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April 8, 1981     Journal Opinion
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,, f, Thelf ord Panthers April 8, 981- the Journal Opimon-Page 7 VARSITY SOFTBALL AND BASEBALL 1981 9 SB - Woodstock at TA - Scrimmage BB - TA at Woodstock - Scrimmage April 11 SB - TA at S. Hadley - Scrimmage ', April 13 SB & BB at Mascoma - Scrimmage GAMES SB & BB at Chelsea 24 SB & BB at Blue Mountain SB & BB - Whitcomb at TA 1 SB & BB at Rochester 5 SB & BB at South Royalton 7 SB & BB - Chelsea at TA 11 SB - Sunapee at TA, BB - TA at Orford 12 SB & BB - Blue Mountain at TA 15 SB & BB at Whitcomb t8 BB - Orford at TA 19 SB & BB - Rochester at TA 21 .SB & BB - South Royalton at TA 99 Baseball and Softball Picks 25 Regional Quarterfinals ,30 Regional Semifinals Regional Finals , une 6 Statewide Finals contests begin at 4 P.M. except for some tournament Oxbow Olympians BASEBALL (VARSITY) "Thurs. North Country (H) 3:30 -Mon. BMU (A) 1:00 -Tues. Hanover (A) 1:00 -Fri. Harwood (H) 11:00 "Tues. Northfield (A) 4:00 U-32 (H) 4:00 WhiteMtn. (Dbl. H.) (A) 11:00 Williamstown (H) 4:00 Randolph (A) 4:00 Randolph (H) 11:00 Harwood (A) 4:00 Northfield (H) 4:00 U-32 (A) 4:00 Williamstown (A) 4:00 BMU (H) 4:00 Jim Kelly / 8OFTBALL (VARSITY) Hanover (A) 11:00 Northfield (H) 4:00 ' Montpelier (A) 11:00 Williamstown (A) 11:00 U-32 (H) 4:00 Harwood (A) 4:00 Hanover (H) 11:00 Randolph (A) 4:00 Montpelier (H) 4:00 Spaulding (A) 11:00 Williamstown (H) 4:00 U-32 (A) 4:00 Harwood (H) 10:30 Spaulding (H) 4:00 Randolph (H) 4:00 Nortlffield (A) 11:00 : Paul Munn J.V. BASEBALL GUnther Wernecke S.B. & B.B. Northfield "(H) 11:00 ; Hanover (A) 11:00 Northfield (NU) (A) 4:30 Hanover (H) 11:00 Randolph (A) 4:00 Harwood CA) 4:00 Harwood (H) 11:00 U-32 (Dbl. H.) (H) 3:00 Randolph (H) 4:00 Orford (H) 3:00 Orford (A) 4:45 Northfield (H) 11:00 Hanover (A) 1.00 Montpelier (A) 11:00 Harwood (A) 4:00 Randolph (Dbl. lJ. (A) 4:00 Spaulding (A) 11:00 U-32 (A) 4:00 Harwood (H) 12:00 Northfield (A) 11:00 Orford , (H) 3:00 Orford (A) 3:00 iFri. Sandy Mercier (Girls) TRACK : Dave Imhoff Haverhill (A) 4:00 Haverhill (H) 4:00 Montpelier (H) 3:30 St. Johnsbury (H) 3:30 Thefford (A) 4:00 St. Johnsbury (A) 3:45 Thetford (H) 4:00 Harwood (B&G) (H) 4:00 St.Jay (G) (A) 3:30 KUA (B&G) (A) (field) KUA (B&G) CA) (track) N. Country (G) (A) 3:30 St, Jay (B) (relays) (A) 5:00 Lyndon (B&G) (A) 3:30 N. Country (B) (H) 3:30 L. Region (B&G) (A) 4:00 Spaulding (B) CA) 3:30 GOLF Spaulding (A) 3:00 Northfield (A) 3:00 St. Jay (A) 3:00 Spaulding St. Jay (H) 3:00 Montpelier (H) 3:00 Northfield (A) 3:00 aspects of tlodge named r reservist Hodge, assist the victims either in the public area, which includes Defense towns and municipalities, or public in- private individuals. in Reservists are just what the to name implies--people whoare on reserve and respond only in times when they are needed. They had often been refered to in as "disaster gypsies," people who can drop everything and work for an indefinite time under any conditions y anywhere. Lgeney is The job is to help execute recovery post-disaster relief and major recovery programs in corn- by the munities devastated by a reservist, calamity. Reservists work part of with government, voluntary be to agencies, individuals, or 'East Corin.th Haverhill youth plays woman climbs ! Thught$ n the / P Out-of-Doors Lacrosse at Plymouth Me. Katahdin / PLYMOUTH--The Plymouth tacker Rick Brown of l L A --, UU aa .... |State College men's lacrosse Lexington, Mass., is once by STEI,LAKNAPP  Dy terrify me. m ur |team is starting the season again expected to light up the E. CORINTH--The first all- ...... . ..... /with high hopes after a win- scoreboard with regularity. female mountaineering party ning exhibition season. He led the Panthers in scoring to scale Maine's rugged Mount Katahdin in winter included Laura J. Waterman of E. Corinth. Katahdin, located in the northeast wilds of Maine further north than Montreal, is considered one of the most difficult ascents in New England in winter. Park officials stated that the 10-women team was the first all-female group to attempt the 5,267-foot peak. The climb took place during the week of Feb. 14-21. Two full days were needed simply to walk in to the base of the mountain, jthe next day, thied and high winds prevented climbing Katahdin, so the women ascended nearby Mount Hamlin, 4,751 feet, second highest peak in Maine. On Feb. 18, despite con- tinued clouds and wind, all I0 women donned crampons (iron spikes attached to mountaineering boots) and with ice-axes began the ascent, 2,000 feet of steep snow slopes above their camp. They reached the summit at 11:30 a.m. In "white-out" conditions- extremely dense clouds and snow all around which make everything appear white and featureless -- the group had difficulty in locating the proper descent route, but eventually found it and was back at camp by 6 p.m. Next day three of the women, including Mrs. Waterman, climbed South Turner. a smaller mountain in the area. Laura Waterman has been scaling New England peaks in winter for 10 years. She has climbed all of the 47 New Hampshire peaks over 4,000- feet high. This was her econd winter ascent of