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April 28, 1982     Journal Opinion
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.€ usP 598340 :7 Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont April28, 1982 How Cookeville got its name This is the old George Cooke place in standing with the addition of a new cow stable and two .The above picture was taken in 1969. The feed silos added since this picture was taken. The the right in the background was the white building on the left is now owned by Bernard Inn. It was a guest house where partying Curley. The barns, shed, and the Inn is now owned by available. Shown in the far background Robert Dell. All the buildings are still by GEGE C. HASTINGS ; h{a livl in O(ille for 77 yrs end his {1 three Cooke Brothers who owned 1,000 lots for house lots and small farms was cleared. The first high school was here and the only one in town. It was called Academy. been the Cooke Brothers who got the the log cabin and the Fort Wait on the overlooking Cookeville Village• busy little village at that time with the etc. The potash mill was down on the that is down over the hill from the old Inn. - lost three houses in the village. The old log cabin where Col. Wait and his men were stationed 4s long gone and the old fort is pretty well filled in. Some of the old timers used to call Cookeville, Cookesville. This is what our forefathers told us when we studied town history in the Cookeville graded school. Cookeville graded school district took in as far down as the Devins Brothers on the Bradford road and up as far as the Turner place on the West Corinth road, and the old Halsey place just above Maplewood on the Maplewood Road, and up to the old Annis place on the road going up by Warren Jones' and the old George Claflin place, and up back of Waren Jones at the Wilson farms, and down on the Corinth Center road to Gifford Sevenes'. It also took in the farm where the Mosen- thal's now live, which is on the road between the Maplewood road and the Pike Hill road. Tax stabilization question Computer 00rtn seeks place in Bradford, special town meeting may be called BRADFORD Whether or not National Bank in Bradford for WANG computers and Tax Stabilization bylaws as an emergency a computer programming Village. specializes in computer But Bradfordis not theonly measure to help out Bradford firm will relocate in the The building would cost programming for the banking site that Fishera says his residents and business in the Village of Bradford hinges on roughly $200,000 to construct industry, company has been looking at. event of a disaster (i.e. fire or a controversial subject in the and would be built into the side He said about 20 people He said a decision to move to flood). But in more recent Bradford area -- tax of a hill so that only one level would be employed at the new Bradford would largely hinge years, like many towns, stabilization, of the building would be seen building if the company were on whether the company could Bradford has offered tax A1 Fishera, president of from the vantage of Brad- to relocate in Bradford. Fif- be granted tax stabilization by stabilization to industry as an New England Bank Support, a ford's business distric- teen of the 20 employees would the town. incentive device to spur in- computer programming firm t--although Fishera says a come from the company's Tax stabilization is a dustrial growth in the town. currently located in Lyme, number of designs are being existing facilities in Lyme. temporary reduced tax The town's selectmen, N.H., says his company would considered. Fishera said the remaining situation usually graduated rather than trusting the issue like to construct a three story Fishera told the Journal five would be hired from the over a three to five year to their own judgment, have office building behind the Opinion that New England Bradford area and trained by period. The program was set a policy in which they feel offices of the Bradford Bank Support is a distributor the company, initially adopted in the town's tpleneturntopage7) 1890 ordinances brought back to life Trustees seek control in village BRADFORD-- The Bradford with licensing entertainment control over events and would- But after being assured of tempt to place controls on Village Trustees have taken a second look at the village's nearly 100 year old bylaws, most of which have been ignored for decades. Now they have decided that at least two of these 19th century or- dinances might be able to solve some 20th century problems. Last week the trustees voted to reinforce two bylaws, first written in 1890: one dealing in the village, and another be nightclubs in the village as the potential power of the future nightspots or events at concerned with parking, the town selectmen ordinance by village ad- which alcohol is consumed. property upkeep, and have--through the use of ministrator Susan Spaulding, "I think the trustees ought nuisances, permits