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Bradford , Vermont
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April 28, 1982     Journal Opinion
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Page 8-The Journal Opinion-April 28, 1982 0000Foughlove" support group deals with teenage pr, ab] BRADFORD-- Toughlove, a behavio[', according to Rae with thekids, support group for parents Coleman, a spokesman for the Upper Valley Beginning having trouble with their Parents Advisory Council of One of the organizing teenagers, held their first the Orange East Supervisory parents of the Bradford group meeting in the Upper Valley in Union. Finding help through said regarding his reason for February at Oxbow High the support of people outside becoming interested in the School. their immediate family, these group, "Living with my The idea for Toughlove grew parents then began a group to teenaged son had become out of the need of two Penn- carry-on this idea of mutual almost unbearable. His ob- sylvania parents to effectively support• noxious, beligerent behavior deal with a crisis caused by Since then groups have was tearing our family apart. their teen-aged daughter's begun throughout the United Nothing we did seemed to ......... States and Canada. Parents make any difference. We felt meet to share their problems emotionally beaten on and and concerns, help each other exhausted trying to find a way PERFECTION set their own bottom line of to make things right. We lived GUARANTEED acceptable behavior, and then in fear that he would go into back each other up in dealing one of his rages and physically 5. F. Mc ALLISTER Quality Jewelers Since 1923 Woodsvillo, N. H. New Bradford town ohm Phone 74%3482 harm himself or his younger sister. Hearing how families gained strength through the Toughlove support gave us confidence to begin standing up to him. Knowing there was going to be a group, we didn't feel so alone with or problem and have already begun to use Toughlove ideas." The Bradford group, sponsored by the Parent's Advisory Council of the Orange East Supervisory Union, has received the support of the Oxbow Guidance Team. Public hearing on Thursday BRADFORD-- This Thur- sday, residents in Bradford will have the town's proposed new municipal plan unveiled for them by the town's planning commission at a public hearing required by law for public input and review of the plan. The April 29 hearing will be the first of two public hearings that Bradford residents, who are not town or village officials, will be able to review the plan and suggest revisions, if Called for, to the planning com- mission. The new plan, a detailed 45-page document, has been designed to replace the old five-page plan which expired several years ago. The town's planning commission has been debating over the details of one-half years. The Bradford Village Trustees have ap- proved the plan. Last month, the selectmen approved the plan, but with a number of their own revisions. Among the major revisions to the plan madeat the request of the selectmen at a joint meeting with the planning commission on March 11, included a provision on zoning limitations that the planning commission passed reluc- tantly with the idea of waiting to see how the public viewed the matter at the public hearings, according to a planning commission spokesman. This provision would limit future development to no less than three acre lots in the town and no less than one acre lots in the village. virtually no zoning. At a village trustees' meeting last week, trustee Larry Drew asked planning commission member Harry McLam if the commission could begin working on the formulation of new zoning ordinances while waiting for .............. the plan for over two and According to Kent ................ Stevenson of the Two Rivers- Ottaquechee Regional Planning Commission, if additional revisions are requested by the public at the hearings, the planning commission will present them to the town's joint legislative body (selectmen and trustees) for another hearing. If the public ap- proves the plan "as is", the joint legislative body can adopt the plan, making it the official municipal plan of the town. Stevenson has been ad- vising the planning com- mission throuBhout its development of the plan and is said to be responsible for the wording of much of its text. . At recent town and village meetings, both the trtees and the selectmen, along with a majority of other town officials, have indicated a desire for the new plan to be adopted soon, so that the town and village can begin work on a set of zoning or- dinances. Town officials say that, at the present time, the town is using an out-dated set of ordinances and that the village zoning ordinances have expired, leaving the Village of Bradford with v v v ..... v w v v v v 00"MErc'00 RES'0E"t00 S CARPET & _ C.ECKO00,LOW00C r -l,,lmm - HUGE INVENTORY IN STOCK .  rtllKIV/ L'I/"tf'lC .... IMMEDIATE INSTALLATION Hale Furniture & Carpet 802-222-57S$ BRADFORD, YT. Meet the suit that won00 take you to the cleaners. The new Haggar Inflation Buster. Now washable with Magic Stretch. TM Machine wash it, tumble dry it, and it comes out looking great everytime. With no dry cleaning bills to pay. You can't beat the convenience and economy! You can't beat the price, either[ It's the new Haggar Inflation Buster that makes a separates outfit as easy to buy as it is to take care of. Now add the comfort of a two-way stretch woven fabric and you've got )arates no man should be without. $25 slacks. 