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April 8, 1981     Journal Opinion
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April 8, 1981
 

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. I PS 3!W.:I I0 Number 14 Serwng Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont April 8, 1981 4-Hers show at Woodsville LLE--Seventy- !-H members clubs throu appeared and to present and March 28. judges each 60 demon- three action wide variety of included foods, crafts, hor- dairy, shop, plus made up the day program. senior and in each divisions have to represent at the state 4- Day at the Hampshire. SCOring Action ) of the from 4-H elub of Karla-Mari Leta Thom- rom North demon- making MAKING DONUTS---Bob-O-Link 4-H members giving action exhibit are, from left, Kelly Lennon, Karla- Marl Lane, Janet Thompson, Leta Stoddard of N. llaverhill. "Ski were Kathleen ey of Lincoln. of the Lilac maintained titled "Pine All three have been ible to Day of New 23 were: Regina of N. and "BITS AND PIECES"--That was the title of demonstration by Heather Schmid of Plermont. "M & M Chocolate Brownies"--Sheila Fabrizio of N. ribbons Haverhill shows how to make them. Angela Karen ; Annette Jennifer of erratti of Jacqueline Jonathan Jeff Clifford Richard of West Loranger of and Piermont; Cornilins, Scott lSa Burns, Stephanie Barbara 0ri Jones of Christian Chris Ida Dimick and age, Shell Olsen, Heather FOR WANT OF A SHOE .... Elizabeth Trussel of Piermont demonstrated "No care of Feet--No Hor- se." :d and Sugar Program Brooks, Cate DEMONsTRATION--At Metcalf describes "Characteristics of a Goat." of Plermont Vand Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. North Althea Mrs. Gloria SAY CHEESEI--Karla-Mari Lane of N. Haverhill demonstrates "Making Cheese at Home." Town meeting survey W. Fairlee board votes to 00ulate released by Doyle W. FAIRLEE--The W. Fairlee School Board has voted to spend $8,000 in federal revenue sharing funds for insulation, shades and painting. The board reorganized on the same basis as last year and signed teachers' contracts for 1981-82. The board also discussed the matter of high school students causing problems on the bus and set up a system for reporting complaints. Orford teachers file complaint ORFORD--An unfair labor practice charged has been filed by the Orford Teachers Association before the state Public Employees Labor Relations Board, alleging that public statements by school hoard members and School Superintendent Hugh Watson violated ground rules for contract negotiations. Watson and thest'hool board have denied the charge and asked the labor board to reject the complaint. The Teachers Association claimed that board member Katherine Baker violated the ground rules when she publicly disclosed at a school meeting that the teachers were seeking an 18.5 per cent pay increase for 1981-82 and State Senator William Doyle (R-Washington) has released the final results of his twelfth annual town meeting questionnaire. Doyle said the tabulations included 10,600 returns from 129 cities and towns in all of Vermont's fourteen counties. Those questions receiving the most support from the respondents included: -- 71 per cent favor low interest loans to farmers. -- 66 per cent would in- crease the drinking age to 19 or 20. -- 59 per cent would ban opening alcoholic beverage containers within a vehicle. -- 56 per cent would ban the inventory tax. -- 55 per cent believe that state aid to education should be increased and 59 per cent favor the sales tax if state aid: were increased. -- 55 per cent would lower the blood alcohol content to -- 54 per cent favor a four day school week based upon local option. -- 53 per cent favor a drivers license vision re-examination every six years. Those questions receiving the least support included: -- 23 per cent favored casino gambling. -- 27 per cent favored in- creasing the gasoline tax and registration fees. -- 35 per cent felt our nation would benefit from decontrol. -- 41 per cent favored a subsidy to local transportation and funding of the home energy auditing program. -- 46 per cent favored in- creasing the driving age. Road well, couple HAVERHIA Haverhill couple has complained to the selectmen that their drinking water has been contaminated by large amounts of sodium chloride seeping into their well from nearby roads salted by town highway crews. Mr. and Mrs. Rosario salt contaminated contends Oxbow School Board votes to replace leaking roofs BRADFORD--The Oxbow School Board has voted to proceed with replacement of some 60,000 additional square feet of leaking roofs on Oxbow High School at a cost of $295,000, while officials hope for a favorable resolution of the school's lawsuit against the manufacturer of the roofing materials. Oxbow is asking some $600,000 in actual replacement costs in a suit against the GAF Corp, the nation's