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March 24, 1982     Journal Opinion
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, ,,,,, .... i i .... /  FOR TItE HEART-- Rope jumpers of five students and three adults took part at the Brad- L. I participated in this fund-raising venture ford Acadeny gym. the p rticilmnts jt mp il q Retted pledges of approximately $1,250. Twenty- dividually, in doubles, and as a group. . Grants - "-" ..... 11" | "_ WOOUVall s1,.s, m4..t-.'-,,,**dClmnt, I.V Wv Jn.JL,tJ ] p.m. qday Mosses, 8 o.m. end ! 0 o.m. waning. Youth Faliowship G .. BATH # t --"='------ 12. AIIorowalcome. I "q'10 Om,-- .......... Cemmuan 1 st, 3rd o 5th Sandays- l 1:00 flanqpnlkmM U..C. ford Academy gym. The participants jumped in- 10:00 o.m., R. Arthur 6egoy. Faraday MONTPELIER-- Governor schu 0:00 o.m. Yo Fe4ws Sunday Richard A. Shelling has an- aning. Youth Faliowship Grgdas 7 through nounced the award of $5,000 to 12. All ore welcome. each of five ,tgns to par- ticipat6 in the new Vermont o.m. Morning Prayer, 2nd and 4th, .amdays - Rev. John Hnggerty. Sunday Services - Main Street Program. 11,00 o.m. 11 o.m. Chur School 10 o.m. The Vermont Main Street Program will allow five towns nday School, 9:45 (:hurddlkn,m 'ydk 11 a.m. Evening Rev. flysong, pastor. Sunday, 9:45 o.m., Newy, Vt. Rev. Josoh Rinaldi. Say and their downtown - Prayer Moating Sunday school ll o.m., ntin 0 worship. 7 Schu, 9:4S o.m. Momim S-vke,  o.m. organizations to hire a local p.m., evenin9 worship. Wedmmy, 7:15 [vening lowp, z:s0 p.m. me su, coordinator for six months to Wed., 7:30p.m. implement a downtown S o.m., Sunday Services 11 Roy. Willbm L. Sharer, IStor. Sund, i 1 IfflTII OlINBI a.m,, morning worship; church SChoM for pro- Udd Pmbydn Preyer Meeting, Wed. 2 schoal children. Tuesdays, 6:30 o.m., men's Roy. Marian T. Redding. Sunday Worship, breakfast. HalenRutherfoedislelioEliblo 11:30o.m. Church School, 9o.m. study group at he home an 11ruloys 5era 9:30-11 o.m.; evecyano is walcome. tOliTN lit m.d A4t Crd Eldar Lan MonNa. Worship mord, 2:30 p.m. School - I 0:00- 11:00 o.m.- Calw,/ mi; Service - 6;30 p.m., Albert E , imstor. Sunday, 10 o.m., MentlnO.6:3Op.m. Sunday school. 11:00 morning worship. 7 p.m. evening service. Wednesday, 7 p.m., preyer meeting. Satucdoy, 7 p.m., young ,people's meeting. t Services - 9:30 Vermont Set'vlce, Roy. Lee Mooning. Saturday ,rlrvices Sabbath School - I p.m. Worship Service - 2:30 p.m. tlUTII ItIII revitalization program. The five coordinators will be responsible for several downtown activities ranging from conducting building inventories and recruiting businesses to preparing brochures and annual events for the towns. The five towns and the co- sponsoring downtown organizations are: Bristol and m,on * uud rUnCbwcU the Bristol Business u.c.c. Rev. John Knight - Sunday rvk 10:45, Rev. Morion T. Redding. Sunday Worship, 10 Association; Morrisville and Sunday Servkes- Fmdoy Schoui 9:30 o.m. - Child Cute o.m.Ourchhanl, 9o.m. the Morrisville Action 9:30 o.m. Provided. WlION VIttU Committee; Randolph and the ,m u ub. vge dbt chor Randolph Chamber of Sr a. Gri- fo, W. aev. mes b. Suy Uan Va, W. r,or -- ev. 6'V Woa. Commerce; St. Johnsbury and United Sorvicos during the winler with the Business District 9:00 o.m., .Youth SorvkeslO:3Oo.m. SandSchool9:15o.m. lllmttlllllwTkm/FrtChurd P.m, Private Tutoring All Ages Invited. Morning Service 10:30 o.m. &it ages invited. Association; and Windsor and the Windsor Area Chamber of for .[ : "__ C0mmSlmEl ae t"W_tqWz. t cqmmimt amlt v mt = ".,StmQidayServicesl,:00 Stephen J. Pal., pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 o.m. Morning Worship, 11. Evanino " "110:00 om., ChP.d Core ,%rvke, 7, 11:1 o.m., $ School 9:1 11 o.m., UJck 8, Ve@er,. Thorsdoy, 6:0( J[ --' .... rorsol, Thursdays, 7:30 p.m. LI1 Illl LETTER to the EDITOR * To breathe clean air (continued from page 4) Clean Air Act. Furthermore, cannot be considered a vic- the benefits of clean air were tory, since an equally serious found to equal $21.4 billion per threat has been posed by the year, while the costs budget-cutting agenda of the amounted to just over $19 Reagan Administration. The billion per year. Environmental Protection Agency has sustained a 30 percent cut for 1982, and now the Office of Management and Budget is proposing to cut EPA's operating budget an additional 36 percent in 1983. This, at a time when EPA's workload is doubling. With regard to air pollution en- forcement, it means a 42 percent cut in field personnel and a 50 percent headquarters cut. What does it all mean? So what if the air gets a little dirtier? Aren't our economic problems more important? "Dirty" air has some very frightening implications. Acid rain is currently eliminating aquatic life in sensitive areas and threatening agricultural and forestland productivity, while eating away at cars, buildings, and statues throughout the Northeast and parts of the Southeast, Mid- west, and Far West. It represents $5 billion worth of damage each year, according to a recent National Academy of Sciences report. The National Crop Loss Assessment Network, established by the EPA in cooperation with the Departments of Agriculture and Energy, has estimated that ozone, a pollutant resulting from reactions between hydrocarbons and sunlight, causes $3.1 billion damage each year to the country's corn, wheat, soybean, and peanut crops alone. Carbon dioxide levels in the Earth's atmosphere are building up at an astounding rate. The result is a serious problem known as the "greenhouse effect" which is warming the global climate and may eventually melt the polar ice caps -- the con- sequence of which involves inestimable economic ramifications. A 1980 review of 90 studies on air and water