170 coat. vest optional. CARE INSTRUCTIONS Machine wash and dr), separate- Yu" Wash in warm water and rable-press cycle. Dry on durable-pt,e cycle, Do no€ ex- pose to high heat. Remove promptly when dry, Touch up with warm iron  ta'y. Use Your Charge Account 00ta00,qi:9 A'/00aps St Johnsbury, Vermont • WooOsvtllO, New HOmlhtre Ol:n FriOoy Night 'tit 9:00 PM. d journey to a death camp (continued from page !) were not allowed to see it and many people took out han- dkerchiefs when the film concluded and people struggled to get a handle on their emotions as they departed from the cinema. For me, the film left a lump in my throat that would not go away for the rest of the afternoon. True Horrors "One can read all the hooks and watch all the TV and Film documentaries on concentration camp horrors there is and it still won't prepare you for the shock of seeing first hand, evidence of Nazi crimes. No words I know can adequately describe the feelings one has when confronted with rooms of human hair, rooms filled with shoes and rooms filled with artificial limbs. Other rooms contained piles of baby clothes and one room was piled with spec- tacles. In a corner of one room was a lamp with a shade made out of human skin. That was by no means all there was to see. There were buildings that depicted the every day life of the prison. At the far end of the camp, the gas chambers and piles of Cyclon B-gas can- nisters left, and the crematorium with it's ovens still stand. You stumble from one horror scene to another and your mind has a difficult time taking in all these images and forming a coherent picture. "It may come as a sur- prise to some people, but Auschwitz wasn't the main extermination camp. Of the four million men, women and children who perished here, the vast majority were in a nearby camp called Birkenau. This camp is situated just a little over a mile away. Lying on a very flat area of ground, the first thing that hits you is it's size. It's simply immense. The place seems to go on for an eternity. It doesn't of course, but the fact remains that Birkenau is well over four times the size of Auschwitz. When the Soviets were close to liberating that part of Poland, the Nazis in their attempt to conceal what had gone on, tore down and destroyed many of it's buildings. However they ran out of time and as a result, nearly four decades after the camp had shut down, many buildings still remain. Some of the buildings were con- structed out of brick. Many more were built out of wood. "It was a very haunting feeling to enter one of those buildings alone and try to imagine just what it was like to live in one between the years 1940-1945• The silence and emptiness in these huts was devastating. In huts that could barely fit thirty to forty people, hundreds of barely living skeletons were forced to co-exist with one another. Some of the buildings were left exactly as the Russiam had found them. Consequently one could see bunks built on top of bunks. Some of the bunks had torn blankets and prison clothing left in them. Many simply had old hay in them. In the brick buildings, stalls were built for sleeping arrangements. Animals had more space in their stalls than these prisoners had. Each stall would sleep three or four people. "For security reasons the SS split the camp up into sections. Each section was separated from the others by a barbed wired fence that was highly electrified. One could wander from the Gypsy camp, through the Soviet Prisoner of War camp, and of course the Jewish Camp• The Jewish section was in turn divided into the Men's and Women's section. This was further split up into different sec- tions that depended on the prisoner's nationality. "As we were leaving the camp, one of my colleagues turned to know before I could so many of passively deaths least token then I passively the tactics Security present Regime• It ho00less. "This was to others Germany Majdanek here Two seeing these First was the never got these places. an emotionally and gut w perience. thought was How and something like happen?" the municipal plan to go through the hearing 4-H information meeting Newburv planned in Haverhill phone book processan idea McLam agreed to present to the rest HAVERHILL-- The Grafton County 4-H Club will be of the planning commission holding an informational at their next meeting, meeting on Tuesday, May 4 at Stevenson told the Journal the Haverhill Chapel starting Opinion that some basic or "routine" parts of the zoning ordinances could be worked out prior to official adoption of the municipal plan. "We are pretty winded now," he said about the commission's lengthy debate of the new plan, but he added, "it would be nice to take a break ... " but l'd hate to lose momentum on this." Asked whether interim or old village zoning could be temporarily adopted until new ordinances could be devised, Stevenson said, "It's possible" but he said he felt the old ordinance would need "tailoring" to fit the best interests of the village at 7:00p.m. The meeting is being described as an informational and organizational meeting and 4-H local officials are asking those from surroun- ding communities interested in the 4-H program to attend. Group representatives say they are seeking to establish a 4-H program in the com- munities of Haverhill and Pike. "Our immediate needs are individuals who could spend some time guiding and issues in Bradford such as: sewage, solid waste disposal, schools, public