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Bradford , Vermont
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March 31, 1982     Journal Opinion
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March 31, 1982-The Journal Opinion-Page 7 dngpromises to be ", according to a'Tom Kidder. w, who teaches i a Oxbow explained t.Your Wagon" is atniog town that t, s ,. a populatmn to 900 after a man : en Rumson ac  discovers gore ( e  burying a dead A tar the town gets [ :: in'sl,,, ughter ,, with a  ed Julia. The q i ! so deals with the B fe of mining and iV ulg, as well as  efforts to settle ;  .Says that he is fl | -lla'ced with the b  lu: the kids have to l( Y  7"naracters come to Y   '('acltiking forward V ., .. cting, dancing, q fl , together" on a  ncers, there q  ' 35 cast members [ , II di s production. The Z =  'acters -are Ben X   Played by Tom x I  Jennifer Rumson I 'Louise Plante), l   (Played by Brian ] il  Choreography is F ''b- - i e   Y SOphomores " corn and Sandy l, , (members of ,- mr High Band) t e i qia' tubers will put   perfornmnce for ! 00e0000fvrth Town ,I I Mfrom page 6) ..d and Mr ro?a M. s. David amil nsll in,, y spent last I - orwich, Conn ' # area -' :" )p ',*ilV I (llrectlon tlay  ed by the state ' a gl. s L.int Swains were ]a cOttage for the David Breck Mrs. Kenneth Sale 3rd is the rum- school. The 9:00 a.m. AUCTION needed : and his wife to start are Market and April the ' a number of will be sculpture, and MARISA FATHERLEY KATHERINE HARTLEY PETER HODGE LESLIE KASPRZAK TRACt 01TINA TOM RATHBURN B,.q'HANNE WRIGHT M,d ................ A NO Omt,ri ............. STEVE FOUCHER the e elementary school children on Thursday, April 1. Public performances will be held in the Oxbow High School Auditorium at 8:00 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, April 2 and 3, 1982. The charge for admission will be $2.50 for adults, and $2.00 for students. Local History Project The Local History program of Oxbow High School is un- dertaking a project to further develop its collection of slides of the area. With the co- operation of the Art Depar- tment, antique pictures of historical interest will be filmed. An effort is being made to contact area residents who may have pictures or post cards that were taken in the area bet- ween 1880-1950. Especially needed are pictures of com- munity life, disasters, new developments, businesses, etc. The pictures that are loaned to the project will be photographed with a 35mm camera with no harm to the original. Slides will then be made for use in the study of local area. The Local History program already has over 100 slides of Bradford during this period and would like to concentrate on Piermont, N.H., Fairlee, Vt., Newbury, Vt., Corinth, Vt. and Topsham, Vt. Individuals who have items they are willing to loan should contact Lawrence Coffin, Humanities Department, Oxbow High School by April 8. It is an- ticipated that the slides will be made during th e month of April and that all items will he returned by May 15. A public showing of the slides is planned for the 1982-83 school year. Band Activities The Oxbow High School Band does a lot more than just perform a few concerts each year at the high school. It also goes to elementary schools in the Bradford area. In its most recent un- dertaking, the Oxbow band participated in the first half of a band exchange with the Pilgrim High School band of Warwick, Rhode Island. The Oxbow band travelled to Warwick during the weekend of March 26-28. The Pilgrim High band will come to the Bradford area during the weekend of April 30-May 2 to complete the exchange. The band also marches in Bradford and other neigh- boring towns at special events. dil. l(t[eachshouldbe. Garage on Main Street, lrl, ne Benedicts by Bradford, Vt. '7.[ The cheerleaders are get- o 14 YILtRS OF EXPERIENCi 11Jte Dpd 0 1-603.448.3787 making old cars shine like brand new. Graphics Roy Prochorchic, vocational drafting teacher at Oxbow High School, is going to have a combination class of drafting and graphics. This class will start in the fall of AUCTION BAGS g SUPPtlES. 24 HOUR EMERGENCY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICE County Alenta/Iloalth FREE 1.800.622-4244 .CONCENTRATED DEODORIZER Is so effective that 2 DROPS OEOOORIZE A SKUNKI o.,,, Juot think of the odor to sixtoen 16oz. a,mlm $300 tO 8CHMID PRODUCTS CO. Div. of A, Roue 46 Wost, LIttM F4di., NJ 07424. A&W ARTESIAN WELL CO. nce 1930 176. U. 1-102-29S-S112 1982-83. Ten students have already signed up for the class. Prochorchic says that the reasons for combining graphics with drafting is that "there are many graphic skilled jobs in this area." He also says that "among the skills to be taught photography, printing and silk screening, printing will be emphasized." Building Trades For many years at Oxbow High School, students have been involved in a vocational course that gives them im- portant experience. This class is called Building Trades. Harry McLam of Bradford, is the teacher of the building trades class. He has 20 years of building experience and has taken some college courses in the field. McLam has been teaching at Oxbow for four years and he says that he enjoys working with teenagers. The Building Trades class is currently building a home on the Wrights Mountain Road in Bradford, Vt., for Mr. and Mrs. Gene DiBattisto of Connecticut. They plan to retire and move to Vermont in a few years. For the past several years the building trades class has built one house a year, usually privately commissioned. The house the class is building this year is smaller than the ones they have built in the last couple of years. The class began this project in the Autumn of 1981 by having the foundation dug by a hired-out contract. Next came the students' work of leveling the footings, pouring the concrete, and putting up the forms for the walls. This was followed by several months of hard work in all phases of house construction. The house contains a wood paneled living-dining room with a cathedral ceiling and a raised brick hearth with a shelf in it. There are two bedrooms, a bath and a kitchen made of custom-made cabinets with a peninsula. The house features a full basement and a sun porch. The DiBattisto's pay A" Haverhill philosophy