or persmission forms Welch gave the plan his vote to have control over the The idea for bringing back that will now be required by and his endorsement, along village," said Drew. the ancient decrees was the trustees, with fellow trustee Chester NoParking initiated and presented at the Trustee K. Donald Welch Allen. The second set of ordinances trustees' Tuesday, April 20 was skeptical at first of the The new licensing stance by the trustees voted to enact will meeting by newly elected new permit procedtwe. "I the trustees is similar to that enable village police chief trustee Larry Drew. don't want to endorse this taken by the town's selectmen Lynn Clogston to issue The ordinance for licensing thing if all it's going to do is recently, reflecting a-move on parki9g tickets to parking entertainment essentially create more paper without the part of officials in Brad- ordinance violator- gives the trustees the same giving us any clout." ford to limit or at least at- (please turn to page 4) Blue Mountain to receive $12,000 grant by MARGARET BURKE that it must meet local needs through the purchase of WELLS RIVER-- What to do and that the state must ap- outdoor education equipment; BMU will " a with a Federal block grant of prove the expenditure. -- overall improvement of orrow money $12,000 coming to Blue The following are some of instruction by hiring a per- Mountain Union School was the faculty-parent ideas for manent substitute to release I,."r .r, vL'aL'" roe vt re-a:rs., the focus of discussion at the use of the money: teachers for curriculum April 21 meeting of the -- hiring a part-time pre- development, evaluating WELI RIVER-- The BIue The district's lawyer says District 21 board of school school teacher to continue the other teachers, and corn- directors, pre-scbool education program munity contact. Mountain Union District 21 it's not enough money to Principal William G. at BMU, which is imperilled School Board chairman school beard will follow the seek voter approval for," Randall reported that 18 BMU by Federal funding cuts; Stephen T. Allen said that he recommendation of its said Chairman Stephen T. management committee Allen of the decision to staff members and parents -- purchasing a computer or hopes that the board will make and seek an additional loan borrow. had met and identified several word-processor to expand a decision on the grant ex- possible areas that could computer education op- penditure at thenext meeting under the board's Although the board benefit from an expenditure of portnnities; of the board, scheduled for emergency borrowing passed a motion to seek up to $12,000. The only -- better use of the school's May5. powers to pay for the bids for the roof repair job, restrictions on the grant are 60 acres of outdoor facilities completion of repairs to the a Connecticut-based school's faultyroof, company, R & S Con- The bank loan of around struction Services, has the 3rew nightclub planned , $65,OOO will be the second inside track on obtaining , one obtained for this the contract. purpose. The district is The Connecticut firm in awaiting the final outcome 1981 insulated part of the in Village of Bradford of a multi-million dollar school building andmade lawsuit against the GAF the previous repairs to the Corp., manufacturers of roof. The company is the roofing system. The thought by some board Verhill selectmen put positoni Selectmen hear plans from would.be owners suit was decided in the members to be capable of school's favor but the completing the job by Aug. • BRADFORD-- Two Randolph The plan for the new bar more--plus bathroom company is appealliug that 20, 1982, the date the board men presented a written- was presented by two of its facilities for up to 200 persons, decision, specified for completion of outline detailing their plans to prospective owners, Richard Consumables provided "Basically we'regoingto the project in the motion t t h" m-mens down on paper .,,a nightclub below the Niebling, 40, owner of would hemostlyoftheliquid go after the money the passed at the Wednesday • Western Auto Store on Main Ashley's--a nightclub in variety--beer, wine, legal same way we did before, meeting. . Street in Bradford Village to Randolph; and Richard drinks, and soda. However, the town's selectmen last Storm, 31, a service technician hot sandwiches, pizza, and '"  hes appointed deputy treasurer. StephenC. Savage presented responsibility, week at their Thursday and former manager of snack food are planned to be Fairle e [L$ Appointees to the planning to the board a proposal by "They're getting training meeting• Sewards Restaurants• available, A Main Street and resort cottaees to ' / r/d4 board are: Timothy M. Leahy, which the town would gain and we're gettingcoverageon Ironically, the selectmen After the meeting, the rear entrancetothenightclub d t nd " a Pike resident who was some additional police Friday nights when we need had spent their previous selectmen said they were