lands, housing, zoning, land use, agrioalture, ntv ttttlt development, public water supply, and municipal of. fers--to name a few. The town and village are treated separately in the plan. Thursday's meeting will be held at 7:30 p.m• in the Bradford Academy Building. encouraging young members in various projects," ac- cording to a group spokesman• Additional information regarding the local 4-H program may be obtained by calling 787-6944, said a club news release. The 4-H program is a volunteer program designed to meet the needs and in- terests of young people. With community support, the group helps young people to learn how to get along in their en- vironment and to learn through discovery, ex- ploration and "on the job" experiences. at the present time• The new town plan in- with Springfield bank eludes some 13 sections covering over 20 major BRADFORD-- Paul J. Gallerani, president of the Beekeepers need to be 00tered Bradford National Bank to be affiliated The First Nationa| Bank of Vermont had resources of $67 million on Dec. 31, 1981. Its headquarters are located in Springfield, Vt., and operates a full service branch and drive-in office there as well as full service branches in Fair Haven, Northfield, Windsor, and St. Johnsbury. Each organization will retain its present name, Board of Directors, officers, and employee staff. The affiliation will allow each bank to better serve its customers with larger loans and expanded services, according to a Bradford Bank spokesman. WOODSVILLE-- Beekeepers need the fruit and vegetable growers as a source of the raw materials for the production of honey and farmers need the bees to polinate their crops. Bradford National Bank, and Howard L. McDonald, president of the First National Ba of Vet, announce that the Boards of Directors of the two banks have agreed in principal to become affiliated under a holding company. The plan is subject to the necessary shareholder and regulatory approvals. The Bradford National Bank had resources of $30 million on Dec. 31, 1981. Its headquarters are located in Bradford, Vt. and operates full service branches in East Thetford, Fairlee, and Newbury. NEWBURY-- Newbury Residents will have the op- portunity to have their names and birthdays listed for $1.00 per name in the soon-to-be published (July 1982) Newbury Phone Book being assembled by the local • community group, POWR--VAL• Any person wishing to list a family member or friend's birthday, may do so by sen- ding $1.00 per name with the person's birthday to: POWR--VAL, Box 249, Wells River, Vt., 05085. Ages will also be listed for those under 18 and over 80, ff you wish. Deadline for sub- mission of birthday names is June 15, 1982, with distribution of the free Newbury" wide phone book set for July 1982. Breathin00 workshops P00nned . TF RD-- Community Health Services will offer a series of workshops entitled "Building Blocks to Better Breathing", to be held May 3, 10, 17, 24 and June 7, 14, 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. at the E. Thefford Medical Center. This is a group education program for people with Emphysema, Chronic Bronchitis, or Asthma and their family members. Topics include maintaining good physical condition, good VERMONt POLICE BRADFORD-- Vermont State Police troopers arrested a S. Salem, N•Y•, man in the parking lot of Blake's Chevrolet on April 18 at about 11:35 p.m. The man is alleged to be wanted on a number of charges, including escape, in Stamford, Conn•, according to police. Police say the man, Joseph L. Darrett, 18, was lodged after his arrest at the St. Johnsbury Correctional Center as "a fugitive from justice." Police say Darrett is wanted in Connecticut on charges of burglary, larceny and escape. Stolen Battery BRADFORD-- Police say they are investigating a report of the theft of a battery from a parked car and the siphoning of gas from other vehicles parked at Bradford Tire and Auto on Route 5. Police say the incident was reported on April 12 and that the incident was said to have occurred the previous evening. Police are referring to the incident as larceny; no suspects or arrests relating to the incident have been reported• Breaking and Entering BRADFORD-- An unknown person or persons broke into the home of James Russo on the Brook Road while he was away, according to police. No items were reported stolen in the incident but the antagonists reportedly shut off the furnace in the home • i •!i i' Some pesticides are very harmful to bees. Growers free,o 0000e,.,owns POLICE usually try to apply these by Community Health Ser- products when bee activity is ] vices, Inc. Fee for others will WOODSVILLE-- The the lightest and other products be $50.00. following events were BOY'S STATE--- For the 17th consecutive year the Connecticut Valley Jaycees have sponsored a person to attend the Vermont Boy's State. Milton BedeIl, commander of American Legion Post 20 in Bradford accepts this year's check from Jaycee President Wesley Johnson. nutrition, medications: while in the basement caused purpose and side effects, pipes to burst later on after energy conservation, how to freezing. Extensive water avoid complications of damage was reported. Chronic Obstructive Police say that once in the Pulmonary Disease, breathing re-training and r0000axa.oo00e00h.,qu00s HAVF00 The workshops are offered Please call Community reported by a spokespersen of Health Services, Inc. at 295- the Haverhill Police Depar- 7516 in White River for further tment:. information or to enroll. Jeffrey