largest manufacturer of roofing, and Rodd the Roofer of St. Johnsbury, who installed the materials. Blue Mountain Union School Groton serves notice for delinquent taxes "We are working right new taxpayers in Groton, a total of on the personnel plan," said 24 residents, have been Selectman Susan F. Holden, notified to pay up or have their and added that the Board of properties go to tax sales. Selectmen will revise Notices dated March 23 discrepancies, were mailed, giving taxpayers 10 days in which to pay taxes due. The total of taxes owed was approximately $20,000, Haverhill Co-op but payments have begun to come in. The taxes were due board to meet, last October. "It looks like it's going to HAVERHILL--The Haverhill work. The ones that were Cooperative School Board will doubtful were the first ones discuss policy on union ac- in," said Town Tax Collector tivity during the school day at Harold Miller. its regular meeting tonight. Michael Blair, chairman of Also on the agenda are the Board of Selectmen, said discussion of information the get-tough policy was from the school attorney relative to budgetary decisions, and a recom- mendation to renew all teachers' contracts except three'teachers who have been notified. J.V. baseball and verification of the checklist are other topics slated for discussion at the meeting, which will begin at 7 p.m. GROTON--AI! delinquent need to borrow money," Blair said last week. Meanwhile, town officials heard an assessment evaluator say that Groton has a problem in reappraising property for tax purposes because the state owns so much land in the town and is exempt from local taxation. recently was awarded that the outcome of the BMU $t,030,000 in an almost iden- suit indicates a good chance tical suit in Superior Court in that Oxbow will also recover Chelsea, and Rodd was damages for its much larger awarded $1,270,552 after a roof. jury ruled GAF was strictly BMU was awarded only liable for misrepresenting the $230,000 for the actual cost of roofing product to Rodd. replacing its leaking roof, but The total of $2.3 million was the jury also assessed $800,000 the largest damage award and each for BMU and Redd as the case was the longest and punitive damages. costliest trial in Vermont If a jury awarded similar history, according to at- punitive damages, the Oxbow torneys, and it may take case could wind up breaking another two years for GAF's the record for the highest appeal to be decided in the damage award in the state. state SupremeCourt. Oxbow has already replaced Oxbow officials, including about 15,000 square feet of its Superintendent of Schools leaking roofs, 10,000 feet over John Fontana, expressed hope the cafeteria and 5,000 feet over the library. Rodd was originally a defendant along with GAF in the BMU suit, but conceded liability to the school and switched sides, winding up on the winning side. Rodd is still listed as a defendant in the Oxbow suit, but is considered likely to take the same legal course and switch sides to help Oxbow, and itself, recover damages from GAF. Kenyon protetm Martin said they had been told by a nurse that Martin's high blood pressure is from too large an intake of salt. Selectmen Chairman Richard Kinder said the town that the school board had does not admit liability but offered 6.2 per cent. would do what it can to help the Martins. He said he would Man h an00ted for 8hot W, FAIRLEE--A W. Fairlee man was arrested and later released on bail after state police charged he fired a rifle inside his mobile home while being interviewed by an of- ficer. The bullet passed near State 'Trooper Dana Janawickz and traveled out the front door, according to the police report. Charges of reckless en- dangerment and assault on a police officer were filed. talk to William Fortier, a trustee of the Pike water system, to see if the Martins could hook up to the Pike water system. On another issue, Kinder said the town is waiting for a legal opinion on the issue of the town's insurance plan for personnel after James Boucher said the town is paying only 55 per cent instead of the 75 per cent it is supposed to pay of the premiums. adopted in an attempt to bring in enough revenue so the town will not hax, e to borrow against anticipated taxes. "The majority Of people who are paying taxes in town are getting a little fed up of reading the town report and seeing all the people who are delinquent," he said. "If all the delinquent taxes were in right now, we wouldn't Douglas C. MacArthur, whose accredited assessment evaluation firm is headquartered in Montpolier, said "Chances are the larger (privately-owned) land parcels will have to carry a higher tax burden than in the past." Lister Elizabeth Smith said there are currently 32 ad- ditional parcels in the town that the state is considering on nur00 home MONTPELIERState Rep. Wayne Kenyon of Bradford has