are planned, be ;. if, Pol JD/ alreadyprior toServinghis Onofficialthe boardap, protectiOnnocost, this summer -- at officersit'" SavageandSaidtheof the specialproposed liquormeeting speakingboard withinspectorState presentationgenerally impressedand indicatedWith the satisfiedThe selectmenwith a numberappearedof converte o co os pointment; Susan F• Holden, Two special police officers, patrol, which, if authorized by Richard Grasse in an attempt they would be interested in voluntary regulations that FAIRLEE-- Last week, the Colligan is said to be con- 'ETBURKE Haverhill resident and a who have been working with the board of selectmen, would to clarify and discern ways of working with the bar-owners Niebling had already planned Town of Fairlee Selectmen cerned mainly with the JJt. "ql. ii The Town of More3, resort owner who his cottages to condominiums member of the board of the Haverhill police, would last for 12 Friday nights this "keeping a handle" on future to insure that liquor for the establishment. Among heard the plans of a Lake renovation or conversion of  tnl.. a health nightspots in the town. violations, crowd control and those cited would be: a selectmen, who will fill the patrol Woodsville on foot from summer. - ty treasurer, the planning board 6:00 to shortly after 8:00 p.m. The selectmen agreed to According to selectman other problems similar to mandatory dress code, police wants to convert 32 of the which would provide him with .ilt-aaning board slot on .([' reserved for a selectman; on FridaY nights. The pair of look into the legal respon- John Gibbs, the selectmen left those allegedly having oc- hired on nights when bands resorts cottages to con- enough capital, through sales, t the last meeting Homer L• May of Haverhill officers would then use a sibility of the town if the that meeting satisfied that curred at King Arthurs are provided, drinks will not dominiums and also to con- to construct the condominium .,.e/:F-hl'llg,B aOr?eaoft struct 20 more additional units complexes on Bradford Lane. and Robert Rutherford, N. police cruiser to patrol the arrangement proposed by they were much better in- nightclub, a former Bradford be served after 1:00 a,m. on to be put up for sale• The new buildings would be Haverhill. Wondsvillearea and Rte. 10as Savage was implemented formed as to what kind of establishment now closed any night (2:00 a.m. is the Bonnie Oaks Resort owner 44 by 60 feet each and located The selectmen were ap- far as Briar Hill Rd. in N• before deciding on the authority they have. because of financial dif- mandatory closing hour ex- Jim Colligan reportedly told on l0 acre lots. )1iaSigned forms parently unconcerned about Haverhill (near Ames proposal. Questions such as The selectmen have ficulties, do not happen again• cept on Sunday mornings, at the selectmen that the ad- Colligan owns i35 acres of eJ,w:?eintments at questions that had been raised DepartmentStore). what insurance would be ultimate authority over the Plans Presented l:00a.m.), til t wvnhg meeting, by planning board chairman The two officers would required for unpaid special provisions established before Niebling said the "lounge" Troublemakers ditional 20 units or con- land at the resort, and besides ', I Y for the ap- Niebling and Storm told the dominiums will he housed in the cottages, he also owns a 44- iliassttrne their Richard Fabrizio concerning donate their time in return for police will have to be an- a nightspot is issued the would be located in a roughly a possible conflict of interest the training the patrol would swered first. . required permits, under 2,600 square foot area below selectmen that they would builtfive tWOon storYthe BradfordbUildings Lane to be rOOmsitehotelplanOn theapprovalPropertY.and Once -t foffice. the planning board and his job the two had patrolled in the It was reported at the the selectmen have very little village. The lounge would had caused trouble in the past r. tti oa'" they between Rutherford's role on furnish. Savage explained that $666.66 Vermont statutes. Gibbs said the Western Auto store in the obtain a list of persons "who roughly tow and one-half completion of Act 250 criteria, Li a f .Pike is the as a surveyor. * cruiser, but with one of the Monday evening meeting that power to add additional have bar seating for 20 per- or who have been barred from miles from the village of are required by the state's i " hi I Laurent Friday Night Patrol regular Haverhill officers as a a 1978 police cruiser has been provisions once a permit is sons with 20 to 30 tables for other establishments. Each of Fairlee. District Environmenta l erhill, was Haverhill police chief partner bearing primary (please turn to page T) granted, additional seating of up to 150 {pleaseturntopage?