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Bradford , Vermont
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April 8, 1981     Journal Opinion
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April 8, 1981
 

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April 8, 1981-The Journal Opinion-Page I I ate, members of Blue No. 263 are Night at Grange in Barnet at Hall April 8 at P.m. to help them rate their 75th . and Mrs. Bruce Nelson Newport Sunday at- March 29, to attend a Andrea, and James and Mrs. Gene Perkins were luncheon guests Tuesday, March 31, of Mrs. Greg Tocci, Helen and Anna in Orleans. Mr. and Mrs. Terry Steele and daughter Heidi returned to their home in Damneck, Va., where Terry is stationed with the U.S. Navy, Saturday morning March 28. Ginny and party and open Heidi had spent the past six of Jim Carroll, weeks with her parents Mr. Lg colleague of and Mrs. James Kinerson and at Lake Region High Jack, and Terry joined them they, with Curtis here for the final two weeks. and James, visited Timothy White, son of Mr. and family Mr. and and Mrs. Stewart White, was LeBlanc and the recipient of the Good Bitsy, also in Citizenship Award for thefifth to help celebrate grade at Blue Mountain Union 16th birthday and to School for the month of away party for sons. Andrea with the LeBlancs Nelson and Goodwin of South served a luncheon to members of the New Holstein Club February. Mr. and Mrs. Carroll Eastman, Lois and Darryl hosted a sugar on snow party Sunday afternoon, March 29, for the following family members: Mrs. Dean Hatch, Karen, Dawn, and Heather of S. Ryegate, Mr. and Mrs. 12 noon, March 28, at Dean Eastman of W. Barnet, Presbyterian Mr. and Mrs. Tim Rockwood The group was of Hartford, Mr. and Mrs. of several Vermont John Clark and son Chad of E. Barre, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Mountain Grange will Leonard, Darren, Jeffrey, a Bingo Party at the Danny, and Sarah, and Mr. Hall Friday evening, and Mrs. Gene Perkins, Gene at 8:00 p.m. The Jr. andGordon. toattend. Mr. and Mrs. Roland Nelson, Curtis, Sargent and Mr. and Mrs. Stewart White, Timothy, , Benjamin, and Joshua were in Burlington Saturday, March 28, where they attended the annual Vermont Jersey Calf and Heifer Sale at the University of Vermont Farm. Mr. and Mrs. Roy Carlsen of Walpole, N.H. were visitors Sunday, March 22, of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Ritchie. Mr. and Mrs. Reginald White were in Burlington Thursday, March 26, on business and had lunch with their daughter Mrs. Thomas Gibson in S. Burlington. Stewart White attended an E.A.I. Jersey Directors' Meeting at the Holiday Inn in Sus White River Junction tast Tuesday, March 24. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Ritchie had as callers Thursday, March 26, his nephew and wife Mr. and Mrs. Allen Ritehie of Milford, Conn. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Parsons left Thursday morning, April SHOVEL 2, to spend some time with their daughter and family Mr. wood ban- aqd Mrs. Sidney Hinman, " heat- Peter, Jennifer, and Lindsay high-carbon and Mr. and Mrs. Ralph w/rolled Holcomb and family in C2LRCSX Woodstock, New Brunswick, Canada. LIMITEO The April 14 meeting of Blue =o EL an Easter Program, also a pie }RI -=1,1.1 Mountain Grange will include social. Each lady is asked to .,.! v.mo=t IL s0000'00ctims of heart attacks I information please call collect: or 3544 Interior Design and Decorating 8 r Interiors, Inc. Studio and Workrooms GILBERTE BOGHOSIAN Llli Associate FluEh H. Ober Bradford & Nancy Perkins 584-3611 bring a pie, either homemade or bought, which will be auctioned off to the men. Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Steil, Jennifer and Rebecca were at their vacation home on the Symes Pond Road the weekend of March 28 and called on Mr. and Mrs. Harry Ritehie. Weekend guests March 14-15 of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Par- sons were their daughter and husband Mr. and Mrs. Irving Dahlstrom of Farmington, Conn. Mr. and Mrs. Walter Main joined the two couples for dinner Saturday evening in honor of Mrs. Parsons' bir- thday. An evening of Western Style Square Dancing will be held at the Grange Hall Saturday evening, April 11, with caller Eddie Monty. Walkins are welcome at $5.00 per couple. Mr. and Mrs. Norman McLure of Cambridge were overnight guests Monday, March 23, of his parents Mr. and Mrs. Warren McLure and family. Mrs. Alice Smith was a medical patient at Cottage Hospital in Woodsville Thursday through Sunday, March 26-29. The Extension ttomemakers Group will hold their monthly meeting Wednesday, April 8, (note change of date) at the home of Mrs. Guy Labounty at 1:00 p.m. The topic is "Maple Syrup and Sugar," and each member is asked to bring a maple recipe. Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hassenmayer of Milford, Conn., were at their vacation home on the Stone Road the weekend of March 27-29 and called on Mr. and Mrs. Harry Ritehie Friday evening. Gary Bowley, with his aunt and uncle Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Caswell of Rutland, fleew from Bradley Airport in Connecticut Friday, March 20, to St. Cloud, Fla., to spend a week with another aunt and uncle Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Ballou. While in Florida they visited Cypress Gardens, Sea World, and the Barnum and Bailey Circus. Edward McLure and Gene Perkins were in Montpelier Wednesday evening, April 1, to attend a dinner and meeting at the Lobster Pot Restaurant sponsored by the Vermont Department of Forests and Parks. Fairlee,, , The robins are back in Fairlee; as are the song sparrows. Mrs. Bessie Perry has returned from Boston, where she has been visiting friends for several weeks. In place of the sermon at the Federated Church, Sunday, March 29, the congregation joined the children in the undercroft to have Mrs. Morgan Adams tell of the Heifer Project International, a practical approach to world hunger. Those present en- joyed a coffee hour at the close of the talk. The spring clothing drive of the Church Women United will take place between April 13 and April 17. Please bring Wentworth Webster Memorial Library will hold Open House Saturday afternoon from 2-4. All are urged to attend. Celia Howe has returned home to recuperate after her illness at Sceva Speare Memorial Hospital. Mr. and Mrs. Lionel Gordon and Rebecca were in Rochester over the weekend. Wesley Gore was a visitor in town last weekend. Marcella Hoffmann is in Sceva Speare Memorial for Wells Rive/' Blue Mountain Union School Miss Cousins and several students attended an FBLA Convention last week. The Class of 1983 held a car wash on April 3 and 4. Under the auspices of the Rivers Reach ArtS Association the North Country Chorus, directed by Mary Rowe entertained the elementary students at Blue Mountain on April 2. After Making an Easter basket is that is.) lots of fun. (Of course, part of the enjoyment is imaginating the Easter bunny filling the basket with lots of goodies. ) The Easter season is special in lotS of ways. When I was a child, the churches in our town got together and sponsored a big Easter egg hunt for all the kids. The many eggs were handsomely decorated and hidden all over the several church yards. It was lots fun hunting them. The chickens were not so cuddly or playful as they grew, and soon found a home in my great-grandfather's chicken coop. Last week we made little bunnies. Next week we'll try several ways of decorating eggs. This week our project is baskets. A simple sturdy basket is this: Cut the bottom section of a milk carton, making a open of box. With a half-gallon carton, cut about five inches from the bottom. Or simply cut off the top of a half-pint box to make a very small basket. Cover the carton with colorful construction paper. Draw or paste decorations on it. Cut a strip (from the top part of the carton or other /)" paper). Paste this on both ends to the box, thus I '1 J J But the best part was the prizes. Each child who par- ticipated got a fluffy little yellow chick to take home. For those who won in the egg hunts the reward was a little white baby bunny. What we all did with the little pets--or how many parents objected--is not quite clear from this distance of years. However, 1 do remember two little bunnies in a box at the end of our kitchen. How fascinating they were ! Though they graduated to a pen in the backyard, they remained quite tame. With their soft fu and inquisitive natures, they*--were good playmates. The rack from the back of Dad's pickup truck (when not in use) made a play yard for them. It was an ample pen and could be moved to the choicest grassy spots. However, one day when the rabbitS were full-grown, they dug under their outdoor pen and hopped away. Our searching could not find them; I liked to imagine them living happily in the woods. (A child does not know how unlikely Mrs. Esther Johnson I I 333-9704 your layettes, new baby clothes, school or health kits, Remson blankets and like new lightweight clothing to one of the ladies of your church, who will deal with it. Jason Fountain, Brian Thurston, Robert Stone, Ryan Smith, Robert Bradley, Andy Davis, and Bart Musty were the Cub Scouts from Fairlee who attended the Mud Olympics at the Leverone Field House, Hanover, N.H., on Sunday, March 26. Robert Stone and Ryan Smith were the high scorers of Fairlee. The choir of the Federated Church, led by Karen Cramer, is now practicing the Easter music. fashioning a handle. Another simple box-basket can be made with one piece of paper. We used 8" X 10" construction paper. Make four corner cuts, each 2%" long and 2,/' from the edge as indicated by heavy lines on drawing. Fold on dotted lines. (See drawing.) Paste circled areas as folds are held together to form a rectangular basket. Make and attach paper strip handles. This type of basket is at- tractive if the paper is crayoned or painted before beginning the cutting. A third type of basket is woven of paper strips. Cut an equal number of two different colors. Weave the one color through the other. Gather together and staple