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March 24, 1982     Journal Opinion
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vy fashions in art come and go, but throughout American cultural v  tl have always been artists interested in capturing scenes from IY life. Rather than painting dreamy landscapes or at a later time,  p'ractions, they have captured people engaged in commonplace ac- f. Thers often is a democratic art, and though it depicts the human it can be difficult to understand without an awareness of society's d attitudes "The New Hat," by Charles Dana Gibson, contrasts the Upper and working classes. A family album I Everyday life in American Art by DAVIDM. MAXFIELD sidewalk in Vicksburg, Miss. early ta00s in this country, it alike because of that era's based on events tram the past literature. Smithsonian News Service Once in the gallery, it takes only a moment to sense a kinship with the characters in the works of art. These figures are, in a' way, the "American family," generations of or- dinary people going about everyday life on the frontier and the farm, in America's small towns and big cities. This room is a family album. The mountain man, the trapper of beaver in the Rockies, is here. So, too, are the emigrants heading west in 1840 by oxen and Conestoga wagon. Union troops stand in formation in a later painting, while pedestrians scurry for safety in a New York street scene. Dock workers relax at noon in another canvas One turn-of-the-century painting shows two lovely young women in a sunny parlor, one writing letters, the other reading. A 1936 photograph, taken as part of a New Deal art program, documents life passing by on a In the artworks of the 1960s and '70s, many sub- jects--children and elderly alike--look isolated and detached in their urban set- tings. All of these artworks are in the permanent collection of the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., and will be exhibited in the coming months on a nationwide tour organized by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service. The paintings, drawings, photos and sculpture belong to a category of fine art that historians call genre, meaning "a style of painting concerned with depicting scenes and subjects of common everyday life." Throughout the 20th- century's preoccupation with abstract painting, genre art always maintained some following and, now, as the interest in realism revives, this art is gaining wider favor. Since genre emerged in the "has never gone out of style," Coscoran Director Peter C. Marzio says, "yet it has never been the height of style." One reason for this, he believes, is that each generation of critics and artists thinks "either that there is no tradition of art from everyday life in America or that the previous generations were hopelessly romantic, uncritical and totally out of touch with reality." Then, too, comments Lois Fink, the curator in the department of research at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American Art, other types of art, be they the abstractions of recent years or the grand "elevating" history scene paintings of the 19th century, have tended to capture fashion's passing prizes. In the last century, history paintings such as "Washington Crossing the Delaware" were popular with the public, critics and artists interest in uplifting subjects and themes from American (please turn to page 2A) Edmund Charles Trabell's "Josephine and Mercie" presents the artist's vision of the perfect home life. TODAY'S CHUCKLE Never put off 'til tomorrow what you can avoid altogether. THIS WEEK'S PRESS RUN life began, climatic flooding of land, and the which take into account the "es, sad natural clearing of land for timber economic, recreational, and n as volcanic production and agriculture ecological value of these areas u forest fires, have drastically altered the have beeninitiated. 