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March 31, 1982     Journal Opinion
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Page 8-The Journal Opinion-March'31, 1982 L DIAMONDS • WATCHES We Rel:)mr ACCUTRON TIMEX and A;! Makes. Littleton, NH 03561 tO03) 444.3351 Fire in Wentworth by MARCELLAHOFFMANN himself to go because of a WENTWORTH-- A fire of recent operation, Ames called unknown origin Saturday Fire Commissioner Clinton night completely destroyed Hutchins. The alarm went out the home which Mr. and lrs. about eight-thirty. The house, John King, Jr., were building" located on a high knoll, was on Buffalo Road. The Kings, almost inaccessible because visiting in Boston this of bad road conditions. weekend, were planning to By the time the firemen move in, in about two weeks, reached the scene, the blaze, The fire was first noticed by whipped by strong winds, was Robert Muzzey who notified out of control. Roy Ames, Fire Chief. Unable Even with Mutual Aid reinforcements from Rum- hey, Warren, and Plymouth, .......... the building could not be saved and the trucks left at about ll:30p.m. The fire is under in- vestigation by the Fire Marshall, the State Police, and Fire Commissioner Hutchins. COUPON NOW OPEN SUNDAYS co¢00 ¸Christ is coming again! We believe: "In the personal and premfllennial and imminent "coming of our Lord Jesus Christ and that this 'Blessed Hope' has a vital bearing on the personal life end service of the believer." You will find o group of believers who or eagerly awaiting His coming at: Sr00ord Fm ¢bw00 Worship Service I 1:00 Sunday School 9:45 ROUTE 5 LOWER PI,AIN Bill Wick, M. l)iv.. Pastor SKIRT OSHKOSH DENIM & PASTELS • Overall1 • Jeans • Skirts • Bib Skirts (Shown) WESTERN SKIRT Sizes 5 to 15 Denim s19o.o W. TOPSHAM-- Kathy Claflin is 16 years old and a junior at Oxbow High School. She earns extra money by caring for and feeding animals at the Cole Farm on Route 25 in W. Topsham. Her duties bring her out to the Cole barn early in the morning and after she arrives home from school in the afternoon. About 6:15 on the evening of March 3, Kathy reported to the Cole barn as usual. But when she opened the barn door and smelled gas fumes, she knew something was amiss. She investigated the fumes and found a leaky gas hose. "I opened the barn door for air.. • I was afraid the gas would kill the cows." Quickly, Kathy began taping the leaky gas line when suddenly she heard a roaring sound and an ex- plosion about three feet behind where she was. "I turned around to find flames leaping to the ceiling," Kathy remembers. Then the ceiling started to burn. Kathy ran to find the nearest water available. Then, she had remembered seeing a fire extinguisher in the barn. She tore the extinguisher from the wall and returned to the fire. Kathy laments, "Burning material was falling all around me as I emptied the extinguisher onto the fire." Finally, when she was sure the fire was out, she ran down to the nearby general store. She asked the owner to go back to the barn with her and check things over. He went with her and then suggested it best to call the fire department. Kathy explained to the fire chief what had happened and asked them to get in touch with the Coles in Newbury. Because Kathy had suffered burns, she asked the fire chief to tell the Coles the animals had not been fed. She said, "I had burns on my arms and hands and couldn't do it myself." After Kathy was sure the animals were being taken care of, she went hack to the store and soaked her burns in cold water. When her parents arrived, they took her to the doctor for medical treatment. Ann Cole, owner of the farm later said, "Kathy called me when she returned from the doctor. She wanted to be sure that we had gotten the message." Cole continued, "Kathy also wanted to be sure that the animals had been fed." Kathy said she hoped that we didn't feel that she was responsible for the fire. "I don't think it occurred to her even once that she actually, and without even thinking about it, risked her life to save the animals, therefore, also saving the buildings," Cole said. Kathy later told Cole, "My first impulse was to get out. But, somehow I just didn't". 