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March 11, 1981     Journal Opinion
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March 1 l, 198 I-Tiw Journal Opinion-Page 5 ----4 (-, ! The West Virginia Coal balance of payments in in- " Association is promoting ternational trade," the "- i increased use of coal in New association said inn booklet Ag: England as an answer to the entitled "West Virginia Coal: mgh price and possible Energytoshare." .:i sho: ges of heating oil. The coal producers' group In advertisements and argues that the chief road- letters tsee "Letters to the block to greater use of coal is Editor," page 4), officials of unreasonable federal the industry association urge regulations. The United a national energy policy based States, it adds, has sufficient on coal. coal reserves to last the nation "It can help fight inflation for up to 300 years. by offering a low-cost energy "With international oil alternative. It can help production already peaked provide economic and out, it is acknowledged by Political security by reducing energy experts that coal is the dependence on unstable only readily available fuel to forei in energy supplies. It can fill the energy gap," the help bring about a favorable association's booklet adds. Industry urges greater coal use in New England RABIES CLINIC SATURDAY MARCH 21 st THETFORD TOWN GARAGE 10am - 12pm TUESDAY MARCH 24th WOODSVILLE NAT. GUARD ARMORY 7pm - 8:30pro It alsn describes as "myths" tricity generated by oil and reports that greater use of coal that showed the same coal will lead to greatly in- amoun(ofoil-generatedpower creased air pollution such as that cost $105.91 in Boston in "acid rain" and that it would August of 1979 cost only $58.29 create a "greenhouse" effect in Charleston, W. Va., where in the atmosphere to warm up electric generators are fueled the overall world climate, by coal. "'Coal can be-by law must Coal shortages cropped up be-burned cleanly. The around New England last President's Coal Commission, January when severe cold after a two-year study, con- weather caused an increase in eluded that a 'program of consumption. Industry of- replacing oil with coat in ficials said at the time the compliance with the Clean Air shortage was because of the Act will not increase great costs associated with emissions of environmental opening new coal mines. The and health-related pollutants, industry wants to be assured it the booklet said. It will have a market if it in- re((irred t() a report under the creases production and recent administration of supplies to such areas as New President Carter. Englands, industry sources The hooklet included said. comparative costs of elec- Town Meetings are true democracy, Douglas says MONTPELIER- Town state has absorbed so much Meeting day was a power over the years that remarkably harmonious event little is left for towns todecide. this year. according to Others say that the small Secretary of State James It. numbers of citizens that at- Douglas, whose respon- tend Town Meeting in some sibilities include a role as the towns show that there is a chief election officer of dwindling interest in the Vermont. process," he continued. "This was a critical year," "But that's just plain wrong. said Douglas. "The broad Ask the people in any Vermont election law reforms of 1980 town what they think about were given their first local test annual meetings. They'll tell on March 3, 1981, and from all you that the decisions they reports the law served Ver- have made are very important WliDND& mont towns well." to them--decisions on road MARCH 25th The Secretary of State's maintenance and paving, on GROTON ,.rr. office is one of the first places educational financing, and town officials call when town officers. Theseareissues FIRE STATION prohlems arise under the of great impact on thelife of a -,-7r) 30p Vermont election law. The Vermont town, and they , - m - 8: m Secretary's comments are deserve all the respect and the based on more than 20 hours of at tention they get," he said. THURSDAY MARCH 26 telephone calls received and "Complaints about cen- LYME ,,,,]'|ol"i answered over a two-day tralization of government period in his office in Mont- have been around since the SCHOOL GYM pelter. 1820's, bti'Che fact is the towns -.