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March 31, 1982     Journal Opinion
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oak! It's a btrd," tt's" a plane, e !t's Q eUETZALCOATLUS! i!ur tloi , '" " " " "" i o  Ulyin; bar lthe " " " lof ny:t knst whblind ' theworld u,l,l w ve fossil thermal updrafts, it stayed in enlarged to life size. To make 11o w o rag, tirnbilriianth ibnece gliaitonb ;lmt bnue adeleled' hfe:e;trtleopiaQU?t edufsthmediCeasaoC no Vfrheme h ha Upper the air all day with very little the model more dynamic than with malevolent gold and beast is neither a bird nor a Cretaceous period, dating expenditure of energy and, the usual pterosaur recon- a black eyes tilted to one side. figment of a movie script- Quet- back 65 million years, we're when it landed, it walked struction, Harrison decided to Washington, D.C. Posed in a At first glance, it may seem writer's imagination. It is a record--twice as large as any zaleoatlus begins in 1784 when now finding traces of this big around upright on its back depict it'i a gentle, banking bird that ever lived. Cosimo Cellini, a secretary to animal," Dr. Kevin Padian legs like a bird. dive. The creature'sdoublename Voltaire, first reported the says. A University of The Smithsonian Quet- The big Quetzaleoatlus galleries which opened Dec. 4, 1981, at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. Smithsonian News Service Photos by Chip Clark flying animal in the history of life, northropi, has a permanent home skylight in the new paleontology refers to the serpentine Aztec god (Quetzalcoatl) and to the Northrop Flying Wing, an experimental airplane. The Smithsonian's animal, the first full-scale reconstruction of Quetzalcoatlus, represents the latest scientific thinking about the anatomy and lifestyle of these long-extinct flying reptiles. Imagine Quetzalcoatlus swooping down and alighting in a dinosaur hall. If it folded its wings about its large furry body and stood erect like a giant pelican on its strong, slender, long back legs, it would be tall enough to look many of the Smithsonain's big dinosaurs directly in the eye. In its lifetime, Quet- zaleoatlus would certainly have been familiar with the dinosaurs, even if it didn't see eye-to-eye with them. Flying reptiles of all sizes called pterosaurs--some as small as sparrows, others with wingspans of 20 feet or more--were flying the skies during the age of dinosaurs. Both pterosaurs and dinosaurs evolved from an earlier common reptilian ancestor, both lived during the same era and both disappeared at the discovery of pterosaur fossils in a limestone quarry near the Bavarian village of Eichstatt. Cellini thought they were the remains of an amphibious mammal. It wasn't until the turn of this century that the fossils were established to be "ttiose of flying reptiles. Pterosaur remains have since been found on every continent except Antarctica. In the United States, the chalk deposits of western Kansas are a great pterosaur fossil- hunting ground. Still, no one suspected that pterosaurs had grown to such gigantic size until 10 years ago, when a Texas Memorial Museum field party under the direction of Dr. Warm Langston turned up the massive fossilized pterosaur wing bones of Quetzalcoatlus in Big Bend National Park in west Texas. Later, similar but smaller bones thought to be those of Quetzaicoatlus juveniles were found elsewhere in the park. Additional fragmentary material has also been recorded from Montana, Canada and the Middle Eastern kingdom of Jordan. "Everywhere throughout California at Berkeley paleobiologist, Padian is a pterosaur authority who, in addition to Langston, advised the Smithsonian on its exhibit project. The Smithsonian model reflects recent advances in the understanding of pterosaur biology and aerodynamics. Not too long ago, scientists believed that a pterosaur's wings were attached to both its front and back legs. Looking at the creature in this way, scientists found it dif- ficult to understand how it flapped its wings and became