the ends on each of the four sides. Attach two handle strips, one end to each of the four gathered sides. This makes a colorful rounded-woven basket. Orford , At Mt. Cube Grange regular meeting April 2, the Home Economics committee held the chocolate chip cookie bake-off with 5 entries. First place was won by Susan Drabick. We also had our talent contest won by Harry Franklin and he will go to Pomona Grange. We had two visitors from Moosilauke Grange and four from Bakers River Grange and three from Rumney. Four of the visitors were members: of the Pink Sash Family. They also held lecturers conference with the lecturers of the four granges. Mt. Cube had 13 members. Marjorie Gray wishes that one of the Bridge Builders would send her the address of Rev. and Mrs. ttolland Naughan. FBLA LEADERS--From left, Micheile Fifieid of Thetford'Academy, southern vice president for Vermont; Julie Thompson of Oxbow, Vermont state president; Mary llarrington of Round Rock, Tex., national president of Future Business Leaders of America. National FBLA head at Oxbow Virginia. Plans for the Quincy Bog dinner are being formulated. Interested folks may call Dor!s Hillier for information. BRADFORD--National which finally led to her President Mary Harrington of becoming National President. the Future Business Leaders Mary Harrington was in of America came to Oxbow High School April I to speak on how she became involved with FBLA and about some fund raising ideas. She told how her friends got her to run for state office Vermont to visit dif- ferent chapters throughout the state. She attended the state leadership conference on April 2, and 3 in White River Junction. Geothermal energy test is proposed for N.H. WASHINGTON--The Sub- geothermal hot dry rock committee on Energy Development and Applications of the full Committee on Science and Technology, on which Rep. Judd Gregg of New Hamp- shire serves, recently in- vestigated the potential use of geothermal energy. "The hot dry rock geothermal process, which the Subcommittee reviewed, involves sending water down drilled holes tens of thousands of feet deep to heated frac- tured cavities under the earth's surface. The heated water is then pumped out of the fractures into turbines to generate electricity. After the water cools it is recycled back into the underground frac- tures for reheating--making this facility a totally closed, environmentally safe system," Gregg said. "Geothermal energy is a tremendous potential energy resource/' he added. "In order to establish the com- mercial viability of the process, however, it is now necessary to attempt deep well drilling in another type of rock formation." The Hot Dry Rock Cor- poration of Augusta, Ga., has proposed to construct a PAINTING INTERIOR OR EIERIOR ' WillddOdd job's PAULH()I)GE BRADORD, VT. Free Estimates 802-222-5535 4-H speaking contest is held at Woodsville WOODSVILLE--4-H'ers from all over Grafton County competed in a public speaking contest at the Woodsville Elementary School Auditorium March 28. Each of the sixteen 4-H speakers were judged by two teams of judges. Mr. and Mrs. Timothy McKenna of Haverhill scored the Senior 4-H'ers, 14 years of age and older. Everett Aldrich Lilac Lassies, 4-H Club. W. Canaan. Kim is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Newhall of Canaan. Karen Marie Gaulley and Kimberly Newhall will represent Grafton County in the Junior Division in the Public Speaking Program. One of the youngest con- testants, Scott Stevens, was not eligible to compete at Durham because of his age. Others receiving top honors in the Public Speaking Program were Joan Aldrich, Page O'Brien, Samantha Stoddard, Christine Roy, Lynn Fabrizio and Shown Lane, all from N. Haverhlll and members of the Little Ox-Bow 4-H Club and Bob-O-Link 4-H Clubs. Also participating were Tom LaCroix of the Mascoma Valley Boys 4-H Club of West Canaan; Elizabeth Peters of the 3-F's & Bath Braves 4-H Club; Anna Rothe of the N. Monroe Mt. Breeze 4-H Club of N. Monroe and Michael Taffe of the Mr. Stinson Boys 4-H Club of Rumney. TIIOUGIITS If you expect perfection from people, your whole life is a series of disappointments, grumblings and complaints. If, on the contrary, you pitch your expectations low, taking folks as the inefficient creatures which they are, you are frequently surprised by having then} perform better Dog Obedience Classes Starting April 18th For Information Carl: Jeanne Foley Wildwater Goldens (603) 747-213:3 Marcella Hoffman : ' 764-5795 tests and treatment. Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Bates were in Stratford, N.H. last weekend to attend the first birthday party of their granddaughter. Virginia Gove was out-of- of Bethlehem and Mr. Roger town this week attending the Wells of North Haverhill wedding of her niece in judged the Junior 4-H com- petitors. Two top-scoring seniors aged 14-19 and two top-scoring juniors 12 to i3 were selected from this group to attend State Activities Day at the University of New Hampshire I I III I I Beth Nelson at Durham May23. 