Elsie Welch dies at 86 (continued from page I) the chairman of the Haverhill E. CORINTH-- Elsie M. Bagonzi. Woodsville High Cooperative SchooIBoard. Welch, 86, formerly of E. School athletic director and Donald Evans, principal of Corinth died March 27, 1982at teacher of earth science Woodsville High chool, the Country Village Health health and anatomy, to be reported that the committee Care Center in Lancaster, "professionally absent" revising district policy on N.H. after a long illness. March 29 through April 2. eligibility for extra-curricular She was born in Groton, Bagonzi, who recently became activities will meet Tuesday to Dec. 8, 1895 the daughter of the pitching coach of the discuss academic standards Warren M. and Margaret Plymouth State College required for team mem- (Miller)Welch. baseball team, will ac- bership and other activities. She graduated from God- company the New Hampshire In executive session, the dard Seminary in Barre, Vt., college team to Florida that board reviewed and approved and taught school in Corinth, week. Superintendent Norman C. Marshfield, Montgomery and The board approved a Mullen's nominations for then taught at Roger Wolcott request by Archie Steenburgh employment in the district for School in Wilson, Conn., for for the use of a school building the next academic year. over 40 years retiring in 1960. for an auction. Steenburgh is From the time of her retirement until 1971 she had made her home in E. Corinth IVoodsville High School with hersister, before moving to W. Stewartstown, N.H., in d tio I philo phv 1971. e uca na so For the past year she had Editor's Note: The following is the text of Woodsville been a resident of the Country High School's stated philosophy as prepared by the Village Health Care Center in school's steering committee. "The Town of Haverhill, in which the majority of the students of Woodsville High School reside, is located in a rural area of New Hampshire that af- fords few opportunities for employment other than in farming, light industry, and in the service areas. Thus, the tax base from which education and other public services are funded, is limited. Residents of the area must travel con- siderable distances in order to participate in cultural events. "The educational programs at Woodsville High School are designed to provide experiences for the student that allow him-her the opportunity to develop his-her knowledge, abilities, skills, and in- terests. These experiences, specialized and integrated, encompass an un- derstanding and ap- preciation of today's world beyond the student's im- mediate realn,-a respect for originality and self- expression, and preparation for future endeavors in higher education and the working world. Underlying all of these experiences is an environment which fosters personal growth and a desire for seeking knowledge as a continuing way of life. "Since all students should be enrolled to prepare for either post- secondary schooling or a vocation, Woodsville High School, a comprehensive high school, offers education to students of all ability levels, preparing the individual to function as a productive member of society. In addition to Spanish Trip for all the materials for the On March25, 1982 the house, plus I0 percent of the Spanish classes at Oxbow cost of the materials, paid to High School went to the the Vocational Department at Berkeley Performance Center Oxbow. Presently the class is in Boston, Mass. Students doing "finish" work on the from grades 7-12, ap- interior. The 1981-82 building trades proximately 55 people, went class has 28 students. Two of on the one day, trip. Lynn Bentley, Spanish the students are women, teacher at Oxbow, Doug There are two different Linnell, and Joyce Moore classes everyday, each two served aschaperones. Bentley and one quarter hours long. said that the groups that go, The students also gain ex- "always have a good time." perience in plumbing by doing She also added that "it's a all the plumbing in the house, riot." which is taught by Howard The students saw a South Search. Electrical Services American dance group called, students are responsible for "Don Dines." After that they doing all the electrical wiring and heating. It is taught by George Boyce. Both Search and Beyce are Bradford residents. At the end of the year the building trades class will have completed a house from start to finish, having experience in every phase of building. Because the class is a two year program, it also gives the first year students a chance to build another house the following year. Track Season Opens The Oxbow High School Track and Field Team opened its season this year with its first practice on Monday, March 29. A general meeting was held on Monday, March 22. High School has been selling concerning the confirmation of this practice. Another Easter Carnations since March 14. The sale will con- purpose for the meeting was to tinue through April 6. The discuss the viewing of track flowers cost $1.25 each. films. Coach David Imhoff Customers have a choice of feels that these films will be the following colors: pink, helpful indemonstratingbasic yellow, white, or a cam- running techniques in such bination of white and green, or areas as the start and infield white and blue. The people events. The first meet vs. Hanover who purchase the carnations can have them delivered as is scheduled to take place on long as the person to whom it April 14 at the Dartmouth is to be delivered to is in the indoor track, school. making the individual a self-sustaining being with intellectual curiosity, the program recognizes the importance of equipping the student with the skills necessary to function as a responsible citizen in an ever changing world. "Consistent with the statement of philosophy, Woodsville High School attempts the following objectives: -- "To prepare the student with experiences to help him-her in a career and-or a college education after high school. -- "To provide the student with useful skills in all subject areas. -- "To involve the student in classwork and extracurricular activities. -- "To allow for ex- periences that will broaden the student's self- expression and creative talents. -- "To help the student develop discriminating judgments. -- "To enable the student