} At the present time, :(pleaseturntopageT) " tO a death camp !ourney • tt. ed • " " " " we N [ti v r. Th!s is the fourth in a series of articles 2t - 'reel from Bruce MacLean, an Ox .bcw t00cher on leave of absence w00,e ! ]t two american school in Warsaw, Poland. _, e lercms chronicled the military takeover BOP i  Poh martial law while the military gover- -  ren 1. had imposed censorshiv on all news .,a'i - , • '  'nS. out of the country. MacLean s thtrd ml.'W,q nt rote the future struggle between the Ifrdl,.ei2qent and its people. In this fourth ar- [| UZtt' able to i.,e the confines of Waaw • ) the ;.. another part of the country, including l'tati'_amous death camp at Auchwitz.-- an and trust. A few ,/1 [ q re'vCPourhl.liobY n j:wsNaw.medsa h WtWtWtWt d drive to church in  effect, temporary parking a strictly cash deal. Dollars "More of them however arrive on tractors, wagons drawn by horses, and bicycles. Yet the vast majority of church goers come by ,foot. The roads in Poland on a Sunday morning are jammed with people walking to church. In the more rural areas, people walk miles and miles to church. "Three hours south of Warsaw we arrived in Katowice, the capital of the coal mining region and the center of Silesia. Here lies the heart of industrial Poland. Here also lies the most depressing part of Poland that I've seen. It is a sprawling region of coal mines, rail facilities, gigantic factory complexes and grey, dreary, apartment blocks that stretchas far as the eye can see on the horizon. There seems to be no urban planning involved and landscaping is non- .e.istent. Like Gdansk, Katowice was a Solidarity stronghold and this was evident by the number of armoured personnel carriers still blocking strategic roads in and around the city. "30 Kilometers south of Katowice we entered Oswiecim. Right before Auschwitz I saw one of the true signs that spring had arrived in Poland. Sitting in a nest that was situated right on a telephone post was this enormous Stork. These large birds are very interesting. They apparently have very little fear of Man and con- sequently build their nests close to human habitation. Many Storks nests can be found on lamp posts, barn roofs, and even on chimneys. Each year Storks return from Africa and come to roost in the same nest. "We finally arrived at the Museum and going in with us was a large group of elite, Polish Commandoes in their distinctive red b.rets. We got there just in time to see a 25 minute documentary film on the liberation of Ausch- witz by Soviet troops. The film was in Polish but the :  meaning of it was clear for :;: everyone in attendance. It .: was the toughest 25 minutes I believe I have ever gone through. Children under 13 (please turn to page 8) Bruce MacLeaa .€ usP 598340 :7 Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont April28, 1982 How Cookeville got its name This is the old George Cooke place in standing with the addition of a new cow stable and two .The above picture was taken in 1969. The feed silos added since this picture was taken. The the right in the background was the white building on the left is now owned by Bernard Inn. It was a guest house where partying Curley. The barns, shed, and the Inn is now owned by available. Shown in the far background Robert Dell. All the buildings are still by GEGE C. HASTINGS ; h{a livl in O(ille for 77 yrs end his {1 three Cooke Brothers who owned 1,000 lots for house lots and small farms was cleared. The first high school was here and the only one in town. It was called Academy. been the Cooke Brothers who got the the log cabin and the Fort Wait on the overlooking Cookeville Village• busy little village at that time with the etc. The potash mill was down on the that is down over the hill from the old Inn. - lost three houses in the village. The old log cabin where Col. Wait and his men were stationed 4s long gone and the old fort is pretty well filled in. Some of the old timers used to call Cookeville, Cookesville. This is what our forefathers told us when we studied town history in the Cookeville graded school. Cookeville graded school district took in as far down as the Devins Brothers on the Bradford road and up as far as the Turner place on the West Corinth road, and the old Halsey place just above Maplewood on the Maplewood Road, and up to the old Annis place on the road going up by Warren Jones' and the old George Claflin place, and up back of Waren Jones at the Wilson farms, and down on the Corinth Center road to Gifford Sevenes'. It also took in the farm where the Mosen- thal's now live, which is on the road between the Maplewood road and the Pike Hill road. Tax stabilization question Computer 00rtn seeks place in Bradford, special town meeting may be called BRADFORD Whether or not National Bank in Bradford for WANG computers and Tax Stabilization bylaws as an emergency a computer programming Village. specializes in computer But Bradfordis not theonly measure to help out Bradford firm will relocate in the The building would cost programming for the banking site that Fishera says his residents and business in the Village of Bradford hinges on roughly $200,000 to construct