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Bradford , Vermont
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April 28, 1982     Journal Opinion
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Page 4-The 4ournal Opinion-April 28, 1982 THEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. ' Publisher of Journal I1 Opinion Weekly newspaper Mblhked in 15redford, Vnrmont. SubsCrtlpttQn rates - Vollio end New Hampshire - 59.00 per yeaw; 56.00 for sis months; oat of state $15.00 poe year end 57.00 tar sis months; hater citi#en dlscot $2.00. Second lell pootole paid nt tmdferd, Vemont 0$033. Pvblidled by Nertbnst PvbllsklnO Company, Inc.. P.O. hx 371, |mdfnnL Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher :  Woodsville Bradford ; ; 02-222-5281 f 60:1- 747-2016 An Independent Newspaper Editorial L J National Conunemorative Week The following scene might have taken place in any office last week, It's Friday afternoon, a secretary is sitting at her typewriter or desk hoping her employer has not forgotten that it is National Secretarys' Week. Her boss finally appears on his way out the door. She can remain idle no longer; she confronts him. "Don't you realize that this is National Secretarys' Week... every other secretary this side of anywhere at least got a card or a flower or nice word.., or something." Groping for an answer he braces himself for an awkward situation. But after a minimal period of thought, he suddenly realizes he has been af- forded with an abundance of excuses. "Well gosh," he slyly begins, "it started last Monday when I saw President Reagan on the evening news declare, upon the arrival of Queen Beatrix from the Neatherlands, that this was to be National Dutch Week. I guess I must of heard about National Secretarys' Week somewhere, but that was before Tuesday when I began to devote most of my attention toward Ground Zero Week, which, incidentally, coincided with Earth Day." "I couldn't even get my trees in for Arbor Day (New Hampshire) because about mid-week my attention was diverted toward National Library Week." Sighing, the secretary leans back in her chair and rolls her eyes.. "And then yesterday I spent the whole day planning what I was going to do this morning for my observance of National Private Property Week." Fed up, the secretary strains for something appropriate to say. Where are those perfect nsults when you need them? But it is too late. Her boss is halfway out the door, calling behind him, "Hey, gotta run .. have to get home to set my clocks ahead for Daylight Savings Time. If I don't do it today, it'll never get done." Letters to the Editor00 Failed in civic responsibility To the Editor: heartedly, as did the other sponsors Sunday evening, on our way into Patrick Gymnasium at U.V.M. in Burlington, we met several people returning to their cars in the parking lot. One couple stopped and told us the place was jantmed with "kooks and wierdos", and they just wouldn't feel safe in such a setting. The minute we opened the door, my wife and I could tell at a glance those people were correct. That glance also told us why decent, respectable-looking people were in such a minority amidst that army of the "Great Unwashed". As the evening progressed, watching the signs displayed employing the use of an un- printable four-letter word, and hearing that same word shouted and directed at the distinguished speaker, the United States Secretary of the Interior. I regretted whole- gentlemen in the audience, of having brought my wife into such a situation. Is it any wonder respectable people stay away in droves from any occasion where they know these radicals would be present? If I thought for a moment that these people were ac- tually students at this tax- supported university, I would demand that it be closed down. But, I am sure that such was not the case, and these agitators were not students but were the same motley crew one sees at all of the demonstrations and marches in the state. Any effort aiding and abetting towards the downfall of our form of government -- that is where you'll find them. These people were trucked into this assembly from all over the state by their left-wing for the express purpose of disrupting a peaceful assembly, and they succeeded. Did they not, get nation-wide attention from the news media? They succeeded in their effort. It's all part of the main plot, which is to topple the Reagan Administration. To repeat, I do not believe these agitators were enrolled students. If they were students, they sure as heck were not majoring in deportment, grooming, social graces, or civic responsibility. Hell -- they couldn't even qualify for such courses! The only competitive thing they ascribe to is in one trying to look crummier than the other. In that pursuit they all suc- ceed. Frank L. Cutler Bridport, Vermont Defendin00 the utilities To the Editor: In reading of the uproar over utility rates in Vermont, may I list some prices for 1981 at other utilities. Utah Power & Light 6.34 cents per kw: cheap coal, no oil. Con. Edison of N.Y. 13 cents per kw in winter to 15 cents per kw in summer. These high rates due to high taxes and expensive oil. Taxes alone increased from 582 million to 790 million between 1977 and 1981. Boston Edison, 9a/ cents per kw high taxes, high oil prices: Pacific Gas & Electric 6.92 cents per kw the so-called life- line rate. to 12.6 cents per kw. Two nuclear plants