airborne. One popular theory held that it launched itself off cliffs and glided, flopping around on four legs like a bat when it landed. Padian and a number of other scientists dismiss this theory. They believe that the wings were only attached to the front legs and that Quetzalcoatlus was a soaring animal, a superb flying machine as perfectly adapted to the air as birds. When the sun warmed the earth to create a thermal updraft, the reptile jumped off the ground, flapped its powerful wings a few times and took off. Riding zalcoatlus model will never be put to the test of taking off and landing, but simply to make it biologically and aerodynamically plausible in "flight" took more than a year of work and a great deal of thought by Smithsonian scientists and modelmakers. Dr. Jessica Harrison, a paleontologist working on the development of the Smithsonain's new dinosaur hall, went to Texas in late 1979 to research and photograph Quetzalcoatlus fossils. Because there was so little data to work with, she had to use what she calls "educated guesswork," drawing on such disparate fields of study as physics, biology, aeronautical engineering, comparative anatomy and even ar- chitecture. Harrison worked with Walter Sorrell, supervisor of the Smithsonian model shop, to produce a large, detailed wood and fiberglass model--built on a scale of 2 inches to a foot. After some modifications based on suggestions offered by Padian (he thought the neck was too long), the museum had a pterosaur that could be model was constructed in three sections--body and neck, wings and head. It had to be engineered to be light and strong so it could be suspended in the air without sagging. Modelmakers Bruce Hough and Ben Snouffer tackled the body and neck first, making a hollow wire mannequin and covering it with fiberglass. Next, they worked on the wings, the most time-consuming and difficult part of the project. The wing bones of the pterosaur are one of the most distinctive features of its anatomy. Supporting the wing membranes, these bones are an evolutionary variation of the forelimb of an earthbound animal that walked on all fours. The inner wing bone, or humerous, linked the inner wing to the muscular body. The radius and ulna, the outer wing bones, were attached to a wrist and four fingers. The fourth finger was unique. It was greatly elongated--up to 8 feet--and supported as much as half of the length of the wing membrpne. Hough and Snouffer con- (please turn to page 3A) - 1 TODAY'S CHUCKLE e war between the  Will never be won. :h acre's too much raternizlng with the 13 CIRCULATING IM: NIW HAMPSWIB| -- tyme, Lyme Center, Orford, Orfordville, Piermont, Haverhill, Haverhill Center, Haverhill Comer, North Haverhill, East Haverhill, Pike, Woodsville, Bath, Monroe, Lisbon, Landaff, Benton. Lvman, Warren, Glencliff, Wentworth . . . ViltMONT -- Thetford, East Thefford, Thefford Hill, Thetford Center, North Thetford, Post Mills, Foirlee, West Foirleo, Bradford, Bradford Village, Corinth; East Corinth, Topsham, West Topsham, Newbury Village, South Newbury, West Nowbury, Wells River, Gmton, Ryegate Comer, East Ryegate, South Ryegate, Peacham, Bomet, West nomet. Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont THIS WEEK'S PRESS RUN .10,120 i I March 31, 1982 t.,lL. " AR DR VERS' SSOC ON 0 AME C 01  i ore and xnore apparent the value and r[at in the fact w'e have a nationwide .I i'.ling Canadian associates) . . . a network Through our members, we can reach Wic area in North America. iti,JL t. an example of how our members help one .h-tsePararated by thousands of miles. Several t-v. :'mt an ad they had read and literature they ai ._1. ,,, Stl; ti /. t  let 72 MPG on my 1973 Ford Station Wagon e !i[t'l. ,, agiae... my system is simple and will work , ][ay, terature from Mr. Gloss said, in part: p4,,.  