industry, company has been looking at. event of a disaster (i.e. fire or a controversial subject in the and would be built into the side He said about 20 people He said a decision to move to flood). But in more recent Bradford area -- tax of a hill so that only one level would be employed at the new Bradford would largely hinge years, like many towns, stabilization, of the building would be seen building if the company were on whether the company could Bradford has offered tax A1 Fishera, president of from the vantage of Brad- to relocate in Bradford. Fif- be granted tax stabilization by stabilization to industry as an New England Bank Support, a ford's business distric- teen of the 20 employees would the town. incentive device to spur in- computer programming firm t--although Fishera says a come from the company's Tax stabilization is a dustrial growth in the town. currently located in Lyme, number of designs are being existing facilities in Lyme. temporary reduced tax The town's selectmen, N.H., says his company would considered. Fishera said the remaining situation usually graduated rather than trusting the issue like to construct a three story Fishera told the Journal five would be hired from the over a three to five year to their own judgment, have office building behind the Opinion that New England Bradford area and trained by period. The program was set a policy in which they feel offices of the Bradford Bank Support is a distributor the company, initially adopted in the town's tpleneturntopage7) 1890 ordinances brought back to life Trustees seek control in village BRADFORD-- The Bradford with licensing entertainment control over events and would- But after being assured of tempt to place controls on Village Trustees have taken a second look at the village's nearly 100 year old bylaws, most of which have been ignored for decades. Now they have decided that at least two of these 19th century or- dinances might be able to solve some 20th century problems. Last week the trustees voted to reinforce two bylaws, first written in 1890: one dealing in the village, and another be nightclubs in the village as the potential power of the future nightspots or events at concerned with parking, the town selectmen ordinance by village ad- which alcohol is consumed. property upkeep, and have--through the use of ministrator Susan Spaulding, "I think the trustees ought nuisances, permits or persmission forms Welch gave the plan his vote to have control over the The idea for bringing back that will now be required by and his endorsement, along village," said Drew. the ancient decrees was the trustees, with fellow trustee Chester NoParking initiated and presented at the Trustee K. Donald Welch Allen. The second set of ordinances trustees' Tuesday, April 20 was skeptical at first of the The new licensing stance by the trustees voted to enact will meeting by newly elected new permit procedtwe. "I the trustees is similar to that enable village police chief trustee Larry Drew. don't want to endorse this taken by the town's selectmen Lynn Clogston to issue The ordinance for licensing thing if all it's going to do is recently, reflecting a-move on parki9g tickets to parking entertainment essentially create more paper without the part of officials in Brad- ordinance violator- gives the trustees the same giving us any clout." ford to limit or at least at- (please turn to page 4) Blue Mountain to receive $12,000 grant by MARGARET BURKE that it must meet local needs through the purchase of WELLS RIVER-- What to do and that the state must ap- outdoor education equipment; BMU will " a with a Federal block grant of prove the expenditure. -- overall improvement of orrow money $12,000 coming to Blue The following are some of instruction by hiring a per- Mountain Union School was the faculty-parent ideas for manent substitute to release I,."r .r, vL'aL'" roe vt re-a:rs., the focus of discussion at the use of the money: teachers for curriculum April 21 meeting of the -- hiring a part-time pre- development, evaluating WELI RIVER-- The BIue The district's lawyer says District 21 board of school school teacher to continue the other teachers, and corn- directors, pre-scbool education program munity contact. Mountain Union District 21 it's not enough money to Principal William G. at BMU, which is imperilled School Board chairman school beard will follow the seek voter approval for," Randall reported that 18 BMU by Federal funding cuts; Stephen T. Allen said that he recommendation of its said Chairman Stephen T. management committee Allen of the decision to staff members and parents -- purchasing a computer or hopes that the board will make and seek an additional loan borrow. had met and identified several word-processor to expand a decision on the grant ex- possible areas that could computer education op- penditure at thenext meeting under the board's Although the board benefit from an expenditure of portnnities; of the