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March 31, 1982     Journal Opinion
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March 31, 1982
 

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USp .98340 Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont March31,1982 "q R CVI00 blasted by public spokesmen HIW #AMPSNISl tyme Orfovd Piermon! Hoverhdl Woodsvdle Both VlSMONT Thelford So,flee West Fo,rlee Ilredford (Or,nth Topsham Newbury Wells R,vet IlYegote b-_22 labor i00etice suit i00ttl00d I A scheduled u  practice suit , fUity Publishing J ended before it at Wednesday when ,,ny decided to settle te with lawyer . mZo. The company 7 to.pay him $14,000, i._ s back salary. i ,t  daint was actually to he National Labor .s BOard,,_.._ by the D mld, an AFL-  lffiliate. It alleges '.z was fired from his  a N . 1 editor job at [ Pblishing firm for .  organizing ac- eaen.ployees that bw nail also filed un- tPractice charges. ,,. e charges, from ' Iorlll - lr er boss, John k' as voluntarily . ".oe other com-  Joaquin Ber- "qdlnlissed by the W "i Trunzo says s pursuing a -,.the U.S. Human b "umssion claiming [ iid Bermudez_ a lyrY than other -._ Situated,, em- M'Use of his status --'---g,t native in the | " teraporary work % PINEWOOD DERBY-- Cub Scouts competed in the annual derby at Oxbow High School. Pictures and PSB hears ratepayers in Bradford BRADFORD-- Angry called this the "main reason" ratepayers came prepared to a public hearing before representatives from the state Public Service Board (PSB) held last week to compile public testimony regarding a proposed 25 percent rate in- crease currently being sought by Central Vermont Public Service Corporation (CVPS). The Thursday hearing held at the Bradford Academy Building was a long night for two CVPS representatives-- Donald Rushford, corporate attorney and Richard Kep- sack, director of customer services. Nine area ratepayers, most of whom had apparently done their homework, gave official public testimony and several others spoke later with both tlrial Statement from , "The company  to page 7) winners on page 5. ) . ppmg mall planned groups blasting CVPS for even considering an increase the size of the one currently proposed. The 100 people who attended heard relatively little in defense of the rate increase from CVPS. Tla company claims it" needs a 25 percent increase because the cost of purchasing its electricity has gone up 25 percent, "CV buys 92 percent of its power," said Ruslfford, "this represents 68 percent of our operating costs." He said that in 1979 it cost them $34 million to purchase their electricity and that for 1982 the cost had risen to $72 million. Rushford for Woodsville welfare division moves to Littleton It was 10 years ago that the New cases in this district were in Lancaster saying, 'you mean Hampshire Division of the areas of Littleton and in order to see so-and-so, I Welfare opened its office on further north in Lancaster. have to make anS0-mileround Central Street in Woodsville. F'iermont is the southern tip of trip?'" said Kaminski. As of last week, its offices the district, saidKaminski. An Adjustment were empty and its staff had Kaminski listed 159 people Asked whether he felt the moved up the road to a new on welfare assistance move woum nave any aoverse office in Littleton. programs in the Woedsville effects on the towh of How will the move effect area--129 of these people are Haverhill, Kamiuski said he Woodsy(lie? According to housed at the Grafton County did not think there would be. district welfare director Paul Home and 30 families in the "It's going to be an ad- Kaminski, 32 people were area are receiving help under justment; the move was made employed by the welfare the Aid to Families with with a lot of mixed feelings but division at the Woodsville Dependent Children program it's all for the better." office. All except for one of (AFDC). Actually, word of the move these employees will now be Littleton is said to have the has been around for some time working out of the Littleton district's largest oaseload and and few, if any, may be office. Lancaster has about 200 shocked by the news the move The division will still keep welfare cases. One of the has finally happened. The one of their staff available at major reasons for the move, Haverhill selectmen first the Grafton County court said Kaminski, was that the publicly discussed the building on Mondays, Woodsville office was using up possibility of a move on Jan. 9 Tuesdays and Wednesdays. to $17,000 per year on (ran- in 1980/ But to make an appointment sportation costs. To make an appointment to at the office, you must call the Transportation was also a see the welfare division's 'llle Little(on office first, problem for welfare representative at the Grafton office But Kaminski said the move recipients. "When we were in County court building, was based primarily on Woodsy(lie, we had a large Kaminski said to call 