757-3429 The top seniors were Pam Blessing of N. Monroe, whose singing several numbers speech was "One Little including, "You Are Old, Pencil," and Kristi Blessing of Father Williams" from Alice N. Monroe, whose talk was in Wonderland, The titled "In the Beginning., ." Emperor's New Clothes was Pare and Kristi are the presented, daughlers of Dr. and Mrs. Cal Wells River Blessing of N. Monroe and are Congregational Church members of the N. Monroe Mt. A rummage sale was held at Breeze 4-H Club. the Wells River Top Juniors were Scott Congregational Church on Stevens of the Mascoma April 4. Valley Boys 4-H Club of W. Canaan, son of Mr. and Mrs. Brent Stevens of Canaan; and, Karen Marie Gulley of the Bits Corinth 4H Club meets , & Pieces 4-H Club of Lincoln. CORINTH--4::orinth Cougars have an exhibit at the festival. Karen is the daughter of Mr. 4-H Club held a meeting where At the end of the meeting, and Mrs. Les Gulley of Lin- members signed up for the group did experiments coin. electric energy producing unit in the North Conway-Osceola Granite formation in the Wlfite Mountains of New Itamphire. This project would use a combination of private and govermnent funds, If the initial drilling proves suc- cessful and the project con- tinues, the cost through the fiscal year 1983 for the Department of Energy would be $13.95 million," Gregg said. In surveys made by the DOE, geothermal energy potentially could be produced and sold at prices below conventional and other alternative energy sources. In declining order of cost, windpower can produce electric energy on a com- mercial level for ap- proximately 8 cents per kilowatt hour (kw-hr.), oil- fired plants are presently producing electricity at 7 cents per kw-hr., coal at 6.2 cents per kw-hr., and nuclear at 5.4 cents per kw-hr. According to the HDR Cor- poration the geothermal process could generate electricity, from a second generation plant, at 3 to 4 cents per kw-hr., he said. Electric energy generated in New Hampshire by the coal- fired Merrimack One and Two plants and the Newington Coal Facility is produced at an average of 7.5 cents per kw-hr. "The need for alternative energy affects us on the in- ternational, national, and state levels," Gregg said. "The future economic and strategic security of the United States is jeopardized by our dependence on foreign energy sources and its Gift Certificates make a nice Easter Gift , ..... New location Airport Road Side of : llave We have lal Plaza you seen more supplies our for corduroy, and quilted home sewing, fabrics. Quilt Butterick Books, Pattern Magazines and and Threads Store Hours Patterns Tues..Thurs. 10-5:30 Fri. 10-8 Sat. 10-5 tremendous escalation 00THAR SHE BLOWS! price. Development of af- fordable domestic energy sources can first lessen our .... dependence on international sources, and second, redirect large amounts of dollars and jobs that are lost by pur- chasing overseas oil," he added. "On the state level, being a consumer not a producer of energy, New tlampshire and all the Northeast has some of the highest energy costs in the entire nation. Alternative energy sources, like the Hot Dry Rock Program, that are environmentally benign and in close proximity to relatively large population centers is essential if we are to en- courage industrial develop- ment in New ttampshire and get inflation under control," he said. Severe winds and winter weather conditions can bend the elemeqts on a TV antenna or knock it down altogether. Even a slightly damaged TV antenna can result in picture los:s, ghosting, or interference. If your TV picture isn't what you would like it to be, check your antenna....and if you need a new one, ask for Channel Master Crossfire aptennas. TOWN NURSE SCHEDULE A Community Health Crossfires have been proven to last longer and withstand wind Services, Inc., Town Nurse and winter stress better than any other TV antenna-they're will be checking hypertension, ruggedized for the best in performance. weight and anemia April 15 at the Bradford ,Senior Center So don't let severe winds or rough weather blow your picture from 9 a.m.-12 p.m. and at the quality away, get a Channel Master Crossfire antenna and get Bailey Memorial Club in all the picture you paid for. Newbury from 1-4 p.m. projects at the E. Corinth congregational Church recently. The projects were elec- tricity, babysitting, soap carving, needle crafts and Pottery will start with rhythm. Members copied rhythms, studied com- municating with rhythms and studied dance rhythm The next meeting will be at the end of March. that hadn't arrived in time for the awards meeting were given out and TllOUGHTS awards were also given to People can be divided into members who had been ab- three groups: those who make sent during the awards things happen, those who meeting, watch things happen, and Discussion included the those who wonder what county 4-H festival with happened. suggestions to posters and John W. Newbern Also receiving high honors than you had hoped. was Kimberly Newhall of the Bruce Barton " RRd  TASKER'S WELL Crossfire TV antennas... Performance