'I never really realized hew important a fire extinguisher could be. I will always have one available". After a bit of investigating, the Coles discovered that the explosion was strong enough to cause windows to be blown out, and a roll door that had three feet of snow against it was lifted off the roller carriage. Fire damage itself was minimal, thanks to Kathy. The Coles have known Kathy a long time and say they have always felt that she was quite a gal. "The way she handled this situation only enforces our admiration for her", said Ann Cole. She continued, "Kathy Claflin had risked her life and saved a barn full of animals on that Wednesday evening. She has burned hands and arms, and singed hair and clothing. We have the aninals and their buildings, but most of all we all still have Kathy." Kath+ Claflin of lVest Topsham I, Hearings planned to view state's electricity future Saves farm animals t :!iiiii!!i!ii: KATHY WITH HER FAVORITE HORSE-- Kathy stands next to her favorite horse at the Cole Farm in MONTPELIER-- The Ver- The DPS has prepared a Residential electric mont Department of Public fact paper, Electric Power in customers, the business and Service, in cooperation with Vermont, to serve as a basis industrial community, the Vermont Association of for informed comment at the electric utilities and energy March and April public providers, state and local hearings. Copies of the paper government officials, and are available from the DPS in interested organizations are Montpelier or at the offices of urged to present their views at the regional planning and these hearings. development agencies in To allocate the available Montpelier, Middlebury, heai'ing time fairly, the DPS Arlington, Essex Junction, will pre-reglster persons and Morrisville, St. Johnsbury, organizations planning to Woodstock, Rutland, Windsor, testify. Pre-registrations for Brattleboro, and Lebanon, any of the March-April N.H. hearings may be made by Choices Not Simple telephoning (800) 622-4496 toll- "The future prosperity of free. Organizations are asked , PSB hearb00 (continued from page 1 ) representatives, "We are not a faceless society, we are human beings... I just want to know where this all will end." The crowd, at times, could have been described as somewhat hostile toward the CVPS officials and toward the officials from the PSB. Fresh charges and shared sen- timents against the utility often brought cheers and hoots from the crowd. Near the end of the question and answer session that followed the hearing, Rush- ford, heavily perspiring, found himself apologizing for not being able to answer many of the questions. Kopsack, his partner, said, "This issue is a very technical and com- plicated one in which there are many departments." He defended the company's position, praised its con- servation efforts and told the group that if their questions could not be satisfied at the hearing he would dohis best to provide them with the requested information. This brought little sympathy from the crowd. One woman yelled, "You can't fool us... we're better informed now." What's Next? Public Service Department attorney Anderson told the Journal Opinion that within the next week he expects his department to file its ob- jections against the rate in- crease with the PSB. Technical hearings for the rate hike are expected to begin in May and will he held in Montpelier. Last week's Bradford public hearing was reportedly called at the request of the Newbury based community advocacy group, POWR Valley. Testimony recorded at the meeting by three court stenographers is expected to be used in later PSB hearings ! HAVERHH00 COURT REPORT WOODSVILLE--The week of March 22, Justice Karl T. Bruckner presided over the following cases in Haverhill District Court. Marc H. Krulewitz, 34, Wells River, was charged with operating a motor at a greater than reasonable speed. He pleaded not guilty, was found guilty and fined $50.00, $20.00 of which was suspended, plus a penalty assessment of $3.00. James E. Kinne, 45, Lisbon, was charged with soliciting a ride from persons in vehicles. He pleaded guilty and found guilty, and fined $25.00 and a penalty assessment of $2.50. I Planning and Development Agencies, will hold a series of hearingd around the state during March and April to solicit the views of Ver- monters on the state's electric powm- future, The DPS is charged with developing a Twenty Year Electric Power Plan for Vermont. The Plan will serve s a basis for state policy affecting electric