800-552- logistics. He said most of the percentage of people around 8959. Shops are planned for new shoppin00 mall MT. GARDNER APARTMENT8 you be of the decorative kind," for although he said a widened by the hallway will run from the of front entrance of the mall straight through to another entrance to parking in the rear a of the building. The shops will line the hallway. ten, a N. Patten said the mall would is encompass the entire first Central floor of the building except for Scotty's. "I think it could be the greatest thing for Wood- sville," said Patten. houses Shopping In Woodsville "It should help the mer- chants in town," he added. "If mall somebody was looking fo something, now they can find n nine it in Wondsville." predicted Patten said he feels his mall sometime will bring people from the surrounding area into this Woodsy(lie to shop instead of them driving long distances to Said it Littleton, St. Johnsbury or the Hanover. and "Who knows?" said Patten, a "When they come out of the shop, mall they'll probably want to buy something else at some d NEW SHOPPING MALL.- A sbopping mall with nine the other stores on the block or shops and stores will be moving into the first floor of nearby." the building which used to house the weffare office. for the proposed increase. Public Charges But many of those who testified charged that the increase was due to poor management decisions and investments. The public also charged that CVPS had in- cluded, among other things, "CWlP charges" ($3.5 million) for studying the proposed Quebec power line through Vermont and New Hampshire, and had exceeded its allowed rate of return in 1981. Attorney for the state's Public Service Department, John Anderson, said his department, which represents the public in front of the PSB, had found a number of ob- jections to CVPS's reasons for the increase, which was first proposed last December. Among those objections, according to Anderson, were: -- investments the company made to study a Burlington power plant which were in- eluded in the rate request; -- money the company invested in the defunct Pilgrim If nuclear power plant ($7.8 million, according to Rushford); CVPS's plan to reinvest recoupment money was also objectionable, according to Anderson; Anderson said CVPS had "a lot of fat in their pur- chasing budget" under the terms of the increase. Profits The local people testifying echoed these objections, some presenting their own lists of astonishing figures they said showed that CVPS was profiting at their expense. Bradford resident and Vermont Alliance member Charlene Stebbins testified saying, "They want us to pay for their mistakes." Stebbins and many others placed part of the blame for high utility rates on the PSB saying, "Ask the PSB what they have done to make the company recover costs for shoddy work- manship." Stebbins cited repair costs, reportedly due to faulty workmanship, from one Vermont Yankee shutdown that cost over $1 million. Newbury resident Steve Holt gave in his testimony a lengthy discourse on "phantom taxes" or projected budget planning and on a number of tax loopholes and "incentives" the federal government allows utilities. He pointed out that Federal law prohibits the passage of most of these tax breaks to ratepayers, a system originally created to spawn growth in the power industry but that now encourages utilities to profit at their ratepayers expense, ac- cording to Holt. Stock is Up This year, CVPS increased its shareholders' earnings per share by 63 percent. Holt said, "It's like a basketball game between UVM and Bradford Elementary . . . only the referees keep throwing the ball to UVM." Bradford Mini-mart owner Richard Fox testified that in eight years electricity costs for his store had risen from $200 to $2000 per month. Storeowner Bud Haas testified that his electricity costs ex- Ceeded separately that of his mortgage and his inventory. Both said another 25 percent increase would be "devastating" to their businesses. Helen Pierce Swetland broke into tears while reading her letter to the editor printed in last week's Journal Opinion to the PSB represen- tatives--Rosalyn Hunneman, PSB member and Enis Gid- ney, an economist retained by the board. Swetland said her high utility bills had forced her to divide up and sell part of her property on Lake Morey. One elderly man testified that he was unable to pay his bills without periodically selling off his dwindling personal possessions. He told the CVPS' and PSB (please turn to page 8) Haverhill board ponders school's stated phil0sophv and objectives WOODSVILLE-- The Haverhill Cooperative School Board approved--by one vote--the newly developed by MARGARET BURKE "Philosophy and Objectives" from parents and faculty, Smith replied to that of Woodsy(lie High School at wrote the philosophy and charger "Everything in that Parker has al00rnative to the board's meeting Wed- objectives in preparation for paragraph is factual and nesday, March24. the upcoming evaluation of neutral. ,We are describin The three paragraph the scheol by the New England Woodsy(lie High School in the philosophy and list of ten Association ' of Secondary context of the town it is in and objectives (see adjoining box) *Schools and Colleges. The the students who attend it." It were presented to the board Association is made up of was noted by the board that by Monica Smith, Wondsville education professionals who much of the first paragraph is High School math and science assess the total programs of based on the Town of schools and decide whether or Haverhill's master plan. "The not they will receive ac- words 'few,' 'limited,' and credidation. 