I. Thompson, 23, Sew Smart Seminar planned LITTLETON-- Do your clothes have that "loving hands at home" look? Do your facings play "peek-a-boo" and have lumps at the tops of zippers? Solve these and many other problems by at- tending a Sew Smart Seminar. Clotilde Yourick, well known author and lecturer, will be at the Continental 93 Motel in Littleton on May 10 at Small business workshops'°:00 will give a ,three hour Sew Smart Seminar on manufacturers' Bath, was arrested April 21 on a bench warrant for non- payment of a small claims judgement against him. A 17-year-old juvenile was extradited out of Chelsea, Vt., on April 21. The juvenile was charged with escape from custody (a felony), being in possession of alcohol and making a false report to police. All charges stemmed from an April 12 incident. The minor was released to the custody of his mother. Peoples Market, Wood- sville, reported on April 20 the receipt of a had check in the amount of $33. Lisa Mae Hudson, Wood- sville, reported an attempted burglary on April 20. Doyle's Country Store, N. Haverhill, reported on April 19 a forged check in the amount of $98.65. Police say that Frank Shaw, who is currently serving time in the Merrimac house of corrections for forgery, will soon be arrested in this case. Forest Hills Gas, N. Haverhill, on April 17 reported a burglary that occurred over (i.e. encapsulated Methyl Parathion) require a special permit before it can be used. To keep the communication lines open between the beekeepers and the fruit and vegetable growers, beekeepers ar being asked to register with the State Entomologist. The several beekeeper associations across the State are distributing copies of the application form and copies are available at the Extension Office -- Telephone 603-787-6944. If you keep bees call, write or drop in for an application form. Encourage beekeepers in your neighborhood to become registered. Growers and beekeepers need each other--working together both will puta good product on the table. WELL DRILLING ROTARY HAMMER DRILLING. 20 YEARS DRILLING EXPERIENCE ( ()MP[[ TF WhT[R SYST[tS tNSIALL[D presented in Bradford BRADFORD-- The Small May 25-- THE LANGUAGE Business Administration in OF BUSINESS-- This session will cover basic recor- dkeeping systems, sources of financing and sources of further information. There is a fee of $7.00 for each session and interested people can register at the sessions. For more in- formation call Community College of Vermont at 476- cooperation with Community College of Vermont, is presenting a four workshop series entitled Starting a Small Business in Vermont at Oxbow High School on Tuesday nights beginning May 4• Materials and films are prepared by the SBA, and the two and one-half hour tricks of the trade and designer techniques not shown on pattern instruction sheets. Whether you've sewn three months or thirty years, you will learn dozens of useful and practical sewing tips to give your clothes the professional look of the finest ready-to- wear. Pre-registration is required. Please call the Cooperative Extension Service at 603-787- 6944 or write Box 191, Woodsville, N.H. 03785. A the unable to rest of the house. NEWBURY-- vehicle was truck plowed path of a _ Interstate 91. Tile said to 12 at about 6:15 a. Jerry Robert Groton was driver of the International damaged car William Henry Roslyn, Pa. No injuries a Damage to Volkswagen, the hood and according to damage was truck. Weather time of the described by and to h BRADFORD--" cars Hill Road in 12 at about 12:00 Police said 36, of Bradford northbound Christopher Piermont 1979 Pontiac cars collided. Only minor reported to both vehicles. No in Weather time of the described by Police said covered / the night of Persons by breaking a and stole Joseph C. svelte, unknown garage over 16 to 17. two vehicles helmet. Police a tie-in with four Wells River Brian K. was arrested outstanding including jumping, forgery, charges Smith involve tions of tleton. Having months ago, and willingly t to police. He the Grafton Corrections in cash hail. Mark V. Newbury, was l 16 for failing Concord was taken County house lieu of $405 Concord was later jail in Concord. FOR FREE ESTIMATE CALL OR WRITE The E. BEREDINI Artesian Well Co. B.," V,(,., O,,ve R D Borre V 47b 4832 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE sessions will be led by local business people. The sessions begin at 7:00 and are scheduled for: May 4 -- PLANNING A NEW BUSINESS -- This session will cover business and personal considerations; franchises, family-owned businesses, types of business organizations. May II  THE BUSINESS PLAN -- The session will cover determining capital needs, licenses and permits, and insurance requirements• May IS -- MARKETING FOR PROFITS 3817. tuition charge o[ $3.00 will be collected at the door. HAVERHH00 COURT REPORT WOODSVILLE-- The operating a motor vehicle following case was heard in without a valid registration. the HaverhillDistrictCourton He pleaded guilty on both April 23. charges and was found guilty. Michael A. Perkins, 27, S. Perkins was fined $,50 on each Ryegate, was charged with count, plus a total penalty operating a motor vehicle assessment ef $10. without a valid license, and AREA SCHOOL Bhte Mountain Schools For the week of April 28 to 20: Wednesday-- Baked Beans & Hot Dogs, slaw, applesauce, milk. sli, 1"aureday-- Ravioli, Italian bread, toss sundu, milk. Friday-- Hambwger on Bun, french frieS, topping, milk. Orford Schoo/. For the week of