utility in- vestments, financing, siting and construction of generation Vermont depends on the to limit themselves to one and transmission facilities, electric energy options we presentation atanyhearingso and electric power purchases, choose during the next few that a diversity of views can A draft of the plan is scheduled to be completed in Nov. 1982, with a second round of public hearings to follow in Dec. 1982 and Jan. 1983. A final version of the plan will be adopted by the DPS by Feb. 1, 1983. Public Hearings The current round of public hearings includes the following: March 30 at St. Margaret Mary parish hall, Arlington, _ 7:00p.m. ="  March 31 at the Pavilion auditorium, Montpelier, 7:30 p.m.  April 5 at Hartford High School cafeteria, White River Junction, 7:30 p.m. April 15 at Bellows Falls Union High School cafeteria, Bellows Falls, 7:30 p.m. April 21 at Essex Junction High School cafeteria, Essex Junction, 7: 30 p.m. April 22 at Otter Valley Union High School cafeteria, Brandon, 7:30 p.m. April 27 at Lyndon Institute auditorium, Lyndon Center, 7:30p.m. suggested that the volunteers form the council themselves and added that the council might even 'elect Dunlap as their chairman• "This is probably a great idea," selectman Gibbs told Dunlap, "but I think this is something you could do without us appointing you." "Don't "you care about the years," said Lawrence D. be heard. Copp, DPS Director of Written comments and Planning. "Those choices will testimony are encouraged and not he simple, and many of may be submitted at the them will involve difficult hearings or mailed to the trade-offs. At this stage of the Department of Public Service, planning process, we need to Division of Planning, 120 State hear what Vermonters' Street, Montpelier 05602. concerns and priorities ar$ Written comments should be and what choices will be most submitted before May 1. acceptable to them." * Bradford selectmen name (eontlnuf, from page 1) residents who had volupteered the town s swimming to serve on a re-awakened program coordinator, recreation council (an inac- Recreation Council rive group for a number of Jells' position was formerly years), known as recreation program Dunlap called for the chairman, but the selectmen, selectmen to name her as noting that most, if not all, of chairman of the group that she the town's recreation budget said would act to coordinate goes toward the swimming recreational activities in the program, clumged the title to town. swimming program coor- Bearing in mind the dinator, selectmen had just abolished Immediately followingtbeir the council, Brainerd told decision on the matter, Dunlap, "Since there is really Bradford resident Connie no money in the (recreation) Dunlap appeared at the budget after the swimming meeting to tell the selectmen program anway... I don't see that she hada list of six other why you need us." He kids in this town?" asked Dunlap. The selectmen said they did. Dunlap charged that selectmen were refusing to sanction recreation in the Town of Bradford. Gibbs said he wished her and the com- mittee "good luck." Other Business In other business, the selectmen discussed the preparation of specifications for the slate roof to be replaced on the Bradford Public Library. They also signed their yearly agreement with II II I II _ III II COMMERCIAL- RESIDENTIAL CARPET! CARPET! SAVE ON EVERY ROLL OUR ENTIRE INVENTORY IS NOW RE[)UCED! Community Health Services, $700 LOTTERY WINNER Inc. for health care in the ORFORD-- Barbara J. town. Sleeper of Orford has been named as a $700 winner in the latest drawing of the New IRESTING FACT "Hampshire Sweepstakes• In 1978, nearly 24 percent of Sleeper purchased her win- all restaurant orders were for ning ticket at the Orfordville hamburgers. General Store in Orfordville. 