'considerable' show the town Opposition to approval of in a negative light," Kimball the philosophy was led by maintained. board member Peter Kimball, Other Business who objected to the tone of the In oLher business, the board first paragraph, whiehhese approved the re(mist of John as "negative." (please turn to page 7) education sales ST. JOHNSBURY-- Those raisiag about ,4 million. who thought the House- passed education aid sales tax bill would sail through the state's senate may get a surprise today if Senator Scudder Parker-D, Caledonia County, announces a different plan before the senate's finance committee. Parker told the Journal Opinion last" week that he would announce a plan to the Senate Finance Committee on Wednesday, March 31, that calls for revenues generated from other sources than the state's sales tax. Specifically, he is calling for blockage of a pass-through of federal income tax cuts, which essentially means raising the state income tax level. Parker said this would produce about $I0 million. The new plan also calls for a two percent increase on the state's rooms and meals tax raisfng another $a.2 million, and an additional five cents per pack increase on the state's tax on cigarettes Under the education bill passed by the house, the state would see a three to four percent increase in its sales tax. Sa me Formula "I support the formula laid out that takes into account income coming into the community. The negative part of the bill is the sales tax which will hurt many towns in our region because of our proximity to New Hampshire, which has no sales tax," said Parker. Parker said he had no plans to change any of the amounts that towns would receive for aid to education under the house-passed bill. Under the education for- muia that passed in the house, state aid to education would dramatically increase-- something many town and school officials in the area say they are looking forward to. Discretionary Taxes For example, under the new (please turn to page 3) tax bi// teacher and chairperson of the steering committee, and Richard Pike, an English teacher at Woodsy(lie High School who chaired the philosophy committee. These committees, asing questionnaires and discussions to gather input Prime asricultural Act-250 dispute grows in Thetford THETFORD--Bradford land Mal Gilbert, reportedly told SchonlCosts developer George Huntington the environmental board that As to bow the town will is seeking to subdivide a 23- acre lot in Thetford into 11 lots for houses. The problem is that the lot has been designated as prime agricultural land. Last Wednesday, the first round of a District Environ- mental Board hearing to decide the matter got un- derway. The case is already being called a test case for a section of Vermont's Act-250 that deals with prime agricultural land and housing. At the hearing last week two sections out of Act-250's l0 the The(ford site under dispute, located on the Lake Fairlec Road, is "the largest single chunk of prime agricultural soil scheduled for development that is literally challenging Act-250, criteria 9- b.$$ Carter is said to be arguing that only six to seven acres of the site would actually be developed leaving roughly 15 acres still open to agriculture for the future. The site reportedly is open land described as "virtually flat" with one house currently benefit from the development, both sides seem to agree the town may lose out if the homes are built. Carter estimates the proposed development would net the town roughly $15#00 per year in tax revenue, or $1,500 per house. But the annual education cost to the town based on 1.5 children per house would be about $22,000, he said. Thetford Zoning Administrator Rick Hoffman says the figure for tax revenue per house might be closer to Mountain Lakes bu'00 criteria were the focus of arguments presented by the ski area chairlift 100 attend annua/meet/n00 by MARGARET BURKE MT. LAKES-- Mountain Lakes, the district of the Town of Haverhill, N.H., that last October purchased the Monteau ski area, has deepened its involvement in the winter sport with a vote at the annual District Meeting to purchase the double chair lift that serves the mountain. Voters at Mountain Lakes' annual District