Katahdin. In 1975, she became the first woman to climb the cliff of Cannon Mountain in Fran- conia Notch in winter. This 1,000-foot precipice is the highest sheer cliff east of the Mississippi River and is regarded as a major technical feat of mountaineering. The cliff is famous for the Old Man of the Mountains, a granite feature that is the state's symbol. Mrs. Waterman is an out- doors writer and co-author with husband Guy Waterman of a book. "Backwoods Ethics: Environmental Concerns for Hikers and Campers," published by Stephen Greene Press of Brattleboro. N.I-L grant fights youth alcoholism CONCORDThe Governor and Council have approved a grant for Alcoholism Services to Adolescents to the Upper Valley Youth Services of Lebanon. The grant award is for $19,000. The program will adapt existing service forms to better serve youngsters who are either alcoholic them- selves or are members of an alcoholic family. The programs will work with youngsters currently in some form of residential care, such as group homes or foster homes. The program is among the first publicly supported residential treatment programs for alcoholics in New Hampshire. It is an- ticipated that this direct service will aid recovering alcoholic teenagers in the Lebanon and Upper Valley area. Trout season opens this Saturday The long awaited day comes on the llth this year and the streams and lakes of Vermont will be alive with anglers who have waited impatiently all winter. The prospects look good for the stream fishermen as the water is lower than it has been at this time most years. Many of the lakes should be open if the warm weather holds. Charlie Spencer, my colleague on the Rutland Herald, called today to say that the ice in the lakes around Windsor and Rutland Counties was going fast and that there should be plenty of open water on Saturday. Retired warden Jim Redmond called today to say that the ice will be out of Lake Morey later this week so that is good Bews. The waters in the Northeast Kingdom still have plenty of ice, but a lot can happen in a week. Today's warm rain will do a lot to dissolve the ice and a warm breeze could well com- plete the job on many of the lakes. Just to be safe, you should Call someone in the area you intend to fish before making a long drive only to find the ice still in. Check that gear Now is the time to get out all the gear that you will use on Saturday. Some items seem to disappear over the long winter. It is frustrating to find you don't have a bait box at 4 a.m. on opening day or that you forgot to register the boat trailer. Likewise, standing in three feet of icy water is a bad time to find that your wadders leak. Many a reel fails on opening morning because it was never cleaned or lubricated and no amount of cursing will help. I recommend that you change your monofilament every year. Losing a big one is a rough way to find out that your line has weakened since last year. Monofilament is very suceptable to light and heat and many of the substances that it comes in contact with in a boat such as gas and oil. Those reels kept in the back window of your car may well come back to haunt you. Spare spools of mono should be kept in a cool dry place away from sunlight. Don't let any store sell you line that has been on display in the window. As most fishermen know the weakest point in a line is the knot that attaches the swivel or lure. A test was conducted at last year's conference of the Outdoor Writers Association of America. Each of 53 writers participating was given several yards of nylon mono taken from the same giant spool. They were given five swivels and told to tie their favorite knot. The strongest knot tested was the new Trilene knot which was t.ied by rr'riters. The average knot strength for the I0 pound test line with the Trilene knots was 11.16 pounds. The second strongest knot was the Palomar with an average strength of 10.75 pounds. The Improved Clinch knot is perhaps the most popular knot used today. It was the weakest knot tested averaging 8.98 pounds. 1]Vinnepesaukee is hot The Big W in New Hampshire is really producing some nice salmon since tee out. I highly recommend that serious salmon fishermen at least give it a try this spring. I returned to my office Friday morning to find a message from my secretary that Wayne Carter had called. Wayne is The squad includes fresh- man Bernie Marvin of Haverhill. The Panthers, who have been ranked in 17th place in the New England Pre-Season All-Division Men's Collegiate Lacrosse Ratings, posted a 3-1 exhibition record last week in Maryland against Delaware Lacrosse Club (won 16-3), Skidmore College (won 15-5), Washington College I won 13-7) and the U.S. Naval Academy (lost 0-7). "We've got outstanding balance and good depth on defense," says Coach Dave Webster, whose club is hoping to improve on last season's 6-5 record. "The big thing I'm con- cerned with is that we've got several young people playing in key positions." The squad is led by junior co-captains David Hadley of Summit and Matt Fogarty of Madison, Conn. High-scoring senior at- Woodsville High School The. Engineers Norwich, sophomore I Ben Cole of Lexington, Mass.; freshman Bernie Marvin of Haverhill; freshman Bill Van Antwerp of Hamden, Conn.; freshman Tom Haydock of Cincinnati, Ohio and junior Shawn Gangloff of Milford.  ' I Conn.; Sporting Goods   Nike Shoes Hunt(as & Fidfinz Lkems wHrr mv1 VgaMONT S.?lOO |.v i. i i .. I IIIIII ] , last11 assistsSeasOnforWith42 points.31 goals and 14 YIAR$ OF [XPIRIEKI . if Other attackers expected to CldI Joe bllo I-b03-4411-3717 " perform for the Panthers are senior Jeff Valentine of SALES & SERVICE BAGS&SUPPLIES. Cherry Hill, N.J.: sophomore 7_.:::;-':-_:-:_:::;::?;.\\;---SU-_/: m:Jl _- .. ..... i_ _ii " .......... N.J.: freshman Bill Foley of Port Jefferson, N.Y., and ' freshman David Appleman of Ingmeadow, Mass. Expected to help out HadleY l t  Headquarters I at midfield are freshman , Terry O'Brien of Boonton, N.J.; sophomore Bob Olson of I ! t  :a!i.. I Fiing ,ialkta [ Netcong, N.J.; sophomore Matt Morriss of Longmeadow, SPECIAL[ Mass.: freshman Rick I Ill SPRING . DiGiovanni of Lexington, ' Mass.; freshman Geoff J I Fly Outfit -- h)d Reel LiCe| Ben.son of Lexington, Mas ] - junior Joe Popinchalk Soi $7.08 -- tax included I  .,1 . I by RICK McKEAN Woodsville ready to play baseball WOODSVILLE-- The dancing course starting April Woodsville baseball and 21. The class will meet at the softball teams are preparing Woodsville Community for an early season which will Building every Tuesday and start - April 17 - with both Thursday night from 7-9 p,m. teams hosting Colebrook. The cost will be $20.00 for The baseball team will be the entire eight weeks. coached by John Bagonzi, Everyone is welcome, and while the softball team will be those interested should come coached by Steve Walker. ready to exercise and dance Both coaches are looking on April 21. To register call toward a successful season. Diana Walker; day: 747-2781, Elsewhere at Woodsville, night:747-3712. Diana Walker will be con- ducting an eight-week arobic Ft. parks season passesonsale Vermont State Park season passes went on sale April I. the chief of Information and Education for New Hampshire Edward J. Koenemann, Fish and Game and an ardent fisherman who is a great Director of Parks, said the source of information for those of us who write as well as fish. single vehicle bumper sticker is $15 for the season. A second vehicle sticker may be issued w $ to another vehicle owned by the same person. The individual "Walk-In" Pass sells for $5. "That is a real bargain these days", said Koenemann. The bumper sticker entitles lhc vehicle and a maximum of nine passengers entrance at all State Parks and the use of park roads, parking and picnic areas and bathing beaches. The pass does not include the use of campsites or other facilities which have a charge beyond Ihe regular entrance fee. The two-car owner may get the second bumper sticker for the reduced fee. The "Walk- In" Season Pass is for those who live close to a park and prefer to travel by foot or bicycle. FLOOD PLAIN WORKSHOP HARTFORD--A workshop on "What's Wrong With Flood Plain Management" will be held April 16 at 4:30 p.m. at the Hartford High School. The workshop is designed to present practical information for selectmen, planning and zoning officials, ad- ministrators, Civil Defense officials, emergency service providers, developers, recreational and conservation commissioners, bankers, landowners, lawyers, realtors and others. It will be sponsored by the Upper Valley-Lake Sunapee Council, Connecticut River Watershed Council, Montshire Museum Public Service and New England River Basins Commission. businesses to help rebuild disrupted lives and economies. TltOUGHTS I've seen boys on my baseball team go into slumps attd never come out of them, I gave him a call and his first words were, "Can you meet me at Winnepesaukee tomorrow? The ice went out yesterday and the salmon are hitting." No matter that I had lawns to rake and wood to cut, I im- mediately said yes. I might as well have left then as I ac- complished little the rest of the day. My mind kept drifting back to last spring when I did so well taking my limit both days on the lake. I got up at four a.m. and drove to Glendale where I met Wayne Carter with his boar. It was hard to believe that the ice had gone out only two days earlier. Literally hundreds of boats were on the lake at daylight. As Wayne is the number one promotor of New Hampshire fishing, he combined business with pleasure and brought along his cameras to record the action. I was amazed to find so many fishermen who had come from all over New England. There is an elaborate, if informal, grapevine that seems to spread the announcement of ice out within hours to the far away abodes of dedicated salmon anglers. Nearly everyone we saw was catching fish and raving about the nice weather. One angler up from Massachusetts had taken and released six in two hours. I managed to land a 20 inch beauty early and a sublega114 incher later. Later in the morning we went out with well known guide Gordan Freeman and cruised around charting fish on his recording graph depth finder and fish locater. My only regret was that I had to work Saturday night and thus had to leave the lake in the early afternoon. While on the topic of salmon I hear that some good ones are being taken on Vermont's Champlain. This