and I believe that it will work on any [1 r.teL_.mjected or diesels. That I'm working on  .'gues look feasible e.lte of the system is" to totally vaporize the t ga Vapor that does not condense, similar to tt,tl tOve. This eliminates the burning of the atdt' =rmally found in t .oda.ys carlos. Unburned a flnEpolY a'a sinlple" It will fit in any car, aN is com- e ,Ivy, a metering pump and 12 volt electric qt uel_ flow, a vaporizer, and a distribution  t at the standard curb. It is an add on and [k :"  ra the standard to the high mileage and it ill he available in a couple of weeks if ]lte: Inns and parts list will be $35:00 and the ].nulstructior is $350.00 plus freight."  zip cod book and map, we identified \\;tbrs in the St. Dora, area. We asked aWuldcntactMr'Glssandevaluate The arrival of sprin00 'e Lae f weeks, this answer came back: .-.'Phe n: t. address), is empty and has a for sale '"telh'nghbrssayhemvedoutatChristmas marked by tappin00 4ean_Yoae where he was going. In checking /, /1  yo., he was there about six months and ' ''.O. Box and found it registered in the Vermont maple tree "'=" -' (religions) organization from Vermont maple facts Vermont has an ideal climate for growing sugar maple trees; an ideal climate for good sap flow; and a syrup making know-how which has been handed down from generation to generation. An air of romance associated with this long established industry calls back many people each year to hear the roar of the raging fire, to inhale the sweet aroma of the boiling syrup, and to partake the unmatched flavor of Vermont maple syrup. Statistics: 2,000,000 total taps made yearly. 2,000 estimated sugarmakers, double that of 10 years ago. 545,000 gallons made in 1981, but production varies from year to year. 1981 established 20 year high in production. In 1981, Vermont produced 73 percent more pure maple syrup than New York, its nearest competitor. In the last 10 years, we have produced 25 percent more than New York. According to New England Crop Reporting Service, producers received 9/ million dollars for their crop in 1981. Virtually all of the inputs which sugarmaker use in producing syrup are purchased from manufacturing companies located within Vermont. The normal maple season lasts 4 to 6 weeks, sometimes starting as early as February in southern Vermont and lasting into late April in northern Vermont. Forty years are required to grow a maple tree large enough to tap. Ten inches in diameter is considered minimum tappable size for one tap. For each additional six inch increase in diameter, another bucket may be added. 10 inches equals I bucket 16 inches equals 2 buckets or taps 22 inches equals 3 taps Thirty-five to forty galloon of sap are required to make one gallon of maple syrup. Thirty-four to thirty-nine gallons of water must boil away in steam for each gallon of syrup made. Four to five buckets or taps average to produce enough sap for one gallon of syrup. Every Vermont county produces some maple syrup, with Franklin County leading in production. Nearly every area of Vermont has "sugar parties" during the maple season with Franklin County hosting a three day maple festival April 16, 17, and 18,1982. Most maple producers sell at least part of their crop directly to consumers. Normally about 50 percent of the Vermont crop is sold retail, 20 percent of the Vermont crop is Egg coloring tradition traces to Persians and Egyptians Traditions of eggdecorating And while the Jews do not In many European court- have enriched the myths and celebrate Easter, they too tries, it was the custom on legends of many cultures, and have delighted people of all ages around Eastertime for centuries. Popular beliefs, imagination and craft- smanship have turned egg decorating into a highly developed and diversified folk art. The egg itself possesses colored eggs at approximately the same time of the year, during their Passover season. In some parts of the world, . Jews still use colored eggs for Passover and other religious celebrations. Because of the coincidental nearness of Passover and Easter, Christians may have gotten Easter day to have a "tap- ping" contest where children would knock the ends of eggs together to see who could keep his egg unbroken the longest. Egg-tossing and egg-rolling games were brought to the United States by German settlers, as was the concept of the "Easter Bunny." Because /r 1 la't find any positive information sold wholesale, 30 percent of the Vermont crop is sold in bulk the secret of life; it symbolizes the idea for colored eggs from rabbits multiply quickly and ..." UNDERHILL, VT.