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March 31, 1982     Journal Opinion
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'age 4-The Journal Opinion-March 31 1982 An open letter to ! II NORTHEAST PUBLISHING COMIANY, Inc. Publisher of Journal M Opinion WeIT nemlNUp,, p,l, ln, llsk b wd. VeNmmO. IkdbRrlpltOrl mlOt - Voo'iet  Now Suopshiro Se.N Ir yt if.00 for Itx ink; cut d  III,H p year end 17.H fw Ih moeOkltt  :itil, det SL00. Sotd Chill pelNle Imld at Smdford, VemiNt 0S035. Publidled by aerlbet Ildiski , inc.. P.O. |01 iT|, lmdford. Robert F. Humlnskl President & Publisher Bradford /  502-222-528 i   Woodsville  o" 603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper -- Ill hill i ] i . -- Bath Lumber Company ",." Rat yers vs. utilities ' ...... The two representatives from the less electricity  winter. This has Vermont Public Service Board, who presided over public testimony at last week's Bradford hearing on CVPS's proposed 25 percent rate increase, should have left the meeting with no second thoughts about how the public in this area views the proposal. Those who testified at the hearing did not do so merely to get a nagging problem off from their chest. The public seemed to he demanding action -- action by government officials to force the state's utilities to look more humanely toward their ratepayers. The ratepayers, at least in this area, are saying they have bad,hough. Public testimony at the hearing was overwhelming in its call for help. It will be important to see how the PSB rules on the rate increase after the end of its scheduled technical hearings on the subject in May'. If the increase is ittle of A 25 ) in utility rates raises a number of concerto regard- ing fairness. CVPS has asked their ratepayers through their Peak Alert program to conserve energy this year; the public used nine percent been a year of recession and we have also seen our general economy slow down, inflation has dropped and so have oil prices. In these economic times, the comfortable usually stay comfortable while waiting for better times ahead; the little guy (most of us) usually suffers. A look at the stock market shows CVPS to be doing quite well by most corporate standards. Late last year CVPS announced that it had become the first Vermont Corporation to make it on to tile New York Stock .Exchange. But you have to wonder at whose expense when shortly after their "great news shareholders" announcement, the company an- nounced their 25 percent rate increase proposal. Besides keeping a Watchful eye on the PSB, the public may also want to watch the fate of the two Senate bills currently hnging in the legislature. one bill, 8.220 would prohibit the utilities from recoupment collection or charging ratepayers retroactive fees. A second Senate bill, S.24 would allow the PSB to warn utilities when they are on the verge of unwise in- vestments. Congressional Report James M. Jeffords, (R-Vt.) f Vermonters offer insittht into knotty budget queations opportune time. broiled in debate and the questionnaire responses provide excellent insights into the views of Ver- monters on the knotty issues that have been raised. The questionnaire, which was filled out by 8,116 adult Vermonters in January, sought opinion on the basic economic issue facing Congress and the social impact of our economic policies, A basic question on budget policy began by asking, "Do you feel it is important to balance These who then stzmld he (First of three repm ,m quUmmaire results. ) r mast recent Vermont reduction package are also widely viewed an as culprits in our deficit problem. Of those eva- concerned about deficit spending, 76.9 per cent said we should "roll hack some of the The question was admittedly gene'al in nature, since there are great differences of opinion as to how soon itwfll be feasible to balance the budget. But the responses showed there is strong concern over deficit spending: 85.6 per cent answered "yes". Those who answered "yes" made it clear that they feel the primary targets, in reducing future deficits, should be the military budget and some of the new tax breaks that were adopted last year. The largest number (of those concerned about deficit spending) said we should "Scrutinize the military budget, to total of 94.6 per sub- -into our rapidly increasing military budget. Wasted defense dollars are not a sacred cow in Vermont. A smaller, but still significant, number ) of the military" as a step said there should be "less emphasis on military buildup." Some of the provisions of last year's tax special tax breaks "that were added to the 1981 Tax Bill, such as these granted to the oil companies." Smaller (but significant) numbers of Vermonters expressed skepticism about the economic impact of more basic features of the tax package. A total of 36,2 per cent said we should "roll back some of the general tax cuts for business and industry," while 20.3 percent said we should "roll back some of the individual tax cuts enacted in 1981." Disillusionment over aspects of the tax package also showed up strongly in the rt of the questionn dealing with social policies. In that ctlon, 74.9 per "cent of respondents said there should be "lea tax breaks for the wealthy, more tax relief for low and middle incume people." Of the steps listed for reducing future dofielts, the one receiving the least support was "deeper cuts in domestic programs." However, support for that option was not insignificant: 25.4 per cent (ef those concerned about deficit spending) ex- pressed