is good news as the Fish and Game Department has worked hard to establish the fishery there. I hope to get a crack at the salmon in June and l've seen others snap right when Vermont hosts the New England Outdoor Writers. Bish out and come back better than Bishop of the Burlington Free Press keeps telling me about the fishing, but I have yet to get a chance to try it. Turkeys in Bradford I got a call from Lloyd Kidder last week to report a turkey on the South Road. Lloyd said that he and Charlie Stimpson watched it for some time. The last two years have brought sightings of several birds in the area. This is good news and may well mean that a flock can be established in the future. .WBARU & 8 GREEN ST. ever. I guess more players lick themselves than are ever licked by an opposing team. The first thing any man has to know is how to handle himself. Connie Mack I ATTENTION GOLFERS! BRADFORD GOLF CLUB 444--0000 LITTLETON Welcomes you to play their sporty 9 hole course located in the center of town. Send in your membership dues now and save! Mule Membership Green Fees $56.65 before May 15th $5.00 daily $61.8{) after May 15th (Tax included) (3 percent Vt. Sales Tax incl.) ' A'ill You mav send your check to: -. ,.,  Bradford Golf Club, Inc. ' ' ,/;;t Bradford, Vt. 05033 .,\\; /; Please include your mailing address. ID/l" Mike Maxwell will be in charge of V::,  i SPRING CLEANING SALE SCRAP fIREWOOD -- all klln-drled maple, you load it at 3'/cublc 00oot. SAWDUST -- perfect for kindling or small sugaring operations. FACTORY SECONDS BUTCHER BLOCK TABLES, TABLE TOPS, AND WORKBENCHES - a once in a lifetime opportunity to purchase high quality maple tables at 50% discounts. If you are interested in tables plan to visit our factory on Friday, April 3rd between 12:00 and 5: 00 or Saturday, April 4th between 9:00 and 2: 00. If you are interested in firewood or sawdust call or visit anytime. We are located behind Channel Mills in the Pierson Industrml Park In Bradford, Vt.. P.O. Box 386 Bradford, Vt. 05033 I _---- -_- __- ..... _=: _- :_ Te!e_phone802:222-4t771 __I Gas Saver Testdo&o. Patentedri DENVER--The Copley News Service reported that United States Patents have now been issued to Wm. Trevaskis, California veteran electrical engineer, for his Vapror-JetO brand water vapor injector (Pat. No. 4.119.062). The Vapor-JetO system has survived testing by a certified independent automotive testing laboratory. Test results showed miles per pllon improvement of 17.3 percent on Trevaskis" 1971 Ford Galaxie and 13.3 percent on a 1973 Olds Starfire. Water injectors arc nothing new since they were used during World War II to give combat planes extended speed and range. The design of Trevaskis" new Vapor-JetS is very inexpensive ($29.95 + $3.00 shipping) and can be easily installed in 15 minutes. The Vapor-JetO has a{} unconditional 60 day guarantee. If for any reason you are not satisfied you may return it within 60 days for a ]$29.95 refund. How do tl Vapor J system work? Vapor-Jete has no moving pans to wear out. Engine vacuum draws a mist from the bubbling reservoir into any intake manifold suction hose. The connection to the hose is made by simply screwing the exclusive hyplcrmlc-like injector nozzle Iwhich contains a regulator to allowiust the right amount ol mist to pass} into the hose. The introduction of this mist cools the fuel-air mixture thus increasing the octane effect of the gasoline, improwng combustion fficicncy, horsepower and eliminating ping and deiseling (after- running of motor). Steam being a good cleaner, helps dissolve carbon deposits on the spark plugs and cylinder walls of older vehicles and helps prevent carbon buildup in new ones. Vapor-Jet combined with regular gas gives "premium" results. Will Vor4efe fie ell cus; Yes, Vapor-Jet@ is easily installed on all domestic and foreign atrs, vans, light trucks, R.V.s, campers, motor homes, and small boats. It will work on fuel injection, lean burn cars and cars with turbo chariOts,and super charlPs and rotary engines. It will also work with unleaded jas, ptahol, or peopan burning cars. The same kit fits all Cars and cdntaim evedythin8 needed. Simple with a diagram are ''r,J included and even a "'"" novice should be able to l install it in less than 15 ,*Nl minutes. CaR Vor4ete dlmge my engine? Absolutely not! VaporOet cools down the fuel air mixture giving a better burn and suppresses ping thus aiding your engine. Why Use Methanol?. (Vw Inrtor Mix?) Methanol (wood) alcohol is mixed with water mainly to prevent freezing and lesser amounts used to keep the injector nozzle clean in non-freezing weather. A full reservoir should last 1,000 to 1.500 miles. Sources of methanol are drug stores, paint supply stores, service stations, ctc. Substitutions are ethanol Igrain) alcohol and Hoot. dry gas, or other gas line antifreezes that contain methanol. What mileage increase is expected? ". lhis varies irom car to car. lesting by an independent laboratory obtained improvements from 13.3r to 17.3%. For purchase, or further information, write Fort Morgan Vapor-Jet, 15160 Hwy 144, No. 7, Fort Morgan, C(). 