-- The 15, 1982 by the Honorable to be repacked in small containers or made into candy, a "rebirth" and is often the Jews and incorporated it are a symbol of fertility, they e , Verytruly, annual harvest of maple sap Ric(hredaA.tSurnnelt?aY;BAnor Increased tottraelrinyer=ont has made it possible associated with Easter, into their Easter celebration. . 'pleaseturntepage4A, idJ[,e Wa t -- E R T has been a true harbinger of ,t, ,,  r ,-,v=s .... spring, oawn ann creation. An "l!ti k int,Ul, auk Mr. T. for taking the time rind'd" spring since the 17th century. Im ...... "--''-"/-- --. ,  ... ,ffi-- involve a beginng, and in [ _/_, 14K Gold Wedding Bands,  '" ._ YbemiS;Y- thisandisSendwrittenthe withoutinfrmatinprejudice for thiner changeThis year,of seasonsthe welcomewas IT I' J .M. LanOsca,',z ,, .-'I I I I]L U L N eneertivnnrtlaintlealnro I  J Diamonds and other Precious It" ,x _  Y g g Stones t tll[thaVeL.ttnOWwhereMr. Gloss is nowlocated" marked with a ceremony I r ..... l 1|[:Ti[-'t[|C or can be traced back to an [ 3". " t .t',  I egg of somesort I Q _ J/., .'/Y':,-, God&StlverJewelrRepors  !,lipurehased his system and can report to us designating a tree selected to "" ........ I " become a symbolic "parent" [] PIERMONT'N'H'03779 '  ,] ly, rt'lmo?t (504 Many years before the birth J otztt' &(z' SUNSHINE BOUTIQUE Lawn mowing servces for 1982 season t N It L= e f Chmst t for all pure maple syrup Ik Lawn mowing serv ;eason. [[ ; 331"|67 i ,,r 4174 [ 748-293 71Lstern Ave St Johnsbury Z,'g 5n is solicited . . . and in the meantime " o ' , he Persians and 3 ..a..tcheck m someone we cant locate and a produced in the state. [,-- Callanime_ (603) 272-5864  -802-33r4o _ i Egyptians were coloring eggs. , . " ' ms" "" The honorary designation '  isPather system a member wrte about" and "tapping" ceremny was -W-A-N T" 00M-E -if0 0M - [ e ,,proesnterpris.es, Philadelphia, Pa. They performed on the grounds of FIR [-WOOD [ EO--PiNB 1981-82 FARM JOURNALS VIDEO--PINBALL ,'aearb ..... tonally drawn illustrations aria ex- the Proctor Maple Farm in VID ;m"' frm'n's'fo imefazetor=s=y=s=tem t)hat. ?;nV  Underhill, Vt., by Richard Will return in good condition. Needed to study for gtgSyl Snelling, governor of the state Cut, split and delivered to order National Dairy Quiz Bow! by Woodsville student. I (Behind Allen'sSUpervisedwestern Auto) 0#' "' The ip ..... cars, truck , of Vermont, on Monday, ;tlP... ( i'urations, etc. sell for $15. March 15. $70. cord 802-333-9215 Contact Nancy Hehre at 603-989-5931.  Monday-Friday -- 3-9 PM-- Sat. 1-9 PM A bronze plaque per- manently marks the Tree, and reads, "The Vermont Maple GOOD, USED, SALEABLE Syrup Tree (Acer sac-  1 J.M. Landscaping..th'00l l.vnL;a:d. charum)" This tree sym" -k CLOTHING FOR ALL THE FAMIL . t .  , ,., . [[ ,i[: RIVERROAD s =,-.uunurYOCA_mm_. " bolizes the Vermont Maple  "THEFCAROUSELtt o[ t? 00:00ono up[nmn [[ w nds3a7;:p ]cts ,,  Syruplndustry. The flowofits S 0 y $1U UU I l " ro'e . A sOS, call me imm i Call sap heralds the arrival of b=liEn::pOrnTgiNa spring. Dedicated on March Main St., Bradford, Vt. 802-222.5735 ] [ Call anytime. (e03) 272-5864 J FOR SALE " $125 PAINT SPECIAL ON ANY CAR Happy B" LOOK FOR OUR DELl AD  am.-.-----Tr-- .=,uOooFOoSL on page 1 of $'. " '! CK-UPTRUCKS ][ 0N PAGE 2A. 18 YI HEIFERS the Second Opinion oowoRx, "-'""'-' ' "'"""'""" I =s  I I =s ! ! t w'_ ;= : N [] (includes paint materials) [[[l"]r BI@_KINflN . I I i . . | . It Is ff"'-.-.. oz-ss-a.7 is only $5.00 =...,.-g""o ,.',--,-.'g"" ,.,,,-J" OWR ,=m . ., ,,,,, r w" =- w-r', : m" ,t v v v "r, 'r- zr. = (80t) 222 44,, FREE ESTIMATES ,-t B.O00o,v, on April /. Thru the Underpass Woodsvflle, N.H. TILDEN ELECTRIC Ely, Vermont 05044  I.