April 28 to 0: Wednelay-- Ravioli, greta lmm, cake. Thm'eday-- Chicken & Rice Friday-- Pizza, salad, gelatin. Page 8-The Journal Opinion-April 28, 1982 0000Foughlove" support group deals with teenage pr, ab] BRADFORD-- Toughlove, a behavio[', according to Rae with thekids, support group for parents Coleman, a spokesman for the Upper Valley Beginning having trouble with their Parents Advisory Council of One of the organizing teenagers, held their first the Orange East Supervisory parents of the Bradford group meeting in the Upper Valley in Union. Finding help through said regarding his reason for February at Oxbow High the support of people outside becoming interested in the School. their immediate family, these group, "Living with my The idea for Toughlove grew parents then began a group to teenaged son had become out of the need of two Penn- carry-on this idea of mutual almost unbearable. His ob- sylvania parents to effectively support• noxious, beligerent behavior deal with a crisis caused by Since then groups have was tearing our family apart. their teen-aged daughter's begun throughout the United Nothing we did seemed to ......... States and Canada. Parents make any difference. We felt meet to share their problems emotionally beaten on and and concerns, help each other exhausted trying to find a way PERFECTION set their own bottom line of to make things right. We lived GUARANTEED acceptable behavior, and then in fear that he would go into back each other up in dealing one of his rages and physically 5. F. Mc ALLISTER Quality Jewelers Since 1923 Woodsvillo, N. H. New Bradford town ohm Phone 74%3482 harm himself or his younger sister. Hearing how families gained strength through the Toughlove support gave us confidence to begin standing up to him. Knowing there was going to be a group, we didn't feel so alone with or problem and have already begun to use Toughlove ideas." The Bradford group, sponsored by the Parent's Advisory Council of the Orange East Supervisory Union, has received the support of the Oxbow Guidance Team. Public hearing on Thursday BRADFORD-- This Thur- sday, residents in Bradford will have the town's proposed new municipal plan unveiled for them by the town's planning commission at a public hearing required by law for public input and review of the plan. The April 29 hearing will be the first of two public hearings that Bradford residents, who are not town or village officials, will be able to review the plan and suggest revisions, if Called for, to the planning com- mission. The new plan, a detailed 45-page document, has been designed to replace the old five-page plan which expired several years ago. The town's planning commission has been debating over the details of one-half years. The Bradford Village Trustees have ap- proved the plan. Last month, the selectmen approved the plan, but with a number of their own revisions. Among the major revisions to the plan madeat the request of the selectmen at a joint meeting with the planning commission on March 11, included a provision on zoning limitations that the planning commission passed reluc- tantly with the idea of waiting to see how the public viewed the matter at the public hearings, according to a planning commission spokesman. This provision would limit future development to no less than three acre lots in the town and no less than one acre lots in the village. virtually no zoning. At a village trustees' meeting last week, trustee Larry Drew asked planning commission member Harry McLam if the commission could begin working on the formulation of new zoning ordinances while waiting for .............. the plan for over two and According to Kent ................ Stevenson of the Two Rivers- Ottaquechee Regional Planning Commission, if additional revisions are requested by the public at the hearings, the planning commission will present them to the town's joint legislative body (selectmen and trustees) for another hearing. If the public ap- proves the plan "as is", the joint legislative body can adopt the plan, making it the official municipal plan of the town. Stevenson has been ad- vising the planning com- mission throuBhout its development of the plan and is said to be responsible for the wording of much of its text. . At recent town and village meetings, both the trtees and the selectmen, along with a majority of other town officials, have indicated a desire for the new plan to be adopted soon, so that the town and village can begin work on a set of zoning or- dinances. Town officials say that, at the present time, the town is using an out-dated set of ordinances and that the village zoning ordinances have expired, leaving the Village of Bradford with v v v ..... v w v v v v 00"MErc'00 RES'0E"t00 S CARPET & _ C.ECKO00,LOW00C r -l,,lmm - HUGE INVENTORY IN STOCK .  rtllKIV/ L'I/"tf'lC .... IMMEDIATE INSTALLATION Hale Furniture & Carpet 802-222-57S$ BRADFORD, YT. Meet the suit that won00 take you to the cleaners. The new Haggar Inflation Buster. Now washable with Magic Stretch. TM Machine wash it, tumble dry it, and it comes out looking great everytime. With no dry cleaning bills to pay. You can't beat the convenience and economy! You can't beat the price, either[ It's the new Haggar Inflation Buster that makes a separates outfit as easy to buy as it is to take care of. Now add the comfort of a two-way stretch woven fabric and you've got )arates no man should be without. $25 slacks. 