proven on more We N00..d rooftops than any other brand! Your Bumessl Our Business Is Goine in The Hole. 942-5581 802479-0540 Nodhwood, N.H. April 8, 1981-The Journal Opinion-Page I I ate, members of Blue No. 263 are Night at Grange in Barnet at Hall April 8 at P.m. to help them rate their 75th . and Mrs. Bruce Nelson Newport Sunday at- March 29, to attend a Andrea, and James and Mrs. Gene Perkins were luncheon guests Tuesday, March 31, of Mrs. Greg Tocci, Helen and Anna in Orleans. Mr. and Mrs. Terry Steele and daughter Heidi returned to their home in Damneck, Va., where Terry is stationed with the U.S. Navy, Saturday morning March 28. Ginny and party and open Heidi had spent the past six of Jim Carroll, weeks with her parents Mr. Lg colleague of and Mrs. James Kinerson and at Lake Region High Jack, and Terry joined them they, with Curtis here for the final two weeks. and James, visited Timothy White, son of Mr. and family Mr. and and Mrs. Stewart White, was LeBlanc and the recipient of the Good Bitsy, also in Citizenship Award for thefifth to help celebrate grade at Blue Mountain Union 16th birthday and to School for the month of away party for sons. Andrea with the LeBlancs Nelson and Goodwin of South served a luncheon to members of the New Holstein Club February. Mr. and Mrs. Carroll Eastman, Lois and Darryl hosted a sugar on snow party Sunday afternoon, March 29, for the following family members: Mrs. Dean Hatch, Karen, Dawn, and Heather of S. Ryegate, Mr. and Mrs. 12 noon, March 28, at Dean Eastman of W. Barnet, Presbyterian Mr. and Mrs. Tim Rockwood The group was of Hartford, Mr. and Mrs. of several Vermont John Clark and son Chad of E. Barre, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Mountain Grange will Leonard, Darren, Jeffrey, a Bingo Party at the Danny, and Sarah, and Mr. Hall Friday evening, and Mrs. Gene Perkins, Gene at 8:00 p.m. The Jr. andGordon. toattend. Mr. and Mrs. Roland Nelson, Curtis, Sargent and Mr. and Mrs. Stewart White, Timothy, , Benjamin, and Joshua were in Burlington Saturday, March 28, where they attended the annual Vermont Jersey Calf and Heifer Sale at the University of Vermont Farm. Mr. and Mrs. Roy Carlsen of Walpole, N.H. were visitors Sunday, March 22, of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Ritchie. Mr. and Mrs. Reginald White were in Burlington Thursday, March 26, on business and had lunch with their daughter Mrs. Thomas Gibson in S. Burlington. Stewart White attended an E.A.I. Jersey Directors' Meeting at the Holiday Inn in Sus White River Junction tast Tuesday, March 24. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Ritchie had as callers Thursday, March 26, his nephew and wife Mr. and Mrs. Allen Ritehie of Milford, Conn. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Parsons left Thursday morning, April SHOVEL 2, to spend some time with their daughter and family Mr. wood ban- aqd Mrs. Sidney Hinman, " heat- Peter, Jennifer, and Lindsay high-carbon and Mr. and Mrs. Ralph w/rolled Holcomb and family in C2LRCSX Woodstock, New Brunswick, Canada. LIMITEO The April 14 meeting of Blue =o EL an Easter Program, also a pie }RI -=1,1.1 Mountain Grange will include social. Each lady is asked to .,.! v.mo=t IL s0000'00ctims of heart attacks I information please call collect: or 3544 Interior Design and Decorating 8 r Interiors, Inc. Studio and Workrooms GILBERTE BOGHOSIAN Llli Associate FluEh H. Ober Bradford & Nancy Perkins 584-3611 bring a pie, either homemade or bought, which will be auctioned off to the men. Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Steil, Jennifer and Rebecca were at their vacation home on the Symes Pond Road the weekend of March 28 and called on Mr. and Mrs. Harry Ritehie. Weekend guests March 14-15 of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Par- sons were their daughter and husband Mr. and Mrs. Irving Dahlstrom of Farmington, Conn. Mr. and Mrs. Walter Main joined the two couples for dinner Saturday evening in honor of Mrs. Parsons' bir- thday. An evening of Western Style Square Dancing will be held at the Grange Hall Saturday evening, April 11, with caller Eddie Monty. Walkins are welcome at $5.00 per couple. Mr. and Mrs. Norman McLure of Cambridge were overnight guests Monday, March 23, of his parents Mr. and Mrs. Warren McLure and family. Mrs. Alice Smith was a medical patient at Cottage Hospital in Woodsville Thursday through Sunday, March 26-29. The Extension ttomemakers Group will hold their monthly meeting Wednesday, April 8, (note change of date) at the home of Mrs. Guy Labounty at 1:00 p.m. The topic is "Maple Syrup and Sugar," and each member is asked to bring a maple recipe. Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hassenmayer of Milford, Conn., were at their vacation home on the Stone Road the weekend of March 27-29 and called on Mr. and Mrs. Harry Ritehie Friday evening. Gary Bowley, with his aunt and uncle Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Caswell of Rutland, fleew from Bradley Airport in Connecticut Friday, March 20, to St. Cloud, Fla., to spend a week with another aunt and uncle Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Ballou. While in Florida they visited Cypress Gardens, Sea World, and the Barnum and Bailey Circus. Edward McLure and Gene Perkins were in Montpelier Wednesday evening, April 1, to attend a dinner and meeting at the Lobster Pot Restaurant sponsored by the Vermont Department of Forests and Parks. Fairlee,, , The robins are back in Fairlee; as are the song sparrows. Mrs. Bessie Perry has returned from Boston, where she has been visiting friends for several weeks. In place of the sermon at the Federated Church, Sunday, March 29, the congregation joined the children in the undercroft to have Mrs. Morgan Adams tell of the Heifer Project International, a practical approach to world hunger. Those present en- joyed a coffee hour at the close of the talk. The spring clothing drive of the Church Women United will take place between April 13 and April 17. Please bring Wentworth Webster Memorial Library will hold Open House Saturday afternoon from 2-4. All are urged to attend. Celia Howe has returned home to recuperate after her illness at Sceva Speare Memorial Hospital. Mr. and Mrs. Lionel Gordon and Rebecca were in Rochester over the weekend. Wesley Gore was a visitor in town last weekend. Marcella Hoffmann is in Sceva Speare Memorial for Wells Rive/' Blue Mountain Union School Miss Cousins and several students attended an FBLA Convention last week. The Class of 1983 held a car wash on April 3 and 4. Under the auspices of the Rivers Reach ArtS Association the North Country Chorus, directed by Mary Rowe entertained the elementary students at Blue Mountain on April 2. After Making an Easter basket is that is.) lots of fun. (Of course, part of the enjoyment is imaginating the Easter bunny filling the basket with lots of goodies. ) The Easter season is special in lotS of ways. When I was a child, the churches in our town got together and sponsored a big Easter egg hunt for all the kids. The many eggs were handsomely decorated and hidden all over the several church yards. It was lots fun hunting them. The chickens were not so cuddly or playful as they grew, and soon found a home in my great-grandfather's chicken coop. Last week we made little bunnies. Next week we'll try several ways of decorating eggs. This week our project is baskets. A simple sturdy basket is this: Cut the bottom section of a milk carton, making a open of box. With a half-gallon carton, cut about five inches from the bottom. Or simply cut off the top of a half-pint box to make a very small basket. Cover the carton with colorful construction paper. Draw or paste decorations on it. Cut a strip (from the top part of the carton or other /)" paper). Paste this on both ends to the box, thus I '1 J J But the best part was the prizes. Each child who par- ticipated got a fluffy little yellow chick to take home. For those who won in the egg hunts the reward was a little white baby bunny. What we all did with the little pets--or how many parents objected--is not quite clear from this distance of years. However, 1 do remember two little bunnies in a box at the end of our kitchen. How fascinating they were ! Though they graduated to a pen in the backyard, they remained quite tame. With their soft fu and inquisitive natures, they*--were good playmates. The rack from the back of Dad's pickup truck (when not in use) made a play yard for them. It was an ample pen and could be moved to the choicest grassy spots. However, one day when the rabbitS were full-grown, they dug under their outdoor pen and hopped away. Our searching could not find them; I liked to imagine them living happily in the woods. (A child does not know how unlikely Mrs. Esther Johnson I I 333-9704 your layettes, new baby clothes, school or health kits, Remson blankets and like new lightweight clothing to one of the ladies of your church, who will deal with it. Jason Fountain, Brian Thurston, Robert Stone, Ryan Smith, Robert Bradley, Andy Davis, and Bart Musty were the Cub Scouts from Fairlee who attended the Mud Olympics at the Leverone Field House, Hanover, N.H., on Sunday, March 26. Robert Stone and Ryan Smith were the high scorers of Fairlee. The choir of the Federated Church, led by Karen Cramer, is now practicing the Easter music. fashioning a handle. Another simple box-basket can be made with one piece of paper. We used 8" X 10" construction paper. Make four corner cuts, each 2%" long and 2,/' from the edge as indicated by heavy lines on drawing. Fold on dotted lines. (See drawing.) Paste circled areas as folds are held together to form a rectangular basket. Make and attach paper strip handles. This type of basket is at- tractive if the paper is crayoned or painted before beginning the cutting. A third type of basket is woven of paper strips. Cut an equal number of two different colors. Weave the one color through the other. Gather together and staple the ends on each of the four sides. Attach two handle strips, one end to each of the four gathered sides. This makes a colorful rounded-woven