costing over 2 billion ready to go, but delayed by the eco-freaks. Northeast Utility, Conn. & Mass. 7.85 cents per kw nuclear and expensive oil. Public Service of New Hampshire 8.65 per kw; ex- pensive oil and coal, some imported nuclear. Central & So. West, large Texas utility 5.19 cents per kw; large supply of cheap natural gas and coal. Florida Power -- fuel costs increased from 280 million to 520 million between 19o-80; 5.56 cents per kw, higher in 1982. Duke Power. North & South Carolina 4.51 cents per kw, higher in 1982: large nuclear and coal fuels. Central Vermont 6.28 per kw. Nuclear and mostly purchased power from outside the state, helped by cheap hydro power from New York and Canada. We must not forget, fuel is almost 60 percent of the cost of electricity. In 1969, oil was $2 a barrel; coal $15 a ton; today, coal $45 a ton; oil, $30a barrel. If it were not for cheap nuclear and cheap hydro from outside the state, Central Vermont rates would be higher. Some interesting observations Vermont land, housing and rentals, even cord wood, have increased 500 to 1000 percent in the past 20 years. We cer- tainly cannot blame greedy utilities or oil extortionists for these escalating costs, but greed it is, just the same, and who is to blame? Just look in the mirror. One real estate ad from the mid 60's listed 20 acres in the Bradford area for $2000; taxes $20 a year. Another. 5 acres, and 3 year old cottage in the Newbury area, $5600. xes $50; ready to move in. ,.... Central Vermont, common stock ranged from 20.2 to 264 in 1966. In 1981 the stock ranged from 12a,4 to 17a4. In view of these figures the 1966 ;,+* t,, +,- ,- .++vr,: +, L zn' :[t./. i ",7;+. , "- .,, ..... ,*++.. ;" " "+ + * r +  :''+ .... ;: 3"" ,,'.r)+ ]'C+"7 +"+';++.,+++ ++": ...................... :.. ............ . .............. .: .. . + .......... 00The Chubb fish rod factor+ The present Malmquist In 1871, Marston sold out mill site in Post Mills, Ver- mont, has been in industrial use since 1798, when Joseph Hincldey built a linseed oil mill here. He pressed the oil from linseed t flaxseed) grown both locally and in Canada. The mill was operated by the family, down through the grandson, Lyman Hinckley, until about 1860. Mter the Civil War, the Chubb family came to Post Mills" (more about them later). Thomas Henry Chubb Jr. bought the old Hinckley oil mill site in 1869, in partnership with William G. Marston. They built a mill here and began making rake and shovel handles -- but that same year their new mill was carried away by a flood. Recon- struction began immediately, and they were back in production in the spring of 1870. Fish rods According to local legend, one day Mr. Chubb was on a trip to Boston when he saw some boys on a riverbank fishing, using makeshift poles cut from nearby saplings -- his interest to Chubb, and by 1872 there was a new part- nership, Chubb & Hall, manufacturing fishing rods here. At the peak of operations the mill gave employment to 75 people and produced $75,000 worth of rods, reels and other fishing tackle annually. Their specialties were high grade split bamboo and lancewood rods from 4 to 24 ounces in weight. Fires Twice the fish rod factory was destroyed by fire, first in 1875 and again in 1891. On the night of February 14, 1875, the factory burned to the ground, along with machinery and stock valued at $28,000. A larger building was im- mediately erected in its place, and operation was resumed by autumn of that same year. Mter another devastating fire in 1891, Mr. Chubb retired from business life, as he also was in impaired health and his eyesight was failing. He sold out to the Montague City Rod and Reel Company, then in 1893 moved with his family to Massachusetts. and he conceived the idea of There may have been +, using a long piece of bamboo another fire around 1900. In as::a fishpole. When he Tales of Thetferd, Helen returned home to Post Mills he Savery Paige tells a story she put his idea into action and began manufacturing bamboo fishing poles He made use of the machinery he already had in his rake and shovel handle factory, later adding specialized machinery which he +but soon he the bamboo it hack together, making a stronger pole. As the story goes, he was the first commercial manufacturer of fish poles, and the first person to laminate a fish pole. has heard of a fire at the fish rod factory, during which the mill whistle got stuck and blew continuously while the building was burning. When the new mill was built, it too had a whistle, but because of the blood-chilling memories of the earlier whistle it was never blown until a generation later, after Mr. Melmquist had bought the mill. The mill was rebuilt for the Montague City company by Frank Ilsley, said to have been Thetford's finest car- psnter and bridge-builder. Montague City continued the manufacture of fishing rods under the Chubb tradename until the company moved out in 1931, during the Depression. Other Sources: A Short History of Thetford, Charles Latham; Post Mills and Fairlee Lake about 1875, C. S. Davis; Wildwood's Magazine, Feb. 1889; Orange County Gazetteer, Hamilton Child, 1888; Walton's Vermont Register and Farmer's Almanac, 1871 and 1876; Genealogy of the Chubb Family, Thomas H. Chubb, 1909; registered deeds of Thetford; records of Malmquist Wood Products, Inc.; information from Pat Doyle and Charles W. Hughes. The Chubb family According to the Chubb family