Meeting March 20 approved article IV of the district warrant, which stated the price of the Thiokill brand lift -- O,O00.O0--and provided for the borrowing ot needed funds "by the issuance of bonds and-or notes under the New Hampshire Municipal Finance Act." Mountain Lakes had been leasing the lift from the Monteau Ski Area, Inc. since October, 1981. Of the municipal venture into the recreational skiing business, district and ski area manager Diane Rappa said, "We've had a profitable season and are looking forward to another one next year." One hundred people at- tended the Saturday evening meeting, of whom 35 were registered district voters and the remaining 65 mostly Mountain Lakes home owners whose voting residences are elsewhere. Rappa noted that 35 voters is a turnout of 50 percent, since there are only 70 registered voters in the district. Mountain Lakes includes 175 homes scattered around two man-made lakes and the ski area. Thirty-two of the homes house residents full-time, year 'round. District Officers At the annual meeting, Jerry Johnson was re-elected to the office of Commissioner, a three-year term. Gwendolyn Henderson was re-elected for a one-year term to the office of treasurer. Christine L. Chamherland was re-elected (please turn to page 3) two sides of the issue. The sections specifically cover the proposed development's financial impact on the town and its impact on prime agricultural soil--sections 9-a and 9-b in criteria number nine. Arguing Huntington's side in the case is project engineer Robert Carter of Corinth. On the other side, trying to stop development on the lot, is a neighboring farmer who raises crops next to the lot, several town officials and representatives from the Vermont Environmental Conservation Commission and the U.S. Soil Conservation Service (SCS). Test Case The SCS representative, on the lot. (please turn to page 2) Bradford selectmen name residents to .fill posts BRADFORD-- Bradford selectmen last week made appointments for a number of town positions including the reinstatement of P. Charles Brainerd to serve as their chairman. Last week's meeting was their first official session since town meeting on March 2. The selectmen--Brainerd, John Gibbs and Leonard Dobbins--quickly reviewed their balance and expenses for the coming year, agreeing that it might he tough to hold expenses down to within the town budget. But as bobbins said later in the meeting, "The mood of the voters is to cut taxes and to hold down our budgets.., and that's what we're going to do." Moving on to appointing townspeople to various town organizations, the selectmen named Susan Spaulding as town service officer--a psotion tponsibte for ad- ministering town aid such as fuel aid assistance. For town representatives to the library, the selectmen appointed John Sanborn and Bruce Stevens. Carolyn Jefts was named as (please turn to page 8) Budget held m 5 nercent increase Haverhill voters okay school budget N. HAVERHILL-- Town of This year's estimate is about term arguing budget matters director spot left vacant since Haverhill voters met at the eight percent higher, with the district's superin- school board member Stephen James R. Morrill School on However, an exact figure tendents and is an advocate of Elliot resigned last summer, Thursday, March 18 where for the amount to be raised in lower budgets and lower the voters elected Grafton they electedschoolofficersfor taxes cannot officially be taxes. Kimball will serve County Correctional Center positions open this year and determined until the end of the another three years. Director Ernest Towne. approved a budget that is up school's fiscal year this Attorney Karl T. Bruckner Other Matters about five percent over last summer--and then the figure became moderator at the Voters also approved two year's school budget, is determined and set by the meeting even though he lost articles which will authorize This year's Haverhill New Hampshire Department his election bid to Archie the school board to apply for Cooperative School District of RevenueAdministration. Steenbtirgh. According to funds through grants anti budget stands at $1,809,528 as School Elections assistant superintendent other sources. compared to $1,714,124.10 last N. Haverhill farmer Peter Harold Haskins, state law In addition, they approved year. Kimball was re-elected to the required that Steenburgh an article authorizing the A projected figure for the school board by a write-in forfeit the election becausehe district to allocate 50 percent amount to be raised for the campaign. He had announced was elected this year as the of the surplus from t981-82 school budget by taxes this his decision not to seek town's moderator. The law toward the district's Capital year was given as $1,094,179. another term to the school reportedly says you cannot be Reserve Fund. This amount is Last year's figure "to be board in December. Kimball both. not to exceed $I0,000, ac- raised in taxes was $1,009,499. spent much of his previous For the one-year school cording tothearticle. USp .98340 Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont March31,1982 "q R CVI00 blasted by public spokesmen HIW #AMPSNISl tyme Orfovd Piermon! Hoverhdl Woodsvdle Both VlSMONT Thelford So,flee West Fo,rlee Ilredford (Or,nth Topsham Newbury Wells R,vet IlYegote b-_22 labor i00etice suit i00ttl00d I A scheduled u  practice suit , fUity Publishing J ended before it at Wednesday when ,,ny decided to settle te with lawyer . mZo. The company 7 to.pay him $14,000, i._ s back salary. i ,t  daint was actually to he National Labor .s BOard,,_.._ by the D mld, an AFL-  lffiliate. It alleges '.z was fired from his  a N . 