basket. Orford , At Mt. Cube Grange regular meeting April 2, the Home Economics committee held the chocolate chip cookie bake-off with 5 entries. First place was won by Susan Drabick. We also had our talent contest won by Harry Franklin and he will go to Pomona Grange. We had two visitors from Moosilauke Grange and four from Bakers River Grange and three from Rumney. Four of the visitors were members: of the Pink Sash Family. They also held lecturers conference with the lecturers of the four granges. Mt. Cube had 13 members. Marjorie Gray wishes that one of the Bridge Builders would send her the address of Rev. and Mrs. ttolland Naughan. FBLA LEADERS--From left, Micheile Fifieid of Thetford'Academy, southern vice president for Vermont; Julie Thompson of Oxbow, Vermont state president; Mary llarrington of Round Rock, Tex., national president of Future Business Leaders of America. National FBLA head at Oxbow Virginia. Plans for the Quincy Bog dinner are being formulated. Interested folks may call Dor!s Hillier for information. BRADFORD--National which finally led to her President Mary Harrington of becoming National President. the Future Business Leaders Mary Harrington was in of America came to Oxbow High School April I to speak on how she became involved with FBLA and about some fund raising ideas. She told how her friends got her to run for state office Vermont to visit dif- ferent chapters throughout the state. She attended the state leadership conference on April 2, and 3 in White River Junction. Geothermal energy test is proposed for N.H. WASHINGTON--The Sub- geothermal hot dry rock committee on Energy Development and Applications of the full Committee on Science and Technology, on which Rep. Judd Gregg of New Hamp- shire serves, recently in- vestigated the potential use of geothermal energy. "The hot dry rock geothermal process, which the Subcommittee reviewed, involves sending water down drilled holes tens of thousands of feet deep to heated frac- tured cavities under the earth's surface. The heated water is then pumped out of the fractures into turbines to generate electricity. After the water cools it is recycled back into the underground frac- tures for reheating--making this facility a totally closed, environmentally safe system," Gregg said. "Geothermal energy is a tremendous potential energy resource/' he added. "In order to establish the com- mercial viability of the process, however, it is now necessary to attempt deep well drilling in another type of rock formation." The Hot Dry Rock Cor- poration of Augusta, Ga., has proposed to construct a PAINTING INTERIOR OR EIERIOR ' WillddOdd job's PAULH()I)GE BRADORD, VT. Free Estimates 802-222-5535 4-H speaking contest is held at Woodsville WOODSVILLE--4-H'ers from all over Grafton County competed in a public speaking contest at the Woodsville Elementary School Auditorium March 28. Each of the sixteen 4-H speakers were judged by two teams of judges. Mr. and Mrs. Timothy McKenna of Haverhill scored the Senior 4-H'ers, 14 years of age and older. Everett Aldrich Lilac Lassies, 4-H Club. W. Canaan. Kim is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Newhall of Canaan. Karen Marie Gaulley and Kimberly Newhall will represent Grafton County in the Junior Division in the Public Speaking Program. One of the youngest con- testants, Scott Stevens, was not eligible to compete at Durham because of his age. Others receiving top honors in the Public Speaking Program were Joan Aldrich, Page O'Brien, Samantha Stoddard, Christine Roy, Lynn Fabrizio and Shown Lane, all from N. Haverhlll and members of the Little Ox-Bow 4-H Club and Bob-O-Link 4-H Clubs. Also participating were Tom LaCroix of the Mascoma Valley Boys 4-H Club of West Canaan; Elizabeth Peters of the 3-F's & Bath Braves 4-H Club; Anna Rothe of the N. Monroe Mt. Breeze 4-H Club of N. Monroe and Michael Taffe of the Mr. Stinson Boys 4-H Club of Rumney. TIIOUGIITS If you expect perfection from people, your whole life is a series of disappointments, grumblings and complaints. If, on the contrary, you pitch your expectations low, taking folks as the inefficient creatures which they are, you are frequently surprised by having then} perform better Dog Obedience Classes Starting April 18th For Information Carl: Jeanne Foley Wildwater Goldens (603) 747-213:3 Marcella Hoffman : ' 764-5795 tests and treatment. Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Bates were in Stratford, N.H. last weekend to attend the first birthday party of their granddaughter. Virginia Gove was out-of- of Bethlehem and Mr. Roger town this week attending the Wells of North Haverhill wedding of her niece in judged the Junior 4-H com- petitors. Two top-scoring seniors aged 14-19 and two top-scoring juniors 12 to i3 were selected from this group to attend State Activities Day at the University of New Hampshire I I III I I Beth Nelson at Durham May23. 