the view that there is room for further cuts on the domestic side of the budget. There are, of course, limitations in the extent to which the questionnaire results can ha applied to Vermonters' views on specific budget items. First, any questionnaire inherently over-simplifies the categories of public opinion. Secondly, mOst of the responses came before President Reagan outlined his specific budget proposals. Thirdly, the general attitudes covered by the questionnaire cannot always he directly translated to specific pieces of legislation covering specific s|tuatimm. But in facing the major qubestionn t issues now be/ore Congress, the- aire--combined with the thousands of personal letters and com- ments I have received from individual Vermonters--providm a valuable guide to the views of people in our state. I shall he reporting the results of all oth sections of the qt.mtinnnnire over the next two weelm. IVater.powered industries at Bath Vill00e Waterpower was the key to early industry, and the waterpower of the Ammonoosuc River was harnessed in Bath Village for nearly 200 years. The earliest mill here was a grist mill built by Daniel Mills on the east side of the river, sometime before 1782  a mill which was worth "300 Spanish milled dollars" in a mortgage to Timothy Bedel (Grafton County Register of Deeds). Rev. Sutherland told in his history of Bath about the trials and tribulations of Mr. Mills: "Soon after his first mill was built, it was carried away by a flood; whereupon he remarked he was glad of it, for it wasn't st in the right place. He therefore built a second one in the right place; this having been burnt down a short time after, he again said he was glad of it, for it wasn't built as it ought to have been. He then built a third one, which exactly suited him ," In 178, Daniel andhls wife Nancy sold the mill to Roger Sargent for "200 pounds lawful money." Sargent then added a sawmill on the same side of the river (cast side). Around the same time (by 1792), John Hurd and his son Jacob were building a sawmill 1799, Gookin and Standring river. Mr. Bancroft built a moved to Haverhill and began manufacturing carding machines for sale throughout the United States and Canada Gookin also set up woolen mills in all parts of New England, including the village of Bath. Between 1802 and 1815 be bought up all the property round the dam, on both sides of the river, including the rights to all the water power. He operated a fulling or cloth- dressing mill in partnership with Caleb Hunt, also built a brick gristmill. In 1822, Gookin and Hunt built a new woolen mill, at a cost of $I0,000 a lot of money for a factory in those days. Rev. Sutherland wrote: "Mr. Gookin was a man of uncommon energy and en- terprise, as was shown by his rebuilding in mid-winter the mill-dams at Bath Village, which bad been swept away by the great freshet of Feb. 12, 1824, thereby topping all the milis. He di at HaVerhill, where he had long resided, May 20, 1826." Evidently the mill did not prosper after Mr. Gookin was gone, as Mr. Hunt lost it in 1829 through foreclosed mortgages, to Ira Gondall. and gristmill on the west side Village Falls Manufacturing of the river. In those days Co. Ira Goodall continued operation of the woolen mill as part of the Village Falls Manufacturing Company, which also had a dye house and factory on the west side of Main Street. However, the woolen mill burned to the ground on the night of Feb. II, 1851. Mr. Goodall rebuilt, installing three sets of woolen machinery, all running by waterpower from thegristmill flume. The company ran into financial difficulties, and by mortgage foreclosure was taken over in 1858 by Col. James H. Johnson, who was Bath's most prominent dtizen at that time. He ran a saw mill and lumber business, owned most of the village water power, and served at various times in the State Legislature, Senate, Governor's Council, and the U. S. House of Representatives. Conant & Company In 1872 Col. Johnson sold to William Bancroft a part of the land on the east side of the there was no bridge at Bath Village, and people had to cross by means of a boat, so it was convenient to have mills on both sides of the river. The next 20 years saw a great development of small industries at the falls in Bath Village. A deed from Roger Sargent to Richard Gookin in 1815 mentions the following in that neighborhood: brickyard, nail factory, blacksmith shop, trip hammer shop, and a hatter's shop, besides the saw and grist mills. Rev. Sutherland's history adds further details and mentions also a whetstone factory and a clothing mill. Richard Gookin The prosperity of Bath Village was greatly increased by Richard Oookin, an in- ventor and industrialist from Boston who later had his residence in Haverhill, N.H. In cooperation with his brother, he had made the first watch springs manufactured in America. During the 1790's he took charge of, a British- owned nail factory in Newbury, Mass. While there, he became acquainted with William Standring, who had recently brought from England certain parts of a wool-carding machine. Together, Gookin and Stan- dring improved and developed the machine, for which Gookin received two patents. However: the British government, to protect its own industries, had prohibited the export of any British machinery, so Gookin and Standrin.g soon found that they had put their lives in jeopardy. According to Bit- tinger's History of Haverhili, a trunk was sent to Standring which was intended to explode when it was opened. Also, Gookin