protested the recom- mendation of the Vermont Health Policy Corp. that the State Health Commissioner Lloyd Novick deny ap- plications for two nursing homes, one in Bradford and one in Northiield. Kenyon charged that buying, although the operator of a "If the state buys3,000 more Bradford nursing home in- acres then we will be up the dicated that he wanted to creek without a paddle," she expand in Bradford, Paul said. She said the state owns Wallace-Brodeur, executive most of the town's vacation director of the health policy land, the type of land on which agency, urged Lorraine Day Groton now gets most of its of the Mayo Nursing Home in taxes. Northfield to file an ap- plication in Bradford. Kenyon said this was "un- Workfare bill offered in New Hampshire House CONCORD--Leigh D. Bosse, majority leader of the New concert presented by Woody Martens, a former member of the Henry Mancini Band, on May 6 at Orford Memorial Hall. A dinner will be held prior to the concert and tickets for both dinner and concert are $5. So far, $600 has been raised for the planned three-day New York trip by 30 to 35 students with eight to 10 chaperones. At least another $2,000 is needed. The trip is being sponsored by the student council and the Parents Club. professional." Wallace-Bredeur said he did urge Mrs. Day to consider Hampshire House of Representatives, has in- troduced legislation that would require recipients of town welfare to work off assistance received at three- fourths of the minimum wage. "This bill requires any person who receives assistance from a town under RSA 165 to work off the amount of assistance received at the rate of three-quarters of the minimum wage. Any person required to work off assignment of work. Certain Bradford, but only after the assistance payments does not assistance recipients are original operator, George receive any public employee exempted from this benefits from the town. A town requirement on the basis of providing assistance is not age, physical or mental liable for any damages unless condition, or responsibilities grossly negligent. A town may in the home. A recipient may obtain a lien on property and also apply to the selectmen for execute a loan agreement with a waiver of the work the person receiving requirement," he added. assistance who refuses to A person who refuses to work," Bosse said. work is ineligible for benefits "The overseers of public under RSA 165 or RSA 166 for welfare are responsible for the one year," under his proposal. Huntington, had not pursued his intent to go through hearings. The Health Policy Corp. has recommended denial of the applications for River Bend Nursing home for 54 beds in Bradford and Mayo in Nor- thfield for 70 beds. The state health com- missioner is not bound by the recommendations. Orford raising fun& for high school trip ORFORD--Three fund- musical comedy raising events are scheduled in a drive to raise money to finance a tour for Orford High School students to New York City. Two of the events will be mini-bingos on April 5 and May 3 in Memorial Hall in Orford. Minimum admission will he $10, which will include 12 cards with a $10 minimum payoff. The doors will open at 11 a.m. with early bird games at 12:30 p.m. and more games starting at 1 p.m. The third event will be a Newbury reduces sweet lighting -- Highway danger. -- Area (land) light serves. -- Isolation of area." The recommendation would save approximately $2,000 a year. Charles Cheney, chairman of the trustees said, "If we could make a substantial reduction in the lighting ex- pense, this would then make a substantial reduction in the total budget, therefore lowering village taxes or releasing funds to provide the opportunity to do other things within the village." The trustees moved to implement the lighting committee's recom- mendations-on a trial basis of one month. This may he extended if deemed desirable. The electric company will remove the bulbs from the listed lighting fixtures for the indicated period of time. In other matters, the trustees discussed preliminary budget figures for the coming fiscal year. Public hearings on the use of village revenue sharing will he held April 13 and April 20, (pleaSe turn to page 9) by L.F. BARNES NEWBURY--Village trustees have voted to reduce street lighting on an experimental basis as a cost-saving measure. The cost of street lighting in Newbury has become more than half of the village budget. In recognition of thi ex- pense, a motion was passed at the 1980 annual meeting "to authorize the trustees to form a committee to study lighting in the village in an effort to reduce costs and present a recommended plan of possibl e reductions. '' The trustees appointed a street light committee of Alan Jaoohs, chairman, Cecil Ross and Liltian Barnes. This committee reported to the April meeting of the trustees and presented a recom- mended