to recognize the in- terrelationships between various school disciplines. Lancaster, N.H. She is survived by one brother Rev. George H. Welch of Barington R.I., a sister Harriet W. Carter of Littleton and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held Tuesday March 30 at the Hale Funeral Home in Bradford with the Rev. Richard White, pastor of the E. Corinth Congregational Church of- ficiating. Entombment will take place in the Sawyer Tomb Bradford pending spring burial in the family lot in the New Cemetery East Corinth. Donations in her memory may be made to your favorite charity. The Hale Funeral Home of Bradford, Vt. is in charge of arrangements. Lena Howe, 87, dies after long illness TUNBRIDGE-- Lena E. nieces, Blanche E. Fisk and Howe, 87, died Thursday, March 18, in the Berlin Con- valescent Center after a long illness. She was born Dec. 25, 1894 in Tunbridge, the daughter of Perley and Melessey (Cleveland) Moses. She married Herber H. Howe in 1917. After his death she moved to S. Royalton to make her home with her twin brother, Lee E. Moses. She was also a resident of the Chelsea Home for the Aged before entering the Berlin Convalescent Home. Mrs. Howe was a member of the S. Tunbridge Methodist Church and the Tunbridge Market Ladies Aid Society. She is survived by two Mrs. Edward H, Barnaby, both of Tunbridge; three nephews, William L. Moses of Fort Myers, Fla., Everett B. Moses of Tunbridge and Elroy R. Moses of S. Royalton. Funeral services were held at the Tunbridge Congregational Church. Entombment will be in the Riverside Cemetery vault in S. Royalton to await com- mittal in the Button Cemetery in S. Tunbridge. Memorial contributions may be made to the Tunbridge Recreation Association, in care of David Cilley, Tun- bridge, Vt., 05077. The Boardway and Cilley Funeral Home of Chelsea was in charge of arrangements. Obituaries Services planned for Myrtle Mattoon BRADFORD-- Murtle B. member of the Rebekah. Mattoon, 7I, diedJan. 5atthe She is survived by her Winterhaven Hospital in husband Carroll of Bradford Winterhaven, Fla., after a and Winterhaven, Fla.; her long illness, son Gordon of New Haven, She was born April 23, 1910 Ind.; five grandchildren; and in C6rinth the daughter of two brothers, Wallace D. Ernest F. and Julia (Hoyt) Blake ofEastHartford, Conn., Blake. She attended schools in and Lloyd V. Blake of Brad- Corinth and Bradford. ford. On Nov. ll, 1933, she Services Planned married Carroll F. Mattoon. Funeral services will be They had two children, a held on Sunday, April 4 at the daughter Roberta, whodiedin Hale Funeral Home in November, 1975, and a son Bradford. The Rev. John Gordon. Knight will officiate She attended the Bradford Donations may be made to Congregational Church and the American Cancer Society, was a member of their various 13 Loomis St., Montpelier, Vt. organizations. She was also a Clara Langerhans dies W. FAIRLEE-- Clara E. Foundation for the Overseas Langerhans, 72, died at Blind. She spent much timein Hanover Terrace Health Care, Latin America where she after a long illness, organized services for the She was born in Addyville, blind, specially in Chile. Ill., daughter of the Reverend She retired in 1959 and C.L. Langerhans and Amalia moved to W. Fairlee, Vt., (Baltzer) Langerhans. where she was Town Clerk for She graduated from high 17years. school in Hamilton, Ohio, and She leaves several nieces Western College for women in and nephews. Oxford, Ohio and did her post A memorial service and graduate work at Miami committal will be later in the University. spring. She was a social worker by Instead of ' flowers, con- profession, specializing in tributions may be made to the work for the blind, first for the American Heart Association State of Ohio, then for the in care of Mrs. Barbara American Federation for the Sumner, West Fairlee, Vt. Blind and the American 05083. The Godfrey Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Margaret Leighton dies at 87 NEW, BURY-- Margaret active in community affairs. Me.; Kenneth and George Leighton, 87, died Saturday in She was a lifelong member of Putnam, S. Ryegate; Donald Rowan Court Nursing Home in the First Congregational Putnam, Newbbury and Barre following a long illness. Church of Newbury. Charles Kennedy, N. Dux- FOR RENT-- 3 -- "To increase the student's capacity for physical and social development. -- "To help equip the student with a clear un- derstanding of his-her role as an individual. -- "To enable the student to recognize his-her im- portance as a member of the community and as a citizen of his-her nation and world. -- "To provide the student with opportunities that allow for personal growth and desirable social relationships." bedroom. Connnunitv Theatre Born in Newbury, July 13, 1894, she was daughter of Franklin and Mary Elizabeth (Burroughs) Leighton. A teacher by occupation, she had also worked in banks and post offices in the Newbury-Wells River area where she had spent most of her lifetime. During her earlier years, she had been Surviving are five nieces, Ruth Hartshorn, Hollis, N.Y.; Mrs. Paul Tiffany, in Con- necticut; Ethel Putnam, in Massachusetts; Beatrice Putnam, So. Ryegate and Louise Hildreth, Fairfield, Me.; six nephews, George Leighton Jr., in Arkansas; Franklin Leighton, Garfield, * Ecuit+ labor suit settled (continued frompage 1) testify at the NLRB hearing has been reluctant to settle the that would have taken place in (Trunzo) complaint without a White River Jct. on March 25, 'nd-e " hearing before a j g . The according to Trunzo. company says the NLRB has agreed to tell the employees that the company was not in violation of the law when Trunzo was fired. The settlement also in- cluded an agreement from Trunzo that he would not come back to work at the company. According to the official company statement, "The company felt it was better to settle the issue than to go through a long, time- consuming and costly hearing which we are certain would have only confirmed the company's right to maintain discipline and run an efficient, productive operation." Trunzo is an attorney who started his practice during his employment at Equity Publishing Company. Trunzo maintains his law duties were sanctioned by the company and the company maintains he was let go