board, scheduled for emergency borrowing passed a motion to seek up to $12,000. The only -- better use of the school's May5. powers to pay for the bids for the roof repair job, restrictions on the grant are 60 acres of outdoor facilities completion of repairs to the a Connecticut-based school's faultyroof, company, R & S Con- The bank loan of around struction Services, has the 3rew nightclub planned , $65,OOO will be the second inside track on obtaining , one obtained for this the contract. purpose. The district is The Connecticut firm in awaiting the final outcome 1981 insulated part of the in Village of Bradford of a multi-million dollar school building andmade lawsuit against the GAF the previous repairs to the Corp., manufacturers of roof. The company is the roofing system. The thought by some board Verhill selectmen put positoni Selectmen hear plans from would.be owners suit was decided in the members to be capable of school's favor but the completing the job by Aug. • BRADFORD-- Two Randolph The plan for the new bar more--plus bathroom company is appealliug that 20, 1982, the date the board men presented a written- was presented by two of its facilities for up to 200 persons, decision, specified for completion of outline detailing their plans to prospective owners, Richard Consumables provided "Basically we'regoingto the project in the motion t t h" m-mens down on paper .,,a nightclub below the Niebling, 40, owner of would hemostlyoftheliquid go after the money the passed at the Wednesday • Western Auto Store on Main Ashley's--a nightclub in variety--beer, wine, legal same way we did before, meeting. . Street in Bradford Village to Randolph; and Richard drinks, and soda. However, the town's selectmen last Storm, 31, a service technician hot sandwiches, pizza, and '"  hes appointed deputy treasurer. StephenC. Savage presented responsibility, week at their Thursday and former manager of snack food are planned to be Fairle e [L$ Appointees to the planning to the board a proposal by "They're getting training meeting• Sewards Restaurants• available, A Main Street and resort cottaees to ' / r/d4 board are: Timothy M. Leahy, which the town would gain and we're gettingcoverageon Ironically, the selectmen After the meeting, the rear entrancetothenightclub d t nd " a Pike resident who was some additional police Friday nights when we need had spent their previous selectmen said they were are planned, be ;. if, Pol JD/ alreadyprior toServinghis Onofficialthe boardap, protectiOnnocost, this summer -- at officersit'" SavageandSaidtheof the specialproposed liquormeeting speakingboard withinspectorState presentationgenerally impressedand indicatedWith the satisfiedThe selectmenwith a numberappearedof converte o co os pointment; Susan F• Holden, Two special police officers, patrol, which, if authorized by Richard Grasse in an attempt they would be interested in voluntary regulations that FAIRLEE-- Last week, the Colligan is said to be con- 'ETBURKE Haverhill resident and a who have been working with the board of selectmen, would to clarify and discern ways of working with the bar-owners Niebling had already planned Town of Fairlee Selectmen cerned mainly with the JJt. "ql. ii The Town of More3, resort owner who his cottages to condominiums member of the board of the Haverhill police, would last for 12 Friday nights this "keeping a handle" on future to insure that liquor for the establishment. Among heard the plans of a Lake renovation or conversion of  tnl.. a health nightspots in the town. violations, crowd control and those cited would be: a selectmen, who will fill the patrol Woodsville on foot from summer. - ty treasurer, the planning board 6:00 to shortly after 8:00 p.m. The selectmen agreed to According to selectman other problems similar to mandatory dress code, police wants to convert 32 of the which would provide him with .ilt-aaning board slot on .([' reserved for a selectman; on FridaY nights. The pair of look into the legal respon- John Gibbs, the selectmen left those allegedly having oc- hired on nights when bands resorts cottages to con- enough capital, through sales, t the last meeting Homer L• May of Haverhill officers would then use a sibility of the town if the that meeting satisfied that curred at King Arthurs are provided, drinks will not dominiums and also to con- to construct the condominium .,.e/:F-hl'llg,B aOr?eaoft struct 20 more additional units complexes on Bradford Lane. and Robert Rutherford, N. police cruiser to patrol the arrangement proposed by they were much better in- nightclub, a former Bradford be served after 1:00 a,m. on to be put up for sale• The new buildings would be Haverhill. Wondsvillearea and Rte. 10as Savage was implemented formed as to what kind of establishment now closed any night (2:00 a.m. is the Bonnie Oaks Resort owner 44 by 60 feet each and located The selectmen were ap- far as Briar Hill Rd. in N• before deciding on the authority they have. because of