list of lights to be removed. Their report states: "Factors involved in the recommendation were: -- Personal request to remove light. -- Distance to next light. -- Other area source lighting. Caledonia cobbler is happy by PHYLLIS NEMHAUSER ST. JOHNSBURY-- "I like people," says George Krizan, also known as the Caledonia Cobbler. With a robust smile he describes growing up in a busy neighborhood in Detroit. "My father was a minister and didn't like the kids hanging around on street corners. I was the oldest of I0 children, When I was fourteen my father decided it was time for me to help raise the family. So, be bought a small shoe repair business where I became an apprentice." He has been repairing shoes ever since. He joined the Navy and was out to sea for three years before moving to Brooklyn, N.Y. where he repaired shoes for the Army and Navy Air Corps. Moving to the countryside of Seattle he raised his three daughters. The youngest was four at that time. He raised French Chalet bulls and chickens and took over two shoe repair concessions, one at Mccord Air Force Base and the other at the Fort Louis Army Post. About a year ago Krizan, new re-married, decided to move his family to Vermont. HAPPY COBBLER--George Krtzan is happy at "Vermont has always in' his cobbling work in St. Johnsbury, and about his trigued me, it seems to be a recent move to Vermont. special part of the world," he said. He wrote the Chamber of Commerce in Burlington, Rutland and Brattleboro. Things seemed to be moving slowly, so this summer he packed a five ton truck full of all their belongings and brought his family to Ver. mont. He had wanted to open a shoe repair shop in Burlington, to be near the water, but an opportunity arose in St. Johnsbury and he decided that this would be his new home. Last Jan. 5, he opened the 'Caledonia Cob- bler,' located at 61 Eastern Ave. in St. Johnsbury. Customers seem happy with the opportunity to re-cycle their shoes and just as happy to see the Cobbler's tremendous smile or hear his gusty laugh. He also enjoys whistling while he works and is proficient at the warbler call. "You have to care about your work. Now I can repair shoes in a matter of minutes,,' he said, and he is quick to demonstrate his equipment with 800 pounds of pressure that helps him to do it. The Caledonia Cobbler now has a customer pick-up at Burnham Shoes in Wells River. In St. Johnsbury, the shop has a selection of hats, brass buckles, stained glass and other unique gifts, and customers can have their (please turn'topage 9) . I PS 3!W.:I I0 Number 14 Serwng Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont April 8, 1981 4-Hers show at Woodsville LLE--Seventy- !-H members clubs throu appeared and to present and March 28. judges each 60 demon- three action wide variety of included foods, crafts, hor- dairy, shop, plus made up the day program. senior and in each divisions have to represent at the state 4- Day at the Hampshire. SCOring Action ) of the from 4-H elub of Karla-Mari Leta Thom- rom North demon- making MAKING DONUTS---Bob-O-Link 4-H members giving action exhibit are, from left, Kelly Lennon, Karla- Marl Lane, Janet Thompson, Leta Stoddard of N. llaverhill. "Ski were Kathleen ey of Lincoln. of the Lilac maintained titled "Pine All three have been ible to Day of New 23 were: Regina of N. and "BITS AND PIECES"--That was the title of demonstration by Heather Schmid of Plermont. "M & M Chocolate Brownies"--Sheila Fabrizio of N. ribbons Haverhill shows how to make them. Angela Karen ; Annette Jennifer of erratti of Jacqueline Jonathan Jeff Clifford Richard of West Loranger of and Piermont; Cornilins, Scott lSa Burns, Stephanie Barbara 0ri Jones of Christian Chris Ida Dimick and age, Shell Olsen, Heather FOR WANT OF A SHOE .... Elizabeth Trussel of Piermont demonstrated "No care of Feet--No Hor- se." :d and Sugar Program Brooks, Cate DEMONsTRATION--At Metcalf describes "Characteristics of a Goat." of Plermont Vand Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. North Althea Mrs. Gloria SAY CHEESEI--Karla-Mari Lane of N. Haverhill demonstrates "Making Cheese at Home." Town meeting survey W. Fairlee board votes to 00ulate released by Doyle W. FAIRLEE--The W. Fairlee School Board has voted to spend $8,000 in federal revenue sharing funds for insulation, shades and painting. The board reorganized on the same basis as last year and signed teachers' contracts for 1981-82. The board also discussed the matter of high school students causing problems on the bus and set up a system for reporting complaints. Orford teachers file complaint ORFORD--An unfair labor practice charged has been filed by the Orford Teachers Association before the state Public Employees Labor Relations Board, alleging that public statements by school hoard members and School Superintendent Hugh Watson violated ground rules for contract