-N.II. Licensed 1-802-333-.1678 or 4,174 oak! It's a btrd," tt's" a plane, e !t's Q eUETZALCOATLUS! i!ur tloi , '" " " " "" i o  Ulyin; bar lthe " " " lof ny:t knst whblind ' theworld u,l,l w ve fossil thermal updrafts, it stayed in enlarged to life size. To make 11o w o rag, tirnbilriianth ibnece gliaitonb ;lmt bnue adeleled' hfe:e;trtleopiaQU?t edufsthmediCeasaoC no Vfrheme h ha Upper the air all day with very little the model more dynamic than with malevolent gold and beast is neither a bird nor a Cretaceous period, dating expenditure of energy and, the usual pterosaur recon- a black eyes tilted to one side. figment of a movie script- Quet- back 65 million years, we're when it landed, it walked struction, Harrison decided to Washington, D.C. Posed in a At first glance, it may seem writer's imagination. It is a record--twice as large as any zaleoatlus begins in 1784 when now finding traces of this big around upright on its back depict it'i a gentle, banking bird that ever lived. Cosimo Cellini, a secretary to animal," Dr. Kevin Padian legs like a bird. dive. The creature'sdoublename Voltaire, first reported the says. A University of The Smithsonian Quet- The big Quetzaleoatlus galleries which opened Dec. 4, 1981, at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. Smithsonian News Service Photos by Chip Clark flying animal in the history of life, northropi, has a permanent home skylight in the new paleontology refers to the serpentine Aztec god (Quetzalcoatl) and to the Northrop Flying Wing, an experimental airplane. The Smithsonian's animal, the first full-scale reconstruction of Quetzalcoatlus, represents the latest scientific thinking about the anatomy and lifestyle of these long-extinct flying reptiles. Imagine Quetzalcoatlus swooping down and alighting in a dinosaur hall. If it folded its wings about its large furry body and stood erect like a giant pelican on its strong, slender, long back legs, it would be tall enough to look many of the Smithsonain's big dinosaurs directly in the eye. In its lifetime, Quet- zaleoatlus would certainly have been familiar with the dinosaurs, even if it didn't see eye-to-eye with them. Flying reptiles of all sizes called pterosaurs--some as small as sparrows, others with wingspans of 20 feet or more--were flying the skies during the age of dinosaurs. Both pterosaurs and dinosaurs evolved from an earlier common reptilian ancestor, both lived during the same era and both disappeared at the discovery of pterosaur fossils in a limestone quarry near the Bavarian village of Eichstatt. Cellini thought they were the remains of an amphibious mammal. It wasn't until the turn of this century that the fossils were established to be "ttiose of flying reptiles. Pterosaur remains have since been found on every continent except Antarctica. In the United States, the chalk deposits of western Kansas are a great pterosaur fossil- hunting ground. Still, no one suspected that pterosaurs had grown to such gigantic size until 10 years ago, when a Texas Memorial Museum field party under the direction of Dr. Warm Langston turned up the massive fossilized pterosaur wing bones of Quetzalcoatlus in Big Bend National Park in west Texas. Later, similar but smaller bones thought to be those of Quetzaicoatlus juveniles were found elsewhere in the park. Additional fragmentary material has also been recorded from Montana, Canada and the Middle Eastern kingdom of Jordan. "Everywhere throughout California at Berkeley paleobiologist, Padian is a pterosaur authority who, in addition to Langston, advised the Smithsonian on its exhibit project. The Smithsonian model reflects recent advances in the understanding of pterosaur biology and aerodynamics. Not too long ago, scientists believed that a pterosaur's wings were attached to both its front and back legs. Looking at the creature in this way, scientists found it dif- ficult to understand how it flapped its wings and became airborne. One popular theory held that it launched itself off cliffs