1 editor job at [ Pblishing firm for .  organizing ac- eaen.ployees that bw nail also filed un- tPractice charges. ,,. e charges, from ' Iorlll - lr er boss, John k' as voluntarily . ".oe other com-  Joaquin Ber- "qdlnlissed by the W "i Trunzo says s pursuing a -,.the U.S. Human b "umssion claiming [ iid Bermudez_ a lyrY than other -._ Situated,, em- M'Use of his status --'---g,t native in the | " teraporary work % PINEWOOD DERBY-- Cub Scouts competed in the annual derby at Oxbow High School. Pictures and PSB hears ratepayers in Bradford BRADFORD-- Angry called this the "main reason" ratepayers came prepared to a public hearing before representatives from the state Public Service Board (PSB) held last week to compile public testimony regarding a proposed 25 percent rate in- crease currently being sought by Central Vermont Public Service Corporation (CVPS). The Thursday hearing held at the Bradford Academy Building was a long night for two CVPS representatives-- Donald Rushford, corporate attorney and Richard Kep- sack, director of customer services. Nine area ratepayers, most of whom had apparently done their homework, gave official public testimony and several others spoke later with both tlrial Statement from , "The company  to page 7) winners on page 5. ) . ppmg mall planned groups blasting CVPS for even considering an increase the size of the one currently proposed. The 100 people who attended heard relatively little in defense of the rate increase from CVPS. Tla company claims it" needs a 25 percent increase because the cost of purchasing its electricity has gone up 25 percent, "CV buys 92 percent of its power," said Ruslfford, "this represents 68 percent of our operating costs." He said that in 1979 it cost them $34 million to purchase their electricity and that for 1982 the cost had risen to $72 million. Rushford for Woodsville welfare division moves to Littleton It was 10 years ago that the New cases in this district were in Lancaster saying, 'you mean Hampshire Division of the areas of Littleton and in order to see so-and-so, I Welfare opened its office on further north in Lancaster. have to make anS0-mileround Central Street in Woodsville. F'iermont is the southern tip of trip?'" said Kaminski. As of last week, its offices the district, saidKaminski. An Adjustment were empty and its staff had Kaminski listed 159 people Asked whether he felt the moved up the road to a new on welfare assistance move woum nave any aoverse office in Littleton. programs in the Woedsville effects on the towh of How will the move effect area--129 of these people are Haverhill, Kamiuski said he Woodsy(lie? According to housed at the Grafton County did not think there would be. district welfare director Paul Home and 30 families in the "It's going to be an ad- Kaminski, 32 people were area are receiving help under justment; the move was made employed by the welfare the Aid to Families with with a lot of mixed feelings but division at the Woodsville Dependent Children program it's all for the better." office. All except for one of (AFDC). Actually, word of the move these employees will now be Littleton is said to have the has been around for some time working out of the Littleton district's largest oaseload and and few, if any, may be office. Lancaster has about 200 shocked by the news the move The division will still keep welfare cases. One of the has finally happened. The one of their staff available at major reasons for the move, Haverhill selectmen first the Grafton County court said Kaminski, was that the publicly discussed the building on Mondays, Woodsville office was using up possibility of a move on Jan. 9 Tuesdays and Wednesdays. to $17,000 per year on (ran- in 1980/ But to make an appointment sportation costs. To make an appointment to at the office, you must call the Transportation was also a see the welfare division's 'llle Little(on office first, problem for welfare representative at the Grafton office But Kaminski said the move recipients. "When we were in County court building, was based primarily on Woodsy(lie, we had a large Kaminski said to call 800-552- logistics. He said most of the percentage of people around 8959. Shops are planned for new shoppin00 