negotiations. Watson and thest'hool board have denied the charge and asked the labor board to reject the complaint. The Teachers Association claimed that board member Katherine Baker violated the ground rules when she publicly disclosed at a school meeting that the teachers were seeking an 18.5 per cent pay increase for 1981-82 and State Senator William Doyle (R-Washington) has released the final results of his twelfth annual town meeting questionnaire. Doyle said the tabulations included 10,600 returns from 129 cities and towns in all of Vermont's fourteen counties. Those questions receiving the most support from the respondents included: -- 71 per cent favor low interest loans to farmers. -- 66 per cent would in- crease the drinking age to 19 or 20. -- 59 per cent would ban opening alcoholic beverage containers within a vehicle. -- 56 per cent would ban the inventory tax. -- 55 per cent believe that state aid to education should be increased and 59 per cent favor the sales tax if state aid: were increased. -- 55 per cent would lower the blood alcohol content to -- 54 per cent favor a four day school week based upon local option. -- 53 per cent favor a drivers license vision re-examination every six years. Those questions receiving the least support included: -- 23 per cent favored casino gambling. -- 27 per cent favored in- creasing the gasoline tax and registration fees. -- 35 per cent felt our nation would benefit from decontrol. -- 41 per cent favored a subsidy to local transportation and funding of the home energy auditing program. -- 46 per cent favored in- creasing the driving age. Road well, couple HAVERHIA Haverhill couple has complained to the selectmen that their drinking water has been contaminated by large amounts of sodium chloride seeping into their well from nearby roads salted by town highway crews. Mr. and Mrs. Rosario salt contaminated contends Oxbow School Board votes to replace leaking roofs BRADFORD--The Oxbow School Board has voted to proceed with replacement of some 60,000 additional square feet of leaking roofs on Oxbow High School at a cost of $295,000, while officials hope for a favorable resolution of the school's lawsuit against the manufacturer of the roofing materials. Oxbow is asking some $600,000 in actual replacement costs in a suit against the GAF Corp, the nation's largest manufacturer of roofing, and Rodd the Roofer of St. Johnsbury, who installed the materials. Blue Mountain Union School Groton serves notice for delinquent taxes "We are working right new taxpayers in Groton, a total of on the personnel plan," said 24 residents, have been Selectman Susan F. Holden, notified to pay up or have their and added that the Board of properties go to tax sales. Selectmen will revise Notices dated March 23 discrepancies, were mailed, giving taxpayers 10 days in which to pay taxes due. The total of taxes owed was approximately $20,000, Haverhill Co-op but payments have begun to come in. The taxes were due board to meet, last October. "It looks like it's going to HAVERHILL--The Haverhill work. The ones that were Cooperative School Board will doubtful were the first ones discuss policy on union ac- in," said Town Tax Collector tivity during the school day at Harold Miller. its regular meeting tonight. Michael Blair, chairman of Also on the agenda are the Board of Selectmen, said discussion of information the get-tough policy was from the school attorney relative to budgetary decisions, and a recom- mendation to renew all teachers' contracts except three'teachers who have been notified. J.V. baseball and verification of the checklist are other topics slated for discussion at the meeting, which will begin at 7 p.m. GROTON--AI! delinquent need to borrow money," Blair said last week. Meanwhile, town officials heard an assessment evaluator say that Groton has a problem in reappraising property for tax purposes because the state owns so much land in the town and is exempt from local taxation. recently was awarded that the outcome of the BMU $t,030,000 in an almost iden- suit indicates a good chance tical suit in Superior Court in that Oxbow will also recover Chelsea, and Rodd was damages for its much larger awarded $1,270,552 after a roof. jury ruled GAF was strictly BMU was awarded only liable for misrepresenting the $230,000 for the actual cost of roofing product to Rodd. replacing its leaking roof, but The total of $2.3 million was the jury also assessed $800,000 the largest damage award and each for BMU and Redd as the case was the longest and punitive damages. costliest trial in Vermont If a jury awarded similar history, according to at- punitive damages, the Oxbow torneys, and it may take case could wind up breaking another two years for GAF's the record for the highest appeal to be decided in the damage award in the state. state SupremeCourt. Oxbow has already replaced Oxbow