genealogy, the Thomas Chubb who manufactured fish poles was actually the eighth Thomas Chubb in a direct line from his ancestor who came from England -- and we can only guess how many Thomases there may have been before that! The Chubbs settled around Boston sometime before 1631. Thomas the fifth was in the Battle of Bunker Hill, and Thomas the sixth in the War of 1812. The seventh Thomas, later known as Captain Chubb or Comodore Chubb, left home as a boy and went to sea, against his parents wishes. He worked his way up from cabin boy and had many exciting adventures, including the pursuit of Greek pirates who were preying on American shipping in the munitions of war and sailed for Texas. His generosity and efforts were rewarded by his friend, Governor Sam Houston, who appointed him superintendant of public construction in the new Republic of Texas. At the outbreak of the Civil War, Capt. Chubb was one of the first men afloat with the Confederate navy, com- manding a vessel called the Royal Yact, capturing Union ships and guarding the Con- federate coastline. At one time Capt. Chubb was captured and confined in double irons for six weeks or longer, but was finally exchanged. Returning to Texas a hero, he continued the fight as long as there was any hope left, contributing generously from his ample fortune. After the war be was appointed [arbormaster at the Port of Galveston, and became known as Commodore Chubh In 1869 he moved to Post Mills, Vermont, where he built a large house which he operated as a hotel and summer boardinghouse, known as the Commodore House (later burned; the site of the present home of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Shopp). Accor- ding to C. S. Davis's reminiscences, Commodore Chubb had lived long enough in the South to acquire the manners and appearance of a real southern gentleman, but not the southern speech, his temperament being much too firey for that. Most of his summer boarders were from "Dixie Land," many of them from Baltimore. Due to his long residence in the South, he was partial to colored help, a novelty here at that time. According to an anecdote in the Springfield (Vt.) Reporter (Apr. 8, 1920), Commodore Chubb was once elected road surveyor for the town of West Fairlee. This injured his dignity, but he got even by sending one of his colored servants to boss the road gang, giving him in- structions never to dismount from his horse and not to do a thing but "boss the gang." The eighth Thomas Mediterranean. In 1838 he While in Texas, Com- became so aroused on behalf modore Chubb's son Thomas of the Texans' struggle for had been his right hand man in independence from Mexico ship building and sailing, and that at his own expense he had supervised the family loaded the brigg Cecelia with plantation at Goose Creek. He served under his father on the Royal Yact -- although he was on leave when the ship and his father were captured. The ship was disabled and abandoned by its captors, but the Confederates repaired it, and young Thomas succeeded to his father's position as captain. Later in the war, with other vessels, Thomas ran through the Union blockade twice, was once captured by raiders and ransomed, and survived various chases by Federal gunboats. The Chubb family history includes the romantic story of Thomas Chubb's courtship and marriage. His wife was Isabel Mason, a girl from Baltimore, who when she was about 18 had moved with her parents to a plantation in Texas. The following spring (1859) the Chubb family came ten miles by boat from Goose Creek to pay their respects to their new neighbors. During this visit, Thomas and Isabel met for the first time -- and their visit was prolonged to two days by a violent "nor- ther" which prevented the Chubbs from returning home by boat over the open waters of Galveston Bay. This ill wind blew good to Thomas and Isabel. as it gave them time to get acquainted and form the friendship which soon ripened into love. After an acquaintance of three or four months and a courtship of one month, Thomas and Isabel were anxious to be married -- but she could not get her father's consent. So the young couple secretly made plans, and one night she met him at the rail fence not far from her home and mounted the extra horse which he had brought for her. They rode off eight miles across the prairie to the house of Rev. Edward Stocking, who was one of Thomas's former tutors and had agreed to marry them. The ceremony took place on his porch in the September moonlight, then the young couple rode away. On their arrival at Thomas's home in Goose Creek, they were warmly welcomed by his family -- and soon Isabel's parents relented and gave the marriage their blessing. The couple "lived happily ever after," although they suffered many misfor- tunes, such as the loss of their first three children. The stockholder has not done too well, unless he was fortunate to sell in 1966 and bought in a more progressive area. Remember the early 60's, haircut 75 cents; teacher salaries $3,000 per year. One significant reason for increased utility costs is that in 1960, a large generating station could be built for $100 million, finaneed at 5 to 6 percent. Today it costs $1 billion, interest 15 percent or higher. Most nuclear plants, and even hydro plants have been delayed for years, by red tape and opposition by the eco- freaks. Thus greatly in- creasing final cost. Connecticut Yankee nuclear, 1972; .was built and operating in 5 years; today it takes 10 to 12 years, and don't forget the high finance charges. In sharp contrast, Japan and France can build and start to operate in 5 to 7 years. Q.E.D. M. Nevins NOW THAT APRIL'S HERE !