was sent a hat armed with a deadly prong powered with a strong spring, which was discovered-befere the hat was worn. It was tested by putting it onto the head of a dog, which was instantly killed. In spite of' the danger, Gookin and Standring went ahead with their plans, as the country was in great need of carding machines, all wool being carded by hand in America up to that time. In A news report in the Littleton Courier for July 1, 1952, tells the story of the life and death of the leatherboard mill: "The 25 to 34) men em- ployed at the factory were to have this week off for vacations and the Indepen- dence Day holiday. Con- sequently the plant was closed, though 3 or 4 men did go to the mill Tuesday mor- ning to make some machinery repairs. In some way, while attending to these duties, a spark from a tool ignited oil in the pump room, near the northwest section. Before. the men could rush downstairs to fight the blaze and close fire doors the intense heavy Smoke drove them outside. It seemed, reported one of the employees, that in no time fire was in all partsof the building, which mostly was of brick and cement. "The alarm was given locally by ringing the Congregational Church bell. Some at first thought that the boys of the village were having a premature Fourth of July celebration, but on looking outdoors they quickly saw the dense smoke and realized that a landmark was threatened. "By telephone the fire departments in Lisbon, Woodsville and Monroe were notified. All quickly responded to the call for help. On Monday afternoon Lisbon had had a brand new pumper delivered, and soon after 8 o'clock the next morning.., it was doing valiant work pumPing water out of the Ammoncosnc River for several lines of hose... "In making leatherbcard the company used bales of leather scraps and paper, shipped to Bath from other mills for processing. Some of these caught fire, causing excessive heat and necessitating attention by the firemen all day Tuesday, The odor of burning leather per- meated the entire area... "Cushman-Rankin was one of five leatherboard factories in the country, having a Boston office and shipping to all parts of the East. For years it has been known as a prosperous and substantial company, most of the time working 24 hours a day, year in and year out." ( continued next week) pulp mill here, then the next year took John H. Conant as his partner. The mill did a thriving business and by 1888 was grinding out about five tons of pulp in 24 hours. However. the mill burned down in 1889. According to Historical Notes of Bath, Mr. Conant was considered one of the town magnates. For more than 70 years he and his family lived in the house across from the Colonial Inn. The original house was torn down and Mr. Conant replaced it with one which the White Mountain Republic described as one of the finest houses in town (present home of Charles Diamond and family). The Conant children were tran- sported to school in a "surrey with a fringe on top," drawn by a beautiful span of horses, with a hostler in attendance. Mr. Conant's widow lived to be nearly a hundred. Bath Lumber Company In 1891 the Conant mill site was sold to the Bath Lumber Company, which built a saw mill here. For about 15 years the mill did a large business, employing 4O or 50 men, besides running lumber camps at Black Mountain, Easton and Franconia which employed another 100 men as choppers and loggers. The president and the treasurer of the company were Edward Woods and his son-in-law, Amos N. Blandin, of Bath's Upper Village. Mr. Blandin became a highly- successful lumberman and businessman, and was also active in local and state politics, becoming speaker of the House in 1934 and can- didate for governor in 1936. Cushman-Rankin Company The sawmill property was sold in 1905 to Walter P. Rankin and George F. Cush- man, who established a leatherboard mill. For about 30 years, Mr. Rankin's son Kenneth served as superin- tendant of the mill. The leatherboard mill was struck twice by fire -- first in 1915, when the finishing room, dry house and store house were destroyed. The mill was rebuilt as a modern brick structure and operated steadily until 1951, when there was a second fire. EXECtmVE COt00CILOR %, I Raymond & Burton, (R-N.IL) New Hampshire Division of Economic Development I have obtained a guest column from the Division of Economic Development outlining the mission of that division which is within the Department of Resources and Economic Development. The column follows. The Division of Economic Development consists of two major offices, the Office of Vacation Travel and the Office of Industrial Development and, A newly formed Film and Television Bureau, The Division of Economic Developmentis a major component of the Dept. of Resources and Economic Development. Since the Office of Vacation Travel will be discussed in a separate column, this ar- ticle will focus on Industrial Development and the Film Bureau. A year ago, alter a record year of in- dnstriai expansion in 1979, and with most forecasters calling for an economic downturn, we were lboking at 1980 with some misgivings. Fortunately, New Hampshire has been able to withstand the dip in the national economy with continued growth and with an unemployment rate well below the national average. During the past year, there were eighty-two (82) new industries which located in the state and sixty-two (62) expansions of firms already doing business here. Such progress is second only to 1979, our record year. Moreover, in 