30% OFF! RUBBERBACK AND JUTE BACK, REGULARLY PRICED FROM $5.99 TO $16.99, LEVEL LOOPS, BERBERS AND SAXONYS, HUNDREDS OF ROLLS, HUNDREDS OF COLORS, EVERY SOUARE YARD OF CARPET IN STOCK IS REDUCED BY 30%. SAVE NOW WHILE SELECTION IS STILL EXCELLENT. FREE ESTIMATES GLADLY GIVEN Now Thru April lOth Only ,U.N,.O., AND CARPET BRADFORD, VT. Z-STS8 I I II II I IIII II I IIII IIIII II I Baseball Season begins Baseball Season has started at WHS. The pitchers and catchers have begun to warm up their arms for this season. The Engineers will be under the direction of a new coach, Tim Whalen. The first game will be at Oxbow against the Olympians when and if the snow melts. Softball practice The WHS softball team has started practicing for the '82 season. The team, coached by Steve Walker, consists of Seniors the co-captains Lisa and Leslie Strickiand and Kathy Patoine; Juniors are Trish Demers, Sandy Boyce, Sue Whalen, Dora Boutin, Gerry Boudreault (who has been disabled with a broken finger), Tracy Bumford, and Theo Simpson; Sophomores are Cheryl Cardin, Bonnie Boyce. The freshmen are Bully Demers, Greta Briggeman, Nancy Fabrizio, and Lisa Driscoll. The team still has three weeks of pre- season to get ready for their tough schedule. Student ReeogniUon Banquet The annual Student Recognition Banquet will be next Saturday, April 3, at the Woodsville Community Building at 6:00 p.m. The guest speaker is Thomas Heinsohn, former Celtic great and coach. It is a roast beef dinner. Tickets are $5 for adults and $3.50 under 12. Tickets are on sale at the WHS Guidance office. The banquet is sponsored by the Woodsville Area Booster Club and recognizes excellence in many extra-curricular areas. National Honor Society The National Honor Society recently had a meeting. Many different topics were brought up. The Honor Society is planning a Citizens for Scholarship program. Plans are also underway for a Bookstore redecoration. We will once again sponsor a National Honor Society Scholarship for a graduating senior. QUOTE "The most momentuous events of history are always things accomplished that had been held to he impossible." Pestalozzi ALL YOU NEED FOR MINOR ITCHF.S AND RASHES. New Hampshire YMCA Last weekend WHS sent two students, Mark Wheeler and Mike Fresolone, to the New Hampshire Youth in Gover- nment program in Concord. This program is run by the New Hampshire YMCA and its purpose is to create a model state government. The youth governor was Lincoln Rohertson from Keene. The program was very successful and the use of the State House was very enjoyable. Mr. Kent Riach, history teacher at WHS made the program available to the students. North Country Music Festival Last Friday, March 26, selected members of the band and chorus went to Berlin High School to participate in the North Country Music Festival. The concert took place at 7:30 that evening. Those who were chosen to participate were Ginny Englert, Gina Eastman, Jon Clough, Jim Batchelder, Pete Simano, Lisa Hall, Sylvia Fournier, Barb Whitney, Susie Whalen, Dawn Sellinger, Tim Sackett, Lew Bancroft, Andrea Smith, Sarah Byrne, Kim Blake, Mark Wheeler, Danny Kieth, Nancy Hehre, Karla Lane, Bruce Simonds, and Paul Eastman. These students spent all day at Berlin High preparing for the evening's concert. The previous weekend, the Band and Chorus put on an ex- change concert with Lincoln Academy from Newcastle, Maine. The concert was Saturday evening. Everyone enjoyed skiing at Monteau on Saturday and the concert was a great success. A lot of new friendswere made and everyone who participated is looking for- ward to the second half of the exchange -- a visit to Newcastle, a concert, and sailing. WHS Drama Club The WHS Drama Club will present their annual spring play o Thursday; Apr, il I. The play is "The Lottery, based on a short story by Shirley Jackson. Tickets are available at the door of the Community Building. The Drama Club has been working very hard and this promises to be a fine .production. Congratulations l Congratulations to Ron Magoon who has been ac- cepted at St. Anselm College, Mike Aldrich, Ron Magoon, Jen Clough, and Lisa Hall who have been accepted at UNH and especially to Jon Thor- nton, a sophomore from N. Haverhilll who came in second, .and on the winning team at the Eastern Regionals of the NYI Festival of Life road race held at Eastern Nazarene College in Quincy, Mass. ( pkote by m-" Two -weeks sponsored a at New Capt. Vie assistants from Hampshire They teach the way of job communicate themselves job applications techniques. his own resume future reference the materials. The two day handled throug English classes seventh period classes. A the National write United was presented periods c On WednesdaY, WHS enjoyed  by Tom Eslicg. perceptive chosen by Magazine as in has four market. Eslick blended music expertly performer he ability into his distinct dexterity on string Between songS: history