80701 or call 303-867-9320. Dealerships available, Void in CA. Fnlo 595+$3 tl potagc and handhng (::'heck [:X'O I) I'ISA (:]Mmad Card No Ep Le t 1 Name ddR- 0 dly mon hick Immm ,, f, Thelf ord Panthers April 8, 981- the Journal Opimon-Page 7 VARSITY SOFTBALL AND BASEBALL 1981 9 SB - Woodstock at TA - Scrimmage BB - TA at Woodstock - Scrimmage April 11 SB - TA at S. Hadley - Scrimmage ', April 13 SB & BB at Mascoma - Scrimmage GAMES SB & BB at Chelsea 24 SB & BB at Blue Mountain SB & BB - Whitcomb at TA 1 SB & BB at Rochester 5 SB & BB at South Royalton 7 SB & BB - Chelsea at TA 11 SB - Sunapee at TA, BB - TA at Orford 12 SB & BB - Blue Mountain at TA 15 SB & BB at Whitcomb t8 BB - Orford at TA 19 SB & BB - Rochester at TA 21 .SB & BB - South Royalton at TA 99 Baseball and Softball Picks 25 Regional Quarterfinals ,30 Regional Semifinals Regional Finals , une 6 Statewide Finals contests begin at 4 P.M. except for some tournament Oxbow Olympians BASEBALL (VARSITY) "Thurs. North Country (H) 3:30 -Mon. BMU (A) 1:00 -Tues. Hanover (A) 1:00 -Fri. Harwood (H) 11:00 "Tues. Northfield (A) 4:00 U-32 (H) 4:00 WhiteMtn. (Dbl. H.) (A) 11:00 Williamstown (H) 4:00 Randolph (A) 4:00 Randolph (H) 11:00 Harwood (A) 4:00 Northfield (H) 4:00 U-32 (A) 4:00 Williamstown (A) 4:00 BMU (H) 4:00 Jim Kelly / 8OFTBALL (VARSITY) Hanover (A) 11:00 Northfield (H) 4:00 ' Montpelier (A) 11:00 Williamstown (A) 11:00 U-32 (H) 4:00 Harwood (A) 4:00 Hanover (H) 11:00 Randolph (A) 4:00 Montpelier (H) 4:00 Spaulding (A) 11:00 Williamstown (H) 4:00 U-32 (A) 4:00 Harwood (H) 10:30 Spaulding (H) 4:00 Randolph (H) 4:00 Nortlffield (A) 11:00 : Paul Munn J.V. BASEBALL GUnther Wernecke S.B. & B.B. Northfield "(H) 11:00 ; Hanover (A) 11:00 Northfield (NU) (A) 4:30 Hanover (H) 11:00 Randolph (A) 4:00 Harwood CA) 4:00 Harwood (H) 11:00 U-32 (Dbl. H.) (H) 3:00 Randolph (H) 4:00 Orford (H) 3:00 Orford (A) 4:45 Northfield (H) 11:00 Hanover (A) 1.00 Montpelier (A) 11:00 Harwood (A) 4:00 Randolph (Dbl. lJ. (A) 4:00 Spaulding (A) 11:00 U-32 (A) 4:00 Harwood (H) 12:00 Northfield (A) 11:00 Orford , (H) 3:00 Orford (A) 3:00 iFri. Sandy Mercier (Girls) TRACK : Dave Imhoff Haverhill (A) 4:00 Haverhill (H) 4:00 Montpelier (H) 3:30 St. Johnsbury (H) 3:30 Thefford (A) 4:00 St. Johnsbury (A) 3:45 Thetford (H) 4:00 Harwood (B&G) (H) 4:00 St.Jay (G) (A) 3:30 KUA (B&G) (A) (field) KUA (B&G) CA) (track) N. Country (G) (A) 3:30 St, Jay (B) (relays) (A) 5:00 Lyndon (B&G) (A) 3:30 N. Country (B) (H) 3:30 L. Region (B&G) (A) 4:00 Spaulding (B) CA) 3:30 GOLF Spaulding (A) 3:00 Northfield (A) 3:00 St. Jay (A) 3:00 Spaulding St. Jay (H) 3:00 Montpelier (H) 3:00 Northfield (A) 3:00 aspects of tlodge named r reservist Hodge, assist the victims either in the public area, which includes Defense towns and municipalities, or public in- private individuals. in Reservists are just what the to name implies--people whoare on reserve and respond only in times when they are needed. They had often been refered to in as "disaster gypsies," people who can drop everything and work for an indefinite time under any conditions y anywhere. Lgeney is The job is to help execute recovery post-disaster relief and major recovery programs in corn- by the munities devastated by a reservist, calamity. Reservists work part of with government, voluntary be to agencies, individuals, or 'East Corin.th Haverhill youth plays woman climbs ! Thught$ n the / P Out-of-Doors Lacrosse at Plymouth Me. Katahdin / PLYMOUTH--The Plymouth tacker Rick Brown of l L A --, UU aa .... |State College men's lacrosse Lexington, Mass., is once by STEI,LAKNAPP  Dy terrify me. m ur |team is starting the season again expected to light up the E. CORINTH--The first all- ...... . ..... /with high hopes after a win- scoreboard with regularity. female mountaineering party ning exhibition season. He led the Panthers in scoring to scale Maine's rugged Mount Katahdin in winter included Laura J. Waterman of E. Corinth. Katahdin, located in the northeast wilds of Maine further north than Montreal, is considered one of the most difficult ascents in New England in winter. Park officials stated that the 10-women team was the first all-female group to attempt the 5,267-foot peak. The climb took place during the week of Feb. 14-21. Two full days were needed simply to walk in to the base of the mountain, jthe next day, thied and high winds prevented climbing Katahdin, so the women ascended nearby Mount Hamlin, 4,751 feet, second highest peak in Maine. On Feb. 18, despite con- tinued clouds and wind, all I0 women donned crampons (iron spikes attached to mountaineering boots) and with ice-axes began the ascent, 2,000 feet of steep snow slopes above their camp. They reached the summit at 11:30 a.m. In "white-out" conditions- extremely dense clouds and snow all around which make everything appear white and featureless -- the group had difficulty in locating the proper descent route, but eventually found it and was back at camp by 6 p.m. Next day three of the women, including Mrs. Waterman, climbed South Turner. a smaller mountain in the area. Laura Waterman has been scaling New England peaks in winter for 10 years. She has climbed all of the 47 New Hampshire peaks over 4,000- feet high. This was her econd winter ascent of Katahdin. In 1975, she became the first woman to climb the cliff of Cannon