because of the amount of time his practice took away from his office hours. to open Disagreement However. Trunzo said. "No BRADFORD--A Community oe would ever pay $14,000 Theatre will open in Bradford unless they were sure they on Saturday, April 10, 1982 at were going to lose on the the Woods Building. Full merits of their case." Trunzo length films will be shown, charged that the company alternating between agreed to settle in order to children's films and those "avoid any embarrassment" more suitable for adults, to former New Hampshire There will be matinees at governor Meldrim Thomson, 2:00 p.m. and evening shows Jr. at 7:00 p.m., complete with Thomson was subpoenaed to popcorn, candy and soda for sale. Admission will be $1.25 for. matinees and $1.50 for went shopping in Harvard Square in Cambridge and then Although the company to a Mexican restaurant claims union organizing had called, "La Pinata." The nothing to do with the firing of money for this trip was raised evening shows for all ages. Trunzo. MacMaster and by selling candy sticks in The Community Theatre is David Jensen or Deb Burgan Bermudez: Trunzo admits school. Some money for the being run by Vermont East at222-4706. bus was from the foreign language field trip fund. The students paid for their lunch, the performance, and also two dollars each toward the price of the bus. Bentley said that "part of learning language is learning about culture, beyond just speaking In class. She said the trip was, "enjoyed by everyone." Carnations The Junior Class at Oxbow A FUN NEW KOOL-AID" RECIPE fl t#OSDO0 gooI.Al" Bran(] 2 toblespoons sugar Unsweened Soft Dnn V cup water Mix, any flovo J/s Cup m#k loft* drink mix oral Sgr in v in $S $1tr in milk. Serve ot OnCe Or chili oncl Stir beforo r,vr. Mokes I cup Or I serwng Odemorks Of Genem Foos CoDorohon Projects, a vocational and life skills program, that is operated at the old Ag Building in Bradford. Program Director, David Jensen. explained that the Community Theatre will provide employment training for the workers and provide family entertainment in Bradford. "Eight to ten workers will operate the Theatre, including running the film projector, selling tickets, and refreshments. Vermont East Projects staff will train and assist the workers as necessary." Donations The projector that will be used by the Community Theatre has been graciously donated by the Bell and Howell Company in Chicago, Illinois. People who have also been helpful are David Joslyn, Richard Fox, and Susan Spaulding. The Community Theatre still needs a back up projector and volunteers to assist in running the operation. If you're interested, please call that the three were principal The first movie will be Benji organizers behind the effort to with cartoons. Other future unionize the employee s at the movies include the original company. Invasion of the Body Snat- Equity Publishing Company chers, Scarecrow, The Point, is the largest employer in the and Laurel and Hardy. Town of Orford. p Phone 444-2742 Call collect. 5tA ROEBUCK, Woodville, N.H. PIKE IOR[ Pike, N.H I CLEANERS FAIRLEE GENERAL, Fairlee, Vt. ORFORDVlLLE STORE, Orfordvitle, N.H. BATH VARIETY STOR, Both, N.H. GROTON GENERAL STORE, Groton, Vt. yn.r enmnh*tn elnthma care center SOUTH RYEGATE STORE, South Ryegot., Vt+ "For;icl'upam] deiivery service" * WESTERN AUTO l'OREfBrodfrd, Vt. MERRILLS' iHSU RANCE OR:ICE, Lisbon, N.H., bury, and I0 grandnieces and house on Main Street. O'Brien grandnephews. Realty, Bradford, Vt. 802-222- A funeral service will be 4704. 2T--4-7-- announced at a later date. 1975 FI00 FORD PICKUP-- Committal will be in the Standard transmission, Oxbow Cemetery in Newbury. positive traction, 300cc motor, Arrangements are under the + cylinder with cap. Call after direction of tbe Kicker 5 p.m. 603-272-4949. 1T---3- Funeral Home, Birch Lane, 31---c Woodsville, N.H. AUCTION As I am discontinuing milking, I will sell my milking herd at my farm, located on the River Road, Lyme, N.H. Watch for Auction signs. THURSDAY, APRIL 8 STARTING AT 12:30 P.M. 37 HEAD OF AYRSHIRE8 of which 30 are Registered Consisting of: 6 fresh, 8 due April, 4 due May, 3 due July, 1 due August, 2 due Sept. Balance of cows in all stages of lactation. Cattle T.B., blood tested and checked for pregnancy before time of sale. This is a good herd of Ayrshires, with the fresh cows milking good. TERMS CASH OR GOOD CHECK CATALOGS AT RINGSIDE OWNER: IRVIN WILMOT, LYMEo N.H. AUCTIONEERS: C.W. GRAY & SONS, INC. EAST THETFORD, VT. 78,%4348 or 785-2101 R. & D. LUSSIER. LYNDONVILLE, VT. 626-5448 N.H. LICENSE NO. 2140 . , I I To settle the Estate of the late Asa Waterman, we will sell same at the farm, located on the Swiftwater Road, 1 mile from the Cottage Hospital, off Route I0 in Woodsville, N.H. Watch for Auction sigm. SATURDAY, APRIL 10 STARTING AT 10.'30 A.M. FARM MACHINERY Case 870 Agr-King w- bucket, cab, heater & radio; Farmall cub tractor w-single quick hitch; Cub cultivator, Woods 42' lawn mower for Cub, single quick hitch harrow for cub, single hitch plow & 2 row corn planter, Farmall 300 tractor w- loader, needs rear axle; Farmall H tractor, N.H. 470 haybine, N.H. 273 hayliner baler, N.H. 36 flail mower, N.H. 512 PTO spreader w- tailgate, N.H. 718 chopper w- both heads, 3 pt. hitch post hole digger, new Mighty Mac sprayer w- gas engine, Colby forage wagon, fuel tank, trailer, potato planter, potato digger, Easy Flow lime spreader, cement mixer, Kuhn tedder, pinwheel rake, transport harrow, bale loader, cedar posts, hay elevator, potato grader, chicken plucker, 1960 Ford car, rough, portable air compressor, welder, vise, anvil, barrels of oil w- pumps, ladders, lawn mower, space heater, iron furnace front, pony saddle, bull rake, wheelbarrow, milk cans, 8 new rolls of woven wire, barb wire, tractor wind breaker, horse drawn cultivator, platform scales, walking plow, hay hoist, belts, wagon seats, plus small tools used on a farm of this size. 1970 Ford 500 truck w- 17,000 miles, w- 12 ft. factory body TERMS CASH OR GOOD CHECK LUNCH BY, 4-H AUCTIONEERS: C.W. GRAY & SONS, INC. EAST THETFORD, VT. 785-4348 Or 785-2101 R. & D. LUSSIER, LYNDONVILLE, VT. 626-5448 N.H. LICENSE NO. 2140 AUCTIONEERS NOTE: Anyone wishing to buy good equipment, plan to attend this sale. This machinery