pollution by the President Council on Environmental Quality concluded about 14,000 lives would be lost annually without the protection offered by the The National Commission on Air Quality, a bipartisan commission appointed in 1978 to review the Clean Air Act in preparation for its reauthorization in 1981, found that the Act's effects on national economic indicators labor productivity, unem- ployment, and consumer prices ) has not been significant. Air pollution controls do not cost jobs, contrary to the assertions of polluting industries. In fact, labor unions such as the United Steel Workers of America and the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers have been among the strongest supporters of the National Clean Air Coalition, even though they stand to suffer the greatest job losses if the "clean air costs jobs" theory were true. Polluting industries also maintain that air pollution controls place them at a competitive disadvantage with Germany and Japan. The fact is that these two coun- tries, and Canada . as well, spend a larger portion of their GNP on air pollution controls than does the United States. Last June, a Harris poll revealed that 86 percent of Americans polled oppose a weakening of the Clean Air Act -- and 38 percent wish to see it strengthened. Why, in the face of this strong public support, is the Clean Air Act in trouble? Powerful lobbying efforts by a handful of polluting industries have made the difference and brought us to the brink of destruction of one of our most important pieces of en- vironmental legislation. An open question to the public: do we want clean air or don't we? Our senators and representatives, and those of our friends and relatives in other parts of the country, had better hear from us -- and soon. The consequences of a quiescent public are severe indeed. Robert O. Linck Associate Executive Director, Connecticut River Watershed Council March 24, 198Z-The Journal Opinion-Page 5 HAPPY CREW-- 4.H participants in the junior placemat contest. Grafton County 4-H Food Show held LISBON-- Seventy Grafton Tom Driscoll, B -- 3F's and County 4-Hers participated in the 18th Annual Grafton County 4-H Food Show which was held at Lisbon High School. This special event allows each 4-H'er to exhibit their food preparation, as well as share their nutritional knowledge with a judge. While the judging was taking place, leaders and parents were able to attend workshops. Tom Danko, UNH Poultry Specialist, taught how to be creative with eggs by making Omelets and Crepes. Ellie Fiest, Grafton County Home Economist taught about Nutritional snacks for kids. Both workshops allowed participants to sample ! 4H'ers played consumer education games after their foods were judged. Sue Roberts, 4-H Agent from Sullivan County, and her 4-H Teens kept the participants interest with these new challenges. The awards program concluded the day's events. All participants received their score sheets back along with a ribbon: Cindi McLure, Suzie Cady, Shari Carbonneau, Jane Goodrich, "A" -- Laf-A Landers; Lisa Driscoll, A; Bath Braves; Julie Simpson, Tracy Monahan, A, Clover- bloom; Michelle Farr, Rochelle Farr, Annette Merchand, Stanley Gochee, Robert Newton, Mary Dimick, Aimee Loranger, A, Chris Gochee, Jennifer Belyea, Angola Merryman, B -- Hunt Me.; Katrina Clark, Sherry Foster, Kristen Lennon, Jennie Verratti, Jessica Schablein, Angela Thayer, Michelle Reed, Sheila Fabrizio, Karen Keniston, Heather Olsen, Stephanie Page, Christine Roy, A-- Bob- O-Link; Kristi'Blessing, Pam Blessing, Michele Bullock, Judith Carroll, Jennifer Hall, Lorna Thomas, A -- No. Monroe Mt. Breeze; Mike McGuire, Kelly Simpson, Jennifer Jo Peters, Karen Commerce. John Fontana speaks roLLS mvm "The high quality of all the on Oxbow Discipline St. lmee'a Chk "Josh'mmd, Poster, C.s,s.R. Saturday proposals reflect the interest The Oxbow News recently ts- 7:00 p.m. ay Moss.- 9,30 and dedication to downtown interviewed Superintendent of o.m. revitalization in Vermont," Schools John Fontana teeu.c.c. Lambert said. regarding his feelings about waits my,r, yr. Re,. Artr Cn,V, S The ten remaining towns the recent attention being rvic, - o:o o.m. Cld care providaU, submitting applications were: given to the problem of SandaySchool-Pa.m. Bradford, Fair Haven, student discipline at Oxbow m|mv Manchester, Poultney, Rich- High School. erv. nlu', Ptor. Sxy mond, Rutland, Waitsfield, Fontana feels that the role trvicos 10:45 o.m., Church han- 10:45 Waterbury, West Rutland, and of the Superintendent of Richard A. White, Poster, Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m., S School 9:45 o.m., Pot o.m. Wilmington. These ten towns Schools' Office in the tk 8, Ve@erz "rtr.,rio, 6 p.m. Choir will also be invited to par- discipline process is to "act as Wltl'PAnlltn ticipate in the training an advisor to the school wu,_ .... sessions and will receive board" and then to take an FAllU! Pstor, Gorck Cenk. $nday xn, -:, II st'nmtlilaldlEIllee o.m.; Worship Service, 10_:30 o;m..;.  