-7r) 3019 "We hear all the corn- still have a tremendous m - 8: m plaints, but after taking the amount of discretion in how pulse of Town Meeting day, they run their social and For Information Call: 1981, it is clear the process economic lives," he added. B V P A works, and works well--the "Low turnout?Don't believe last living example of true it. We've had complaints that democracy," he said. some towns don't have rooms 0503) 787-6233 "There is always criticism big enough to contain all the of the process. Some say the people who want to come to Town Meeting," Douglas said. "The essential democratic experience that is shared at Town Meeting is available to very few other Americans. Maybe that's why people in D0 other states feel so skeptical about the political process --because it's remote and inaccessible. In Vermont, Have it's just the opposite. The opportunity to participate fully in the decision making KITCHENS process is there, directly, every first Tuesday in March. We're a very lucky people, and we must never forget that. It's institutions and traditions like Town Meeting that keep us free and independent," he concluded. You Betl OVER 30 STYL ON DISPLAY IN OUR STOCKROOMS IN OUR SHOW ROOM BY . TRIPLE * HOMECREST * OVERTON . ARROW * KEMPER-TNaPEN * SCHR(X . BRUCE * MEDN.LION * YORK TOWN k" GREGG . KIII;HEN-KOMPIET * MERILLAT VERMONT CABINET See Our New Kitchen (Model Set) And Form Your Own Kitchen Right Before Your Eyes! See It Before You Do It, Eliminate Costly Mistakes And Guesswork. Appointments After Hours, Estimates, Measuring Given Freely! KES BROS. BUILDING SUPPLIES & HARDWARE , Vt. 222-52.80 MON. -"'RI. 7:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M. SATURDAY 8:00 A.M. - NOON Showroom Open Beg. Store Hours Plus Fri. Til 9 p. m. Janette Santaw Santaw enlists in the Air Force N. ATTLEBORO, MASS. -- Janette ("Tootle") Santaw of N. Attlebero, Mass., formerly of Newbury and Wells River, Vt.. has enlisted in the United States Air Force. On February 12, 1981, she left for Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. Mter attending Oxbow High School for three years, Santaw graduated from North Attleboro High School in the Spring of 1980. She is the daughter of Ruth and the late William A. Santaw, and has several sisters and a brother in nor- thern Vermont TIlOUGliTS Lord, when we are wrong, nmke us willing to change. And when we are right, make us easy to live with. Peter Marshall TASKER'S WELL We Need Your Business! lur Business Is Goin8 In The Hole. Northwood, NJt. 942-5581 Our American Heritage Winning essays in the American lleritage Essay i'd,crest sponsored by the llaverhill Memorial VFW Post No. 5245 Auxiliary in ilaverhill Academy Junior Iligh. Ilegina ('iteroni Grade 8A FIRST PI,ACE We Americans have the greatest tolerance and self perseverance than any other country on the face of the earth. Our h)lerance comes from us being born of immigranls t'rnm the world over. We are a giant melting pot. The variety of nationalities and religions gave way to tolerance if we were to have peace. The lxwseverance came from having to fight for our rights every step of the way. Our continent is rich in all the natural resources needed to make us self-reliant. ( If we learn to use them right. ) We are a nation that has always put GOD at the head, and the rights of human dignity in first place. We are a peace-loving people, but in no way are we in- timidated by the threats from the world around us. When 1 think of my heritage as an American, I am proud. I am glad to be part of a nation that has produced such great men that have shaped our past and proud In be growing up where I dare to dream of beconfing whatever I choose, that I can go to any church that 1 want t0, and that 1 can go as far with my educat ion as I want even though I'm a girl. My grandparents on both sides were born in the "Old Country," one set in Poland, behind the Iron Curtain and Ihe other in Italy. I grew up with the tales of how they worked and dreamed to get here and how hard it was for them when they arrived. It was hard to leave home and friends and all the familiar scenes of the homeland to come to a strange land where the language and cusloms and daily activities were so different. But l'm really glad that they did. After they were naluralized, they could take an active part in the community, and the Democratic system. I'm never going to take the privilege to vote for granted. Because I know first hand the many sacrifices that my family made so thai their grandchildren could be born free. I, too, am able to take a part in choosing the type government that will head our land and shape our future. It was quite an experience watching the Presidential Voting this year and being old enough to understand what was going on with the elections. Even though it got drawn out, the process itself was fascinating. To watch a president step down and hand his office over graciously to the newly elected one and the transition of all that power shifted before the eyes of the world was a miracle in itself. I also saw 52 Americans that were cruelly held hostage obtain freedom through peaceful means, without our country losing face or