'tYna,.the" carrying carrying capacity of vast The nation's growing a.. rural systems, areas of wildlifehabitat, demand for our diminishing t'/&at could not Realizing that our actions natural resources--fossil ,,.2. changes or threaten many species of fuels, forests, grazing land- "ate to another plants and animals with ex- s--has caused increased the Northwest carved #the LUCIEN L. BOURBEAU INSURANCE AGENCY J 802 FAIRL.E-E I,, -333.9224 . ,TdQy Wedcloy 12 nn to 4.30 PM" ,,. Y],, r.ZL='W, 2 PM -  PM ' " aSONAt a FORMING IN BRADFORD .'wl dru. miner , a bass player or a lead- H me Immedlately. Call i/U_ Cd)O]D, USED, SALEABLE  CLOTHING FOR ALL TH-E-FAMILY. "THE CAROUSEL" d, Vt. Four Seasons 80'Z--S  a0 FORPItI:UF TRUCKS l (includes paint materials) Booy WORK EXTRA FIREWOOD CUt, sp|| t aM delivend to order . $?0. cord S02-333-gm5 Your ad, this size, on page 1 of the Second Opinion is only $5.00 PRE-INVENTORY CLEARANCE NO-WAX INLAID We'd rather wheel 'n deal than pay taxes. j ROUTE 14 pressures to develop lands that have been set aside for wildlife. Therefore, more research is currently being undertaken to determine the exact needs of threatened and endangered wildlife across the nation. An excellent example of a multiple-use management plan that is balancing the needs of wildlife with human actions is the plan adopted by the Snake River Birds of Prey Conservation Area in north central Idaho. After intensive research by the Bureau of Land Management, it was doter- mined that in order to support the six hundred pairs of nexting raptors living in the conservation area, over 90 percent of the land tap- proxim.atey 4., acre) was pmcea mx llmlIs to cropland conversion. It was also determined that the high cost of supplying the energy needed to convert the area into productive farmland would be uneconomical, but grazing, recreation, mining, and National Guard training activities could continue in the area. figure of an eagle in their totem poles to represent a spiritual relationship between their families and this majestic predator. On June 20, 1782, the Con- tinental Congress adopted the bald eagle as the central figure of the Great Seal of the U.S.A. The District of Columbia, and the states of New York, Pennsylvania, Mississippi, Missouri, Arkansas, Michigan, Iowa, Oregon, Utah, New Mexico and Wyoming also use the eagle in their official seal. At the time the bald eagle became our national symbol, it nested throughout the country. As the United States expanded from thirteen colonies to 50 states, the population of the bald eagle declined. The clearing of land for agriculture and the development of cities and HAPPY 18th BIRTHDAY ROUTE 14 SOUTH BARRE, VT. BARRE HOME SUPPLY SOUTH BARRE, VT. M iss M uffet! PRE-INVENTORY CLEARANCE CARPETING We'd raher wheel 'n deal than pay taxes. BARRE HOME SUPPLY EEIPRE TALONN PDIIAX HEGGET INSCRC LELWIN ITOQEI PATKST DATORA I EEL ZKOOATTYAE AEOHBESPTU ZSHABNEVSR VASB I OPNEP GVl ITIMIAS EAHTGRAALA ENSAERETWL PEHWAXRN I TLASNBM I RBZQETAFR I CAUPO NHADR I BCGRAPTORN ETFEATHERSZLEMUR has served as a symbol of power, freedom, and im- mortality. The Egyptians used the eagle in their picture writing (hieroglyphics) and their priests made elaborate eagle masks for special religious ceremonies. Greek coins dating back to 413 B.C. the eagle Since the beginning of industry urastically reduced recorded history, the eagle eagle nesting and roosting habitat. Egg collecting and shooting also contributed to the decline of the bald eagle. On June 8, 1940, in response to the need to protect our national symbol, Congress enacted the Bald Eagle Protection Act. Despite strict enforcement of the Act, the number of bald eagles decreased rapidly in the 1950's and 1960's. This was mainly due to the widespread use of pesticides such as DDT. These long-lasting pesticides drained off farmlands into streams, rivers, and lakes and concentrated in the fatty tissues of fish. Bald eagles fed on these contaminated fish, and the pesticides interfered with the proper production of the eagles' eggs. The Department of the Interior officially lists the bald eagle as "endangered" in 43 of the 48 contous states and "threatened" in the other five: Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Oregon and Washington. (It is not en- dangered or threatened in Alaska and has never existed in Hawaii.) Fortunately, greater public awareness of the bald eagle's decline in the past two decades has led to an im- provement in its once bleak future. In the last ten years the use of pesticides such as DDT