has been kept under cover and is In very good con- ditions. ADMINISTRATRIX: LEE WATERMAN, WOOD- SVILLE, N.H. March 31, 1982-The Journal Opinion-Page 7 dngpromises to be ", according to a'Tom Kidder. w, who teaches i a Oxbow explained t.Your Wagon" is atniog town that t, s ,. a populatmn to 900 after a man : en Rumson ac  discovers gore ( e  burying a dead A tar the town gets [ :: in'sl,,, ughter ,, with a  ed Julia. The q i ! so deals with the B fe of mining and iV ulg, as well as  efforts to settle ;  .Says that he is fl | -lla'ced with the b  lu: the kids have to l( Y  7"naracters come to Y   '('acltiking forward V ., .. cting, dancing, q fl , together" on a  ncers, there q  ' 35 cast members [ , II di s production. The Z =  'acters -are Ben X   Played by Tom x I  Jennifer Rumson I 'Louise Plante), l   (Played by Brian ] il  Choreography is F ''b- - i e   Y SOphomores " corn and Sandy l, , (members of ,- mr High Band) t e i qia' tubers will put   perfornmnce for ! 00e0000fvrth Town ,I I Mfrom page 6) ..d and Mr ro?a M. s. David amil nsll in,, y spent last I - orwich, Conn ' # area -' :" )p ',*ilV I (llrectlon tlay  ed by the state ' a gl. s L.int Swains were ]a cOttage for the David Breck Mrs. Kenneth Sale 3rd is the rum- school. The 9:00 a.m. AUCTION needed : and his wife to start are Market and April the ' a number of will be sculpture, and MARISA FATHERLEY KATHERINE HARTLEY PETER HODGE LESLIE KASPRZAK TRACt 01TINA TOM RATHBURN B,.q'HANNE WRIGHT M,d ................ A NO Omt,ri ............. STEVE FOUCHER the e elementary school children on Thursday, April 1. Public performances will be held in the Oxbow High School Auditorium at 8:00 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, April 2 and 3, 1982. The charge for admission will be $2.50 for adults, and $2.00 for students. Local History Project The Local History program of Oxbow High School is un- dertaking a project to further develop its collection of slides of the area. With the co- operation of the Art Depar- tment, antique pictures of historical interest will be filmed. An effort is being made to contact area residents who may have pictures or post cards that were taken in the area bet- ween 1880-1950. Especially needed are pictures of com- munity life, disasters, new developments, businesses, etc. The pictures that are loaned to the project will be photographed with a 35mm camera with no harm to the original. Slides will then be made for use in the study of local area. The Local History program already has over 100 slides of Bradford during this period and would like to concentrate on Piermont, N.H., Fairlee, Vt., Newbury, Vt., Corinth, Vt. and Topsham, Vt. Individuals who have items they are willing to loan should contact Lawrence Coffin, Humanities Department, Oxbow High School by April 8. It is an- ticipated that the slides will be made during th e month of April and that all items will he returned by May 15. A public showing of the slides is planned for the 1982-83 school year. Band Activities The Oxbow High School Band does a lot more than just perform a few concerts each year at the high school. It also goes to elementary schools in the Bradford area. In its most recent un- dertaking, the Oxbow band participated in the first half of a band exchange with the Pilgrim High School band of Warwick, Rhode Island. The Oxbow band travelled to Warwick during the weekend of March 26-28. The Pilgrim High band will come to the Bradford area during the weekend of April 30-May 2 to complete the exchange. The band also marches in Bradford and other neigh- boring towns at special events. dil. l(t[eachshouldbe. Garage on Main Street, lrl, ne Benedicts by Bradford, Vt. '7.[ The cheerleaders are get- o 14 YILtRS OF EXPERIENCi 11Jte Dpd 0 1-603.448.3787 making old cars shine like brand new. Graphics Roy Prochorchic, vocational drafting teacher at Oxbow High School, is going to have a combination class of drafting and graphics. This class will start in the fall of AUCTION BAGS g SUPPtlES. 24 HOUR EMERGENCY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICE County Alenta/Iloalth FREE 1.800.622-4244 .CONCENTRATED DEODORIZER Is so effective that 2 DROPS OEOOORIZE A SKUNKI o.,,, Juot think of the odor to sixtoen 16oz. a,mlm $300 tO 8CHMID PRODUCTS CO. Div. of A, Roue 46 Wost, LIttM F4di., NJ 07424. A&W ARTESIAN WELL CO. nce 1930 176. U. 1-102-29S-S112 1982-83. Ten students have already signed up for the class. Prochorchic says that the reasons for combining graphics with drafting is that "there are many graphic skilled jobs in this area." He also says that "among the skills to be taught photography, printing and silk screening, printing will be emphasized." Building Trades For many years at Oxbow High School, students have been involved in a vocational course that gives them im- portant experience. This class is called Building Trades. Harry McLam of Bradford, is the teacher of the building trades class. He has 20 years of building experience and has taken some college courses in the field. McLam has been teaching at Oxbow for four years and he says that he enjoys working with teenagers. The Building Trades class is currently building a home on the Wrights Mountain Road in Bradford, Vt., for Mr. and Mrs. Gene DiBattisto of Connecticut. They plan to retire and move to Vermont in a few years. For the past several years the building trades class has built one house a year, usually privately commissioned. The house the class is building this year is smaller than the ones they have built in the last couple of years. The class began this project in the Autumn of 1981 by having the foundation dug by a hired-out contract. Next came the students' work of leveling the footings, pouring the concrete, and putting up the forms for the walls. This was followed by several months of hard work in all phases of house construction. The house contains a wood paneled living-dining room with a cathedral ceiling and a raised brick hearth with a shelf in it. There are two bedrooms, a bath and a kitchen made of custom-made cabinets with a peninsula. The house features a full basement and a sun porch. The DiBattisto's pay A" Haverhill philosophy Elsie Welch dies at 86 (continued from page I) the chairman of the Haverhill E. CORINTH-- Elsie M. Bagonzi. Woodsville