1960, somewhat fewer firms actually provided more new jobs, a total of 5,319. The new businesses included 18 in the electric and electronic fields, 18 in machinery (non-electric) and 13 in fabricated metal products. Also, there was representation in the wood products, plastics, footwear, chemicals and in-' strumentation fields. So, New Hampshire (please turn to page 5) Public Service Board To the Editor: Delphia, the An open letter to Louise 46 percent of its Mccarren, Chairman of the Vermont Yankee. Public Service Board: To me, this In the Times Argus, 25 ratepayers do March 1982, p.8, there appears these ads. Is this an article headlined "Yankee practice Begins Major Ad Push". The engage in? Does $150,000 advertising campaign realize he told a about to he initiated deals with object to the use ( four issues of public concern, in this manner To quote from the article, furious that "Vermont Yankee bear the burden shareholders will foot the bill when for the campaign, according each penny to plant spokesman Stephen be willing to Stoll, who said it will thus not majority of affect ratepayers' electric this view. bills". That's not the way I see Regardless of it. judicial" status CVPSC owns 31.1 percent of Board Vermont Yankee and is its Hunneman), the largest stockholder. It is mandate to joined by other Vermont waste when it utilities: Green Mountain filings. Power Corp., Washington have to bear Electric Co-op., Vermont institution's Electric Co-op., and the existance. Burlington Electric Depar- tment. According to figures Secretary, given by CV's Michael Our Fifteen Mile Falls hy BOB LINCK It used to be called Fifteen Mile Falls, Gilman, Vt. to the base of the Connecticut River. The wildest of the "falls" cascaded 348 feet ( deposited boulders. Last summer in St. Johnsbury, while I was Connecticut River Watershed Council's "Source canoe expedition, I met an old it was like to be on the river before Moore Comerford Dam inundated the rapids. When I longing to have travelled the old river, head. "You wouldn't have wanted to river in those days," he insisted. Wild rapids, one after another -- it is easy to why Fifteen Mile Falls was the Connecticut's stretch of river during the log drives. Two sets particular were believed to have claimed more lives over the years. The last log of 1915. The last pulp drive, that the long timber logs did, was carried Today, ff the 170-foot Comerford Dam and Moore Dam had never been built, Fifteen Mi5 a whitewater enthusiasts' dream. of folklore and history will remember the ra madethe hearts of lumbermen skia beat.. One small remnant of the rapids can downstream from Gilman Dam. The head known as "Horse Race Rapids", whitewater no man ever rode a log, has recentl3 protection from further encroachment on iL, and natural beauty. A 14-acre parcel of river in Dalton, N.H. has been voluntarily manent conservation use by its owners Smith. "We feel very strongly Connecticut River in as close to its natural state It is a dream to have a protected strip along each future generations may enjoy fishing, ping." They speak the dream of the Connecticut Council as well. For two years, the Council has land conservancy efforts on the formation Of a a corridor of natural, recreational, and along the river. Their efforts in New mont have been generously funded by the Charitable Fund (the John Pearson Trust) Howard Charitable Trust. Ensured productivity of farm and forest protection of wildlife habitat, increased river recreation, the improvement of water scenic beauty of the valley -- all are goals Greenway Project. Each of these directly region's economic health. Guilding inevitable from important riverfront land is one wa land values and income and preserving many have been attracted from outside the valley have lived their lives in the valley. Perhaps most importantly, the greenway ca future availability of productive forestland. Last year, the recipient of a conservation easement (or restriction) on thirteen acres of prime Lyme, N.H. Similar efforts are underway on two of forest land and pasture land in Claremont N.H. The same mechanism was used on the head of Fifteen Mile Falls. . Conservation easements, the principal Land Conservancy Program and Greenway voluntary agreements between nonprofit town governments and interested easements can be tailored to the landowner'S desires -- and they imply not a change in forfeiture of certain rights to the land. As an while retaining the rights to grow crops and from his land, and the right to pass the land on t landowner may choose to restrict his own future owners to subdivide and servation easements amount to restrictions on future use of land. Not fortably match the owner's original plans but they ma Progress on the Connecticut River GreenwaY there appears to he a gathering awareness play an important role in.land conservancy. ficult ebstacle to overcome is the inherent many landowners to answer to that is to keep some agreement, for possible futm'e development.  