170 coat. vest optional. CARE INSTRUCTIONS Machine wash and dr), separate- Yu" Wash in warm water and rable-press cycle. Dry on durable-pt,e cycle, Do no€ ex- pose to high heat. Remove promptly when dry, Touch up with warm iron  ta'y. Use Your Charge Account 00ta00,qi:9 A'/00aps St Johnsbury, Vermont • WooOsvtllO, New HOmlhtre Ol:n FriOoy Night 'tit 9:00 PM. d journey to a death camp (continued from page !) were not allowed to see it and many people took out han- dkerchiefs when the film concluded and people struggled to get a handle on their emotions as they departed from the cinema. For me, the film left a lump in my throat that would not go away for the rest of the afternoon. True Horrors "One can read all the hooks and watch all the TV and Film documentaries on concentration camp horrors there is and it still won't prepare you for the shock of seeing first hand, evidence of Nazi crimes. No words I know can adequately describe the feelings one has when confronted with rooms of human hair, rooms filled with shoes and rooms filled with artificial limbs. Other rooms contained piles of baby clothes and one room was piled with spec- tacles. In a corner of one room was a lamp with a shade made out of human skin. That was by no means all there was to see. There were buildings that depicted the every day life of the prison. At the far end of the camp, the gas chambers and piles of Cyclon B-gas can- nisters left, and the crematorium with it's ovens still stand. You stumble from one horror scene to another and your mind has a difficult time taking in all these images and forming a coherent picture. "It may come as a sur- prise to some people, but Auschwitz wasn't the main extermination camp. Of the four million men, women and children who perished here, the vast majority were in a nearby camp called Birkenau. This camp is situated just a little over a mile away. Lying on a very flat area of ground, the first thing that hits you is it's size. It's simply immense. The place seems to go on for an eternity. It doesn't of course, but the fact remains that Birkenau is well over four times the size of Auschwitz. When the Soviets were close to liberating that part of Poland, the Nazis in their attempt to conceal what had gone on, tore down and destroyed many of it's buildings. However they ran out of time and as a result, nearly four decades after the camp had shut down, many buildings still remain. Some of the buildings were con- structed out of brick. Many more were built out of wood. "It was a very haunting feeling to enter one of those buildings alone and try to imagine just what it was like to live in one between the years 1940-1945• The silence and emptiness in these huts was devastating. In huts that could barely fit thirty to forty people, hundreds of barely living skeletons were forced to co-exist with one another. Some of the buildings were left exactly as the Russiam had found them. Consequently one could see bunks built on top of bunks. Some of the bunks had torn blankets and prison clothing left in them. Many simply had old hay in them. In the brick buildings, stalls were built for sleeping arrangements. Animals had more space in their stalls than these prisoners had. Each stall would sleep three or four people. "For security reasons the SS split the camp up into sections. Each section was separated from the others by a barbed wired fence that was highly electrified. One could wander from the Gypsy camp, through the Soviet Prisoner of War camp, and of course the Jewish Camp• The Jewish section was in turn divided into the Men's and Women's section. This was further split up into different sec- tions that depended on the prisoner's nationality. "As we were leaving the camp, one of my colleagues turned to know before I could so many of passively deaths least token then I passively the tactics Security present Regime• It ho00less. "This was to others Germany Majdanek here Two seeing these First was the never got these places. an emotionally and gut w perience. thought was How and something like happen?" the municipal plan to go through the hearing 4-H information meeting Newburv planned in Haverhill phone book processan idea McLam agreed to present to the rest HAVERHILL-- The Grafton County 4-H Club will be of the planning commission holding an informational at their next meeting, meeting on Tuesday, May 4 at Stevenson told the Journal the Haverhill Chapel starting Opinion that some basic or "routine" parts of the zoning ordinances could be worked out prior to official adoption of the municipal plan. "We are pretty winded now," he said about the commission's lengthy debate of the new plan, but he added, "it would be nice to take a break ... " but l'd hate to lose momentum on this." Asked whether interim or old village zoning could be temporarily adopted until new ordinances could be devised, Stevenson said, "It's possible" but he said he felt the old ordinance would need "tailoring" to fit the best interests of the village at 7:00p.m. The meeting is being described as an informational and organizational meeting and 4-H local officials are asking those from surroun- ding communities interested in the 4-H program to attend. Group representatives say they are seeking to establish a 4-H program in the com- munities of Haverhill and Pike. "Our immediate needs are individuals who could spend some time guiding and issues in Bradford such as: sewage, solid waste disposal, schools, public lands, housing, zoning, land use, agrioalture, ntv ttttlt development, public water supply, and municipal of. fers--to