of the amusing last one. New England Arts. 0 1982 Dorse: Sandoz Inc Page 8-The Journal Opinion-March'31, 1982 L DIAMONDS • WATCHES We Rel:)mr ACCUTRON TIMEX and A;! Makes. Littleton, NH 03561 tO03) 444.3351 Fire in Wentworth by MARCELLAHOFFMANN himself to go because of a WENTWORTH-- A fire of recent operation, Ames called unknown origin Saturday Fire Commissioner Clinton night completely destroyed Hutchins. The alarm went out the home which Mr. and lrs. about eight-thirty. The house, John King, Jr., were building" located on a high knoll, was on Buffalo Road. The Kings, almost inaccessible because visiting in Boston this of bad road conditions. weekend, were planning to By the time the firemen move in, in about two weeks, reached the scene, the blaze, The fire was first noticed by whipped by strong winds, was Robert Muzzey who notified out of control. Roy Ames, Fire Chief. Unable Even with Mutual Aid reinforcements from Rum- hey, Warren, and Plymouth, .......... the building could not be saved and the trucks left at about ll:30p.m. The fire is under in- vestigation by the Fire Marshall, the State Police, and Fire Commissioner Hutchins. COUPON NOW OPEN SUNDAYS co¢00 ¸Christ is coming again! We believe: "In the personal and premfllennial and imminent "coming of our Lord Jesus Christ and that this 'Blessed Hope' has a vital bearing on the personal life end service of the believer." You will find o group of believers who or eagerly awaiting His coming at: Sr00ord Fm ¢bw00 Worship Service I 1:00 Sunday School 9:45 ROUTE 5 LOWER PI,AIN Bill Wick, M. l)iv.. Pastor SKIRT OSHKOSH DENIM & PASTELS • Overall1 • Jeans • Skirts • Bib Skirts (Shown) WESTERN SKIRT Sizes 5 to 15 Denim s19o.o W. TOPSHAM-- Kathy Claflin is 16 years old and a junior at Oxbow High School. She earns extra money by caring for and feeding animals at the Cole Farm on Route 25 in W. Topsham. Her duties bring her out to the Cole barn early in the morning and after she arrives home from school in the afternoon. About 6:15 on the evening of March 3, Kathy reported to the Cole barn as usual. But when she opened the barn door and smelled gas fumes, she knew something was amiss. She investigated the fumes and found a leaky gas hose. "I opened the barn door for air.. • I was afraid the gas would kill the cows." Quickly, Kathy began taping the leaky gas line when suddenly she heard a roaring sound and an ex- plosion about three feet behind where she was. "I turned around to find flames leaping to the ceiling," Kathy remembers. Then the ceiling started to burn. Kathy ran to find the nearest water available. Then, she had remembered seeing a fire extinguisher in the barn. She tore the extinguisher from the wall and returned to the fire. Kathy laments, "Burning material was falling all around me as I emptied the extinguisher onto the fire." Finally, when she was sure the fire was out, she ran down to the nearby general store. She asked the owner to go back to the barn with her and check things over. He went with her and then suggested it best to call the fire department. Kathy explained to the fire chief what had happened and asked them to get in touch with the Coles in Newbury. Because Kathy had suffered burns, she asked the fire chief to tell the Coles the animals had not been fed. She said, "I had burns on my arms and hands and couldn't do it myself." After Kathy was sure the animals were being taken care of, she went hack to the store and soaked her burns in cold water. When her parents arrived, they took her to the doctor for medical treatment. Ann Cole, owner of the farm later said, "Kathy called me when she returned from the doctor. She wanted to be sure that we had gotten the message." Cole continued, "Kathy also wanted to be sure that the animals had been fed." Kathy said she hoped that we didn't feel that she was responsible for the fire. "I don't think it occurred to her even once that she actually, and without even thinking about it, risked her life to save the animals, therefore, also saving the buildings," Cole said. Kathy later told Cole, "My first impulse was to get out. But, somehow I just didn't". 