The Connecticut River and lands through have undergone a major transformation navigator Adrian Block discovered the river ago. Even since the last log was driven . more of the river has been tamed as a for hydroelectric power, I frequently remember that day last Johnsbury when I was told that I wouldn't paddle through the rapids of Fifteen is that I would have, and that I wish I Connecticut River Watershed land and water management, future to see and remember more of the river as it presently recollect about the days of log rapids. (Bob IAnck is the Asseciute Executive necticut River Watershed Council) 'age 4-The Journal Opinion-March 31 1982 An open letter to ! II NORTHEAST PUBLISHING COMIANY, Inc. Publisher of Journal M Opinion WeIT nemlNUp,, p,l, ln, llsk b wd. VeNmmO. IkdbRrlpltOrl mlOt - Voo'iet  Now Suopshiro Se.N Ir yt if.00 for Itx ink; cut d  III,H p year end 17.H fw Ih moeOkltt  :itil, det SL00. Sotd Chill pelNle Imld at Smdford, VemiNt 0S035. Publidled by aerlbet Ildiski , inc.. P.O. |01 iT|, lmdford. Robert F. Humlnskl President & Publisher Bradford /  502-222-528 i   Woodsville  o" 603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper -- Ill hill i ] i . -- Bath Lumber Company ",." Rat yers vs. utilities ' ...... The two representatives from the less electricity  winter. This has Vermont Public Service Board, who presided over public testimony at last week's Bradford hearing on CVPS's proposed 25 percent rate increase, should have left the meeting with no second thoughts about how the public in this area views the proposal. Those who testified at the hearing did not do so merely to get a nagging problem off from their chest. The public seemed to he demanding action -- action by government officials to force the state's utilities to look more humanely toward their ratepayers. The ratepayers, at least in this area, are saying they have bad,hough. Public testimony at the hearing was overwhelming in its call for help. It will be important to see how the PSB rules on the rate increase after the end of its scheduled technical hearings on the subject in May'. If the increase is ittle of A 25 ) in utility rates raises a number of concerto regard- ing fairness. CVPS has asked their ratepayers through their Peak Alert program to conserve energy this year; the public used nine percent been a year of recession and we have also seen our general economy slow down, inflation has dropped and so have oil prices. In these economic times, the comfortable usually stay comfortable while waiting for better times ahead; the little guy (most of us) usually suffers. A look at the stock market shows CVPS to be doing quite well by most corporate standards. Late last year CVPS announced that it had become the first Vermont Corporation to make it on to tile New York Stock .Exchange. But you have to wonder at whose expense when shortly after their "great news shareholders" announcement, the company an- nounced their 25 percent rate increase proposal. Besides keeping a Watchful eye on the PSB, the public may also want to watch the fate of the two Senate bills currently hnging in the legislature. one bill, 8.220 would prohibit the utilities from recoupment collection or charging ratepayers retroactive fees. A second Senate bill, S.24 would allow the PSB to warn utilities when they are on the verge of unwise in- vestments. Congressional Report James M. Jeffords, (R-Vt.) f Vermonters offer insittht into knotty budget queations opportune time. broiled in debate and the questionnaire responses provide excellent insights into the views of Ver- monters on the knotty issues that have been raised. The questionnaire, which was filled out by 8,116 adult Vermonters in January, sought opinion on the basic economic issue facing Congress and the social impact of our economic policies, A basic question on budget policy began by asking, "Do you feel it is important to balance These who then stzmld he (First of three repm ,m quUmmaire results. ) r mast recent Vermont reduction package are also widely viewed an as culprits in our deficit problem. Of those eva- concerned about deficit spending, 76.9 per cent said we should "roll hack some of the The question was admittedly gene'al in nature, since there are great differences of opinion as to how soon itwfll be feasible to balance the budget. But the responses showed there is strong concern over deficit spending: 85.6 per cent answered "yes". Those who answered "yes" made it clear that they feel the primary targets, in reducing future deficits, should be the military budget and some of the new tax breaks that were adopted last year. The largest number (of those concerned about deficit spending) said we should "Scrutinize the military budget, to total of 94.6 per sub- -into our rapidly increasing military budget. Wasted defense dollars are not a sacred cow in Vermont. A smaller, but still significant, number ) of the military" as a step said there should be "less emphasis on military buildup." Some of the provisions of last year's tax special tax breaks "that were added to the 1981 Tax Bill, such as these granted to the oil companies." Smaller (but significant) numbers of Vermonters expressed skepticism about the economic impact of more basic features of the tax package. A total of 36,2 per cent said we should "roll back some of the general tax cuts for business and industry," while 20.3 percent said we should "roll back some of the individual tax cuts enacted in 1981." Disillusionment over aspects of the tax package also showed up strongly in the rt of the questionn dealing with social policies. In that ctlon, 74.9 per "cent of respondents said there should be "lea tax breaks for the wealthy, more tax relief for low and middle incume people." Of the steps listed for reducing future dofielts, the one receiving the least support was "deeper cuts in domestic programs." However, support for that option was not insignificant: 25.4 per cent (ef those concerned about deficit spending) ex- pressed the view that there is room for further cuts on the domestic side