name a few. The town and village are treated separately in the plan. Thursday's meeting will be held at 7:30 p.m• in the Bradford Academy Building. encouraging young members in various projects," ac- cording to a group spokesman• Additional information regarding the local 4-H program may be obtained by calling 787-6944, said a club news release. The 4-H program is a volunteer program designed to meet the needs and in- terests of young people. With community support, the group helps young people to learn how to get along in their en- vironment and to learn through discovery, ex- ploration and "on the job" experiences. at the present time• The new town plan in- with Springfield bank eludes some 13 sections covering over 20 major BRADFORD-- Paul J. Gallerani, president of the Beekeepers need to be 00tered Bradford National Bank to be affiliated The First Nationa| Bank of Vermont had resources of $67 million on Dec. 31, 1981. Its headquarters are located in Springfield, Vt., and operates a full service branch and drive-in office there as well as full service branches in Fair Haven, Northfield, Windsor, and St. Johnsbury. Each organization will retain its present name, Board of Directors, officers, and employee staff. The affiliation will allow each bank to better serve its customers with larger loans and expanded services, according to a Bradford Bank spokesman. WOODSVILLE-- Beekeepers need the fruit and vegetable growers as a source of the raw materials for the production of honey and farmers need the bees to polinate their crops. Bradford National Bank, and Howard L. McDonald, president of the First National Ba of Vet, announce that the Boards of Directors of the two banks have agreed in principal to become affiliated under a holding company. The plan is subject to the necessary shareholder and regulatory approvals. The Bradford National Bank had resources of $30 million on Dec. 31, 1981. Its headquarters are located in Bradford, Vt. and operates full service branches in East Thetford, Fairlee, and Newbury. NEWBURY-- Newbury Residents will have the op- portunity to have their names and birthdays listed for $1.00 per name in the soon-to-be published (July 1982) Newbury Phone Book being assembled by the local • community group, POWR--VAL• Any person wishing to list a family member or friend's birthday, may do so by sen- ding $1.00 per name with the person's birthday to: POWR--VAL, Box 249, Wells River, Vt., 05085. Ages will also be listed for those under 18 and over 80, ff you wish. Deadline for sub- mission of birthday names is June 15, 1982, with distribution of the free Newbury" wide phone book set for July 1982. Breathin00 workshops P00nned . TF RD-- Community Health Services will offer a series of workshops entitled "Building Blocks to Better Breathing", to be held May 3, 10, 17, 24 and June 7, 14, 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. at the E. Thefford Medical Center. This is a group education program for people with Emphysema, Chronic Bronchitis, or Asthma and their family members. Topics include maintaining good physical condition, good VERMONt POLICE BRADFORD-- Vermont State Police troopers arrested a S. Salem, N•Y•, man in the parking lot of Blake's Chevrolet on April 18 at about 11:35 p.m. The man is alleged to be wanted on a number of charges, including escape, in Stamford, Conn•, according to police. Police say the man, Joseph L. Darrett, 18, was lodged after his arrest at the St. Johnsbury Correctional Center as "a fugitive from justice." Police say Darrett is wanted in Connecticut on charges of burglary, larceny and escape. Stolen Battery BRADFORD-- Police say they are investigating a report of the theft of a battery from a parked car and the siphoning of gas from other vehicles parked at Bradford Tire and Auto on Route 5. Police say the incident was reported on April 12 and that the incident was said to have occurred the previous evening. Police are referring to the incident as larceny; no suspects or arrests relating to the incident have been reported• Breaking and Entering BRADFORD-- An unknown person or persons broke into the home of James Russo on the Brook Road while he was away, according to police. No items were reported stolen in the incident but the antagonists reportedly shut off the furnace in the home • i •!i i' Some pesticides are very harmful to bees. Growers free,o 0000e,.,owns POLICE usually try to apply these by Community Health Ser- products when bee activity is ] vices, Inc. Fee for others will WOODSVILLE-- The the lightest and other products be $50.00. following events were BOY'S STATE--- For the 17th consecutive year the Connecticut Valley Jaycees have sponsored a person to attend the Vermont Boy's State. Milton BedeIl, commander of American Legion Post 20 in Bradford accepts this year's check from Jaycee President Wesley Johnson. nutrition, medications: while in the basement caused purpose and side effects, pipes to burst later on after energy conservation, how to freezing. Extensive water avoid complications of damage was reported. Chronic Obstructive Police say that once in the Pulmonary Disease, breathing re-training and r0000axa.oo00e00h.,qu00s HAVF00 The workshops are offered Please call Community reported by a spokespersen of Health Services, Inc. at 295- the Haverhill Police Depar- 7516 in White River for further tment:. information or to enroll. Jeffrey I. Thompson, 23, Sew Smart Seminar planned LITTLETON-- Do your clothes have that "loving hands at