mall MT. GARDNER APARTMENT8 you be of the decorative kind," for although he said a widened by the hallway will run from the of front entrance of the mall straight through to another entrance to parking in the rear a of the building. The shops will line the hallway. ten, a N. Patten said the mall would is encompass the entire first Central floor of the building except for Scotty's. "I think it could be the greatest thing for Wood- sville," said Patten. houses Shopping In Woodsville "It should help the mer- chants in town," he added. "If mall somebody was looking fo something, now they can find n nine it in Wondsville." predicted Patten said he feels his mall sometime will bring people from the surrounding area into this Woodsy(lie to shop instead of them driving long distances to Said it Littleton, St. Johnsbury or the Hanover. and "Who knows?" said Patten, a "When they come out of the shop, mall they'll probably want to buy something else at some d NEW SHOPPING MALL.- A sbopping mall with nine the other stores on the block or shops and stores will be moving into the first floor of nearby." the building which used to house the weffare office. for the proposed increase. Public Charges But many of those who testified charged that the increase was due to poor management decisions and investments. The public also charged that CVPS had in- cluded, among other things, "CWlP charges" ($3.5 million) for studying the proposed Quebec power line through Vermont and New Hampshire, and had exceeded its allowed rate of return in 1981. Attorney for the state's Public Service Department, John Anderson, said his department, which represents the public in front of the PSB, had found a number of ob- jections to CVPS's reasons for the increase, which was first proposed last December. Among those objections, according to Anderson, were: -- investments the company made to study a Burlington power plant which were in- eluded in the rate request; -- money the company invested in the defunct Pilgrim If nuclear power plant ($7.8 million, according to Rushford); CVPS's plan to reinvest recoupment money was also objectionable, according to Anderson; Anderson said CVPS had "a lot of fat in their pur- chasing budget" under the terms of the increase. Profits The local people testifying echoed these objections, some presenting their own lists of astonishing figures they said showed that CVPS was profiting at their expense. Bradford resident and Vermont Alliance member Charlene Stebbins testified saying, "They want us to pay for their mistakes." Stebbins and many others placed part of the blame for high utility rates on the PSB saying, "Ask the PSB what they have done to make the company recover costs for shoddy work- manship." Stebbins cited repair costs, reportedly due to faulty workmanship, from one Vermont Yankee shutdown that cost over $1 million. Newbury resident Steve Holt gave in his testimony a lengthy discourse on "phantom taxes" or projected budget planning and on a number of tax loopholes and "incentives" the federal government allows utilities. He pointed out that Federal law prohibits the passage of most of these tax breaks to ratepayers, a system originally created to spawn growth in the power industry but that now encourages utilities to profit at their ratepayers expense, ac- cording to Holt. Stock is Up This year, CVPS increased its shareholders' earnings per share by 63 percent. Holt said, "It's like a basketball game between UVM and Bradford Elementary . . . only the referees keep throwing the ball to UVM." Bradford Mini-mart owner Richard Fox testified that in eight years electricity costs for his store had risen from $200 to $2000 per month. Storeowner Bud Haas testified that his electricity costs ex- Ceeded separately that of his mortgage and his inventory. Both said another 25 percent increase would be "devastating" to their businesses. Helen Pierce Swetland broke into tears while reading her letter to the editor printed in last week's Journal Opinion to the PSB represen- tatives--Rosalyn Hunneman, PSB member and Enis Gid- ney, an economist retained by the board. Swetland said her high utility bills had forced her to divide up and sell part of her property on Lake Morey. One elderly man testified that he was unable to pay his bills without periodically selling off his dwindling personal possessions. He told the CVPS' and PSB (please turn to page 8) Haverhill board ponders school's stated phil0sophv and objectives WOODSVILLE-- The Haverhill Cooperative School Board approved--by one vote--the newly developed by MARGARET BURKE "Philosophy and Objectives" from parents and faculty, Smith replied to that of Woodsy(lie High School at wrote the philosophy and charger "Everything in that Parker has al00rnative to the board's meeting Wed- objectives in preparation for paragraph is factual and nesday, March24. the upcoming evaluation of neutral. ,We are describin The three paragraph the scheol by the New England Woodsy(lie High School in the philosophy and list of ten Association ' of Secondary context of the town it is in and objectives (see adjoining box) *Schools and Colleges. The the students who attend it." It were presented to the board Association is made up of was noted by the board that by Monica Smith, Wondsville education professionals who much of the first paragraph is High School math and science assess the total programs of based on the Town of schools and decide whether or Haverhill's master plan. "The not they will receive ac- words 'few,' 'limited,' and credidation. 