'I never really realized hew important a fire extinguisher could be. I will always have one available". After a bit of investigating, the Coles discovered that the explosion was strong enough to cause windows to be blown out, and a roll door that had three feet of snow against it was lifted off the roller carriage. Fire damage itself was minimal, thanks to Kathy. The Coles have known Kathy a long time and say they have always felt that she was quite a gal. "The way she handled this situation only enforces our admiration for her", said Ann Cole. She continued, "Kathy Claflin had risked her life and saved a barn full of animals on that Wednesday evening. She has burned hands and arms, and singed hair and clothing. We have the aninals and their buildings, but most of all we all still have Kathy." Kath+ Claflin of lVest Topsham I, Hearings planned to view state's electricity future Saves farm animals t :!iiiii!!i!ii: KATHY WITH HER FAVORITE HORSE-- Kathy stands next to her favorite horse at the Cole Farm in MONTPELIER-- The Ver- The DPS has prepared a Residential electric mont Department of Public fact paper, Electric Power in customers, the business and Service, in cooperation with Vermont, to serve as a basis industrial community, the Vermont Association of for informed comment at the electric utilities and energy March and April public providers, state and local hearings. Copies of the paper government officials, and are available from the DPS in interested organizations are Montpelier or at the offices of urged to present their views at the regional planning and these hearings. development agencies in To allocate the available Montpelier, Middlebury, heai'ing time fairly, the DPS Arlington, Essex Junction, will pre-reglster persons and Morrisville, St. Johnsbury, organizations planning to Woodstock, Rutland, Windsor, testify. Pre-registrations for Brattleboro, and Lebanon, any of the March-April N.H. hearings may be made by Choices Not Simple telephoning (800) 622-4496 toll- "The future prosperity of free. Organizations are asked , PSB hearb00 (continued from page 1 ) representatives, "We are not a faceless society, we are human beings... I just want to know where this all will end." The crowd, at times, could have been described as somewhat hostile toward the CVPS officials and toward the officials from the PSB. Fresh charges and shared sen- timents against the utility often brought cheers and hoots from the crowd. Near the end of the question and answer session that followed the hearing, Rush- ford, heavily perspiring, found himself apologizing for not being able to answer many of the questions. Kopsack, his partner, said, "This issue is a very technical and com- plicated one in which there are many departments." He defended the company's position, praised its con- servation efforts and told the group that if their questions could not be satisfied at the hearing he would dohis best to provide them with the requested information. This brought little sympathy from the crowd. One woman yelled, "You can't fool us... we're better informed now." What's Next? Public Service Department attorney Anderson told the Journal Opinion that within the next week he expects his department to file its ob- jections against the rate in- crease with the PSB. Technical hearings for the rate hike are expected to begin in May and will he held in Montpelier. Last week's Bradford public hearing was reportedly called at the request of the Newbury based community advocacy group, POWR Valley. Testimony recorded at the meeting by three court stenographers is expected to be used in later PSB hearings ! HAVERHH00 COURT REPORT WOODSVILLE--The week of March 22, Justice Karl T. Bruckner presided over the following cases in Haverhill District Court. Marc H. Krulewitz, 34, Wells River, was charged with operating a motor at a greater than reasonable speed. He pleaded not guilty, was found guilty and fined $50.00, $20.00 of which was suspended, plus a penalty assessment of $3.00. James E. Kinne, 45, Lisbon, was charged with soliciting a ride from persons in vehicles. He pleaded guilty and found guilty, and fined $25.00 and a penalty assessment of $2.50. I Planning and Development Agencies, will hold a series of hearingd around the state during March and April to solicit the views of Ver- monters on the state's electric powm- future, The DPS is charged with developing a Twenty Year Electric Power Plan for Vermont. The Plan will serve s a basis for state policy affecting electric utility in- vestments, financing, siting and construction of generation Vermont depends on the to limit themselves to one and transmission facilities, electric energy options we presentation atanyhearingso and electric power purchases, choose during the next few that a diversity of views can A draft of the plan is scheduled to be completed in Nov. 1982, with a second round of public hearings to follow in Dec. 1982 and Jan. 1983. A final version of the plan will be adopted by the DPS by Feb. 1, 1983. Public Hearings The current round of public hearings includes the following: March 30 at St. Margaret Mary parish hall, Arlington, _ 7:00p.m. ="  March 31 at the Pavilion auditorium, Montpelier, 7:30 p.m.  