757-3429 The top seniors were Pam Blessing of N. Monroe, whose singing several numbers speech was "One Little including, "You Are Old, Pencil," and Kristi Blessing of Father Williams" from Alice N. Monroe, whose talk was in Wonderland, The titled "In the Beginning., ." Emperor's New Clothes was Pare and Kristi are the presented, daughlers of Dr. and Mrs. Cal Wells River Blessing of N. Monroe and are Congregational Church members of the N. Monroe Mt. A rummage sale was held at Breeze 4-H Club. the Wells River Top Juniors were Scott Congregational Church on Stevens of the Mascoma April 4. Valley Boys 4-H Club of W. Canaan, son of Mr. and Mrs. Brent Stevens of Canaan; and, Karen Marie Gulley of the Bits Corinth 4H Club meets , & Pieces 4-H Club of Lincoln. CORINTH--4::orinth Cougars have an exhibit at the festival. Karen is the daughter of Mr. 4-H Club held a meeting where At the end of the meeting, and Mrs. Les Gulley of Lin- members signed up for the group did experiments coin. electric energy producing unit in the North Conway-Osceola Granite formation in the Wlfite Mountains of New Itamphire. This project would use a combination of private and govermnent funds, If the initial drilling proves suc- cessful and the project con- tinues, the cost through the fiscal year 1983 for the Department of Energy would be $13.95 million," Gregg said. In surveys made by the DOE, geothermal energy potentially could be produced and sold at prices below conventional and other alternative energy sources. In declining order of cost, windpower can produce electric energy on a com- mercial level for ap- proximately 8 cents per kilowatt hour (kw-hr.), oil- fired plants are presently producing electricity at 7 cents per kw-hr., coal at 6.2 cents per kw-hr., and nuclear at 5.4 cents per kw-hr. According to the HDR Cor- poration the geothermal process could generate electricity, from a second generation plant, at 3 to 4 cents per kw-hr., he said. Electric energy generated in New Hampshire by the coal- fired Merrimack One and Two plants and the Newington Coal Facility is produced at an average of 7.5 cents per kw-hr. "The need for alternative energy affects us on the in- ternational, national, and state levels," Gregg said. "The future economic and strategic security of the United States is jeopardized by our dependence on foreign energy sources and its Gift Certificates make a nice Easter Gift , ..... New location Airport Road Side of : llave We have lal Plaza you seen more supplies our for corduroy, and quilted home sewing, fabrics. Quilt Butterick Books, Pattern Magazines and and Threads Store Hours Patterns Tues..Thurs. 10-5:30 Fri. 10-8 Sat. 10-5 tremendous escalation 00THAR SHE BLOWS! price. Development of af- fordable domestic energy sources can first lessen our .... dependence on international sources, and second, redirect large amounts of dollars and jobs that are lost by pur- chasing overseas oil," he added. "On the state level, being a consumer not a producer of energy, New tlampshire and all the Northeast has some of the highest energy costs in the entire nation. Alternative energy sources, like the Hot Dry Rock Program, that are environmentally benign and in close proximity to relatively large population centers is essential if we are to en- courage industrial develop- ment in New ttampshire and get inflation under control," he said. Severe winds and winter weather conditions can bend the elemeqts on a TV antenna or knock it down altogether. Even a slightly damaged TV antenna can result in picture los:s, ghosting, or interference. If your TV picture isn't what you would like it to be, check your antenna....and if you need a new one, ask for Channel Master Crossfire aptennas. TOWN NURSE SCHEDULE A Community Health Crossfires have been proven to last longer and withstand wind Services, Inc., Town Nurse and winter stress better than any other TV antenna-they're will be checking hypertension, ruggedized for the best in performance. weight and anemia April 15 at the Bradford ,Senior Center So don't let severe winds or rough weather blow your picture from 9 a.m.-12 p.m. and at the quality away, get a Channel Master Crossfire antenna and get Bailey Memorial Club in all the picture you paid for. Newbury from 1-4 p.m. projects at the E. Corinth congregational Church recently. The projects were elec- tricity, babysitting, soap carving, needle crafts and Pottery will start with rhythm. Members copied rhythms, studied com- municating with rhythms and studied dance rhythm The next meeting will be at the end of March. that hadn't arrived in time for the awards meeting were given out and TllOUGHTS awards were also given to People can be divided into members who had been ab- three groups: those who make sent during the awards things happen, those who meeting, watch things happen, and Discussion included the those who wonder what county 4-H festival with happened. suggestions to posters and John W. Newbern Also receiving high honors than you had hoped. was Kimberly Newhall of the Bruce Barton " RRd  TASKER'S WELL Crossfire TV antennas... Performance proven on more We N00..d rooftops than any other brand! Your Bumessl Our Business Is Goine in The Hole. 942-5581 802479-0540 Nodhwood, N.H.