Mountain in Fran- conia Notch in winter. This 1,000-foot precipice is the highest sheer cliff east of the Mississippi River and is regarded as a major technical feat of mountaineering. The cliff is famous for the Old Man of the Mountains, a granite feature that is the state's symbol. Mrs. Waterman is an out- doors writer and co-author with husband Guy Waterman of a book. "Backwoods Ethics: Environmental Concerns for Hikers and Campers," published by Stephen Greene Press of Brattleboro. N.I-L grant fights youth alcoholism CONCORDThe Governor and Council have approved a grant for Alcoholism Services to Adolescents to the Upper Valley Youth Services of Lebanon. The grant award is for $19,000. The program will adapt existing service forms to better serve youngsters who are either alcoholic them- selves or are members of an alcoholic family. The programs will work with youngsters currently in some form of residential care, such as group homes or foster homes. The program is among the first publicly supported residential treatment programs for alcoholics in New Hampshire. It is an- ticipated that this direct service will aid recovering alcoholic teenagers in the Lebanon and Upper Valley area. Trout season opens this Saturday The long awaited day comes on the llth this year and the streams and lakes of Vermont will be alive with anglers who have waited impatiently all winter. The prospects look good for the stream fishermen as the water is lower than it has been at this time most years. Many of the lakes should be open if the warm weather holds. Charlie Spencer, my colleague on the Rutland Herald, called today to say that the ice in the lakes around Windsor and Rutland Counties was going fast and that there should be plenty of open water on Saturday. Retired warden Jim Redmond called today to say that the ice will be out of Lake Morey later this week so that is good Bews. The waters in the Northeast Kingdom still have plenty of ice, but a lot can happen in a week. Today's warm rain will do a lot to dissolve the ice and a warm breeze could well com- plete the job on many of the lakes. Just to be safe, you should Call someone in the area you intend to fish before making a long drive only to find the ice still in. Check that gear Now is the time to get out all the gear that you will use on Saturday. Some items seem to disappear over the long winter. It is frustrating to find you don't have a bait box at 4 a.m. on opening day or that you forgot to register the boat trailer. Likewise, standing in three feet of icy water is a bad time to find that your wadders leak. Many a reel fails on opening morning because it was never cleaned or lubricated and no amount of cursing will help. I recommend that you change your monofilament every year. Losing a big one is a rough way to find out that your line has weakened since last year. Monofilament is very suceptable to light and heat and many of the substances that it comes in contact with in a boat such as gas and oil. Those reels kept in the back window of your car may well come back to haunt you. Spare spools of mono should be kept in a cool dry place away from sunlight. Don't let any store sell you line that has been on display in the window. As most fishermen know the weakest point in a line is the knot that attaches the swivel or lure. A test was conducted at last year's conference of the Outdoor Writers Association of America. Each of 53 writers participating was given several yards of nylon mono taken from the same giant spool. They were given five swivels and told to tie their favorite knot. The strongest knot tested was the new Trilene knot which was t.ied by rr'riters. The average knot strength for the I0 pound test line with the Trilene knots was 11.16 pounds. The second strongest knot was the Palomar with an average strength of 10.75 pounds. The Improved Clinch knot is perhaps the most popular knot used today. It was the weakest knot tested averaging 8.98 pounds. 1]Vinnepesaukee is hot The Big W in New Hampshire is really producing some nice salmon since tee out. I highly recommend that serious salmon fishermen at least give it a try this spring. I returned to my office Friday morning to find a message from my secretary that Wayne Carter had called. Wayne is The squad includes fresh- man Bernie Marvin of Haverhill. The Panthers, who have been ranked in 17th place in the New England Pre-Season All-Division Men's Collegiate Lacrosse Ratings, posted a 3-1 exhibition record last week in Maryland against Delaware Lacrosse Club (won 16-3), Skidmore College (won 15-5), Washington College I won 13-7) and the U.S. Naval Academy (lost 0-7). "We've got outstanding balance and good depth on defense," says Coach Dave Webster, whose club is hoping to improve on last season's 6-5 record. "The big thing I'm con- cerned with is that we've got several young people playing in key positions." The squad is led by junior co-captains David Hadley of Summit and Matt Fogarty of Madison, Conn. High-scoring senior at- Woodsville High School The. Engineers Norwich, sophomore I Ben Cole of Lexington, Mass.; freshman Bernie Marvin of Haverhill; freshman Bill Van Antwerp of Hamden, Conn.; freshman Tom Haydock of Cincinnati, Ohio and junior Shawn Gangloff of Milford.  ' I Conn.; Sporting Goods   Nike Shoes Hunt(as & Fidfinz Lkems wHrr mv1 VgaMONT S.?lOO |.v i. i i .. I IIIIII ] , last11 assistsSeasOnforWith42 points.31 goals and 14 YIAR$ OF [XPIRIEKI . if Other attackers expected to CldI Joe bllo I-b03-4411-3717 " perform for the Panthers are senior Jeff Valentine of SALES & SERVICE BAGS&SUPPLIES. Cherry Hill, N.J.: sophomore 7_.:::;-':-_:-:_:::;::?;.\\;---SU-_/: m:Jl _- .. ..... i_ _ii " .......... N.J.: freshman Bill Foley of Port Jefferson, N.Y., and ' freshman David Appleman of Ingmeadow, Mass. Expected to help out HadleY l t  Headquarters I at midfield are freshman , Terry O'Brien of Boonton, N.J.; sophomore Bob Olson of I ! t  :a!i.. I Fiing ,ialkta [ Netcong, N.J.; sophomore Matt Morriss of Longmeadow, SPECIAL[ Mass.: freshman Rick I Ill SPRING . DiGiovanni of Lexington, ' Mass.; freshman Geoff J I Fly Outfit -- h)d Reel LiCe| Ben.son of Lexington, Mas ] - junior Joe Popinchalk Soi $7.08 -- tax included I  .,1 . I by RICK McKEAN Woodsville ready to play baseball WOODSVILLE-- The dancing course starting April Woodsville baseball and 21. The class will meet at the softball teams are preparing Woodsville Community for an early season which will Building every Tuesday and start - April 17 - with both Thursday night from 7-9 p,m. teams hosting Colebrook. The cost will be $20.00 for The baseball team will be the entire eight weeks. coached by John Bagonzi, Everyone is welcome, and while the softball team will be those interested should come coached by Steve Walker. ready to exercise and dance Both coaches are looking on April 21. To register call toward a successful season. Diana Walker; day: 747-2781, Elsewhere at Woodsville, night:747-3712. Diana Walker will be con- ducting an eight-week arobic Ft. parks season passesonsale Vermont State Park season passes went on sale April I. the chief of Information and Education for New Hampshire Edward J. Koenemann, Fish and Game and an ardent fisherman who is a great Director of Parks, said the source of information for those of us who write as well as fish. single vehicle bumper sticker is $15 for the season. A second vehicle sticker may be issued w $ to another vehicle owned by the same person. The individual "Walk-In" Pass sells for $5. "That is a real bargain these days", said Koenemann. The bumper sticker entitles lhc vehicle and a maximum of nine passengers entrance at all State Parks and the use of park roads, parking and picnic areas and bathing beaches. The pass does not include the use of campsites or other facilities which have a charge beyond Ihe regular entrance fee. The two-car owner may get the second bumper sticker for the reduced fee. The "Walk- In" Season Pass is for those who live close to a park and prefer to travel by foot or bicycle. FLOOD PLAIN WORKSHOP HARTFORD--A workshop on "What's Wrong With Flood Plain Management" will be held April 16 at 4:30 p.m. at the Hartford High School. The workshop is designed to present practical information for selectmen, planning and zoning officials, ad- ministrators, Civil Defense officials, emergency service providers, developers, recreational and conservation commissioners, bankers, landowners, lawyers, realtors and others. It will be sponsored by the Upper Valley-Lake Sunapee Council, Connecticut River Watershed Council, Montshire Museum Public Service and New England River Basins Commission. businesses to help rebuild disrupted lives and economies. TltOUGHTS I've seen boys on my baseball team go into slumps attd never come out of them, I gave him a call and his first words were, "Can you meet me at Winnepesaukee tomorrow? The ice went out yesterday and the salmon are hitting." No matter that I had lawns to rake and wood to cut, I im- mediately said yes. I might as well have left then as I ac- complished little the rest of the day. My mind kept drifting back to last spring when I did so well taking my limit both days on the lake. I got up at four a.m. and drove to Glendale where I met Wayne Carter with his boar. It was hard to believe that the ice had gone out only two days earlier. Literally hundreds of boats were on the lake at daylight. As Wayne is the number one promotor of New Hampshire fishing, he combined business with pleasure and brought along his cameras to record the action. I was amazed to find so many fishermen who had come from all over New England. There is an elaborate, if informal, grapevine that seems to spread the announcement of ice out within hours to the far away abodes of dedicated salmon anglers. Nearly everyone we saw was catching fish and raving about the nice weather. One angler up from Massachusetts had taken and released six in two hours. I managed to land a 20 inch beauty early and a sublega114 incher later. Later in the morning we went out with well known guide Gordan Freeman and cruised around charting fish on his recording graph depth finder and fish locater. My only regret was that I had to work Saturday night and thus had to leave the lake in the early afternoon. While on the topic of salmon I hear that some good ones are being taken on Vermont's Champlain. This is good news as the Fish and Game Department has worked hard to