and glided, flopping around on four legs like a bat when it landed. Padian and a number of other scientists dismiss this theory. They believe that the wings were only attached to the front legs and that Quetzalcoatlus was a soaring animal, a superb flying machine as perfectly adapted to the air as birds. When the sun warmed the earth to create a thermal updraft, the reptile jumped off the ground, flapped its powerful wings a few times and took off. Riding zalcoatlus model will never be put to the test of taking off and landing, but simply to make it biologically and aerodynamically plausible in "flight" took more than a year of work and a great deal of thought by Smithsonian scientists and modelmakers. Dr. Jessica Harrison, a paleontologist working on the development of the Smithsonain's new dinosaur hall, went to Texas in late 1979 to research and photograph Quetzalcoatlus fossils. Because there was so little data to work with, she had to use what she calls "educated guesswork," drawing on such disparate fields of study as physics, biology, aeronautical engineering, comparative anatomy and even ar- chitecture. Harrison worked with Walter Sorrell, supervisor of the Smithsonian model shop, to produce a large, detailed wood and fiberglass model--built on a scale of 2 inches to a foot. After some modifications based on suggestions offered by Padian (he thought the neck was too long), the museum had a pterosaur that could be model was constructed in three sections--body and neck, wings and head. It had to be engineered to be light and strong so it could be suspended in the air without sagging. Modelmakers Bruce Hough and Ben Snouffer tackled the body and neck first, making a hollow wire mannequin and covering it with fiberglass. Next, they worked on the wings, the most time-consuming and difficult part of the project. The wing bones of the pterosaur are one of the most distinctive features of its anatomy. Supporting the wing membranes, these bones are an evolutionary variation of the forelimb of an earthbound animal that walked on all fours. The inner wing bone, or humerous, linked the inner wing to the muscular body. The radius and ulna, the outer wing bones, were attached to a wrist and four fingers. The fourth finger was unique. It was greatly elongated--up to 8 feet--and supported as much as half of the length of the wing membrpne. Hough and Snouffer con- (please turn to page 3A) - 1 TODAY'S CHUCKLE e war between the  Will never be won. :h acre's too much raternizlng with the 13 CIRCULATING IM: NIW HAMPSWIB| -- tyme, Lyme Center, Orford, Orfordville, Piermont, Haverhill, Haverhill Center, Haverhill Comer, North Haverhill, East Haverhill, Pike, Woodsville, Bath, Monroe, Lisbon, Landaff, Benton. Lvman, Warren, Glencliff, Wentworth . . . ViltMONT -- Thetford, East Thefford, Thefford Hill, Thetford Center, North Thetford, Post Mills, Foirlee, West Foirleo, Bradford, Bradford Village, Corinth; East Corinth, Topsham, West Topsham, Newbury Village, South Newbury, West Nowbury, Wells River, Gmton, Ryegate Comer, East Ryegate, South Ryegate, Peacham, Bomet, West nomet. Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont THIS WEEK'S PRESS RUN .10,120 i I March 31, 1982 t.,lL. " AR DR VERS' SSOC ON 0 AME C 01  i ore and xnore apparent the value and r[at in the fact w'e have a nationwide .I i'.ling Canadian associates) . . . a network Through our members, we can reach Wic area in North America. iti,JL t. an example of how our members help one .h-tsePararated by thousands of miles. Several t-v. :'mt an ad they had read and literature they ai ._1. ,,, Stl; ti /. t  let 72 MPG on my 1973 Ford Station Wagon e !i[t'l. ,, agiae... my system is simple and will work , ][ay, terature from Mr. Gloss said, in part: p4,,.  