-- So are the Spring floods as Farm in Piermont. The cows will be in the barn until the pasture dries out. STATE 1Vayne Kenyon. (D.Vt.) The Vermont General Assembly has concluded one of the most productive sessions in recent memory. Partly labels fell aside in a solid bipartisan effort to address the state's major problems. The State Aid to Education formula was finally revised, providing a sizeable windfall to most Vermont communities. A significant reduction in the property tax burden will now be possible in nearly all sehool districts. Consumers won major victories despite heavy lobbying by utilities. Recoupment, which allowed eustomers to be retroac- tively billed for rate increases, is now prohibited. Also, conservation has been encouraged through financial incentives within the rate strticture. An Independence Fund was established to help keep the elderly and handicapped out of costly and demoralizing institutions. It is the first such program in the nation and offers an opportunity to reduce the state's Medicaid burden. A comprehensive crime enacted,placing tighter bargaining, and setting a sentence, without parole, first-degree murders. stiffened for driving with a license, for leaving the cident, for furnishing and for misrepresenting age obtain alcoholic bevera million, 30-bed j authorized. The General Assembly to govern oil and gas drilling, imposed a 14-cent shore up the ailing Highway the midst of federal budgetary and tax reapportioned itself to confor 1980 census. If you (Bradford, Corinth, need assistance with state programs, please let Telephone: 439-5567. Vt. 05033 ! and in the and was a for Post Mills After the away in 1893, connections and their have a Also, Camp founded by Besides operating the fish although it has rod factory, Thomas Chubb out of the familY. moved to the bracing air and Civil War, they had slaves, took an active part in the life pure water of New England. and were used to being waited of the community, serving on Thomas came permanently to on. When they came to Post the local school committee Next ReminiscenceS factory. I1! 1: ..... THE CHUBB FISH ROD FACTORY-- This is an early building of the factory with an bridge (at right). family passed through the hardships of the Civil War with great courage, then in 1867 they met another disaster -- a terrible epidemic of yellow fever which ravaged the Galveston area Thomas assisted in caring for the sick, until he himself was stricken. He was advised by his doctor to go east, so he and Isabel, who was also in poor health, Post Mills in July of 1868, Mills they brought some of followed by Isabel of next their colored servants with year. Evidently the change them. At that time, Isabel was beneficial, as they both Chubb had had so little ex- soon regained their health, perience in keeping housethat besides restoring the family's she "couldn't even boil prosperity, water," so Mrs. Marston (her Helen Savery Paige has husband's partner's wife) talked with some of the taught her how to cook and to Chubbs' descendants, who told run a household. her that while the family was living in the South, before the have to wait at the vehicle in against a dog's order to issue a citation to its form of a fine) owner. Drew said village plaints are ordinances will allow the dog. village police to place a ticket On on the vehicle, litter, the Dog Problems the time being, Much of the discussion at ping last week's meeting was the centered around the issue of week's J Monday, May 3 FAIRLEE: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. WOODSVILLE: Haverhill Selectmen, 7:00 p.m. Tuesday, May 4 GROTON: Selectmen, 7:00 p.m. THETFORD: School Board, 7: 30 p.m. WOODSVILLE: Commissioners, 7:00p.m. Wednesday, May 5 ORFORD: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. LYME: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m. NEWBURY: Trustees, 7:30 p.m. Etowah, N.C. to walk on," said Drew in his was a definite parking sidewalks. problem in the village. Will the  Although the trustees voted eventually to reinforce the village bylaws kind of that cover parking;Welch said urban m, he felt that, because of limited call for parking space in the village, each day with the ordinances might be too shovels Wednesday, April 28 general. Allen said he would Not yet, but ORFORD: Selectmen, 8:00p.m. support stricter parking laws discussed LYME: Selectmen, 7:30p.m. "but when you want to start strongly HAVERHILL: SchoolBoard,7:30p.m. ticketing people for meeting. Thursday, April 29 jaywalking in Bradford, that's Barking BRADFORD:PlanningCommissionhearing,7:30p.m. where I'll draw the line." cited as a CORINTH: Union 36 School Board, 7:30 p.m. Drew said he had checked village. Village BRADFORD: BA&GSD School Trustees, 7:30 p.m. with the Vermont State Police Allen remindea NEWBURY: SchoolBoard,9:00a.m. and found that it is against that the village Friday, April 30 state law to park on sidewalks, a "dog WOODSVILLE: Haverhill District Court, 2:00 p.m. but that the state police would policy--action * Trustees seek control in " (continued from page 1) explanatio .for his desire for whose s--particularly those parked stricter enforcement of clean up after on sidewalks, parking