April 5 at Hartford High School cafeteria, White River Junction, 7:30 p.m. April 15 at Bellows Falls Union High School cafeteria, Bellows Falls, 7:30 p.m. April 21 at Essex Junction High School cafeteria, Essex Junction, 7: 30 p.m. April 22 at Otter Valley Union High School cafeteria, Brandon, 7:30 p.m. April 27 at Lyndon Institute auditorium, Lyndon Center, 7:30p.m. suggested that the volunteers form the council themselves and added that the council might even 'elect Dunlap as their chairman• "This is probably a great idea," selectman Gibbs told Dunlap, "but I think this is something you could do without us appointing you." "Don't "you care about the years," said Lawrence D. be heard. Copp, DPS Director of Written comments and Planning. "Those choices will testimony are encouraged and not he simple, and many of may be submitted at the them will involve difficult hearings or mailed to the trade-offs. At this stage of the Department of Public Service, planning process, we need to Division of Planning, 120 State hear what Vermonters' Street, Montpelier 05602. concerns and priorities ar$ Written comments should be and what choices will be most submitted before May 1. acceptable to them." * Bradford selectmen name (eontlnuf, from page 1) residents who had volupteered the town s swimming to serve on a re-awakened program coordinator, recreation council (an inac- Recreation Council rive group for a number of Jells' position was formerly years), known as recreation program Dunlap called for the chairman, but the selectmen, selectmen to name her as noting that most, if not all, of chairman of the group that she the town's recreation budget said would act to coordinate goes toward the swimming recreational activities in the program, clumged the title to town. swimming program coor- Bearing in mind the dinator, selectmen had just abolished Immediately followingtbeir the council, Brainerd told decision on the matter, Dunlap, "Since there is really Bradford resident Connie no money in the (recreation) Dunlap appeared at the budget after the swimming meeting to tell the selectmen program anway... I don't see that she hada list of six other why you need us." He kids in this town?" asked Dunlap. The selectmen said they did. Dunlap charged that selectmen were refusing to sanction recreation in the Town of Bradford. Gibbs said he wished her and the com- mittee "good luck." Other Business In other business, the selectmen discussed the preparation of specifications for the slate roof to be replaced on the Bradford Public Library. They also signed their yearly agreement with II II I II _ III II COMMERCIAL- RESIDENTIAL CARPET! CARPET! SAVE ON EVERY ROLL OUR ENTIRE INVENTORY IS NOW RE[)UCED! Community Health Services, $700 LOTTERY WINNER Inc. for health care in the ORFORD-- Barbara J. town. Sleeper of Orford has been named as a $700 winner in the latest drawing of the New IRESTING FACT "Hampshire Sweepstakes• In 1978, nearly 24 percent of Sleeper purchased her win- all restaurant orders were for ning ticket at the Orfordville hamburgers. General Store in Orfordville. 