technical assistance from the active role in "making sure ?El WlilIH TheRen. WilliomAtkimon. odoy$orce, ,rvice(m.l, 7:OOp.m,;Tu,.tamesl? Department of Housing and that the school carries out  l' 10e m 10:00 o.m. 14{: first, lhl  fifth. Sundays Seedy, I0:00 o.m:; Follomhe Night (Woo./, Community Affairs. " and MP, dondrm. " what the board has decided." ;l 7:00 p.m. people Returning power to the the federalgovernmentfromthetrustfund _  . eOntlnued from page 4) During a transitional period, monies from a money or use the trust fund money as "super "l,'ig from $30.8 billion to $72.5 federal trust fund will pay ,or me programs, revenue sharing" to spend according to their v --tr I own rules and priorities. v- -t, 4 - 981 mcrease alone was a full 21 with the fund created out of existing alcohol, j':.hy l,Caid itself will cost 83 percent tobacco and telephone excise taxes; two cents Stamps, states with high Medicaid rates, like - !I , t)ased on current projections, per gallon of the gaso,,ne tax ann a portmn oz In trading Medicaid for AFDC and Food  .. states lose costly liability in the windfall profits oil tax. Starting !n 1984, New York and California, could benefit at the _-. St-' 'Y assuming control of AFDC.and the states will have ac .cess t_tritTnt ied n expense of states with low Medicaid rates. To Lo?21.., they accept programs wnnse e, ,,m,,,, in the trust luna aim start, s avoid such inquities, the trust fund allocation "i "s - ,o,'_'tf-ndandthesupportiogfedera! formula will be adjusted, so that both ds'-u!7:'Th eShmated to be only 10 percent , ='-' ":,nhased out at a rate of 25 percent [lofeh.s.wap will result in aggregate "*" .......... uv--rtin" tax elements of the New Federalism work I'', O u Ulion. - "" m per year. By 1991,.tl,entlre,sPnd ocal together, avoiding net gains or losses for any .o,o .,, av.,,--o ,o ---- lent of New Federans =:.z=.will,ts allowing them access to new state. l s'of 3 programs to state control, ,,= ......... OF THE PEOPLE, BY THE PEOPLE tdI2 le-sCial, health and nutrition ser- [ bases at no additional expense to thmr "in a single stroke, we will he ac- mS L ." 'aaanl,transportation procts, sewer, taxpayers. complishing a reiignment that will end s"" Community development During the transition perioa, states will B'd'tra'ii'revenue sharing, educational and have one of two options. First, either receive cumbersome administration and spiralling the former categorical grant programs along costs at the federal level while we insure ,e W;t. '"Lag, and home energy aid for the with the federal regulations, and reimburse these programs will be more responsible to ' both the people they are meant to help and the people who pay for them." -- PresCient Reagan States Would rmt From Washington sa*4 o,t $46.7 bfl. gmmmms sm4 tot.i S| bM. ........... $9 ? bil. Oil "'indtail profits" tel ....................... 116.7 pit, Alcohol excise tax TobacCo ......... $6 bit Excise tax ............ 116.1 bi{, end nutriUon Gasoline ....... $8.0 bil excise rex .............. $22 bit, $6.4 biL Telephone excise tax .......... $03 bil, ...... $4.8 bit resources to target programs to their specific ....................... needs Oxhow ll Schuel IMol, Vmm ................. JUDY AUfJSTII Steff ................... Lff. FARNHAM MARISA FkTHLEY KATHERINE HARTLEY PETER HODGE LESLIE KAhPRZAK TRCI OTTINA TOM RATHaUIDI BETHANNE WRIGHT iqaelpaphr ........... KRII'IN H[RNdhl Mmor ................ ARNOLD SHIELDS When asked his personal opinion of student discipline and whether he feels changes need to he made in the present policies, Fontana replied that there were "always ways to improve policies." He added that he felt communication was the key to policy im- provement, basically, "better communication on policies that exist" and a better un- derstanding .by different groups of the effect of these policies. Fontana was asked to comment on what appears to be a disagreement between the teachers and the ad- ministration on this issue. He said that there was a "dif- ference of opinion" and felt that this was a result of a "lack of understanding of each other's goals." Fontana went on to say that this was a "mutual problem" which "can't be one person's problem. It takes mutual respect for the role of each group." The Oxbow News also questioned Fontana about the recently comprised Student Rules Committee--more specifically what he hoped the outcome of their meetings would be and how this will be applied to the problem at Oxbow. Fontana said that they found out quickly that the rules in the Student Handbook needed to be reorganized and rewritten. He added that the Handbook "has never really been revised--just added to." Fontana mentioned that a sub-committee has been established to start the task of rewriting. He added that the privileges." The Student Rules Com- mittee is comprised of members of the faculty, ad- ministration, school board and student body. Fontana describes the aim of this group as "to get representative points of view, in one place, on hew the school operates." Fontana sees the role of the school board as that of a policy-makiog body, not as one responsible for specific rules, but states that "the rules must he consistant with the policies." He describes the role of his own office as being "responsible for the im- plementation of the board's policies" or to "recommend changes as a result of the policies." Fontana commends the success of the committee in "coming out with a different view." He feels that after the first meeting there was a better understanding between the committee members of "each other's roles in fostering a positive at- mosphere for the school" and an "awareness of the students." Fontana praised the students involved, saying that they really "carried the ball at the discussion of the first meeting." Fontana went on to say that he was "impressed with the students' un- derstanding of how 'different' students are," each having "different reactions." Fontana feels that the discipline problem isn't a direct reflection of the school itself, but rather "a reflection of society and problems outside of the school" as well. He notes that finding a solution to the problem is a public concern in which "everyone has a say but no one gets everything," and one can only "hope to come up with a policy which is ac- ceptable to the majority of the people." Vocational Volleyha II Handbook contains policies Tournament and rules regarding "all Vicki diZerega, vocational aspects" of school, "not just