ordinances in the residents who "Your sidewalks are made village. He said he felt there their dogs Page 4-The 4ournal Opinion-April 28, 1982 THEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. ' Publisher of Journal I1 Opinion Weekly newspaper Mblhked in 15redford, Vnrmont. SubsCrtlpttQn rates - Vollio end New Hampshire - 59.00 per yeaw; 56.00 for sis months; oat of state $15.00 poe year end 57.00 tar sis months; hater citi#en dlscot $2.00. Second lell pootole paid nt tmdferd, Vemont 0$033. Pvblidled by Nertbnst PvbllsklnO Company, Inc.. P.O. hx 371, |mdfnnL Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher :  Woodsville Bradford ; ; 02-222-5281 f 60:1- 747-2016 An Independent Newspaper Editorial L J National Conunemorative Week The following scene might have taken place in any office last week, It's Friday afternoon, a secretary is sitting at her typewriter or desk hoping her employer has not forgotten that it is National Secretarys' Week. Her boss finally appears on his way out the door. She can remain idle no longer; she confronts him. "Don't you realize that this is National Secretarys' Week... every other secretary this side of anywhere at least got a card or a flower or nice word.., or something." Groping for an answer he braces himself for an awkward situation. But after a minimal period of thought, he suddenly realizes he has been af- forded with an abundance of excuses. "Well gosh," he slyly begins, "it started last Monday when I saw President Reagan on the evening news declare, upon the arrival of Queen Beatrix from the Neatherlands, that this was to be National Dutch Week. I guess I must of heard about National Secretarys' Week somewhere, but that was before Tuesday when I began to devote most of my attention toward Ground Zero Week, which, incidentally, coincided with Earth Day." "I couldn't even get my trees in for Arbor Day (New Hampshire) because about mid-week my attention was diverted toward National Library Week." Sighing, the secretary leans back in her chair and rolls her eyes.. "And then yesterday I spent the whole day planning what I was going to do this morning for my observance of National Private Property Week." Fed up, the secretary strains for something appropriate to say. Where are those perfect nsults when you need them? But it is too late. Her boss is halfway out the door, calling behind him, "Hey, gotta run .. have to get home to set my clocks ahead for Daylight Savings Time. If I don't do it today, it'll never get done." Letters to the Editor00 Failed in civic responsibility To the Editor: heartedly, as did the other sponsors Sunday evening, on our way into Patrick Gymnasium at U.V.M. in Burlington, we met several people returning to their cars in the parking lot. One couple stopped and told us the place was jantmed with "kooks and wierdos", and they just wouldn't feel safe in such a setting. The minute we opened the door, my wife and I could tell at a glance those people were correct. That glance also told us why decent, respectable-looking people were in such a minority amidst that army of the "Great Unwashed". As the evening progressed, watching the signs displayed employing the use of an un- printable four-letter word, and hearing that same word shouted and directed at the distinguished speaker, the United States Secretary of the Interior. I regretted whole- gentlemen in the audience, of having brought my wife into such a situation. Is it any wonder respectable people stay away in droves from any occasion where they know these radicals would be present? If I thought for a moment that these people were ac- tually students at this tax- supported university, I would demand that it be closed down. But, I am sure that such was not the case, and these agitators were not students but were the same motley crew one sees at all of the demonstrations and marches in the state. Any effort aiding and abetting towards the downfall of our form of government -- that is where you'll find them. These people were trucked into this assembly from all over the state by their left-wing for the express purpose of disrupting a peaceful assembly, and they succeeded. Did they not, get nation-wide attention from the news media? They succeeded in their effort. It's all part of the main plot, which is to topple the Reagan Administration. To repeat, I do not believe these agitators were enrolled students. If they were students, they sure as heck were not majoring in deportment, grooming, social graces, or civic responsibility. Hell -- they couldn't even qualify for such courses! The only competitive thing they ascribe to is in one trying to look crummier than the other. In that pursuit they all suc- ceed. Frank L. Cutler Bridport, Vermont Defendin00 the utilities To the Editor: In reading of the uproar over utility rates in Vermont, may I list some prices for 1981 at other utilities. Utah Power & Light 6.34 cents per kw: cheap coal, no oil. Con. Edison of N.Y. 13 cents per kw in winter to 15 cents per kw in summer. These high rates due to high taxes and expensive oil. Taxes alone increased from 582 million to 790 million between 1977 and 1981. Boston Edison, 9a/ cents per kw high taxes, high oil prices: Pacific Gas & Electric 6.92 cents per kw the so-called life- line rate. to 12.6 cents per kw. Two nuclear plants costing over 2 billion ready to go, but delayed by the eco-freaks. Northeast Utility, Conn. & Mass. 7.85 cents