financial dif- mandatory closing hour ex- Jim Colligan reportedly told on l0 acre lots. )1iaSigned forms parently unconcerned about Haverhill (near Ames proposal. Questions such as The selectmen have ficulties, do not happen again• cept on Sunday mornings, at the selectmen that the ad- Colligan owns i35 acres of eJ,w:?eintments at questions that had been raised DepartmentStore). what insurance would be ultimate authority over the Plans Presented l:00a.m.), til t wvnhg meeting, by planning board chairman The two officers would required for unpaid special provisions established before Niebling said the "lounge" Troublemakers ditional 20 units or con- land at the resort, and besides ', I Y for the ap- Niebling and Storm told the dominiums will he housed in the cottages, he also owns a 44- iliassttrne their Richard Fabrizio concerning donate their time in return for police will have to be an- a nightspot is issued the would be located in a roughly a possible conflict of interest the training the patrol would swered first. . required permits, under 2,600 square foot area below selectmen that they would builtfive tWOon storYthe BradfordbUildings Lane to be rOOmsitehotelplanOn theapprovalPropertY.and Once -t foffice. the planning board and his job the two had patrolled in the It was reported at the the selectmen have very little village. The lounge would had caused trouble in the past r. tti oa'" they between Rutherford's role on furnish. Savage explained that $666.66 Vermont statutes. Gibbs said the Western Auto store in the obtain a list of persons "who roughly tow and one-half completion of Act 250 criteria, Li a f .Pike is the as a surveyor. * cruiser, but with one of the Monday evening meeting that power to add additional have bar seating for 20 per- or who have been barred from miles from the village of are required by the state's i " hi I Laurent Friday Night Patrol regular Haverhill officers as a a 1978 police cruiser has been provisions once a permit is sons with 20 to 30 tables for other establishments. Each of Fairlee. District Environmental erhill, was Haverhill police chief partner bearing primary (please turn to page T) granted, additional seating of up to 150 {pleaseturntopage?} At the present time, :(pleaseturntopageT) " tO a death camp !ourney • tt. ed • " " " " we N [ti v r. Th!s is the fourth in a series of articles 2t - 'reel from Bruce MacLean, an Ox .bcw t00cher on leave of absence w00,e ! ]t two american school in Warsaw, Poland. _, e lercms chronicled the military takeover BOP i  Poh martial law while the military gover- -  ren 1. had imposed censorshiv on all news .,a'i - , • '  'nS. out of the country. MacLean s thtrd ml.'W,q nt rote the future struggle between the Ifrdl,.ei2qent and its people. In this fourth ar- [| UZtt' able to i.,e the confines of Waaw • ) the ;.. another part of the country, including l'tati'_amous death camp at Auchwitz.-- an and trust. A few ,/1 [ q re'vCPourhl.liobY n j:wsNaw.medsa h WtWtWtWt d drive to church in  effect, temporary parking a strictly cash deal. Dollars "More of them however arrive on tractors, wagons drawn by horses, and bicycles. Yet the vast majority of church goers come by ,foot. The roads in Poland on a Sunday morning are jammed with people walking to church. In the more rural areas, people walk miles and miles to church. "Three hours south of Warsaw we arrived in Katowice, the capital of the coal mining region and the center of Silesia. Here lies the heart of industrial Poland. Here also lies the most depressing part of Poland that I've seen. It is a sprawling region of coal mines, rail facilities, gigantic factory complexes and grey, dreary, apartment blocks that stretchas far as the eye can see on the horizon. There seems to be no urban planning involved and landscaping is non- .e.istent. Like Gdansk, Katowice was a Solidarity stronghold and this was evident by the number of armoured personnel carriers still blocking strategic roads in and around the city. "30 Kilometers south of Katowice we entered Oswiecim. Right before Auschwitz I saw one of the true signs that spring had arrived in Poland. Sitting in a nest that was situated right on a telephone post was this enormous Stork. These large birds are very interesting. They apparently have very little fear of Man and con- sequently build their nests close to human habitation. Many Storks nests can be found on lamp posts, barn roofs, and even on chimneys. Each year Storks return from Africa and come to roost in the same nest. "We finally arrived at the Museum and going in with us was a large group of elite, Polish Commandoes in their distinctive red b.rets. We got there just in time to see a 25 minute documentary film on the liberation of Ausch- witz by Soviet troops. The film was in Polish but the :  meaning of it was clear for :;: everyone in attendance. It .: was the toughest 25 minutes I believe I have ever gone through. Children under 13 (please turn to page 8) Bruce MacLeaa