High Cooperative SchooIBoard. Welch, 86, formerly of E. School athletic director and Donald Evans, principal of Corinth died March 27, 1982at teacher of earth science Woodsville High chool, the Country Village Health health and anatomy, to be reported that the committee Care Center in Lancaster, "professionally absent" revising district policy on N.H. after a long illness. March 29 through April 2. eligibility for extra-curricular She was born in Groton, Bagonzi, who recently became activities will meet Tuesday to Dec. 8, 1895 the daughter of the pitching coach of the discuss academic standards Warren M. and Margaret Plymouth State College required for team mem- (Miller)Welch. baseball team, will ac- bership and other activities. She graduated from God- company the New Hampshire In executive session, the dard Seminary in Barre, Vt., college team to Florida that board reviewed and approved and taught school in Corinth, week. Superintendent Norman C. Marshfield, Montgomery and The board approved a Mullen's nominations for then taught at Roger Wolcott request by Archie Steenburgh employment in the district for School in Wilson, Conn., for for the use of a school building the next academic year. over 40 years retiring in 1960. for an auction. Steenburgh is From the time of her retirement until 1971 she had made her home in E. Corinth IVoodsville High School with hersister, before moving to W. Stewartstown, N.H., in d tio I philo phv 1971. e uca na so For the past year she had Editor's Note: The following is the text of Woodsville been a resident of the Country High School's stated philosophy as prepared by the Village Health Care Center in school's steering committee. "The Town of Haverhill, in which the majority of the students of Woodsville High School reside, is located in a rural area of New Hampshire that af- fords few opportunities for employment other than in farming, light industry, and in the service areas. Thus, the tax base from which education and other public services are funded, is limited. Residents of the area must travel con- siderable distances in order to participate in cultural events. "The educational programs at Woodsville High School are designed to provide experiences for the student that allow him-her the opportunity to develop his-her knowledge, abilities, skills, and in- terests. These experiences, specialized and integrated, encompass an un- derstanding and ap- preciation of today's world beyond the student's im- mediate realn,-a respect for originality and self- expression, and preparation for future endeavors in higher education and the working world. Underlying all of these experiences is an environment which fosters personal growth and a desire for seeking knowledge as a continuing way of life. "Since all students should be enrolled to prepare for either post- secondary schooling or a vocation, Woodsville High School, a comprehensive high school, offers education to students of all ability levels, preparing the individual to function as a productive member of society. In addition to Spanish Trip for all the materials for the On March25, 1982 the house, plus I0 percent of the Spanish classes at Oxbow cost of the materials, paid to High School went to the the Vocational Department at Berkeley Performance Center Oxbow. Presently the class is in Boston, Mass. Students doing "finish" work on the from grades 7-12, ap- interior. The 1981-82 building trades proximately 55 people, went class has 28 students. Two of on the one day, trip. Lynn Bentley, Spanish the students are women, teacher at Oxbow, Doug There are two different Linnell, and Joyce Moore classes everyday, each two served aschaperones. Bentley and one quarter hours long. said that the groups that go, The students also gain ex- "always have a good time." perience in plumbing by doing She also added that "it's a all the plumbing in the house, riot." which is taught by Howard The students saw a South Search. Electrical Services American dance group called, students are responsible for "Don Dines." After that they doing all the electrical wiring and heating. It is taught by George Boyce. Both Search and Beyce are Bradford residents. At the end of the year the building trades class will have completed a house from start to finish, having experience in every phase of building. Because the class is a two year program, it also gives the first year students a chance to build another house the following year. Track Season Opens The Oxbow High School Track and Field Team opened its season this year with its first practice on Monday, March 29. A general meeting was held on Monday, March 22. High School has been selling concerning the confirmation of this practice. Another Easter Carnations since March 14. The sale will con- purpose for the meeting was to tinue through April 6. The discuss the viewing of track flowers cost $1.25 each. films. Coach David Imhoff Customers have a choice of feels that these films will be the following colors: pink, helpful indemonstratingbasic yellow, white, or a cam- running techniques in such bination of white and green, or areas as the start and infield white and blue. The people events. The first meet vs. Hanover who purchase the carnations can have them delivered as is scheduled to take place on long as the person to whom it April 14 at the Dartmouth is to be delivered to is in the indoor track, school. making the individual a self-sustaining being with intellectual curiosity, the program recognizes the importance of equipping the student with the skills necessary to function as a responsible citizen in an ever changing world. "Consistent with the statement of philosophy, Woodsville High School attempts the following objectives: -- "To prepare the student with experiences to help him-her in a career and-or a college education after high school. -- "To provide the student with useful skills in all subject areas. -- "To involve the student in classwork and extracurricular activities. -- "To allow for ex- periences that will broaden the student's self- expression and creative talents. -- "To help the student develop discriminating judgments. -- "To enable the student to recognize the in- terrelationships between various school disciplines. Lancaster, N.H. She is survived