electricity teacher at Oxbow discipline." Fontana corn- High School, is in charge of the mented that he hoped the new vocational volleyball tour- Handbook will help everyone nament which was held March "better understand student 17 and 18, 1982. responsibilities and DiZerega has been in charge Locke, A -- Sunrise; Marie Tucker, B -- Clover Crew; Weston Faery, Dean Jones, Chris Morrison, Robert and Rodney Peck, A  Mascoma Valley Boys; Tina Ware, Laurie Monica, Katherine Weaver, Christine Lacroix, Laurie Clifford, Laurie Stone, Amy Dube, Colleen Johnson, Becky Cant/in, A, Christine Ashline, Barbara .]ones, Robin Jones, B -- Lilac Lassies. The Senior Ward Baking Award is awarded each year to the judges choice for club exhibits  this year N. Monroe Mountain Breeze 4-H Club received this trophy. Participating members in- cluded Pare and Kristi Blessing, Michelle Bullock, and Lorna Thomas. Second Place went to Bob-O-Links 4-H Club, N. Haverhill, with Kelly Lennon, Janet .Thompson, of the volleyball tournaments ever since they started, and always enjoyed it. The students go "wild" during the tournaments, she said. The classes that competed against each other were: The Agriculture Class vs. Food services; Automotives vs. Health Occupations; Building Trades Vs. Business; Elec- trical Services vs. Forestry; and Human Services vs. Pro- Vocational, for the morning competition on the 17th. For the afternoon competition, held on the 18th, it was Building Trades against Foods Services and Building Trades versus Automotives. The classes narrowed down to the Agriculture Class vs. Building Trades and Forestry vs. Human Services. Then the Agriculture Class played Forestry and the Agriculture Class won. They had to play Forestry for the championship game and won. A trophy was awarded to Joe Button,  the Vocational Agricultural teacher. FBLA Members of the Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) at Oxbow High School attended a conference on Thursday, March 11 at the Windjammer restaurant in Burlington, Vt. At the con- ference, topics such as re- division of FBLA regions and the amount of people per club running for state office were discussed. The FBLA members who attended the meeting were: Brenda Oliver, Gina Wheeler, Tummy Sarazin, and Bethanne Wright. Thirty4ive people attended the con- ference including people from: Enosburg, Colchester, St. Johnsbury, Lamoille, and Spaulding. Peter Stebbins, Northern Regional Vice President and Mindy Hall, State Historian were speakers at the con- ference. Co-Ed Correspondent Sheri Morgan, who was recently appointed a correspondent to Co-Ed THUS. States would Take over programs costin9 ......... $4G 7 bil Receive savings and revenues totaling ........... $47,1 bil As proposed by President Reagan, the New Federalism will return structure, efficiency and responsiveness to all levels o( govern- ment: -- Sorting out responsibilities within the federal system on the basis of clear principles and criteria; -- Restoring balance of responsibilities within the federal system and reducing decision, management and fiscal overload there; -- By fully federalizing Medicaid, initiating a centralized cost containment program to limit the skyrocketing growth of health care programs; -- And perhaps more importantly, giving. state and local government the flexibility anu $33 b*l $1 3 btl Karla-Marie Lane par- ticipating. Third place to Lilac Lassies , W. Canaan, Lori Jones participating. Fourth to Cloverbloom, participating members Cathy Coulter and Susan Wescott. The Senior Foley Manufacturing Award is given to the committee's top three choices. Each club has one nomination based on out- standing food ac- complishments, nutritional knowledge and leadership in food projects. This year Kelley Lennon, Bob-O-Link, N. Haverhill was first. Lori Jones, Lilac Lassies, W. Canaan, second, and Kristi Blessing, Mt. Breeze, N. Monroe was third. Each received kitchen utensils done/ted from Foley. The Junior Foley Contes is called the Placemat Contest. These placemat and napkins are to be made by the 4-H'er and are judged on ap- pearance, useability, con- struction, and creativity. First place went to Jennifer Hall, N. Monroe Mt. Breeze. Second place to Jane Goodrich, Laf-A- Lenders, Littleton, third to Amy Dube, Lilac Lassies, W. Canaan. Other's participating were: Laurie Clifford, Laurie Stone, Becky Cantlin, Lilac Lassies; Robert Peck, Mascoma Valley Boys; Judith Carroll, N. Monroe Mt. Breeze; Jennie Verratti, Bob- O-Link. Remember 4-H is for all youth ages 8-19. Anyone in- terested in learning more about the 4-H program, becoming a member or a volunteer, should contact the Cooperative Extension Office in Grafton County, 787-6944. Magazine has begun her duties. Sheri Morgan Sheri has been busy filling out surveys on teenage products. The magazine is interested in finding out about those products used by their correspondeents. Another duty which Sberi will become involved in the future is that of writing essays on such current topics as drugs and teenage pregnancy. Says Sheri, "The Magazine is interested in a certain sort of a national profile, including teens opinions and feelings". Planetarium Tom Estill, Science teacher at Oxbow High School, and Fred Rubenfell of U-36, coordinate a Planetarium for the school district. The money for this planetarium was obtained from a state grant and the school district. All public and private schools in the district can use the planetarium. The public can use it also if they take a mini- course on the use of the planetarium. Estill and a student at Oxbow, John Grow, prepare programs for the needs of the public or the curriculum of a certain class. The planetarium travels from school to school and stays at each school for a month then goes on to another school. Estili invited fcur classes (please turn to page 8) , ,,,,, .... i i .... /  FOR TItE HEART-- Rope jumpers of five students and three adults took part at the Brad- L. I participated in this fund-raising venture ford Acadeny gym. the p rticilmnts jt mp il q Retted pledges of approximately $1,250. Twenty- dividually, in doubles, and as a group. . Grants - "-" ..... 