and I believe that it will work on any [1 r.teL_.mjected or diesels. That I'm working on  .'gues look feasible e.lte of the system is" to totally vaporize the t ga Vapor that does not condense, similar to tt,tl tOve. This eliminates the burning of the atdt' =rmally found in t .oda.ys carlos. Unburned a flnEpolY a'a sinlple" It will fit in any car, aN is com- e ,Ivy, a metering pump and 12 volt electric qt uel_ flow, a vaporizer, and a distribution  t at the standard curb. It is an add on and [k :"  ra the standard to the high mileage and it ill he available in a couple of weeks if ]lte: Inns and parts list will be $35:00 and the ].nulstructior is $350.00 plus freight."  zip cod book and map, we identified \\;tbrs in the St. Dora, area. We asked aWuldcntactMr'Glssandevaluate The arrival of sprin00 'e Lae f weeks, this answer came back: .-.'Phe n: t. address), is empty and has a for sale '"telh'nghbrssayhemvedoutatChristmas marked by tappin00 4ean_Yoae where he was going. In checking /, /1  yo., he was there about six months and ' ''.O. Box and found it registered in the Vermont maple tree "'=" -' (religions) organization from Vermont maple facts Vermont has an ideal climate for growing sugar maple trees; an ideal climate for good sap flow; and a syrup making know-how which has been handed down from generation to generation. An air of romance associated with this long established industry calls back many people each year to hear the roar of the raging fire, to inhale the sweet aroma of the boiling syrup, and to partake the unmatched flavor of Vermont maple syrup. Statistics: 2,000,000 total taps made yearly. 2,000 estimated sugarmakers, double that of 10 years ago. 545,000 gallons made in 1981, but production varies from year to year. 1981 established 20 year high in production. In 1981, Vermont produced 73 percent more pure maple syrup than New York, its nearest competitor. In the last 10 years, we have produced 25 percent more than New York. According to New England Crop Reporting Service, producers received 9/ million dollars for their crop in 1981. Virtually all of the inputs which sugarmaker use in producing syrup are purchased from manufacturing companies located within Vermont. The normal maple season lasts 4 to 6 weeks, sometimes starting as early as February in southern Vermont and lasting into late April in northern Vermont. Forty years are required to grow a maple tree large enough to tap. Ten inches in diameter is considered minimum tappable size for one tap. For each additional six inch increase in diameter, another bucket may be added. 10 inches equals I bucket 16 inches equals 2 buckets or taps 22 inches equals 3 taps Thirty-five to forty galloon of sap are required to make one gallon of maple syrup. Thirty-four to thirty-nine gallons of water must boil away in steam for each gallon of syrup made. Four to five buckets or taps average to produce enough sap for one gallon of syrup. Every Vermont county produces some maple syrup, with Franklin County leading in production. Nearly every area of Vermont has "sugar parties" during the maple season with Franklin County hosting a three day maple festival April 16, 17, and 18,1982. Most maple producers sell at least part of their crop directly to consumers. Normally about 50 percent of the Vermont crop is sold retail, 20 percent of the Vermont crop is Egg coloring tradition traces to Persians and Egyptians Traditions of eggdecorating And while the Jews do not In many European court- have enriched the myths and celebrate Easter, they too tries, it was the custom on legends of many cultures, and have delighted people of all ages around Eastertime for centuries. Popular beliefs, imagination and craft- smanship have turned egg decorating into a highly developed and diversified folk art. The egg itself possesses colored eggs at approximately the same time of the year, during their Passover season. In some parts of the world, . Jews still use colored eggs for Passover and other religious celebrations. Because of the coincidental nearness of Passover and Easter, Christians may have gotten Easter day to have a "tap- ping" contest where children would knock the ends of eggs together to see who could keep his egg unbroken the longest. Egg-tossing and egg-rolling games were brought to the United States by German settlers, as was the concept of the "Easter Bunny." Because /r 1 la't find any positive information sold wholesale, 30 percent of the Vermont crop is sold in bulk the secret of life; it symbolizes the idea for colored eggs from rabbits multiply quickly and ..." UNDERHILL, VT.