making frightening threats. I feel safe at night knowing that peace and human dignity is my heritage. My parents never forgot to pray for peace in church every Sunday, especially for Poland, the homeland of my mother's people. Every time I do, I realize how much America means to me. America means freedom to be me and I will work and pray to keep it that way.. for my children and their children and so on... I hope till the. end of time. Groton voters approve reappraisal ,GltOTON-. Volers at Town Meeting March 3 approved the raising of $366,186.50 in taxes f()r 1981 town expeoditures, and appiovcd $22,(M)0 for a property reappraisal by an independent firm. The tax levy is $30,904.68 ifigher than last year. Voters also approved $235,284 as Groton's share of the budget of t Inion School District No. 21. Freddie Braman Sr. was elected selechnan. Michael Blair was reelected a selec- tman. Gall Davis was elected school director and Ida I)ennis was reelected town clerk. Groton voters also approved the expenditure of $15,000 for the Fire Department to health services and $200 for purchase a pumper after, )(tult education. Fireman ttarold Puffer said ' Voters rejected a proposal the present 1954 model 11) appropriate $1,400 to pumper is "not dependable." replace the gold on the town Alsn voted was $2,50() to in- clock. sulate the fire house, with the ............................ labor to be done by the SISTERSON firemen. DEAN'S LIST The voters also acted to SMITHFIELD, R.I.-- Two abolish the inventory tax after sisters from the Upper Valley explanations that revenues area were named to the were not significant, and Dean's list at Bryant College voted to implement firearms for the 1980 fall semester. ordilmnces at the discretion of They are Debra Blanehard the selectmen after public of Bradford, who is majoring hearings, in marketing, and Nancy Appropriations were ap-Blanchard of W. Topsham. proved for $750 to Caledonia majoring to be a legal Home Health, $500 to mental secretary. SHOW & FLEA MARKET Sponsored by [he Upper Valley Fish & Game Club Inc. Sunday, March 15, '81 THETFORD ACADEMY GYM llam - 6pm - DOOR PRIZES - also Exhibits by Vt. & N.H. Fish & Game Depts. Refreshments by Girl Scout Cadette Sr. Troop No. 144 Added Attraction Fiddling Dick Wilson and the Country ADMISSION FREE! VALVOLINE I 0-W-30 01L GOOD THRU SAT. MARCH 14 WOrld's Ftrlt - World'S Ftrte 00/ALVo LItI00 "' LIMIT,CASE,. c.,o., tPJART MOTOR OIL, March 1 l, 198 I-Tiw Journal Opinion-Page 5 ----4 (-, ! The West Virginia Coal balance of payments in in- " Association is promoting ternational trade," the "- i increased use of coal in New association said inn booklet Ag: England as an answer to the entitled "West Virginia Coal: mgh price and possible Energytoshare." .:i sho: ges of heating oil. The coal producers' group In advertisements and argues that the chief road- letters tsee "Letters to the block to greater use of coal is Editor," page 4), officials of unreasonable federal the industry association urge regulations. The United a national energy policy based States, it adds, has sufficient on coal. coal reserves to last the nation "It can help fight inflation for up to 300 years. by offering a low-cost energy "With international oil alternative. It can help production already peaked provide economic and out, it is acknowledged by Political security by reducing energy experts that coal is the dependence on unstable only readily available fuel to forei in energy supplies. It can fill the energy gap," the help bring about a favorable association's booklet adds. Industry urges greater coal use in New England RABIES CLINIC SATURDAY MARCH 21 st THETFORD TOWN GARAGE 10am - 12pm TUESDAY MARCH 24th WOODSVILLE NAT. GUARD ARMORY 7pm - 8:30pro It alsn describes as "myths" tricity generated by oil and reports that greater use of coal that showed the same coal will lead to greatly in- amoun(ofoil-generatedpower creased air pollution such as that cost $105.91 in Boston in "acid rain" and that it would August of 1979 cost only $58.29 create a "greenhouse" effect in Charleston, W. Va., where in the atmosphere to warm up electric generators are fueled the overall world climate, by coal. "'Coal can be-by law must Coal shortages cropped up be-burned cleanly. The around New England last President's Coal Commission, January when severe cold after a two-year study, con- weather caused an increase in eluded that a 'program of consumption. Industry of- replacing oil with coat in ficials said at the time the compliance with the Clean Air shortage was because of the Act will not increase great costs associated with emissions of environmental opening new coal mines. The and health-related pollutants, industry wants to be assured it the