of the budget. There are, of course, limitations in the extent to which the questionnaire results can ha applied to Vermonters' views on specific budget items. First, any questionnaire inherently over-simplifies the categories of public opinion. Secondly, mOst of the responses came before President Reagan outlined his specific budget proposals. Thirdly, the general attitudes covered by the questionnaire cannot always he directly translated to specific pieces of legislation covering specific s|tuatimm. But in facing the major qubestionn t issues now be/ore Congress, the- aire--combined with the thousands of personal letters and com- ments I have received from individual Vermonters--providm a valuable guide to the views of people in our state. I shall he reporting the results of all oth sections of the qt.mtinnnnire over the next two weelm. IVater.powered industries at Bath Vill00e Waterpower was the key to early industry, and the waterpower of the Ammonoosuc River was harnessed in Bath Village for nearly 200 years. The earliest mill here was a grist mill built by Daniel Mills on the east side of the river, sometime before 1782  a mill which was worth "300 Spanish milled dollars" in a mortgage to Timothy Bedel (Grafton County Register of Deeds). Rev. Sutherland told in his history of Bath about the trials and tribulations of Mr. Mills: "Soon after his first mill was built, it was carried away by a flood; whereupon he remarked he was glad of it, for it wasn't st in the right place. He therefore built a second one in the right place; this having been burnt down a short time after, he again said he was glad of it, for it wasn't built as it ought to have been. He then built a third one, which exactly suited him ," In 178, Daniel andhls wife Nancy sold the mill to Roger Sargent for "200 pounds lawful money." Sargent then added a sawmill on the same side of the river (cast side). Around the same time (by 1792), John Hurd and his son Jacob were building a sawmill 1799, Gookin and Standring river. Mr. Bancroft built a moved to Haverhill and began manufacturing carding machines for sale throughout the United States and Canada Gookin also set up woolen mills in all parts of New England, including the village of Bath. Between 1802 and 1815 be bought up all the property round the dam, on both sides of the river, including the rights to all the water power. He operated a fulling or cloth- dressing mill in partnership with Caleb Hunt, also built a brick gristmill. In 1822, Gookin and Hunt built a new woolen mill, at a cost of $I0,000 a lot of money for a factory in those days. Rev. Sutherland wrote: "Mr. Gookin was a man of uncommon energy and en- terprise, as was shown by his rebuilding in mid-winter the mill-dams at Bath Village, which bad been swept away by the great freshet of Feb. 12, 1824, thereby topping all the milis. He di at HaVerhill, where he had long resided, May 20, 1826." Evidently the mill did not prosper after Mr. Gookin was gone, as Mr. Hunt lost it in 1829 through foreclosed mortgages, to Ira Gondall. and gristmill on the west side Village Falls Manufacturing of the river. In those days Co. Ira Goodall continued operation of the woolen mill as part of the Village Falls Manufacturing Company, which also had a dye house and factory on the west side of Main Street. However, the woolen mill burned to the ground on the night of Feb. II, 1851. Mr. Goodall rebuilt, installing three sets of woolen machinery, all running by waterpower from thegristmill flume. The company ran into financial difficulties, and by mortgage foreclosure was taken over in 1858 by Col. James H. Johnson, who was Bath's most prominent dtizen at that time. He ran a saw mill and lumber business, owned most of the village water power, and served at various times in the State Legislature, Senate, Governor's Council, and the U. S. House of Representatives. Conant & Company In 1872 Col. Johnson sold to William Bancroft a part of the land on the east side of the there was no bridge at Bath Village, and people had to cross by means of a boat, so it was convenient to have mills on both sides of the river. The next 20 years saw a great development of small industries at the falls in Bath Village. A deed from Roger Sargent to Richard Gookin in 1815 mentions the following in that neighborhood: brickyard, nail factory, blacksmith shop, trip hammer shop, and a hatter's shop, besides the saw and grist mills. Rev. Sutherland's history adds further details and mentions also a whetstone factory and a clothing mill. Richard Gookin The prosperity of Bath Village was greatly increased by Richard Oookin, an in- ventor and industrialist from Boston who later had his residence in Haverhill, N.H. In cooperation with his brother, he had made the first watch springs manufactured in America. During the 1790's he took charge of, a British- owned nail factory in Newbury, Mass. While there, he became acquainted with William Standring, who had recently brought from England certain parts of a wool-carding machine. Together, Gookin and Stan- dring improved and developed the machine, for which Gookin received two patents. However: the British government, to protect its own industries, had prohibited the export of any British machinery, so Gookin and Standrin.g soon found that they had put their lives in jeopardy. According to Bit- tinger's History of Haverhili, a trunk was sent to Standring which was intended to explode when it was opened. Also, Gookin was sent a hat armed with a deadly prong powered with a strong