'considerable' show the town Opposition to approval of in a negative light," Kimball the philosophy was led by maintained. board member Peter Kimball, Other Business who objected to the tone of the In oLher business, the board first paragraph, whiehhese approved the re(mist of John as "negative." (please turn to page 7) education sales ST. JOHNSBURY-- Those raisiag about ,4 million. who thought the House- passed education aid sales tax bill would sail through the state's senate may get a surprise today if Senator Scudder Parker-D, Caledonia County, announces a different plan before the senate's finance committee. Parker told the Journal Opinion last" week that he would announce a plan to the Senate Finance Committee on Wednesday, March 31, that calls for revenues generated from other sources than the state's sales tax. Specifically, he is calling for blockage of a pass-through of federal income tax cuts, which essentially means raising the state income tax level. Parker said this would produce about $I0 million. The new plan also calls for a two percent increase on the state's rooms and meals tax raisfng another $a.2 million, and an additional five cents per pack increase on the state's tax on cigarettes Under the education bill passed by the house, the state would see a three to four percent increase in its sales tax. Sa me Formula "I support the formula laid out that takes into account income coming into the community. The negative part of the bill is the sales tax which will hurt many towns in our region because of our proximity to New Hampshire, which has no sales tax," said Parker. Parker said he had no plans to change any of the amounts that towns would receive for aid to education under the house-passed bill. Under the education for- muia that passed in the house, state aid to education would dramatically increase-- something many town and school officials in the area say they are looking forward to. Discretionary Taxes For example, under the new (please turn to page 3) tax bi// teacher and chairperson of the steering committee, and Richard Pike, an English teacher at Woodsy(lie High School who chaired the philosophy committee. These committees, asing questionnaires and discussions to gather input Prime asricultural Act-250 dispute grows in Thetford THETFORD--Bradford land Mal Gilbert, reportedly told SchonlCosts developer George Huntington the environmental board that As to bow the town will is seeking to subdivide a 23- acre lot in Thetford into 11 lots for houses. The problem is that the lot has been designated as prime agricultural land. Last Wednesday, the first round of a District Environ- mental Board hearing to decide the matter got un- derway. The case is already being called a test case for a section of Vermont's Act-250 that deals with prime agricultural land and housing. At the hearing last week two sections out of Act-250's l0 the The(ford site under dispute, located on the Lake Fairlec Road, is "the largest single chunk of prime agricultural soil scheduled for development that is literally challenging Act-250, criteria 9- b.$$ Carter is said to be arguing that only six to seven acres of the site would actually be developed leaving roughly 15 acres still open to agriculture for the future. The site reportedly is open land described as "virtually flat" with one house currently benefit from the development, both sides seem to agree the town may lose out if the homes are built. Carter estimates the proposed development would net the town roughly $15#00 per year in tax revenue, or $1,500 per house. But the annual education cost to the town based on 1.5 children per house would be about $22,000, he said. Thetford Zoning Administrator Rick Hoffman says the figure for tax revenue per house might be closer to Mountain Lakes bu'00 criteria were the focus of arguments presented by the ski area chairlift 100 attend annua/meet/n00 by MARGARET BURKE MT. LAKES-- Mountain Lakes, the district of the Town of Haverhill, N.H., that last October purchased the Monteau ski area, has deepened its involvement in the winter sport with a vote at the annual District Meeting to purchase the double chair lift that serves the mountain. Voters at Mountain Lakes' annual District Meeting March 20 approved article IV of the district warrant, which stated the price of the Thiokill brand