booklet said. It will have a market if it in- re((irred t() a report under the creases production and recent administration of supplies to such areas as New President Carter. Englands, industry sources The hooklet included said. comparative costs of elec- Town Meetings are true democracy, Douglas says MONTPELIER- Town state has absorbed so much Meeting day was a power over the years that remarkably harmonious event little is left for towns todecide. this year. according to Others say that the small Secretary of State James It. numbers of citizens that at- Douglas, whose respon- tend Town Meeting in some sibilities include a role as the towns show that there is a chief election officer of dwindling interest in the Vermont. process," he continued. "This was a critical year," "But that's just plain wrong. said Douglas. "The broad Ask the people in any Vermont election law reforms of 1980 town what they think about were given their first local test annual meetings. They'll tell on March 3, 1981, and from all you that the decisions they reports the law served Ver- have made are very important WliDND& mont towns well." to them--decisions on road MARCH 25th The Secretary of State's maintenance and paving, on GROTON ,.rr. office is one of the first places educational financing, and town officials call when town officers. Theseareissues FIRE STATION prohlems arise under the of great impact on thelife of a -,-7r) 30p Vermont election law. The Vermont town, and they , - m - 8: m Secretary's comments are deserve all the respect and the based on more than 20 hours of at tention they get," he said. THURSDAY MARCH 26 telephone calls received and "Complaints about cen- LYME ,,,,]'|ol"i answered over a two-day tralization of government period in his office in Mont- have been around since the SCHOOL GYM pelter. 1820's, bti'Che fact is the towns -.-7r) 3019 "We hear all the corn- still have a tremendous m - 8: m plaints, but after taking the amount of discretion in how pulse of Town Meeting day, they run their social and For Information Call: 1981, it is clear the process economic lives," he added. B V P A works, and works well--the "Low turnout?Don't believe last living example of true it. We've had complaints that democracy," he said. some towns don't have rooms 0503) 787-6233 "There is always criticism big enough to contain all the of the process. Some say the people who want to come to Town Meeting," Douglas said. "The essential democratic experience that is shared at Town Meeting is available to very few other Americans. Maybe that's why people in D0 other states feel so skeptical about the political process --because it's remote and inaccessible. In Vermont, Have it's just the opposite. The opportunity to participate fully in the decision making KITCHENS process is there, directly, every first Tuesday in March. We're a very lucky people, and we must never forget that. It's institutions and traditions like Town Meeting that keep us free and independent," he concluded. You Betl OVER 30 STYL ON DISPLAY IN OUR STOCKROOMS IN OUR SHOW ROOM BY . TRIPLE * HOMECREST * OVERTON . ARROW * KEMPER-TNaPEN * SCHR(X . BRUCE * MEDN.LION * YORK TOWN k" GREGG . KIII;HEN-KOMPIET * MERILLAT VERMONT CABINET See Our New Kitchen (Model Set) And Form Your Own Kitchen Right Before Your Eyes! See It Before You Do It, Eliminate Costly Mistakes And Guesswork. Appointments After Hours, Estimates, Measuring Given Freely! KES BROS. BUILDING SUPPLIES & HARDWARE , Vt. 222-52.80 MON. -"'RI. 7:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M. SATURDAY 8:00 A.M. - NOON Showroom Open Beg. Store Hours Plus Fri. Til 9 p. m. Janette Santaw Santaw enlists in the Air Force N. ATTLEBORO, MASS. -- Janette ("Tootle") Santaw of N. Attlebero, Mass., formerly of Newbury and Wells River, Vt.. has enlisted in the United States Air Force. On February 12, 1981, she left for Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. Mter attending Oxbow High School for three years, Santaw graduated from North Attleboro High School in the Spring of 1980. She is the daughter of Ruth and the late William A. Santaw, and has several sisters and a brother in nor- thern Vermont TIlOUGliTS Lord, when we are wrong, nmke us willing to change. And when we are right, make us easy to live with. Peter Marshall TASKER'S WELL We Need Your Business! lur Business Is Goin8 In The Hole. Northwood, NJt. 942-5581 Our American Heritage Winning essays in the American lleritage Essay i'd,crest sponsored by the llaverhill Memorial VFW Post No. 5245 Auxiliary in ilaverhill Academy Junior Iligh. Ilegina ('iteroni Grade 8A FIRST PI,ACE We Americans have the greatest tolerance and self perseverance than any other country on the face of the earth. Our h)lerance comes