per kw nuclear and expensive oil. Public Service of New Hampshire 8.65 per kw; ex- pensive oil and coal, some imported nuclear. Central & So. West, large Texas utility 5.19 cents per kw; large supply of cheap natural gas and coal. Florida Power -- fuel costs increased from 280 million to 520 million between 19o-80; 5.56 cents per kw, higher in 1982. Duke Power. North & South Carolina 4.51 cents per kw, higher in 1982: large nuclear and coal fuels. Central Vermont 6.28 per kw. Nuclear and mostly purchased power from outside the state, helped by cheap hydro power from New York and Canada. We must not forget, fuel is almost 60 percent of the cost of electricity. In 1969, oil was $2 a barrel; coal $15 a ton; today, coal $45 a ton; oil, $30a barrel. If it were not for cheap nuclear and cheap hydro from outside the state, Central Vermont rates would be higher. Some interesting observations Vermont land, housing and rentals, even cord wood, have increased 500 to 1000 percent in the past 20 years. We cer- tainly cannot blame greedy utilities or oil extortionists for these escalating costs, but greed it is, just the same, and who is to blame? Just look in the mirror. One real estate ad from the mid 60's listed 20 acres in the Bradford area for $2000; taxes $20 a year. Another. 5 acres, and 3 year old cottage in the Newbury area, $5600. xes $50; ready to move in. ,.... Central Vermont, common stock ranged from 20.2 to 264 in 1966. In 1981 the stock ranged from 12a,4 to 17a4. In view of these figures the 1966 ;,+* t,, +,- ,- .++vr,: +, L zn' :[t./. i ",7;+. , "- .,, ..... ,*++.. ;" " "+ + * r +  :''+ .... ;: 3"" ,,'.r)+ ]'C+"7 +"+';++.,+++ ++": ...................... :.. ............ . .............. .: .. . + .......... 00The Chubb fish rod factor+ The present Malmquist In 1871, Marston sold out mill site in Post Mills, Ver- mont, has been in industrial use since 1798, when Joseph Hincldey built a linseed oil mill here. He pressed the oil from linseed t flaxseed) grown both locally and in Canada. The mill was operated by the family, down through the grandson, Lyman Hinckley, until about 1860. Mter the Civil War, the Chubb family came to Post Mills" (more about them later). Thomas Henry Chubb Jr. bought the old Hinckley oil mill site in 1869, in partnership with William G. Marston. They built a mill here and began making rake and shovel handles -- but that same year their new mill was carried away by a flood. Recon- struction began immediately, and they were back in production in the spring of 1870. Fish rods According to local legend, one day Mr. Chubb was on a trip to Boston when he saw some boys on a riverbank fishing, using makeshift poles cut from nearby saplings -- his interest to Chubb, and by 1872 there was a new part- nership, Chubb & Hall, manufacturing fishing rods here. At the peak of operations the mill gave employment to 75 people and produced $75,000 worth of rods, reels and other fishing tackle annually. Their specialties were high grade split bamboo and lancewood rods from 4 to 24 ounces in weight. Fires Twice the fish rod factory was destroyed by fire, first in 1875 and again in 1891. On the night of February 14, 1875, the factory burned to the ground, along with machinery and stock valued at $28,000. A larger building was im- mediately erected in its place, and operation was resumed by autumn of that same year. Mter another devastating fire in 1891, Mr. Chubb retired from business life, as he also was in impaired health and his eyesight was failing. He sold out to the Montague City Rod and Reel Company, then in 1893 moved with his family to Massachusetts. and he conceived the idea of There may have been +, using a long piece of bamboo another fire around 1900. In as::a fishpole. When he Tales of Thetferd, Helen returned home to Post Mills he Savery Paige tells a story she put his idea into action and began manufacturing bamboo fishing poles He made use of the machinery he already had in his rake and shovel handle factory, later adding specialized machinery which he +but soon he the bamboo it hack together, making a stronger pole. As the story goes, he was the first commercial manufacturer of fish poles, and the first person to laminate a fish pole. has heard of a fire at the fish rod factory, during which the mill whistle got stuck and blew continuously while the building was burning. When the new mill was built, it too had a whistle, but because of the blood-chilling memories of the earlier whistle it was never blown until a generation later, after Mr. Melmquist had bought the mill. The mill was rebuilt for the Montague City company by Frank Ilsley, said to have been Thetford's finest car- psnter and bridge-builder. Montague City continued the manufacture of fishing rods under the Chubb tradename until the company moved out in 1931, during the Depression. Other Sources: A Short History of Thetford, Charles Latham; Post Mills and Fairlee Lake about 1875, C. S. Davis; Wildwood's Magazine, Feb. 1889; Orange County Gazetteer, Hamilton Child, 1888; Walton's Vermont Register and Farmer's Almanac, 1871 and 1876; Genealogy of the Chubb Family, Thomas H. Chubb, 1909; registered deeds of Thetford; records of Malmquist Wood Products, Inc.; information from Pat Doyle and Charles W. Hughes. The Chubb family According to the Chubb family genealogy, the Thomas Chubb who manufactured fish poles was actually the eighth Thomas Chubb in a direct line from