officials, including about 15,000 square feet of its Superintendent of Schools leaking roofs, 10,000 feet over John Fontana, expressed hope the cafeteria and 5,000 feet over the library. Rodd was originally a defendant along with GAF in the BMU suit, but conceded liability to the school and switched sides, winding up on the winning side. Rodd is still listed as a defendant in the Oxbow suit, but is considered likely to take the same legal course and switch sides to help Oxbow, and itself, recover damages from GAF. Kenyon protetm Martin said they had been told by a nurse that Martin's high blood pressure is from too large an intake of salt. Selectmen Chairman Richard Kinder said the town that the school board had does not admit liability but offered 6.2 per cent. would do what it can to help the Martins. He said he would Man h an00ted for 8hot W, FAIRLEE--A W. Fairlee man was arrested and later released on bail after state police charged he fired a rifle inside his mobile home while being interviewed by an of- ficer. The bullet passed near State 'Trooper Dana Janawickz and traveled out the front door, according to the police report. Charges of reckless en- dangerment and assault on a police officer were filed. talk to William Fortier, a trustee of the Pike water system, to see if the Martins could hook up to the Pike water system. On another issue, Kinder said the town is waiting for a legal opinion on the issue of the town's insurance plan for personnel after James Boucher said the town is paying only 55 per cent instead of the 75 per cent it is supposed to pay of the premiums. adopted in an attempt to bring in enough revenue so the town will not hax, e to borrow against anticipated taxes. "The majority Of people who are paying taxes in town are getting a little fed up of reading the town report and seeing all the people who are delinquent," he said. "If all the delinquent taxes were in right now, we wouldn't Douglas C. MacArthur, whose accredited assessment evaluation firm is headquartered in Montpolier, said "Chances are the larger (privately-owned) land parcels will have to carry a higher tax burden than in the past." Lister Elizabeth Smith said there are currently 32 ad- ditional parcels in the town that the state is considering on nur00 home MONTPELIERState Rep. Wayne Kenyon of Bradford has protested the recom- mendation of the Vermont Health Policy Corp. that the State Health Commissioner Lloyd Novick deny ap- plications for two nursing homes, one in Bradford and one in Northiield. Kenyon charged that buying, although the operator of a "If the state buys3,000 more Bradford nursing home in- acres then we will be up the dicated that he wanted to creek without a paddle," she expand in Bradford, Paul said. She said the state owns Wallace-Brodeur, executive most of the town's vacation director of the health policy land, the type of land on which agency, urged Lorraine Day Groton now gets most of its of the Mayo Nursing Home in taxes. Northfield to file an ap- plication in Bradford. Kenyon said this was "un- Workfare bill offered in New Hampshire House CONCORD--Leigh D. Bosse, majority leader of the New concert presented by Woody Martens, a former member of the Henry Mancini Band, on May 6 at Orford Memorial Hall. A dinner will be held prior to the concert and tickets for both dinner and concert are $5. So far, $600 has been raised for the planned three-day New York trip by 30 to 35 students with eight to 10 chaperones. At least another $2,000 is needed. The trip is being sponsored by the student council and the Parents Club. professional." Wallace-Bredeur said he did urge Mrs. Day to consider Hampshire House of Representatives, has in- troduced legislation that would require recipients of town welfare to work off assistance received at three- fourths of the minimum wage. "This bill requires any person who receives assistance from a town under RSA 165 to work off the amount of assistance received at the rate of three-quarters of the minimum wage. Any person required to work off assignment of work. Certain Bradford, but only after the assistance payments does not assistance recipients are original operator, George receive any public employee exempted from this benefits from the town. A town requirement on the basis of providing assistance is not age, physical or mental liable for any damages unless condition, or responsibilities grossly negligent. A town may in the home. A recipient may obtain a lien on property and also apply to the selectmen for execute a loan agreement with a waiver of the work the person receiving requirement," he added. assistance who refuses to A person who refuses to work," Bosse said. work is ineligible for benefits "The overseers of public under RSA 165 or RSA 166 for welfare are responsible for the one year," under his proposal. Huntington, had not pursued his intent to