has been restricted in the United States, eagle refuges have been established, and penalties for illegal shooting of bald eagles have been (please turn to page 5A) If I were an ea00le by Stun Kulewicz If I were an eagle My arms would be wings My feet would have talons To grasp on to things. If I were an eagle I'd have two shiny eyes My sight would be keen Spotting prey from the skies. If I were an eagle My home would be a nest With sticks, leaves and branches l'd make it the best. If I were an eagle l What fun it would be ] I But I think I'll stop dreaming ] Because I like being me. ] FOR SALE 18 YEARLING HOLSTEIN HEIFERS $6,000 FOR LOT. 802-584-3327 LOOK FOR OUR DELl AD ON PAGE 2 I O ! ' V. , I ol Thru the Underpass Woodsville, N.H. BRADFORD GAME ROOM- VIDEO -- PINBALL Supervised (Behind Allen's Western Auto) MondaY-Friday -- 3-9 PM-- Sat. 1-9 PM [.M. Landscaping RIVER ROAD PIERMONT, N.H 03779 Lawn mowing services for '1982' season. i Call anytime. (603) 272-5864 A Happy Birthday -i Carol Robie! We Love You! FOR SALE 1978 CHEVROLET SHASTA CAMPER VAN txllt ..mfitim -- no_rust, tow mileoge, new mdiol tires, automatic stress,on. AM/FM Stereo .,sette, cm01etely eqippl. 13 to 15 tuned, reody to roll. CoN Bob Groy, o. Newbur, 802.866.3342. mll. Just Your ad, this size, on page 1 of the Second Opinion is only $10.00 748-2933 Colorful things for spring are in American Indian Turquoise Jewelry Jewelry & Precious Stones SUNSHINE BOUTIOUE 71 Eastern Ave,, St. Johnsbury INVITATION TO BID Town of Warren seeks bids on a new Dump Truck. For Specs see Harry Wright, Road Agent, or one of the Selectmen. GRAND OPENING NIMBLE THIMBLE FABRIC SHOP March 27 -- Saturday Rt. 5, Lower Plain, Bradford, Vt. 802-222-4516 L_ " 12 125 VIMOIIT -- Thofford, East Thefford, Thefford flill, Thetford Center, North Thetford, Post Mills, Fairlee, West Foirlee, Bradford, Bradford Village, Corinth, East Corinth, Topsham, West Topsham, Newbury Village, South Newbury, West Newbury, Wells River, Groton,  Ryegate Comer, East Ryegote, South Ryegate. Peachom, Bornet, West Bamet. ., B ..... i.:= / N ANG E / A I CREODWALD I DOPA "7" GCTBSLCSZADGINGT l[r dJk :i 1 rt LHAWTDQNWBMRCKRE JL L/I,J, JL .FJL vy fashions in art come and go, but throughout American cultural v  tl have always been artists interested in capturing scenes from IY life. Rather than painting dreamy landscapes or at a later time,  p'ractions, they have captured people engaged in commonplace ac- f. Thers often is a democratic art, and though it depicts the human it can be difficult to understand without an awareness of society's d attitudes "The New Hat," by Charles Dana Gibson, contrasts the Upper and working classes. A family album I Everyday life in American Art by DAVIDM. MAXFIELD sidewalk in Vicksburg, Miss. early ta00s in this country, it alike because of that era's based on events tram the past literature. Smithsonian News Service Once in the gallery, it takes only a moment to sense a kinship with the characters in the works of art. These figures are, in a' way, the "American family," generations of or- dinary people going about everyday life on the frontier and the farm, in America's small towns and big cities. This room is a family album. The mountain man, the trapper of beaver in the Rockies, is here. So, too, are the emigrants heading west in 1840 by oxen and Conestoga wagon. Union troops stand in formation in a later painting, while pedestrians scurry for safety in a New York street scene. Dock workers relax at noon in another canvas One turn-of-the-century painting shows two lovely young women in a sunny parlor, one writing letters, the other reading. A 1936 photograph, taken as part of a New Deal art program, documents life passing by on a In the artworks of the 1960s and '70s, many sub- jects--children and elderly alike--look isolated and detached in their urban set- tings. All of these artworks are in the permanent collection of the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., and will be exhibited in the coming months on a nationwide tour organized by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service. The paintings, drawings, photos and sculpture belong to a category of fine art that historians call genre, meaning "a style of painting concerned with depicting scenes and subjects of common everyday life." Throughout the 20th- century's preoccupation with abstract painting, genre art always maintained some following and, now, as the interest in realism revives, this art is gaining wider favor. Since genre emerged in the "has never gone out of style," Coscoran Director Peter C. Marzio says, "yet it has never been the height of style." One reason for this, he believes, is that each generation of critics and artists thinks "either that there is no tradition of art from everyday life in America or that the previous generations were hopelessly romantic, uncritical and totally out of touch with reality." Then, too, comments Lois Fink, the curator in the department of research at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American Art, other types of art, be they the abstractions of recent years or the grand "elevating" history scene paintings of the 19th century, have tended to capture fashion's passing prizes. In the last century, history paintings such as "Washington Crossing the Delaware" were popular with the public, critics and artists interest in uplifting subjects and themes from American (please turn to page 2A) Edmund Charles Trabell's "Josephine and Mercie" presents the artist's vision of the perfect home life. TODAY'S CHUCKLE Never put off 'til tomorrow what you can avoid altogether. THIS WEEK'S PRESS RUN life began, climatic flooding of land, and the which take into account the "es, sad natural clearing of land for timber economic, recreational, and n as volcanic production and agriculture ecological value of these areas u forest fires, have drastically altered the have beeninitiated. 'tYna,.the" carrying carrying capacity of vast The nation's growing a.. rural systems, areas of wildlifehabitat, demand for our diminishing t'/&at could not Realizing that our actions natural resources--fossil ,,.2. changes or threaten many species of fuels, forests, grazing land- "ate to another plants and animals with ex- s--has caused increased the Northwest carved #the LUCIEN L. BOURBEAU INSURANCE AGENCY J 802 FAIRL.E-E I,, -333.9224 . ,TdQy Wedcloy 12 nn to 4.30 PM" ,,. Y],, r.ZL='W, 2 PM -  PM ' " aSONAt a FORMING IN BRADFORD .'wl dru. miner , a bass player or a lead- H me Immedlately. Call i/U_ Cd)O]D, USED, SALEABLE  CLOTHING FOR ALL TH-E-FAMILY. "THE CAROUSEL" d, Vt. Four Seasons 80'Z--S  a0 FORPItI:UF TRUCKS l (includes paint materials) Booy WORK EXTRA FIREWOOD CUt, sp|| t aM delivend to order . $?0. cord S02-333-gm5 Your ad, this size, on page 1 of the Second Opinion is only $5.00 PRE-INVENTORY CLEARANCE NO-WAX INLAID We'd rather wheel 'n deal than pay taxes. j ROUTE 14 pressures to develop lands that have been set aside for wildlife. Therefore, more research is currently being undertaken to determine the exact needs of threatened and endangered wildlife across the nation. An excellent example of a multiple-use management plan that is balancing the needs of wildlife with human actions is the plan adopted by the Snake River Birds of Prey Conservation Area in north central Idaho. After intensive research by the Bureau of Land Management, it was doter- mined that in order to support the six hundred pairs of nexting raptors living in the conservation area, over 90 percent of the land tap- proxim.atey 4., acre) was pmcea mx llmlIs to cropland conversion. It was also determined that the high cost of supplying the energy needed to convert the area into productive farmland would be uneconomical, but grazing, recreation, mining, and National Guard training activities could continue in the area. figure of an eagle in their totem poles to represent a spiritual relationship between their families and this majestic predator. On June 20, 1782, the Con- tinental Congress adopted the bald eagle as the central figure of the Great Seal of the U.S.A. The District of Columbia, and the states of New York, Pennsylvania, Mississippi, Missouri, Arkansas, Michigan, Iowa, Oregon, Utah, New Mexico and Wyoming also use the eagle in their official seal. At the time the bald eagle became our national symbol, it nested throughout the country. As the United States expanded from thirteen colonies