11" | "_ WOOUVall s1,.s, m4..t-.'-,,,**dClmnt, I.V Wv Jn.JL,tJ ] p.m. qday Mosses, 8 o.m. end ! 0 o.m. waning. Youth Faliowship G .. BATH # t --"='------ 12. AIIorowalcome. I "q'10 Om,-- .......... Cemmuan 1 st, 3rd o 5th Sandays - l 1:00 flanqpnlkmM U..C. ford Academy gym. The participants jumped in- 10:00 o.m., R. Arthur 6egoy. Faraday MONTPELIER-- Governor schu 0:00 o.m. Yo Fe4ws Sunday Richard A. Shelling has an- aning. Youth Faliowship Grgdas 7 through nounced the award of $5,000 to 12. All ore welcome. each of five ,tgns to par- ticipat6 in the new Vermont o.m. Morning Prayer, 2nd and 4th, .amdays - Rev. John Hnggerty. Sunday Services - Main Street Program. 11,00 o.m. 11 o.m. Chur School 10 o.m. The Vermont Main Street Program will allow five towns nday School, 9:45 (:hurddlkn,m 'ydk 11 a.m. Evening Rev. flysong, pastor. Sunday, 9:45 o.m., Newy, Vt. Rev. Josoh Rinaldi. Say and their downtown - Prayer Moating Sunday school ll o.m., ntin 0 worship. 7 Schu, 9:4S o.m. Momim S-vke,  o.m. organizations to hire a local p.m., evenin9 worship. Wedmmy, 7:15 [vening lowp, z:s0 p.m. me su, coordinator for six months to Wed., 7:30p.m. implement a downtown S o.m., Sunday Services 11 Roy. Willbm L. Sharer, IStor. Sund, i 1 IfflTII OlINBI a.m,, morning worship; church SChoM for pro- Udd Pmbydn Preyer Meeting, Wed. 2 schoal children. Tuesdays, 6:30 o.m., men's Roy. Marian T. Redding. Sunday Worship, breakfast. HalenRutherfoedislelioEliblo 11:30o.m. Church School, 9o.m. study group at he home an 11ruloys 5era 9:30-11 o.m.; evecyano is walcome. tOliTN lit m.d A4t Crd Eldar Lan MonNa. Worship mord, 2:30 p.m. School - I 0:00- 11:00 o.m.- Calw,/ mi; Service - 6;30 p.m., Albert E , imstor. Sunday, 10 o.m., MentlnO.6:3Op.m. Sunday school. 11:00 morning worship. 7 p.m. evening service. Wednesday, 7 p.m., preyer meeting. Satucdoy, 7 p.m., young ,people's meeting. t Services - 9:30 Vermont Set'vlce, Roy. Lee Mooning. Saturday ,rlrvices Sabbath School - I p.m. Worship Service - 2:30 p.m. tlUTII ItIII revitalization program. The five coordinators will be responsible for several downtown activities ranging from conducting building inventories and recruiting businesses to preparing brochures and annual events for the towns. The five towns and the co- sponsoring downtown organizations are: Bristol and m,on * uud rUnCbwcU the Bristol Business u.c.c. Rev. John Knight - Sunday rvk 10:45, Rev. Morion T. Redding. Sunday Worship, 10 Association; Morrisville and Sunday Servkes- Fmdoy Schoui 9:30 o.m. - Child Cute o.m.Ourchhanl, 9o.m. the Morrisville Action 9:30 o.m. Provided. WlION VIttU Committee; Randolph and the ,m u ub. vge dbt chor Randolph Chamber of Sr a. Gri- fo, W. aev. mes b. Suy Uan Va, W. r,or -- ev. 6'V Woa. Commerce; St. Johnsbury and United Sorvicos during the winler with the Business District 9:00 o.m., .Youth SorvkeslO:3Oo.m. SandSchool9:15o.m. lllmttlllllwTkm/FrtChurd P.m, Private Tutoring All Ages Invited. Morning Service 10:30 o.m. &it ages invited. Association; and Windsor and the Windsor Area Chamber of for .[ : "__ C0mmSlmEl ae t"W_tqWz. t cqmmimt amlt v mt = ".,StmQidayServicesl,:00 Stephen J. Pal., pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 o.m. Morning Worship, 11. Evanino " "110:00 om., ChP.d Core ,%rvke, 7, 11:1 o.m., $ School 9:1 11 o.m., UJck 8, Ve@er,. Thorsdoy, 6:0( J[ --' .... rorsol, Thursdays, 7:30 p.m. LI1 Illl LETTER to the EDITOR * To breathe clean air (continued from page 4) Clean Air Act. Furthermore, cannot be considered a vic- the benefits of clean air were tory, since an equally serious found to equal $21.4 billion per threat has been posed by the year, while the costs budget-cutting agenda of the amounted to just over $19 Reagan Administration. The billion per year. Environmental Protection Agency has sustained a 30 percent cut for 1982, and now the Office of Management and Budget is proposing to cut EPA's operating budget an additional 36 percent in 1983. This, at a time when EPA's workload is doubling. With regard to air pollution en- forcement, it means a 42 percent cut in field personnel and a 50 percent headquarters cut. What does it all mean? So what if the air gets a little dirtier? Aren't our economic problems more important? "Dirty" air has some very frightening implications. Acid rain is currently eliminating aquatic life in sensitive areas and threatening agricultural and forestland productivity, while eating away at cars, buildings, and statues throughout the Northeast and parts of the Southeast, Mid- west, and Far West. It represents $5 billion worth of damage each year, according to a recent National Academy of Sciences report. The National Crop Loss Assessment Network, established by the EPA in cooperation with the Departments of Agriculture and Energy, has estimated that ozone, a pollutant resulting from reactions between hydrocarbons and sunlight, causes $3.1 billion damage each year to the country's corn, wheat, soybean, and peanut crops alone. Carbon dioxide levels in the Earth's atmosphere are building up at an astounding rate. The result is a serious problem known as the "greenhouse effect" which is warming the global climate and may eventually melt the polar ice caps -- the con- sequence of which involves inestimable economic ramifications. A 1980 review of 90 studies on air and water pollution by the President Council on Environmental Quality concluded