from us being born of immigranls t'rnm the world over. We are a giant melting pot. The variety of nationalities and religions gave way to tolerance if we were to have peace. The lxwseverance came from having to fight for our rights every step of the way. Our continent is rich in all the natural resources needed to make us self-reliant. ( If we learn to use them right. ) We are a nation that has always put GOD at the head, and the rights of human dignity in first place. We are a peace-loving people, but in no way are we in- timidated by the threats from the world around us. When 1 think of my heritage as an American, I am proud. I am glad to be part of a nation that has produced such great men that have shaped our past and proud In be growing up where I dare to dream of beconfing whatever I choose, that I can go to any church that 1 want t0, and that 1 can go as far with my educat ion as I want even though I'm a girl. My grandparents on both sides were born in the "Old Country," one set in Poland, behind the Iron Curtain and Ihe other in Italy. I grew up with the tales of how they worked and dreamed to get here and how hard it was for them when they arrived. It was hard to leave home and friends and all the familiar scenes of the homeland to come to a strange land where the language and cusloms and daily activities were so different. But l'm really glad that they did. After they were naluralized, they could take an active part in the community, and the Democratic system. I'm never going to take the privilege to vote for granted. Because I know first hand the many sacrifices that my family made so thai their grandchildren could be born free. I, too, am able to take a part in choosing the type government that will head our land and shape our future. It was quite an experience watching the Presidential Voting this year and being old enough to understand what was going on with the elections. Even though it got drawn out, the process itself was fascinating. To watch a president step down and hand his office over graciously to the newly elected one and the transition of all that power shifted before the eyes of the world was a miracle in itself. I also saw 52 Americans that were cruelly held hostage obtain freedom through peaceful means, without our country losing face or making frightening threats. I feel safe at night knowing that peace and human dignity is my heritage. My parents never forgot to pray for peace in church every Sunday, especially for Poland, the homeland of my mother's people. Every time I do, I realize how much America means to me. America means freedom to be me and I will work and pray to keep it that way.. for my children and their children and so on... I hope till the. end of time. Groton voters approve reappraisal ,GltOTON-. Volers at Town Meeting March 3 approved the raising of $366,186.50 in taxes f()r 1981 town expeoditures, and appiovcd $22,(M)0 for a property reappraisal by an independent firm. The tax levy is $30,904.68 ifigher than last year. Voters also approved $235,284 as Groton's share of the budget of t Inion School District No. 21. Freddie Braman Sr. was elected selechnan. Michael Blair was reelected a selec- tman. Gall Davis was elected school director and Ida I)ennis was reelected town clerk. Groton voters also approved the expenditure of $15,000 for the Fire Department to health services and $200 for purchase a pumper after, )(tult education. Fireman ttarold Puffer said ' Voters rejected a proposal the present 1954 model 11) appropriate $1,400 to pumper is "not dependable." replace the gold on the town Alsn voted was $2,50() to in- clock. sulate the fire house, with the ............................ labor to be done by the SISTERSON firemen. DEAN'S LIST The voters also acted to SMITHFIELD, R.I.-- Two abolish the inventory tax after sisters from the Upper Valley explanations that revenues area were named to the were not significant, and Dean's list at Bryant College voted to implement firearms for the 1980 fall semester. ordilmnces at the discretion of They are Debra Blanehard the selectmen after public of Bradford, who is majoring hearings, in marketing, and Nancy Appropriations were ap-Blanchard of W. Topsham. proved for $750 to Caledonia majoring to be a legal Home Health, $500 to mental secretary. SHOW & FLEA MARKET Sponsored by [he Upper Valley Fish & Game Club Inc. Sunday, March 15, '81 THETFORD ACADEMY GYM llam - 6pm - DOOR PRIZES - also Exhibits by Vt. & N.H. Fish & Game Depts. Refreshments by Girl Scout Cadette Sr. Troop No. 144 Added Attraction Fiddling Dick Wilson and the Country ADMISSION FREE! VALVOLINE I 0-W-30 01L GOOD THRU SAT. MARCH 14 WOrld's Ftrlt - World'S Ftrte 00/ALVo LItI00 "' LIMIT,CASE,. c.,o., tPJART MOTOR OIL,