posted with a proposition for the miners: that the men work for lower pay, or at least that they keep the smelting works running to smelt the ore that was on hand to raise money tOpay the men. In the meantime, while men were looking for other work, they could live without rent in- the company tenements. Response of the miners Fearful of losing their back wages, the miners presented a united front in refusing to work under either alternative. During the weekend after the closing they became more and more restless, and in the face of their threats to take over the officials on Sunday night hurriedly moved all their valuable records and papers to a safer place. True to their word, on Monday morning when the company store opened at 8:00, Ihe miners swarmed in and emptied out the place, then nmved on to the Ely-Goddard mansion, but there they were persuaded to leave without doing any damage. malice connected to the term "flat-lander". I have been here nine years now and I have worked hard to over- come the name "flat-laader". I LIKE it here. I liked it when we moved here. I like it now. Hopefully we can learn to accept Vermont and her people for what they are and leave them alone instead of trying to remodel them to what we left behind. If the attitude displayed at our town meeting persists I am afraid we (none of us "transplants") cannot ever expect to be fully accepted as Vermonters no .matter hew long we live here. Marlene Gilson S. Newbury, Vermont Vermont granite or other background sources• We probably can't do anything about Vermont Yankee or nuclear weapons either, but these are pegple-made hazards and it i at least theoretically within our power to do away with them. M. Nevins seems to be a proponent of an argument that we haven't heard much of since the days of the Vietnam war: if you get your hand caught in the wringer, you might as well let your whole body go through. The radioactivity given off by a power plant under ideal conditions won't make your hair fall out. No one argues about this• But when one adds to this smallish peril the inevitable leaks into the cooling system, the frequent malfunctions and spurious emissions, the radiation from uranium mining operations and mine railings, the 500 pounds of plutonium produced each year by an average reactor, and the imoluble problem of other radioactive but when -the mi] discovered that the they would be offered wast about 20 percent of what! due, they demanded nothing -- and gave ultimatum that if not paid they would kegs of gunpowder that had taken and blow • mine, besides burning buildings. They set a of 7: 30 p.m. on Saturday. Calling for help Another drama was Roswell of Bradford, lawyer Vermont Copper Company, who had finished his term as of Vermont. With the of Smith Ely during the at the mines, became acting the company. Wednesday the miners, he met other officers of then sent a letter Barstow, asking him out the state militia miners' deadline on night. In the meantime, nham and other officers met on Thursday company creditors and officials, trying to find to satisfy the a] but they made On Friday, Go Barstow made a call out five compames state militia to bring under his own t The Bradford marched directly to Fairlee, but the companies arrived at Station Saturday 1:30 in a seven-car train, accom Governor Barstow personal staff. The their equipment were into a number of the company's coke wa each man was rounds of ammunition. They were met Lake House near Post Farnham, who Confrontation with Smith Ely Frustrated, the miners milled about until someone suggested a showdown with Smith Ely himself. With this in mind, a group of two or three hundred miners, some of them armed with clubs or knives, marched to West Fairlee and surrounded Mr. Ely's house, shouting "Bread or blood!" and demanding that Mr. Ely come out. When they were told that he was sick in bed, they forced their way through the door and were crowding their way up the stairs -- when ahead of them loomed the imposing figure, of Mr. Ely's friend General Stepheri Thomas, with pistol in hand. In the face of promises and the pistol, they retreated -- then ad- vanced again. This time they complied with a suggestion that a committee of miners meet with Mr. Ely to discuss the matter• His sympathetic words and promises of payment quieted the mob, and persuaded them to retreat to await arrival of the com- pany's financial agent on Wednesday. (Note: Gen. Thomas of West Fairlee was the member of the Vermont legislature who proposed and promoted the raising of one million dollars from the State of Vermont to help finance the Civil War.) A telegram sent to the financial agent by the treasurer of the company, who had been in Mr. Ely's houseat the time of the seige, shows how serious matters had become: "Send all money on both shipments of copper. Fail not. Property in hands of mob all day. They threaten Mr. Ely's life. Have rescued him twice today. They threatened to burn all the property tonight, but have pledged to he quiet till your answer comes. Don't fail to send money . . . The property and Mr. Ely depend on it..." ira: driving Mr. Cazin and his tamity out of the village, they reached harassing them with jeers a.m., saddle horses and threats until they had obtained for the gone beyond West Fairlee. the mile and a half Mr. Ely, feeling that his own the Ely mining life was also in danger, fled begun. from West Fairlee to Brad- The showdown ford, under cover of darkness. The guardsmen The financial agent have been apprehensi I arrived on Wednesday, as they approached the promised, along with some of village, not knowing the other company officers, there would be resistance -- or ambush as they down the open road. As the first houseS into view, the rising just striking their The street showed no T/me to life, but as the tinned into the to coa/? saw a few To the Editor: Dear New Englander: We in West Virginia have a warm message this winter for our neighbors in your area: Coal. If you are watching your thermometer plummet and your utility bills skyrocket, that message should he clear• West Virginia coal is ready to help its neighbors across this nation by providing clean, low-cost energy to ease our foreign oil dependence• We are currently sponsoring a "people-to-people" campaign to get that message into your area. As part of that cam- paign, West Virginians from all walks of life have written letters to their New England neighbors explaining the benefits of coal-fired power; many of those letters soon will appear in a full-page "Boston Globe" advertisement... Sincerely, Allen S. Pack Chairman of the Board West Virginia Coal Association Charleston, W. Va. (Editor's note: see related slory On page 5) wastes, it sure should make your hair stand on cod. Plutonium is a horribly poisonous product which does not occur in nature. It decays so slowly that it will still be one-half as radioactive in 24,400 years as it was when created. And it will have to be kept out of the biosphere by countless generations of people who will derive no benefit from it. Any benefit will have been enjoyed by us, because a nuclear power plant lasts a mere 20 to 40 years. After that it is so con- laminated that no one can work there and it must be shut down. The problem of safely (please turn to pae I I ) drawn back and out" then a few brave cautiously step stared at the army in I midst. Within a short sheriff and his rounded up char the meantime the Guards had of the mine hill, and had taken of the gunpowder miners had Thus the over almost begun to the" everyone• Within minutes the miners families were talking with the "laughing at how had been such a before. The shared their hungry miners, marched back to housewives offered milk and spring water. On Monday, Attorney released prisoners, as he unable to find testify, against them that week, the paid about 20 was due them, but last money give them, and they all had to homes elsewhere, i After five tempting to sell company finally auction and it Mr. Cazin. With a finance the upthe Smelting company' lasted only a it ran out of money. After 1900, the mine briefly (please turn to