about 14,000 lives would be lost annually without the protection offered by the The National Commission on Air Quality, a bipartisan commission appointed in 1978 to review the Clean Air Act in preparation for its reauthorization in 1981, found that the Act's effects on national economic indicators labor productivity, unem- ployment, and consumer prices ) has not been significant. Air pollution controls do not cost jobs, contrary to the assertions of polluting industries. In fact, labor unions such as the United Steel Workers of America and the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers have been among the strongest supporters of the National Clean Air Coalition, even though they stand to suffer the greatest job losses if the "clean air costs jobs" theory were true. Polluting industries also maintain that air pollution controls place them at a competitive disadvantage with Germany and Japan. The fact is that these two coun- tries, and Canada . as well, spend a larger portion of their GNP on air pollution controls than does the United States. Last June, a Harris poll revealed that 86 percent of Americans polled oppose a weakening of the Clean Air Act -- and 38 percent wish to see it strengthened. Why, in the face of this strong public support, is the Clean Air Act in trouble? Powerful lobbying efforts by a handful of polluting industries have made the difference and brought us to the brink of destruction of one of our most important pieces of en- vironmental legislation. An open question to the public: do we want clean air or don't we? Our senators and representatives, and those of our friends and relatives in other parts of the country, had better hear from us -- and soon. The consequences of a quiescent public are severe indeed. Robert O. Linck Associate Executive Director, Connecticut River Watershed Council March 24, 198Z-The Journal Opinion-Page 5 HAPPY CREW-- 4.H participants in the junior placemat contest. Grafton County 4-H Food Show held LISBON-- Seventy Grafton Tom Driscoll, B -- 3F's and County 4-Hers participated in the 18th Annual Grafton County 4-H Food Show which was held at Lisbon High School. This special event allows each 4-H'er to exhibit their food preparation, as well as share their nutritional knowledge with a judge. While the judging was taking place, leaders and parents were able to attend workshops. Tom Danko, UNH Poultry Specialist, taught how to be creative with eggs by making Omelets and Crepes. Ellie Fiest, Grafton County Home Economist taught about Nutritional snacks for kids. Both workshops allowed participants to sample ! 4H'ers played consumer education games after their foods were judged. Sue Roberts, 4-H Agent from Sullivan County, and her 4-H Teens kept the participants interest with these new challenges. The awards program concluded the day's events. All participants received their score sheets back along with a ribbon: Cindi McLure, Suzie Cady, Shari Carbonneau, Jane Goodrich, "A" -- Laf-A Landers; Lisa Driscoll, A; Bath Braves; Julie Simpson, Tracy Monahan, A, Clover- bloom; Michelle Farr, Rochelle Farr, Annette Merchand, Stanley Gochee, Robert Newton, Mary Dimick, Aimee Loranger, A, Chris Gochee, Jennifer Belyea, Angola Merryman, B -- Hunt Me.; Katrina Clark, Sherry Foster, Kristen Lennon, Jennie Verratti, Jessica Schablein, Angela Thayer, Michelle Reed, Sheila Fabrizio, Karen Keniston, Heather Olsen, Stephanie Page, Christine Roy, A-- Bob- O-Link; Kristi'Blessing, Pam Blessing, Michele Bullock, Judith Carroll, Jennifer Hall, Lorna Thomas, A -- No. Monroe Mt. Breeze; Mike McGuire, Kelly Simpson, Jennifer Jo Peters, Karen Commerce. John Fontana speaks roLLS mvm "The high quality of all the on Oxbow Discipline St. lmee'a Chk "Josh'mmd, Poster, C.s,s.R. Saturday proposals reflect the interest The Oxbow News recently ts- 7:00 p.m. ay Moss.- 9,30 and dedication to downtown interviewed Superintendent of o.m. revitalization in Vermont," Schools John Fontana teeu.c.c. Lambert said. regarding his feelings about waits my,r, yr. Re,. Artr Cn,V, S The ten remaining towns the recent attention being rvic, - o:o o.m. Cld care providaU, submitting applications were: given to the problem of SandaySchool-Pa.m. Bradford, Fair Haven, student discipline at Oxbow m|mv Manchester, Poultney, Rich- High School. erv. nlu', Ptor. Sxy mond, Rutland, Waitsfield, Fontana feels that the role trvicos 10:45 o.m., Church han- 10:45 Waterbury, West Rutland, and of the Superintendent of Richard A. White, Poster, Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m., S School 9:45 o.m., Pot o.m. Wilmington. These ten towns Schools' Office in the tk 8, Ve@erz "rtr.,rio, 6 p.m. Choir will also be invited to par- discipline process is to "act as Wltl'PAnlltn ticipate in the training an advisor to the school wu,_ .... sessions and will receive board" and then to take an FAllU! Pstor, Gorck Cenk. $nday xn, -:, II st'nmtlilaldlEIllee o.m.; Worship Service, 10_:30 o;m..;.  