by one brother Rev. George H. Welch of Barington R.I., a sister Harriet W. Carter of Littleton and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held Tuesday March 30 at the Hale Funeral Home in Bradford with the Rev. Richard White, pastor of the E. Corinth Congregational Church of- ficiating. Entombment will take place in the Sawyer Tomb Bradford pending spring burial in the family lot in the New Cemetery East Corinth. Donations in her memory may be made to your favorite charity. The Hale Funeral Home of Bradford, Vt. is in charge of arrangements. Lena Howe, 87, dies after long illness TUNBRIDGE-- Lena E. nieces, Blanche E. Fisk and Howe, 87, died Thursday, March 18, in the Berlin Con- valescent Center after a long illness. She was born Dec. 25, 1894 in Tunbridge, the daughter of Perley and Melessey (Cleveland) Moses. She married Herber H. Howe in 1917. After his death she moved to S. Royalton to make her home with her twin brother, Lee E. Moses. She was also a resident of the Chelsea Home for the Aged before entering the Berlin Convalescent Home. Mrs. Howe was a member of the S. Tunbridge Methodist Church and the Tunbridge Market Ladies Aid Society. She is survived by two Mrs. Edward H, Barnaby, both of Tunbridge; three nephews, William L. Moses of Fort Myers, Fla., Everett B. Moses of Tunbridge and Elroy R. Moses of S. Royalton. Funeral services were held at the Tunbridge Congregational Church. Entombment will be in the Riverside Cemetery vault in S. Royalton to await com- mittal in the Button Cemetery in S. Tunbridge. Memorial contributions may be made to the Tunbridge Recreation Association, in care of David Cilley, Tun- bridge, Vt., 05077. The Boardway and Cilley Funeral Home of Chelsea was in charge of arrangements. Obituaries Services planned for Myrtle Mattoon BRADFORD-- Murtle B. member of the Rebekah. Mattoon, 7I, diedJan. 5atthe She is survived by her Winterhaven Hospital in husband Carroll of Bradford Winterhaven, Fla., after a and Winterhaven, Fla.; her long illness, son Gordon of New Haven, She was born April 23, 1910 Ind.; five grandchildren; and in C6rinth the daughter of two brothers, Wallace D. Ernest F. and Julia (Hoyt) Blake ofEastHartford, Conn., Blake. She attended schools in and Lloyd V. Blake of Brad- Corinth and Bradford. ford. On Nov. ll, 1933, she Services Planned married Carroll F. Mattoon. Funeral services will be They had two children, a held on Sunday, April 4 at the daughter Roberta, whodiedin Hale Funeral Home in November, 1975, and a son Bradford. The Rev. John Gordon. Knight will officiate She attended the Bradford Donations may be made to Congregational Church and the American Cancer Society, was a member of their various 13 Loomis St., Montpelier, Vt. organizations. She was also a Clara Langerhans dies W. FAIRLEE-- Clara E. Foundation for the Overseas Langerhans, 72, died at Blind. She spent much timein Hanover Terrace Health Care, Latin America where she after a long illness, organized services for the She was born in Addyville, blind, specially in Chile. Ill., daughter of the Reverend She retired in 1959 and C.L. Langerhans and Amalia moved to W. Fairlee, Vt., (Baltzer) Langerhans. where she was Town Clerk for She graduated from high 17years. school in Hamilton, Ohio, and She leaves several nieces Western College for women in and nephews. Oxford, Ohio and did her post A memorial service and graduate work at Miami committal will be later in the University. spring. She was a social worker by Instead of ' flowers, con- profession, specializing in tributions may be made to the work for the blind, first for the American Heart Association State of Ohio, then for the in care of Mrs. Barbara American Federation for the Sumner, West Fairlee, Vt. Blind and the American 05083. The Godfrey Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Margaret Leighton dies at 87 NEW, BURY-- Margaret active in community affairs. Me.; Kenneth and George Leighton, 87, died Saturday in She was a lifelong member of Putnam, S. Ryegate; Donald Rowan Court Nursing Home in the First Congregational Putnam, Newbbury and Barre following a long illness. Church of Newbury. Charles Kennedy, N. Dux- FOR RENT-- 3 -- "To increase the student's capacity for physical and social development. -- "To help equip the student with a clear un- derstanding of his-her role as an individual. -- "To enable the student to recognize his-her im- portance as a member of the community and as a citizen of his-her nation and world. -- "To provide the student with opportunities that allow for personal growth and desirable social relationships." bedroom. Connnunitv Theatre Born in Newbury, July 13, 1894, she was daughter of Franklin and Mary Elizabeth (Burroughs) Leighton. A teacher by occupation, she had also worked in banks and post offices in the Newbury-Wells River area where she had spent most of her lifetime. During her earlier years, she had been Surviving are five nieces, Ruth Hartshorn, Hollis, N.Y.; Mrs. Paul Tiffany, in Con- necticut; Ethel Putnam, in Massachusetts; Beatrice Putnam, So. Ryegate and Louise Hildreth, Fairfield, Me.; six nephews, George Leighton Jr., in Arkansas; Franklin Leighton, Garfield, * Ecuit+ labor suit settled (continued frompage 1) testify at the NLRB hearing has been reluctant to settle the that would have taken place in (Trunzo) complaint without a White River Jct. on March 25, 'nd-e " hearing before a j g . The according to Trunzo. company says the NLRB has agreed to tell the employees that the company was not in violation of the law when Trunzo was fired. The settlement also in- cluded an agreement from Trunzo that he would not come back to work at the company. According to the official company statement, "The company felt it was better to settle the issue than to go through a long, time- consuming and costly hearing which we are certain would have only confirmed the company's right to maintain discipline and run an efficient, productive operation." Trunzo is an attorney who started his practice during his employment at Equity Publishing Company. Trunzo maintains his law duties were sanctioned by the company and the company maintains he was let go because of the amount of time his practice took away from his office hours. to open Disagreement However. Trunzo