spring, which was discovered-befere the hat was worn. It was tested by putting it onto the head of a dog, which was instantly killed. In spite of' the danger, Gookin and Standring went ahead with their plans, as the country was in great need of carding machines, all wool being carded by hand in America up to that time. In A news report in the Littleton Courier for July 1, 1952, tells the story of the life and death of the leatherboard mill: "The 25 to 34) men em- ployed at the factory were to have this week off for vacations and the Indepen- dence Day holiday. Con- sequently the plant was closed, though 3 or 4 men did go to the mill Tuesday mor- ning to make some machinery repairs. In some way, while attending to these duties, a spark from a tool ignited oil in the pump room, near the northwest section. Before. the men could rush downstairs to fight the blaze and close fire doors the intense heavy Smoke drove them outside. It seemed, reported one of the employees, that in no time fire was in all partsof the building, which mostly was of brick and cement. "The alarm was given locally by ringing the Congregational Church bell. Some at first thought that the boys of the village were having a premature Fourth of July celebration, but on looking outdoors they quickly saw the dense smoke and realized that a landmark was threatened. "By telephone the fire departments in Lisbon, Woodsville and Monroe were notified. All quickly responded to the call for help. On Monday afternoon Lisbon had had a brand new pumper delivered, and soon after 8 o'clock the next morning.., it was doing valiant work pumPing water out of the Ammoncosnc River for several lines of hose... "In making leatherbcard the company used bales of leather scraps and paper, shipped to Bath from other mills for processing. Some of these caught fire, causing excessive heat and necessitating attention by the firemen all day Tuesday, The odor of burning leather per- meated the entire area... "Cushman-Rankin was one of five leatherboard factories in the country, having a Boston office and shipping to all parts of the East. For years it has been known as a prosperous and substantial company, most of the time working 24 hours a day, year in and year out." ( continued next week) pulp mill here, then the next year took John H. Conant as his partner. The mill did a thriving business and by 1888 was grinding out about five tons of pulp in 24 hours. However. the mill burned down in 1889. According to Historical Notes of Bath, Mr. Conant was considered one of the town magnates. For more than 70 years he and his family lived in the house across from the Colonial Inn. The original house was torn down and Mr. Conant replaced it with one which the White Mountain Republic described as one of the finest houses in town (present home of Charles Diamond and family). The Conant children were tran- sported to school in a "surrey with a fringe on top," drawn by a beautiful span of horses, with a hostler in attendance. Mr. Conant's widow lived to be nearly a hundred. Bath Lumber Company In 1891 the Conant mill site was sold to the Bath Lumber Company, which built a saw mill here. For about 15 years the mill did a large business, employing 4O or 50 men, besides running lumber camps at Black Mountain, Easton and Franconia which employed another 100 men as choppers and loggers. The president and the treasurer of the company were Edward Woods and his son-in-law, Amos N. Blandin, of Bath's Upper Village. Mr. Blandin became a highly- successful lumberman and businessman, and was also active in local and state politics, becoming speaker of the House in 1934 and can- didate for governor in 1936. Cushman-Rankin Company The sawmill property was sold in 1905 to Walter P. Rankin and George F. Cush- man, who established a leatherboard mill. For about 30 years, Mr. Rankin's son Kenneth served as superin- tendant of the mill. The leatherboard mill was struck twice by fire -- first in 1915, when the finishing room, dry house and store house were destroyed. The mill was rebuilt as a modern brick structure and operated steadily until 1951, when there was a second fire. EXECtmVE COt00CILOR %, I Raymond & Burton, (R-N.IL) New Hampshire Division of Economic Development I have obtained a guest column from the Division of Economic Development outlining the mission of that division which is within the Department of Resources and Economic Development. The column follows. The Division of Economic Development consists of two major offices, the Office of Vacation Travel and the Office of Industrial Development and, A newly formed Film and Television Bureau, The Division of Economic Developmentis a major component of the Dept. of Resources and Economic Development. Since the Office of Vacation Travel will be discussed in a separate column, this ar- ticle will focus on Industrial Development and the Film Bureau. A year ago, alter a record year of in- dnstriai expansion in 1979, and with most forecasters calling for an economic downturn, we were lboking at 1980 with some misgivings. Fortunately, New Hampshire has been able to withstand the dip in the national economy with continued growth and with an unemployment rate well below the national average. During the past year, there were eighty-two (82) new industries which located in the state and sixty-two (62) expansions of firms already doing business here. Such progress is second only to 1979, our record year. Moreover, in 1960, somewhat fewer firms actually provided more new jobs, a total of 