-- The 15, 1982 by the Honorable to be repacked in small containers or made into candy, a "rebirth" and is often the Jews and incorporated it are a symbol of fertility, they e , Verytruly, annual harvest of maple sap Ric(hredaA.tSurnnelt?aY;BAnor Increased tottraelrinyer=ont has made it possible associated with Easter, into their Easter celebration. . 'pleaseturntepage4A, idJ[,e Wa t -- E R T has been a true harbinger of ,t, ,,  r ,-,v=s .... spring, oawn ann creation. An "l!ti k int,Ul, auk Mr. T. for taking the time rind'd" spring since the 17th century. Im ...... "--''-"/-- --. ,  ... ,ffi-- involve a beginng, and in [ _/_, 14K Gold Wedding Bands,  '" ._ YbemiS;Y- thisandisSendwrittenthe withoutinfrmatinprejudice for thiner changeThis year,of seasonsthe welcomewas IT I' J .M. LanOsca,',z ,, .-'I I I I]L U L N eneertivnnrtlaintlealnro I  J Diamonds and other Precious It" ,x _  Y g g Stones t tll[thaVeL.ttnOWwhereMr. Gloss is nowlocated" marked with a ceremony I r ..... l 1|[:Ti[-'t[|C or can be traced back to an [ 3". " t .t',  I egg of somesort I Q _ J/., .'/Y':,-, God&StlverJewelrRepors  !,lipurehased his system and can report to us designating a tree selected to "" ........ I " become a symbolic "parent" [] PIERMONT'N'H'03779 '  ,] ly, rt'lmo?t (504 Many years before the birth J otztt' &(z' SUNSHINE BOUTIQUE Lawn mowing servces for 1982 season t N It L= e f Chmst t for all pure maple syrup Ik Lawn mowing serv ;eason. [[ ; 331"|67 i ,,r 4174 [ 748-293 71Lstern Ave St Johnsbury Z,'g 5n is solicited . . . and in the meantime " o ' , he Persians and 3 ..a..tcheck m someone we cant locate and a produced in the state. [,-- Callanime_ (603) 272-5864  -802-33r4o _ i Egyptians were coloring eggs. , . " ' ms" "" The honorary designation '  isPather system a member wrte about" and "tapping" ceremny was -W-A-N T" 00M-E -if0 0M - [ e ,,proesnterpris.es, Philadelphia, Pa. They performed on the grounds of FI R [-WOOD [ EO--PiNB 1981-82 FARM JOURNALS VIDEO--PINBALL ,'aearb ..... tonally drawn illustrations aria ex- the Proctor Maple Farm in VID ;m"' frm'n's'fo imefazetor=s=y=s=tem t)hat. ?;nV  Underhill, Vt., by Richard Will return in good condition. Needed to study for gtgSyl Snelling, governor of the state Cut, split and delivered to order National Dairy Quiz Bow! by Woodsville student. I (Behind Allen'sSUpervisedwestern Auto) 0#' "' The ip ..... cars, truck , of Vermont, on Monday, ;tlP... ( i'urations, etc. sell for $15. March 15. $70. cord 802-333-9215 Contact Nancy Hehre at 603-989-5931.  Monday-Friday -- 3-9 PM-- Sat. 1-9 PM A bronze plaque per- manently marks the Tree, and reads, "The Vermont Maple GOOD, USED, SALEABLE Syrup Tree (Acer sac-  1 J.M. Landscaping..th'00l l.vnL;a:d. charum)" This tree sym" -k CLOTHING FOR ALL THE FAMIL . t .  , ,., . [[ ,i[: RIVERROAD s =,-.uunurYOCA_mm_. " bolizes the Vermont Maple  "THEFCAROUSELtt o[ t? 00:00ono up[nmn [[ w nds3a7;:p ]cts ,,  Syruplndustry. The flowofits S 0 y $1U UU I l " ro'e . A sOS, call me imm i Call sap heralds the arrival of b=liEn::pOrnTgiNa spring. Dedicated on March Main St., Bradford, Vt. 802-222.5735 ] [ Call anytime. (e03) 272-5864 J FOR SALE " $125 PAINT SPECIAL ON ANY CAR Happy B" LOOK FOR OUR DELl AD  am.-.-----Tr-- .=,uOooFOoSL on page 1 of $'. " '! CK-UPTRUCKS ][ 0N PAGE 2A. 18 YI HEIFERS the Second Opinion oowoRx, "-'""'-' ' "'"""'""" I =s  I I =s ! ! t w'_ ;= : N [] (includes paint materials) [[[l"]r BI@_KINflN . I I i . . | . It Is ff"'-.-.. oz-ss-a.7 is only $5.00 =...,.-g""o ,.',--,-.'g"" ,.,,,-J" OWR ,=m . ., ,,,,, r w" =- w-r', : m" ,t v v v "r, 'r- zr. = (80t) 222 44,, FREE ESTIMATES ,-t B.O00o,v, on April /. Thru the Underpass Woodsvflle, N.H. TILDEN ELECTRIC Ely, Vermont 05044  I.-N.II. Licensed 1-802-333-.1678 or 4,174