to 50 states, the population of the bald eagle declined. The clearing of land for agriculture and the development of cities and HAPPY 18th BIRTHDAY ROUTE 14 SOUTH BARRE, VT. BARRE HOME SUPPLY SOUTH BARRE, VT. M iss M uffet! PRE-INVENTORY CLEARANCE CARPETING We'd raher wheel 'n deal than pay taxes. BARRE HOME SUPPLY EEIPRE TALONN PDIIAX HEGGET INSCRC LELWIN ITOQEI PATKST DATORA I EEL ZKOOATTYAE AEOHBESPTU ZSHABNEVSR VASB I OPNEP GVl ITIMIAS EAHTGRAALA ENSAERETWL PEHWAXRN I TLASNBM I RBZQETAFR I CAUPO NHADR I BCGRAPTORN ETFEATHERSZLEMUR has served as a symbol of power, freedom, and im- mortality. The Egyptians used the eagle in their picture writing (hieroglyphics) and their priests made elaborate eagle masks for special religious ceremonies. Greek coins dating back to 413 B.C. the eagle Since the beginning of industry urastically reduced recorded history, the eagle eagle nesting and roosting habitat. Egg collecting and shooting also contributed to the decline of the bald eagle. On June 8, 1940, in response to the need to protect our national symbol, Congress enacted the Bald Eagle Protection Act. Despite strict enforcement of the Act, the number of bald eagles decreased rapidly in the 1950's and 1960's. This was mainly due to the widespread use of pesticides such as DDT. These long-lasting pesticides drained off farmlands into streams, rivers, and lakes and concentrated in the fatty tissues of fish. Bald eagles fed on these contaminated fish, and the pesticides interfered with the proper production of the eagles' eggs. The Department of the Interior officially lists the bald eagle as "endangered" in 43 of the 48 contous states and "threatened" in the other five: Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Oregon and Washington. (It is not en- dangered or threatened in Alaska and has never existed in Hawaii.) Fortunately, greater public awareness of the bald eagle's decline in the past two decades has led to an im- provement in its once bleak future. In the last ten years the use of pesticides such as DDT has been restricted in the United States, eagle refuges have been established, and penalties for illegal shooting of bald eagles have been (please turn to page 5A) If I were an ea00le by Stun Kulewicz If I were an eagle My arms would be wings My feet would have talons To grasp on to things. If I were an eagle I'd have two shiny eyes My sight would be keen Spotting prey from the skies. If I were an eagle My home would be a nest With sticks, leaves and branches l'd make it the best. If I were an eagle l What fun it would be ] I But I think I'll stop dreaming ] Because I like being me. ] FOR SALE 18 YEARLING HOLSTEIN HEIFERS $6,000 FOR LOT. 802-584-3327 LOOK FOR OUR DELl AD ON PAGE 2 I O ! ' V. , I ol Thru the Underpass Woodsville, N.H. BRADFORD GAME ROOM- VIDEO -- PINBALL Supervised (Behind Allen's Western Auto) MondaY-Friday -- 3-9 PM-- Sat. 1-9 PM [.M. Landscaping RIVER ROAD PIERMONT, N.H 03779 Lawn mowing services for '1982' season. i Call anytime. (603) 272-5864 A Happy Birthday -i Carol Robie! We Love You! FOR SALE 1978 CHEVROLET SHASTA CAMPER VAN txllt ..mfitim -- no_rust, tow mileoge, new mdiol tires, automatic stress,on. AM/FM Stereo .,sette, cm01etely eqippl. 13 to 15 tuned, reody to roll. CoN Bob Groy, o. Newbur, 802.866.3342. mll. Just Your ad, this size, on page 1 of the Second Opinion is only $10.00 748-2933 Colorful things for spring are in American Indian Turquoise Jewelry Jewelry & Precious Stones SUNSHINE BOUTIOUE 71 Eastern Ave,, St. Johnsbury INVITATION TO BID Town of Warren seeks bids on a new Dump Truck. For Specs see Harry Wright, Road Agent, or one of the Selectmen. GRAND OPENING NIMBLE THIMBLE FABRIC SHOP March 27 -- Saturday Rt. 5, Lower Plain, Bradford, Vt. 802-222-4516 L_ " 12 125 VIMOIIT -- Thofford, East Thefford, Thefford flill, Thetford Center, North Thetford, Post Mills, Fairlee, West Foirlee, Bradford, Bradford Village, Corinth, East Corinth, Topsham, West Topsham, Newbury Village, South Newbury, West Newbury, Wells River, Groton,  Ryegate Comer, East Ryegote, South Ryegate. Peachom, Bornet, West Bamet. ., B ..... i.:= / N ANG E / A I CREODWALD I DOPA "7" GCTBSLCSZADGINGT l[r dJk :i 1 rt LHAWTDQNWBMRCKRE JL L/I,J, JL .FJL