5,319. The new businesses included 18 in the electric and electronic fields, 18 in machinery (non-electric) and 13 in fabricated metal products. Also, there was representation in the wood products, plastics, footwear, chemicals and in-' strumentation fields. So, New Hampshire (please turn to page 5) Public Service Board To the Editor: Delphia, the An open letter to Louise 46 percent of its Mccarren, Chairman of the Vermont Yankee. Public Service Board: To me, this In the Times Argus, 25 ratepayers do March 1982, p.8, there appears these ads. Is this an article headlined "Yankee practice Begins Major Ad Push". The engage in? Does $150,000 advertising campaign realize he told a about to he initiated deals with object to the use ( four issues of public concern, in this manner To quote from the article, furious that "Vermont Yankee bear the burden shareholders will foot the bill when for the campaign, according each penny to plant spokesman Stephen be willing to Stoll, who said it will thus not majority of affect ratepayers' electric this view. bills". That's not the way I see Regardless of it. judicial" status CVPSC owns 31.1 percent of Board Vermont Yankee and is its Hunneman), the largest stockholder. It is mandate to joined by other Vermont waste when it utilities: Green Mountain filings. Power Corp., Washington have to bear Electric Co-op., Vermont institution's Electric Co-op., and the existance. Burlington Electric Depar- tment. According to figures Secretary, given by CV's Michael Our Fifteen Mile Falls hy BOB LINCK It used to be called Fifteen Mile Falls, Gilman, Vt. to the base of the Connecticut River. The wildest of the "falls" cascaded 348 feet ( deposited boulders. Last summer in St. Johnsbury, while I was Connecticut River Watershed Council's "Source canoe expedition, I met an old it was like to be on the river before Moore Comerford Dam inundated the rapids. When I longing to have travelled the old river, head. "You wouldn't have wanted to river in those days," he insisted. Wild rapids, one after another -- it is easy to why Fifteen Mile Falls was the Connecticut's stretch of river during the log drives. Two sets particular were believed to have claimed more lives over the years. The last log of 1915. The last pulp drive, that the long timber logs did, was carried Today, ff the 170-foot Comerford Dam and Moore Dam had never been built, Fifteen Mi5 a whitewater enthusiasts' dream. of folklore and history will remember the ra madethe hearts of lumbermen skia beat.. One small remnant of the rapids can downstream from Gilman Dam. The head known as "Horse Race Rapids", whitewater no man ever rode a log, has recentl3 protection from further encroachment on iL, and natural beauty. A 14-acre parcel of river in Dalton, N.H. has been voluntarily manent conservation use by its owners Smith. "We feel very strongly Connecticut River in as close to its natural state It is a dream to have a protected strip along each future generations may enjoy fishing, ping." They speak the dream of the Connecticut Council as well. For two years, the Council has land conservancy efforts on the formation Of a a corridor of natural, recreational, and along the river. Their efforts in New mont have been generously funded by the Charitable Fund (the John Pearson Trust) Howard Charitable Trust. Ensured productivity of farm and forest protection of wildlife habitat, increased river recreation, the improvement of water scenic beauty of the valley -- all are goals Greenway Project. Each of these directly region's economic health. Guilding inevitable from important riverfront land is one wa land values and income and preserving many have been attracted from outside the valley have lived their lives in the valley. Perhaps most importantly, the greenway ca future availability of productive forestland. Last year, the recipient of a conservation easement (or restriction) on thirteen acres of prime Lyme, N.H. Similar efforts are underway on two of forest land and pasture land in Claremont N.H. The same mechanism was used on the head of Fifteen Mile Falls. . Conservation easements, the principal Land Conservancy Program and Greenway voluntary agreements between nonprofit town governments and interested easements can be tailored to the landowner'S desires -- and they imply not a change in forfeiture of certain rights to the land. As an while retaining the rights to grow crops and from his land, and the right to pass the land on t landowner may choose to restrict his own future owners to subdivide and servation easements amount to restrictions on future use of land. Not fortably match the owner's original plans but they ma Progress on the Connecticut River GreenwaY there appears to he a gathering awareness play an important role in.land conservancy. ficult ebstacle to overcome is the inherent many landowners to answer to that is to keep some agreement, for possible futm'e development.  The Connecticut River and lands through have undergone a major transformation navigator Adrian Block discovered the river ago. Even since the last log was driven . more of the river has been tamed as a for hydroelectric power, I frequently remember that day last Johnsbury when I was told that I wouldn't paddle through the rapids of Fifteen is that I would have, and that I wish I Connecticut River Watershed land and water management, future to see and remember more of the river as it presently recollect about the days of log rapids. (Bob IAnck is the Asseciute Executive necticut River Watershed Council)