technical assistance from the active role in "making sure ?El WlilIH TheRen. WilliomAtkimon. odoy$orce, ,rvice(m.l, 7:OOp.m,;Tu,.tamesl? Department of Housing and that the school carries out  l' 10e m 10:00 o.m. 14{: first, lhl  fifth. Sundays Seedy, I0:00 o.m:; Follomhe Night (Woo./, Community Affairs. " and MP, dondrm. " what the board has decided." ;l 7:00 p.m. people Returning power to the the federalgovernmentfromthetrustfund _  . eOntlnued from page 4) During a transitional period, monies from a money or use the trust fund money as "super "l,'ig from $30.8 billion to $72.5 federal trust fund will pay ,or me programs, revenue sharing" to spend according to their v --tr I own rules and priorities. v- -t, 4 - 981 mcrease alone was a full 21 with the fund created out of existing alcohol, j':.hy l,Caid itself will cost 83 percent tobacco and telephone excise taxes; two cents Stamps, states with high Medicaid rates, like - !I , t)ased on current projections, per gallon of the gaso,,ne tax ann a portmn oz In trading Medicaid for AFDC and Food  .. states lose costly liability in the windfall profits oil tax. Starting !n 1984, New York and California, could benefit at the _-. St-' 'Y assuming control of AFDC.and the states will have ac .cess t_tritTnt ied n expense of states with low Medicaid rates. To Lo?21.., they accept programs wnnse e, ,,m,,,, in the trust luna aim start, s avoid such inquities, the trust fund allocation "i "s - ,o,'_'tf-ndandthesupportiogfedera! formula will be adjusted, so that both ds'-u!7:'Th eShmated to be only 10 percent , ='-' ":,nhased out at a rate of 25 percent [lofeh.s.wap will result in aggregate "*" .......... uv--rtin" tax elements of the New Federalism work I'', O u Ulion. - "" m per year. By 1991,.tl,entlre,sPnd ocal together, avoiding net gains or losses for any .o,o .,, av.,,--o ,o ---- lent of New Federans =:.z=.will,ts allowing them access to new state. l s'of 3 programs to state control, ,,= ......... OF THE PEOPLE, BY THE PEOPLE tdI2 le-sCial, health and nutrition ser- [ bases at no additional expense to thmr "in a single stroke, we will he ac- mS L ." 'aaanl,transportation procts, sewer, taxpayers. complishing a reiignment that will end s"" Community development During the transition perioa, states will B'd'tra'ii'revenue sharing, educational and have one of two options. First, either receive cumbersome administration and spiralling the former categorical grant programs along costs at the federal level while we insure ,e W;t. '"Lag, and home energy aid for the with the federal regulations, and reimburse these programs will be more responsible to ' both the people they are meant to help and the people who pay for them." -- PresCient Reagan States Would rmt From Washington sa*4 o,t $46.7 bfl. gmmmms sm4 tot.i S| bM. ........... $9 ? bil. Oil "'indtail profits" tel ....................... 116.7 pit, Alcohol excise tax TobacCo ......... $6 bit Excise tax ............ 116.1 bi{, end nutriUon Gasoline ....... $8.0 bil excise rex .............. $22 bit, $6.4 biL Telephone excise tax .......... $03 bil, ...... $4.8 bit resources to target programs to their specific ....................... needs Oxhow ll Schuel IMol, Vmm ................. JUDY AUfJSTII Steff ................... Lff. FARNHAM MARISA FkTHLEY KATHERINE HARTLEY PETER HODGE LESLIE KAhPRZAK TRCI OTTINA TOM RATHaUIDI BETHANNE WRIGHT iqaelpaphr ........... KRII'IN H[RNdhl Mmor ................ ARNOLD SHIELDS When asked his personal opinion of student discipline and whether he feels changes need to he made in the present policies, Fontana replied that there were "always ways to improve policies." He added that he felt communication was the key to policy im- provement, basically, "better communication on policies that exist" and a better un- derstanding .by different groups of the effect of these policies. Fontana was asked to comment on what appears to be a disagreement between the teachers and the ad- ministration on this issue. He said that there was a "dif- ference of opinion" and felt that this was a result of a "lack of understanding of each other's goals." Fontana went on to say that this was a "mutual problem" which "can't be one person's problem. It takes mutual respect for the role of each group." The Oxbow News also questioned Fontana about the recently comprised Student Rules Committee--more specifically what he hoped the outcome of their meetings would be and how this will be applied to the problem at Oxbow. Fontana said that they found out quickly that the rules in the Student Handbook needed to be reorganized and rewritten. He added that the Handbook "has never really been revised--just added to." Fontana mentioned that a sub-committee has been established to start the task of rewriting. He added that the privileges." The Student Rules Com- mittee is comprised of members of the faculty, ad- ministration, school board and student body. Fontana describes the aim of this group as "to get representative points of view, in one place, on hew the school operates." Fontana sees the role of the school board as that of a policy-makiog body, not as one responsible for specific rules, but states that "the rules must he consistant with the policies." He describes the role of his own office as being "responsible for the im- plementation of the board's policies" or to "recommend changes as a result of the policies." Fontana commends the success of the committee in "coming out with a different view." He feels that after the first meeting there was a better understanding between the committee members of "each other's roles in fostering a positive at- mosphere for the school" and an "awareness of the students." Fontana praised the students involved, saying that they really "carried the ball at the discussion of the first meeting." Fontana went on to say that he was "impressed with the students' un- derstanding of how 'different' students are," each having "different reactions." Fontana feels that the discipline problem isn't a direct reflection of the school itself, but rather "a reflection of society and problems outside of the school" as well. He notes that finding a solution to the problem is a public concern in which "everyone has a say but no one gets everything," and one can only "hope to come up with a policy which is ac- ceptable to the majority of the people." Vocational Volleyha II Handbook contains policies Tournament and rules regarding "all Vicki diZerega, vocational aspects" of school, "not just electricity teacher at Oxbow discipline." Fontana corn- High School, is in