establish the fishery there. I hope to get a crack at the salmon in June and l've seen others snap right when Vermont hosts the New England Outdoor Writers. Bish out and come back better than Bishop of the Burlington Free Press keeps telling me about the fishing, but I have yet to get a chance to try it. Turkeys in Bradford I got a call from Lloyd Kidder last week to report a turkey on the South Road. Lloyd said that he and Charlie Stimpson watched it for some time. The last two years have brought sightings of several birds in the area. This is good news and may well mean that a flock can be established in the future. .WBARU & 8 GREEN ST. ever. I guess more players lick themselves than are ever licked by an opposing team. The first thing any man has to know is how to handle himself. Connie Mack I ATTENTION GOLFERS! BRADFORD GOLF CLUB 444--0000 LITTLETON Welcomes you to play their sporty 9 hole course located in the center of town. Send in your membership dues now and save! Mule Membership Green Fees $56.65 before May 15th $5.00 daily $61.8{) after May 15th (Tax included) (3 percent Vt. Sales Tax incl.) ' A'ill You ma v send your check to: -. ,.,  Bradford Golf Club, Inc. ' ' ,/;;t Bradford, Vt. 05033 .,\\; /; Please include your mailing address. ID/l" Mike Maxwell will be in charge of V::,  i SPRING CLEANING SALE SCRAP fIREWOOD -- all klln-drled maple, you load it at 3'/cublc 00oot. SAWDUST -- perfect for kindling or small sugaring operations. FACTORY SECONDS BUTCHER BLOCK TABLES, TABLE TOPS, AND WORKBENCHES - a once in a lifetime opportunity to purchase high quality maple tables at 50% discounts. If you are interested in tables plan to visit our factory on Friday, April 3rd between 12:00 and 5: 00 or Saturday, April 4th between 9:00 and 2: 00. If you are interested in firewood or sawdust call or visit anytime. We are located behind Channel Mills in the Pierson Industrml Park In Bradford, Vt.. P.O. Box 386 Bradford, Vt. 05033 I _---- -_- __- ..... _=: _- :_ Te!e_phone802:222-4t771 __I Gas Saver Testdo&o. Patentedri DENVER--The Copley News Service reported that United States Patents have now been issued to Wm. Trevaskis, California veteran electrical engineer, for his Vapror-JetO brand water vapor injector (Pat. No. 4.119.062). The Vapor-JetO system has survived testing by a certified independent automotive testing laboratory. Test results showed miles per pllon improvement of 17.3 percent on Trevaskis" 1971 Ford Galaxie and 13.3 percent on a 1973 Olds Starfire. Water injectors arc nothing new since they were used during World War II to give combat planes extended speed and range. The design of Trevaskis" new Vapor-JetS is very inexpensive ($29.95 + $3.00 shipping) and can be easily installed in 15 minutes. The Vapor-JetO has a{} unconditional 60 day guarantee. If for any reason you are not satisfied you may return it within 60 days for a ]$29.95 refund. How do tl Vapor J system work? Vapor-Jete has no moving pans to wear out. Engine vacuum draws a mist from the bubbling reservoir into any intake manifold suction hose. The connection to the hose is made by simply screwing the exclusive hyplcrmlc-like injector nozzle Iwhich contains a regulator to allowiust the right amount ol mist to pass} into the hose. The introduction of this mist cools the fuel-air mixture thus increasing the octane effect of the gasoline, improwng combustion fficicncy, horsepower and eliminating ping and deiseling (after- running of motor). Steam being a good cleaner, helps dissolve carbon deposits on the spark plugs and cylinder walls of older vehicles and helps prevent carbon buildup in new ones. Vapor-Jet combined with regular gas gives "premium" results. Will Vor4efe fie ell cus; Yes, Vapor-Jet@ is easily installed on all domestic and foreign atrs, vans, light trucks, R.V.s, campers, motor homes, and small boats. It will work on fuel injection, lean burn cars and cars with turbo chariOts,and super charlPs and rotary engines. It will also work with unleaded jas, ptahol, or peopan burning cars. The same kit fits all Cars and cdntaim evedythin8 needed. Simple with a diagram are ''r,J included and even a "'"" novice should be able to l install it in less than 15 ,*Nl minutes. CaR Vor4ete dlmge my engine? Absolutely not! VaporOet cools down the fuel air mixture giving a better burn and suppresses ping thus aiding your engine. Why Use Methanol?. (Vw Inrtor Mix?) Methanol (wood) alcohol is mixed with water mainly to prevent freezing and lesser amounts used to keep the injector nozzle clean in non-freezing weather. A full reservoir should last 1,000 to 1.500 miles. Sources of methanol are drug stores, paint supply stores, service stations, ctc. Substitutions are ethanol Igrain) alcohol and Hoot. dry gas, or other gas line antifreezes that contain methanol. What mileage increase is expected? ". lhis varies irom car to car. lesting by an independent laboratory obtained improvements from 13.3r to 17.3%. For purchase, or further information, write Fort Morgan Vapor-Jet, 15160 Hwy 144, No. 7, Fort Morgan, C(). 80701 or call 303-867-9320. Dealerships available, Void in CA. Fnlo 595+$3 tl potagc and handhng (::'heck [:X'O I) I'ISA (:]Mmad Card No Ep Le t 1 Name ddR- 0 dly mon hick Immm