home" look? Do your facings play "peek-a-boo" and have lumps at the tops of zippers? Solve these and many other problems by at- tending a Sew Smart Seminar. Clotilde Yourick, well known author and lecturer, will be at the Continental 93 Motel in Littleton on May 10 at Small business workshops'°:00 will give a ,three hour Sew Smart Seminar on manufacturers' Bath, was arrested April 21 on a bench warrant for non- payment of a small claims judgement against him. A 17-year-old juvenile was extradited out of Chelsea, Vt., on April 21. The juvenile was charged with escape from custody (a felony), being in possession of alcohol and making a false report to police. All charges stemmed from an April 12 incident. The minor was released to the custody of his mother. Peoples Market, Wood- sville, reported on April 20 the receipt of a had check in the amount of $33. Lisa Mae Hudson, Wood- sville, reported an attempted burglary on April 20. Doyle's Country Store, N. Haverhill, reported on April 19 a forged check in the amount of $98.65. Police say that Frank Shaw, who is currently serving time in the Merrimac house of corrections for forgery, will soon be arrested in this case. Forest Hills Gas, N. Haverhill, on April 17 reported a burglary that occurred over (i.e. encapsulated Methyl Parathion) require a special permit before it can be used. To keep the communication lines open between the beekeepers and the fruit and vegetable growers, beekeepers ar being asked to register with the State Entomologist. The several beekeeper associations across the State are distributing copies of the application form and copies are available at the Extension Office -- Telephone 603-787-6944. If you keep bees call, write or drop in for an application form. Encourage beekeepers in your neighborhood to become registered. Growers and beekeepers need each other--working together both will puta good product on the table. WELL DRILLING ROTARY HAMMER DRILLING. 20 YEARS DRILLING EXPERIENCE ( ()MP[[ TF WhT[R SYST[tS tNSIALL[D presented in Bradford BRADFORD-- The Small May 25-- THE LANGUAGE Business Administration in OF BUSINESS-- This session will cover basic recor- dkeeping systems, sources of financing and sources of further information. There is a fee of $7.00 for each session and interested people can register at the sessions. For more in- formation call Community College of Vermont at 476- cooperation with Community College of Vermont, is presenting a four workshop series entitled Starting a Small Business in Vermont at Oxbow High School on Tuesday nights beginning May 4• Materials and films are prepared by the SBA, and the two and one-half hour tricks of the trade and designer techniques not shown on pattern instruction sheets. Whether you've sewn three months or thirty years, you will learn dozens of useful and practical sewing tips to give your clothes the professional look of the finest ready-to- wear. Pre-registration is required. Please call the Cooperative Extension Service at 603-787- 6944 or write Box 191, Woodsville, N.H. 03785. A the unable to rest of the house. NEWBURY-- vehicle was truck plowed path of a _ Interstate 91. Tile said to 12 at about 6:15 a. Jerry Robert Groton was driver of the International damaged car William Henry Roslyn, Pa. No injuries a Damage to Volkswagen, the hood and according to damage was truck. Weather time of the described by and to h BRADFORD--" cars Hill Road in 12 at about 12:00 Police said 36, of Bradford northbound Christopher Piermont 1979 Pontiac cars collided. Only minor reported to both vehicles. No in Weather time of the described by Police said covered / the night of Persons by breaking a and stole Joseph C. svelte, unknown garage over 16 to 17. two vehicles helmet. Police a tie-in with four Wells River Brian K. was arrested outstanding including jumping, forgery, charges Smith involve tions of tleton. Having months ago, and willingly t to police. He the Grafton Corrections in cash hail. Mark V. Newbury, was l 16 for failing Concord was taken County house lieu of $405 Concord was later jail in Concord. FOR FREE ESTIMATE CALL OR WRITE The E. BEREDINI Artesian Well Co. B.," V,(,., O,,ve R D Borre V 47b 4832 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE sessions will be led by local business people. The sessions begin at 7:00 and are scheduled for: May 4 -- PLANNING A NEW BUSINESS -- This session will cover business and personal considerations; franchises, family-owned businesses, types of business organizations. May II  THE BUSINESS PLAN -- The session will cover determining capital needs, licenses and permits, and insurance requirements• May IS -- MARKETING FOR PROFITS 3817. tuition charge o[ $3.00 will be collected at the door. HAVERHH00 COURT REPORT WOODSVILLE-- The operating a motor vehicle following case was heard in without a valid registration. the HaverhillDistrictCourton He pleaded guilty on both April 23. charges and was found guilty. Michael A. Perkins, 27, S. Perkins was fined $,50 on each Ryegate, was charged with count, plus a total penalty operating a motor vehicle assessment ef $10. without a valid license, and AREA SCHOOL Bhte Mountain Schools For the week of April 28 to 20: Wednesday-- Baked Beans & Hot Dogs, slaw, applesauce, milk. sli, 1"aureday-- Ravioli, Italian bread, toss sundu, milk. Friday-- Hambwger on Bun, french frieS, topping, milk. Orford Schoo/. For the week of April 28 to 0: Wednelay-- Ravioli, greta lmm, cake. Thm'eday-- Chicken & Rice Friday-- Pizza, salad, gelatin.