charge of the mented that he hoped the new vocational volleyball tour- Handbook will help everyone nament which was held March "better understand student 17 and 18, 1982. responsibilities and DiZerega has been in charge Locke, A -- Sunrise; Marie Tucker, B -- Clover Crew; Weston Faery, Dean Jones, Chris Morrison, Robert and Rodney Peck, A  Mascoma Valley Boys; Tina Ware, Laurie Monica, Katherine Weaver, Christine Lacroix, Laurie Clifford, Laurie Stone, Amy Dube, Colleen Johnson, Becky Cant/in, A, Christine Ashline, Barbara .]ones, Robin Jones, B -- Lilac Lassies. The Senior Ward Baking Award is awarded each year to the judges choice for club exhibits  this year N. Monroe Mountain Breeze 4-H Club received this trophy. Participating members in- cluded Pare and Kristi Blessing, Michelle Bullock, and Lorna Thomas. Second Place went to Bob-O-Links 4-H Club, N. Haverhill, with Kelly Lennon, Janet .Thompson, of the volleyball tournaments ever since they started, and always enjoyed it. The students go "wild" during the tournaments, she said. The classes that competed against each other were: The Agriculture Class vs. Food services; Automotives vs. Health Occupations; Building Trades Vs. Business; Elec- trical Services vs. Forestry; and Human Services vs. Pro- Vocational, for the morning competition on the 17th. For the afternoon competition, held on the 18th, it was Building Trades against Foods Services and Building Trades versus Automotives. The classes narrowed down to the Agriculture Class vs. Building Trades and Forestry vs. Human Services. Then the Agriculture Class played Forestry and the Agriculture Class won. They had to play Forestry for the championship game and won. A trophy was awarded to Joe Button,  the Vocational Agricultural teacher. FBLA Members of the Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) at Oxbow High School attended a conference on Thursday, March 11 at the Windjammer restaurant in Burlington, Vt. At the con- ference, topics such as re- division of FBLA regions and the amount of people per club running for state office were discussed. The FBLA members who attended the meeting were: Brenda Oliver, Gina Wheeler, Tummy Sarazin, and Bethanne Wright. Thirty4ive people attended the con- ference including people from: Enosburg, Colchester, St. Johnsbury, Lamoille, and Spaulding. Peter Stebbins, Northern Regional Vice President and Mindy Hall, State Historian were speakers at the con- ference. Co-Ed Correspondent Sheri Morgan, who was recently appointed a correspondent to Co-Ed THUS. States would Take over programs costin9 ......... $4G 7 bil Receive savings and revenues totaling ........... $47,1 bil As proposed by President Reagan, the New Federalism will return structure, efficiency and responsiveness to all levels o( govern- ment: -- Sorting out responsibilities within the federal system on the basis of clear principles and criteria; -- Restoring balance of responsibilities within the federal system and reducing decision, management and fiscal overload there; -- By fully federalizing Medicaid, initiating a centralized cost containment program to limit the skyrocketing growth of health care programs; -- And perhaps more importantly, giving. state and local government the flexibility anu $33 b*l $1 3 btl Karla-Marie Lane par- ticipating. Third place to Lilac Lassies , W. Canaan, Lori Jones participating. Fourth to Cloverbloom, participating members Cathy Coulter and Susan Wescott. The Senior Foley Manufacturing Award is given to the committee's top three choices. Each club has one nomination based on out- standing food ac- complishments, nutritional knowledge and leadership in food projects. This year Kelley Lennon, Bob-O-Link, N. Haverhill was first. Lori Jones, Lilac Lassies, W. Canaan, second, and Kristi Blessing, Mt. Breeze, N. Monroe was third. Each received kitchen utensils done/ted from Foley. The Junior Foley Contes is called the Placemat Contest. These placemat and napkins are to be made by the 4-H'er and are judged on ap- pearance, useability, con- struction, and creativity. First place went to Jennifer Hall, N. Monroe Mt. Breeze. Second place to Jane Goodrich, Laf-A- Lenders, Littleton, third to Amy Dube, Lilac Lassies, W. Canaan. Other's participating were: Laurie Clifford, Laurie Stone, Becky Cantlin, Lilac Lassies; Robert Peck, Mascoma Valley Boys; Judith Carroll, N. Monroe Mt. Breeze; Jennie Verratti, Bob- O-Link. Remember 4-H is for all youth ages 8-19. Anyone in- terested in learning more about the 4-H program, becoming a member or a volunteer, should contact the Cooperative Extension Office in Grafton County, 787-6944. Magazine has begun her duties. Sheri Morgan Sheri has been busy filling out surveys on teenage products. The magazine is interested in finding out about those products used by their correspondeents. Another duty which Sberi will become involved in the future is that of writing essays on such current topics as drugs and teenage pregnancy. Says Sheri, "The Magazine is interested in a certain sort of a national profile, including teens opinions and feelings". Planetarium Tom Estill, Science teacher at Oxbow High School, and Fred Rubenfell of U-36, coordinate a Planetarium for the school district. The money for this planetarium was obtained from a state grant and the school district. All public and private schools in the district can use the planetarium. The public can use it also if they take a mini- course on the use of the planetarium. Estill and a student at Oxbow, John Grow, prepare programs for the needs of the public or the curriculum of a certain class. The planetarium travels from school to school and stays at each school for a month then goes on to another school. Estili invited fcur classes (please turn to page 8)