his ancestor who came from England -- and we can only guess how many Thomases there may have been before that! The Chubbs settled around Boston sometime before 1631. Thomas the fifth was in the Battle of Bunker Hill, and Thomas the sixth in the War of 1812. The seventh Thomas, later known as Captain Chubb or Comodore Chubb, left home as a boy and went to sea, against his parents wishes. He worked his way up from cabin boy and had many exciting adventures, including the pursuit of Greek pirates who were preying on American shipping in the munitions of war and sailed for Texas. His generosity and efforts were rewarded by his friend, Governor Sam Houston, who appointed him superintendant of public construction in the new Republic of Texas. At the outbreak of the Civil War, Capt. Chubb was one of the first men afloat with the Confederate navy, com- manding a vessel called the Royal Yact, capturing Union ships and guarding the Con- federate coastline. At one time Capt. Chubb was captured and confined in double irons for six weeks or longer, but was finally exchanged. Returning to Texas a hero, he continued the fight as long as there was any hope left, contributing generously from his ample fortune. After the war be was appointed [arbormaster at the Port of Galveston, and became known as Commodore Chubh In 1869 he moved to Post Mills, Vermont, where he built a large house which he operated as a hotel and summer boardinghouse, known as the Commodore House (later burned; the site of the present home of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Shopp). Accor- ding to C. S. Davis's reminiscences, Commodore Chubb had lived long enough in the South to acquire the manners and appearance of a real southern gentleman, but not the southern speech, his temperament being much too firey for that. Most of his summer boarders were from "Dixie Land," many of them from Baltimore. Due to his long residence in the South, he was partial to colored help, a novelty here at that time. According to an anecdote in the Springfield (Vt.) Reporter (Apr. 8, 1920), Commodore Chubb was once elected road surveyor for the town of West Fairlee. This injured his dignity, but he got even by sending one of his colored servants to boss the road gang, giving him in- structions never to dismount from his horse and not to do a thing but "boss the gang." The eighth Thomas Mediterranean. In 1838 he While in Texas, Com- became so aroused on behalf modore Chubb's son Thomas of the Texans' struggle for had been his right hand man in independence from Mexico ship building and sailing, and that at his own expense he had supervised the family loaded the brigg Cecelia with plantation at Goose Creek. He served under his father on the Royal Yact -- although he was on leave when the ship and his father were captured. The ship was disabled and abandoned by its captors, but the Confederates repaired it, and young Thomas succeeded to his father's position as captain. Later in the war, with other vessels, Thomas ran through the Union blockade twice, was once captured by raiders and ransomed, and survived various chases by Federal gunboats. The Chubb family history includes the romantic story of Thomas Chubb's courtship and marriage. His wife was Isabel Mason, a girl from Baltimore, who when she was about 18 had moved with her parents to a plantation in Texas. The following spring (1859) the Chubb family came ten miles by boat from Goose Creek to pay their respects to their new neighbors. During this visit, Thomas and Isabel met for the first time -- and their visit was prolonged to two days by a violent "nor- ther" which prevented the Chubbs from returning home by boat over the open waters of Galveston Bay. This ill wind blew good to Thomas and Isabel. as it gave them time to get acquainted and form the friendship which soon ripened into love. After an acquaintance of three or four months and a courtship of one month, Thomas and Isabel were anxious to be married -- but she could not get her father's consent. So the young couple secretly made plans, and one night she met him at the rail fence not far from her home and mounted the extra horse which he had brought for her. They rode off eight miles across the prairie to the house of Rev. Edward Stocking, who was one of Thomas's former tutors and had agreed to marry them. The ceremony took place on his porch in the September moonlight, then the young couple rode away. On their arrival at Thomas's home in Goose Creek, they were warmly welcomed by his family -- and soon Isabel's parents relented and gave the marriage their blessing. The couple "lived happily ever after," although they suffered many misfor- tunes, such as the loss of their first three children. The stockholder has not done too well, unless he was fortunate to sell in 1966 and bought in a more progressive area. Remember the early 60's, haircut 75 cents; teacher salaries $3,000 per year. One significant reason for increased utility costs is that in 1960, a large generating station could be built for $100 million, finaneed at 5 to 6 percent. Today it costs $1 billion, interest 15 percent or higher. Most nuclear plants, and even hydro plants have been delayed for years, by red tape and opposition by the eco- freaks. Thus greatly in- creasing final cost. Connecticut Yankee nuclear, 1972; .was built and operating in 5 years; today it takes 10 to 12 years, and don't forget the high finance charges. In sharp contrast, Japan and France can build and start to operate in 5 to 7 years. Q.E.D. M. Nevins NOW THAT APRIL'S HERE !