lift -- O,O00.O0--and provided for the borrowing ot needed funds "by the issuance of bonds and-or notes under the New Hampshire Municipal Finance Act." Mountain Lakes had been leasing the lift from the Monteau Ski Area, Inc. since October, 1981. Of the municipal venture into the recreational skiing business, district and ski area manager Diane Rappa said, "We've had a profitable season and are looking forward to another one next year." One hundred people at- tended the Saturday evening meeting, of whom 35 were registered district voters and the remaining 65 mostly Mountain Lakes home owners whose voting residences are elsewhere. Rappa noted that 35 voters is a turnout of 50 percent, since there are only 70 registered voters in the district. Mountain Lakes includes 175 homes scattered around two man-made lakes and the ski area. Thirty-two of the homes house residents full-time, year 'round. District Officers At the annual meeting, Jerry Johnson was re-elected to the office of Commissioner, a three-year term. Gwendolyn Henderson was re-elected for a one-year term to the office of treasurer. Christine L. Chamherland was re-elected (please turn to page 3) two sides of the issue. The sections specifically cover the proposed development's financial impact on the town and its impact on prime agricultural soil--sections 9-a and 9-b in criteria number nine. Arguing Huntington's side in the case is project engineer Robert Carter of Corinth. On the other side, trying to stop development on the lot, is a neighboring farmer who raises crops next to the lot, several town officials and representatives from the Vermont Environmental Conservation Commission and the U.S. Soil Conservation Service (SCS). Test Case The SCS representative, on the lot. (please turn to page 2) Bradford selectmen name residents to .fill posts BRADFORD-- Bradford selectmen last week made appointments for a number of town positions including the reinstatement of P. Charles Brainerd to serve as their chairman. Last week's meeting was their first official session since town meeting on March 2. The selectmen--Brainerd, John Gibbs and Leonard Dobbins--quickly reviewed their balance and expenses for the coming year, agreeing that it might he tough to hold expenses down to within the town budget. But as bobbins said later in the meeting, "The mood of the voters is to cut taxes and to hold down our budgets.., and that's what we're going to do." Moving on to appointing townspeople to various town organizations, the selectmen named Susan Spaulding as town service officer--a psotion tponsibte for ad- ministering town aid such as fuel aid assistance. For town representatives to the library, the selectmen appointed John Sanborn and Bruce Stevens. Carolyn Jefts was named as (please turn to page 8) Budget held m 5 nercent increase Haverhill voters okay school budget N. HAVERHILL-- Town of This year's estimate is about term arguing budget matters director spot left vacant since Haverhill voters met at the eight percent higher, with the district's superin- school board member Stephen James R. Morrill School on However, an exact figure tendents and is an advocate of Elliot resigned last summer, Thursday, March 18 where for the amount to be raised in lower budgets and lower the voters elected Grafton they electedschoolofficersfor taxes cannot officially be taxes. Kimball will serve County Correctional Center positions open this year and determined until the end of the another three years. Director Ernest Towne. approved a budget that is up school's fiscal year this Attorney Karl T. Bruckner Other Matters about five percent over last summer--and then the figure became moderator at the Voters also approved two year's school budget, is determined and set by the meeting even though he lost articles which will authorize This year's Haverhill New Hampshire Department his election bid to Archie the school board to apply for Cooperative School District of RevenueAdministration. Steenbtirgh. According to funds through grants anti budget stands at $1,809,528 as School Elections assistant superintendent other sources. compared to $1,714,124.10 last N. Haverhill farmer Peter Harold Haskins, state law In addition, they approved year. Kimball was re-elected to the required that Steenburgh an article authorizing the A projected figure for the school board by a write-in forfeit the election becausehe district to allocate 50 percent amount to be raised for the campaign. He had announced was elected this year as the of the surplus from t981-82 school budget by taxes this his decision not to seek town's moderator. The law toward the district's Capital year was given as $1,094,179. another term to the school reportedly says you cannot be Reserve Fund. This amount is Last year's figure "to be board in December. Kimball both. not to exceed $I0,000, ac- raised in taxes was $1,009,499. spent much of his previous For the one-year school cording tothearticle.