said. "No BRADFORD--A Community oe would ever pay $14,000 Theatre will open in Bradford unless they were sure they on Saturday, April 10, 1982 at were going to lose on the the Woods Building. Full merits of their case." Trunzo length films will be shown, charged that the company alternating between agreed to settle in order to children's films and those "avoid any embarrassment" more suitable for adults, to former New Hampshire There will be matinees at governor Meldrim Thomson, 2:00 p.m. and evening shows Jr. at 7:00 p.m., complete with Thomson was subpoenaed to popcorn, candy and soda for sale. Admission will be $1.25 for. matinees and $1.50 for went shopping in Harvard Square in Cambridge and then Although the company to a Mexican restaurant claims union organizing had called, "La Pinata." The nothing to do with the firing of money for this trip was raised evening shows for all ages. Trunzo. MacMaster and by selling candy sticks in The Community Theatre is David Jensen or Deb Burgan Bermudez: Trunzo admits school. Some money for the being run by Vermont East at222-4706. bus was from the foreign language field trip fund. The students paid for their lunch, the performance, and also two dollars each toward the price of the bus. Bentley said that "part of learning language is learning about culture, beyond just speaking In class. She said the trip was, "enjoyed by everyone." Carnations The Junior Class at Oxbow A FUN NEW KOOL-AID" RECIPE fl t#OSDO0 gooI.Al" Bran(] 2 toblespoons sugar Unsweened Soft Dnn V cup water Mix, any flovo J/s Cup m#k loft* drink mix oral Sgr in v in $S $1tr in milk. Serve ot OnCe Or chili oncl Stir beforo r,vr. Mokes I cup Or I serwng Odemorks Of Genem Foos CoDorohon Projects, a vocational and life skills program, that is operated at the old Ag Building in Bradford. Program Director, David Jensen. explained that the Community Theatre will provide employment training for the workers and provide family entertainment in Bradford. "Eight to ten workers will operate the Theatre, including running the film projector, selling tickets, and refreshments. Vermont East Projects staff will train and assist the workers as necessary." Donations The projector that will be used by the Community Theatre has been graciously donated by the Bell and Howell Company in Chicago, Illinois. People who have also been helpful are David Joslyn, Richard Fox, and Susan Spaulding. The Community Theatre still needs a back up projector and volunteers to assist in running the operation. If you're interested, please call that the three were principal The first movie will be Benji organizers behind the effort to with cartoons. Other future unionize the employee s at the movies include the original company. Invasion of the Body Snat- Equity Publishing Company chers, Scarecrow, The Point, is the largest employer in the and Laurel and Hardy. Town of Orford. p Phone 444-2742 Call collect. 5tA ROEBUCK, Woodville, N.H. PIKE IOR[ Pike, N.H I CLEANERS FAIRLEE GENERAL, Fairlee, Vt. ORFORDVlLLE STORE, Orfordvitle, N.H. BATH VARIETY STOR, Both, N.H. GROTON GENERAL STORE, Groton, Vt. yn.r enmnh*tn elnthma care center SOUTH RYEGATE STORE, South Ryegot., Vt+ "For;icl'upam] deiivery service" * WESTERN AUTO l'OREfBrodfrd, Vt. MERRILLS' iHSU RANCE OR:ICE, Lisbon, N.H., bury, and I0 grandnieces and house on Main Street. O'Brien grandnephews. Realty, Bradford, Vt. 802-222- A funeral service will be 4704. 2T--4-7-- announced at a later date. 1975 FI00 FORD PICKUP-- Committal will be in the Standard transmission, Oxbow Cemetery in Newbury. positive traction, 300cc motor, Arrangements are under the + cylinder with cap. Call after direction of tbe Kicker 5 p.m. 603-272-4949. 1T---3- Funeral Home, Birch Lane, 31---c Woodsville, N.H. AUCTION As I am discontinuing milking, I will sell my milking herd at my farm, located on the River Road, Lyme, N.H. Watch for Auction signs. THURSDAY, APRIL 8 STARTING AT 12:30 P.M. 37 HEAD OF AYRSHIRE8 of which 30 are Registered Consisting of: 6 fresh, 8 due April, 4 due May, 3 due July, 1 due August, 2 due Sept. Balance of cows in all stages of lactation. Cattle T.B., blood tested and checked for pregnancy before time of sale. This is a good herd of Ayrshires, with the fresh cows milking good. TERMS CASH OR GOOD CHECK CATALOGS AT RINGSIDE OWNER: IRVIN WILMOT, LYMEo N.H. AUCTIONEERS: C.W. GRAY & SONS, INC. EAST THETFORD, VT. 78,%4348 or 785-2101 R. & D. LUSSIER. LYNDONVILLE, VT. 626-5448 N.H. LICENSE NO. 2140 . , I I To settle the Estate of the late Asa Waterman, we will sell same at the farm, located on the Swiftwater Road, 1 mile from the Cottage Hospital, off Route I0 in Woodsville, N.H. Watch for Auction sigm. SATURDAY, APRIL 10 STARTING AT 10.'30 A.M. FARM MACHINERY Case 870 Agr-King w- bucket, cab, heater & radio; Farmall cub tractor w-single quick hitch; Cub cultivator, Woods 42' lawn mower for Cub, single quick hitch harrow for cub, single hitch plow & 2 row corn planter, Farmall 300 tractor w- loader, needs rear axle; Farmall H tractor, N.H. 470 haybine, N.H. 273 hayliner baler, N.H. 36 flail mower, N.H. 512 PTO spreader w- tailgate, N.H. 718 chopper w- both heads, 3 pt. hitch post hole digger, new Mighty Mac sprayer w- gas engine, Colby forage wagon, fuel tank, trailer, potato planter, potato digger, Easy Flow lime spreader, cement mixer, Kuhn tedder, pinwheel rake, transport harrow, bale loader, cedar posts, hay elevator, potato grader, chicken plucker, 1960 Ford car, rough, portable air compressor, welder, vise, anvil, barrels of oil w- pumps, ladders, lawn mower, space heater, iron furnace front, pony saddle, bull rake, wheelbarrow, milk cans, 8 new rolls of woven wire, barb wire, tractor wind breaker, horse drawn cultivator, platform scales, walking plow, hay hoist, belts, wagon seats, plus small tools used on a farm of this size. 1970 Ford 500 truck w- 17,000 miles, w- 12 ft. factory body TERMS CASH OR GOOD CHECK LUNCH BY, 4-H AUCTIONEERS: C.W. GRAY & SONS, INC. EAST THETFORD, VT. 785-4348 Or 785-2101 R. & D. LUSSIER, LYNDONVILLE, VT. 626-5448 N.H. LICENSE NO. 2140 AUCTIONEERS NOTE: Anyone wishing to buy good equipment, plan to attend this sale. This machinery has been kept under cover and is In very good con- ditions. ADMINISTRATRIX: LEE WATERMAN, WOOD- SVILLE, N.H.