30% OFF! RUBBERBACK AND JUTE BACK, REGULARLY PRICED FROM $5.99 TO $16.99, LEVEL LOOPS, BERBERS AND SAXONYS, HUNDREDS OF ROLLS, HUNDREDS OF COLORS, EVERY SOUARE YARD OF CARPET IN STOCK IS REDUCED BY 30%. SAVE NOW WHILE SELECTION IS STILL EXCELLENT. FREE ESTIMATES GLADLY GIVEN Now Thru April lOth Only ,U.N,.O., AND CARPET BRADFORD, VT. Z-STS8 I I II II I IIII II I IIII IIIII II I Baseball Season begins Baseball Season has started at WHS. The pitchers and catchers have begun to warm up their arms for this season. The Engineers will be under the direction of a new coach, Tim Whalen. The first game will be at Oxbow against the Olympians when and if the snow melts. Softball practice The WHS softball team has started practicing for the '82 season. The team, coached by Steve Walker, consists of Seniors the co-captains Lisa and Leslie Strickiand and Kathy Patoine; Juniors are Trish Demers, Sandy Boyce, Sue Whalen, Dora Boutin, Gerry Boudreault (who has been disabled with a broken finger), Tracy Bumford, and Theo Simpson; Sophomores are Cheryl Cardin, Bonnie Boyce. The freshmen are Bully Demers, Greta Briggeman, Nancy Fabrizio, and Lisa Driscoll. The team still has three weeks of pre- season to get ready for their tough schedule. Student ReeogniUon Banquet The annual Student Recognition Banquet will be next Saturday, April 3, at the Woodsville Community Building at 6:00 p.m. The guest speaker is Thomas Heinsohn, former Celtic great and coach. It is a roast beef dinner. Tickets are $5 for adults and $3.50 under 12. Tickets are on sale at the WHS Guidance office. The banquet is sponsored by the Woodsville Area Booster Club and recognizes excellence in many extra-curricular areas. National Honor Society The National Honor Society recently had a meeting. Many different topics were brought up. The Honor Society is planning a Citizens for Scholarship program. Plans are also underway for a Bookstore redecoration. We will once again sponsor a National Honor Society Scholarship for a graduating senior. QUOTE "The most momentuous events of history are always things accomplished that had been held to he impossible." Pestalozzi ALL YOU NEED FOR MINOR ITCHF.S AND RASHES. New Hampshire YMCA Last weekend WHS sent two students, Mark Wheeler and Mike Fresolone, to the New Hampshire Youth in Gover- nment program in Concord. This program is run by the New Hampshire YMCA and its purpose is to create a model state government. The youth governor was Lincoln Rohertson from Keene. The program was very successful and the use of the State House was very enjoyable. Mr. Kent Riach, history teacher at WHS made the program available to the students. North Country Music Festival Last Friday, March 26, selected members of the band and chorus went to Berlin High School to participate in the North Country Music Festival. The concert took place at 7:30 that evening. Those who were chosen to participate were Ginny Englert, Gina Eastman, Jon Clough, Jim Batchelder, Pete Simano, Lisa Hall, Sylvia Fournier, Barb Whitney, Susie Whalen, Dawn Sellinger, Tim Sackett, Lew Bancroft, Andrea Smith, Sarah Byrne, Kim Blake, Mark Wheeler, Danny Kieth, Nancy Hehre, Karla Lane, Bruce Simonds, and Paul Eastman. These students spent all day at Berlin High preparing for the evening's concert. The previous weekend, the Band and Chorus put on an ex- change concert with Lincoln Academy from Newcastle, Maine. The concert was Saturday evening. Everyone enjoyed skiing at Monteau on Saturday and the concert was a great success. A lot of new friendswere made and everyone who participated is looking for- ward to the second half of the exchange -- a visit to Newcastle, a concert, and sailing. WHS Drama Club The WHS Drama Club will present their annual spring play o Thursday; Apr, il I. The play is "The Lottery, based on a short story by Shirley Jackson. Tickets are available at the door of the Community Building. The Drama Club has been working very hard and this promises to be a fine .production. Congratulations l Congratulations to Ron Magoon who has been ac- cepted at St. Anselm College, Mike Aldrich, Ron Magoon, Jen Clough, and Lisa Hall who have been accepted at UNH and especially to Jon Thor- nton, a sophomore from N. Haverhilll who came in second, .and on the winning team at the Eastern Regionals of the NYI Festival of Life road race held at Eastern Nazarene College in Quincy, Mass. ( pkote by m-" Two -weeks sponsored a at New Capt. Vie assistants from Hampshire They teach the way of job communicate themselves job applications techniques. his own resume future reference the materials. The two day handled throug English classes seventh period classes. A the National write United was presented periods c On WednesdaY, WHS enjoyed  by Tom Eslicg. perceptive chosen by Magazine as in has four market. Eslick blended music expertly performer he ability into his distinct dexterity on string Between songS: history of the amusing last one. New England Arts. 0 1982 Dorse: Sandoz Inc