-- So are the Spring floods as Farm in Piermont. The cows will be in the barn until the pasture dries out. STATE 1Vayne Kenyon. (D.Vt.) The Vermont General Assembly has concluded one of the most productive sessions in recent memory. Partly labels fell aside in a solid bipartisan effort to address the state's major problems. The State Aid to Education formula was finally revised, providing a sizeable windfall to most Vermont communities. A significant reduction in the property tax burden will now be possible in nearly all sehool districts. Consumers won major victories despite heavy lobbying by utilities. Recoupment, which allowed eustomers to be retroac- tively billed for rate increases, is now prohibited. Also, conservation has been encouraged through financial incentives within the rate strticture. An Independence Fund was established to help keep the elderly and handicapped out of costly and demoralizing institutions. It is the first such program in the nation and offers an opportunity to reduce the state's Medicaid burden. A comprehensive crime enacted,placing tighter bargaining, and setting a sentence, without parole, first-degree murders. stiffened for driving with a license, for leaving the cident, for furnishing and for misrepresenting age obtain alcoholic bevera million, 30-bed j authorized. The General Assembly to govern oil and gas drilling, imposed a 14-cent shore up the ailing Highway the midst of federal budgetary and tax reapportioned itself to confor 1980 census. If you (Bradford, Corinth, need assistance with state programs, please let Telephone: 439-5567. Vt. 05033 ! and in the and was a for Post Mills After the away in 1893, connections and their have a Also, Camp founded by Besides operating the fish although it has rod factory, Thomas Chubb out of the familY. moved to the bracing air and Civil War, they had slaves, took an active part in the life pure water of New England. and were used to being waited of the community, serving on Thomas came permanently to on. When they came to Post the local school committee Next ReminiscenceS factory. I1! 1: ..... THE CHUBB FISH ROD FACTORY-- This is an early building of the factory with an bridge (at right). family passed through the hardships of the Civil War with great courage, then in 1867 they met another disaster -- a terrible epidemic of yellow fever which ravaged the Galveston area Thomas assisted in caring for the sick, until he himself was stricken. He was advised by his doctor to go east, so he and Isabel, who was also in poor health, Post Mills in July of 1868, Mills they brought some of followed by Isabel of next their colored servants with year. Evidently the change them. At that time, Isabel was beneficial, as they both Chubb had had so little ex- soon regained their health, perience in keeping housethat besides restoring the family's she "couldn't even boil prosperity, water," so Mrs. Marston (her Helen Savery Paige has husband's partner's wife) talked with some of the taught her how to cook and to Chubbs' descendants, who told run a household. her that while the family was living in the South, before the have to wait at the vehicle in against a dog's order to issue a citation to its form of a fine) owner. Drew said village plaints are ordinances will allow the dog. village police to place a ticket On on the vehicle, litter, the Dog Problems the time being, Much of the discussion at ping last week's meeting was the centered around the issue of week's J Monday, May 3 FAIRLEE: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. WOODSVILLE: Haverhill Selectmen, 7:00 p.m. Tuesday, May 4 GROTON: Selectmen, 7:00 p.m. THETFORD: School Board, 7: 30 p.m. WOODSVILLE: Commissioners, 7:00p.m. Wednesday, May 5 ORFORD: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. LYME: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m. NEWBURY: Trustees, 7:30 p.m. Etowah, N.C. to walk on," said Drew in his was a definite parking sidewalks. problem in the village. Will the  Although the trustees voted eventually to reinforce the village bylaws kind of that cover parking;Welch said urban m, he felt that, because of limited call for parking space in the village, each day with the ordinances might be too shovels Wednesday, April 28 general. Allen said he would Not yet, but ORFORD: Selectmen, 8:00p.m. support stricter parking laws discussed LYME: Selectmen, 7:30p.m. "but when you want to start strongly HAVERHILL: SchoolBoard,7:30p.m. ticketing people for meeting. Thursday, April 29 jaywalking in Bradford, that's Barking BRADFORD:PlanningCommissionhearing,7:30p.m. where I'll draw the line." cited as a CORINTH: Union 36 School Board, 7:30 p.m. Drew said he had checked village. Village BRADFORD: BA&GSD School Trustees, 7:30 p.m. with the Vermont State Police Allen remindea NEWBURY: SchoolBoard,9:00a.m. and found that it is against that the village Friday, April 30 state law to park on sidewalks, a "dog WOODSVILLE: Haverhill District Court, 2:00 p.m. but that the state police would policy--action * Trustees seek control in " (continued from page 1) explanatio .for his desire for whose s--particularly those parked stricter enforcement of clean up after on sidewalks, parking ordinances in the residents who "Your sidewalks are made village. He said he felt there their dogs