go through hearings. The Health Policy Corp. has recommended denial of the applications for River Bend Nursing home for 54 beds in Bradford and Mayo in Nor- thfield for 70 beds. The state health com- missioner is not bound by the recommendations. Orford raising fun& for high school trip ORFORD--Three fund- musical comedy raising events are scheduled in a drive to raise money to finance a tour for Orford High School students to New York City. Two of the events will be mini-bingos on April 5 and May 3 in Memorial Hall in Orford. Minimum admission will he $10, which will include 12 cards with a $10 minimum payoff. The doors will open at 11 a.m. with early bird games at 12:30 p.m. and more games starting at 1 p.m. The third event will be a Newbury reduces sweet lighting -- Highway danger. -- Area (land) light serves. -- Isolation of area." The recommendation would save approximately $2,000 a year. Charles Cheney, chairman of the trustees said, "If we could make a substantial reduction in the lighting ex- pense, this would then make a substantial reduction in the total budget, therefore lowering village taxes or releasing funds to provide the opportunity to do other things within the village." The trustees moved to implement the lighting committee's recom- mendations-on a trial basis of one month. This may he extended if deemed desirable. The electric company will remove the bulbs from the listed lighting fixtures for the indicated period of time. In other matters, the trustees discussed preliminary budget figures for the coming fiscal year. Public hearings on the use of village revenue sharing will he held April 13 and April 20, (pleaSe turn to page 9) by L.F. BARNES NEWBURY--Village trustees have voted to reduce street lighting on an experimental basis as a cost-saving measure. The cost of street lighting in Newbury has become more than half of the village budget. In recognition of thi ex- pense, a motion was passed at the 1980 annual meeting "to authorize the trustees to form a committee to study lighting in the village in an effort to reduce costs and present a recommended plan of possibl e reductions. '' The trustees appointed a street light committee of Alan Jaoohs, chairman, Cecil Ross and Liltian Barnes. This committee reported to the April meeting of the trustees and presented a recom- mended list of lights to be removed. Their report states: "Factors involved in the recommendation were: -- Personal request to remove light. -- Distance to next light. -- Other area source lighting. Caledonia cobbler is happy by PHYLLIS NEMHAUSER ST. JOHNSBURY-- "I like people," says George Krizan, also known as the Caledonia Cobbler. With a robust smile he describes growing up in a busy neighborhood in Detroit. "My father was a minister and didn't like the kids hanging around on street corners. I was the oldest of I0 children, When I was fourteen my father decided it was time for me to help raise the family. So, be bought a small shoe repair business where I became an apprentice." He has been repairing shoes ever since. He joined the Navy and was out to sea for three years before moving to Brooklyn, N.Y. where he repaired shoes for the Army and Navy Air Corps. Moving to the countryside of Seattle he raised his three daughters. The youngest was four at that time. He raised French Chalet bulls and chickens and took over two shoe repair concessions, one at Mccord Air Force Base and the other at the Fort Louis Army Post. About a year ago Krizan, new re-married, decided to move his family to Vermont. HAPPY COBBLER--George Krtzan is happy at "Vermont has always in' his cobbling work in St. Johnsbury, and about his trigued me, it seems to be a recent move to Vermont. special part of the world," he said. He wrote the Chamber of Commerce in Burlington, Rutland and Brattleboro. Things seemed to be moving slowly, so this summer he packed a five ton truck full of all their belongings and brought his family to Ver. mont. He had wanted to open a shoe repair shop in Burlington, to be near the water, but an opportunity arose in St. Johnsbury and he decided that this would be his new home. Last Jan. 5, he opened the 'Caledonia Cob- bler,' located at 61 Eastern Ave. in St. Johnsbury. Customers seem happy with the opportunity to re-cycle their shoes and just as happy to see the Cobbler's tremendous smile or hear his gusty laugh. He also enjoys whistling while he works and is proficient at the warbler call. "You have to care about your work. Now I can repair shoes in a matter of minutes,,' he said, and he is quick to demonstrate his equipment with 800 pounds of pressure that helps him to do it. The Caledonia Cobbler now has a customer pick-up at Burnham Shoes in Wells River. In St. Johnsbury, the shop has a selection of hats, brass buckles, stained glass and other unique gifts, and customers can have their (please turn'topage 9)