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April 28, 1982     Journal Opinion
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1% , man, Henry was photographed around 1862 With his wile ancl after playing croquet on the lawn of the original Smithsonian in Washington, D.C. Because the photo is old and faded, it is difficult to identifications, but a good guess is that the eldest daughter, Mary g behind Henry and his wife, Harriet, is at the far right. Historians rescue scientist from 19th century obscurity by MADELEINE JACOBS she corrected his spelling and published under the auspices veyor on a state road project Smithsonian News Service grammar and sometimes of the National Historical Any man who has ever destroyed the originals. She Publications and Records longed for fame might wish to also was fond of cutting Commission. The goal of these have a daughter in the mold of snippets of text from original projects is to preserve and Mary Anna Henry, who spent documents and drawings from recapture, through the words her spinsterhood as a his notebooks, which she and documents of the past, champion of her father's place laboriously pasted onto a many aspects of America's in history, master manuscript, cultural, social and political Her father was no less a Mary Henry never com- heritage. figure than Joseph Henry, the pleted her labor of love, but 90 Included on this list are first great American scientist years later a small group of Washington, Jefferson and after Benjamin Franklin, the researchers at the Franklin (chosen as a first Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution in statesman, not asa scientist). Smithsonian Institution and a Washington, D.C., are trying Unlike these men, Henry has pre-eminent member of the to rescue Joseph Henry from not been the subject of many American scientific com- relative obscurity, books or research, although he munity during most of the 19th The rescue is in the form of could well he considered "an century, a comprehensive 15-volume American success story," Working in the 1880s and project, The Papers of Joseph Reingold says. 1890s, she gathered together Henry, and in this effort, the Henry was born into a poor many of Henry's personal historians are not relying on family in 1797 in Mbany, N.Y. papers, scientific diaries and acts of filial devotion to tell His early education was correspondence and set out to Joseph Henry's story, sparse, although records show write his biography. This, she Rather, under the direction that he studied at the Albany hoped, would establish once of Dr. Nathan Reingold, an Academy between 1819 and and for all that it was her internationally known 1822, taking some time off to father, not the British scientist historian of science and earn money. Because of his Michael Faraday, who technology, the Smitbsonian lack of formal schooling, discovered the important group has tracked down Henry always considered principle of electrical in- nearly 100,000 documents by himself "principally self- duction--the process of Henry and his con- educated." converting magnetism into temporaries. By the time he was 30, he electricity. Joseph Henry is the only had been an apprentice to a Mary Henry zealously scientist on a list of silversmith and a wat- recopied many of her father's distinguished Americans chmaker, a schoolteacher, a documents; in the process, whose papers are being chemical assistant, a sur- Historians have been assembling the papers of Joseph Henry, an eminent 19th century physicist and the first Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. and a professor of mathematics and natural philosophy at Albany Academy. In 1832 he became a professor at the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) where he was an outstanding teacher of physical sciences and a pioneer in the field of elec- trical physics. In 1846, at the age of 49, Henry was selected as the first "Secretary," or chief executive, of the newly founded Smithsonian Institution. Henry, his wife, son and three daughters moved to Washington, then a provincial village of mar- shland and mosquitoes, where they lived in an apartment in the first Smithsonian building unth' his death in 1878. As Secretary of the Smithsonian, Henry spurred the development of many branches of science throughout the nation by enlisting the government's support of research. Under his direction, the Smitlmonian became a leading basic research organization. Indirectly, by shifting much of (please turn to page 6A) TODAY'S CHUCKLE "WOuldn't it be Wonderful if the designers of WOmen's bathing suite were put in Imrge of govern- 'ent budgets ? CI|CUUtTIMG INt NEW NAMININ| -- Lyme, Lyme Center, Orford, Orfordville, Piermont, Haverhill, Haverhill Center, Haverhill Comer, North Haverhill, East Haverhill, Pike, Woodsville, Both, Monroe, Lisbon, Londaff, Benton, LIPPL Warren, Glencbff, Wentworth VIM_BN[. Thet.frld,_ EBst__Th_effo,,hefford Hill, T hetf0rd Cente[, Noh_Thetford, Pot .Mills, Foirlee, West Fairlee, Bradford, "Bradford viiiage, Corinth East corinth, T0psham, West Topshom, Newhury Village, $outhNewbury, West Newbury, Wells River, Grotonl Ryegote Corner, test Ryegate, outh Ryegote, Peacham, uornet, West Spinet. THIS WEEK'S PRESS RUN 10,120 Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont " Aprii2g, 1982 = , i i i n m , i =1 00I:tTH EARTH NEWS is a registered trademark of THE MOTHER EARTH NEWS, tnc AND EASY-T0-BUILD )OD HOUSE! J 1977, Jack Henstridge built an expensive {$75,000, appraised value) home {also called firewood, cordwood, pilewood, stovewood, stackwall, $10,000, and he detailed the experiment for THE MOTHER EARTH 451. By merely stacking 9"-long sections of logs on their sides in a 6 "-long chunks for the interior walls), Jack and his wife construct- that's still braving the extra-cold winters common to Canada homestead. you've never heard of it, is one of the oldest types of construc- of. And it's a wonder more people haven't rediscovered this unusual building, since it offers a number of significant advantages over the .. such as: :ity. who can cut wood with a chain saw, and stack a neat cord, house. cost. Windfalls trees that are too badly bowed or twisted to be used in a log cabin, "waste" lumber.., in short, darn near any kind of wood can stackwood wall, as long as the wood is dry. ign. Because the finished wails are so thick--and because the log "reflect away" outside noises--the insides of cordwood structures are quiet resistance. The mortar in the wall tends to absorb the heat of combustion, impossible for a fire to spread. The mortar is largely self-healing. If a crack should develop, lime the break and calcify Once the wall is up, it's finished insideand out. harmony. The edifices are aesthetically pleasing and they blend into a natural background. drawback to stackwood construction is that the finished walls have poor primarily because lime mortar passes BTU like the proverbial tstridges have solved that problem, however, by making the walls fairly by "sandwiching" hunks of Styrofoam in the mortar. ; about the "house that Jack built", MOTHER's research staff decided architecture a try by building a stackwood dome greenhouse at our With the help of visitors to our summer seminars, the crew raised what is of our knowledge) the world's first such structure. We found this con- method to be labor-intensive but relatively low-cost, especially for folks who wood. In fact, our Eco-Village researchers were so impressed that the fast and easy technique when building part of the barn that houses on stackwood construction and on THE MOTHER EARTH NEWS magazine, e and address ancl ask for Reprint No. 1037: "Cordwood". Mail to Doing MORE . With LESS!, or in care of this paper. "IER EARTH NEWS, Inc. MOTORS D0 USED CARS & TRUCKS t, Johuslmry, Vermont 05819 Phone: (802) 748-2209 or 5105 Landscapino0000 RIVER ROAD PlERMONT. N.H. 03779 services for '1982' season. (603) 2"/2-5864 New Hampsliire hist, cpry to be published 'The first illustrated history they accepted the invitation to ago. The ascendancy of the intrusion of 'alien' cotton New Hampshire has a story Notable Institutions of New Hampshire is now in write this book" "alien' electronics industry textiles into an earlier milling that deepens -- not just The histo_L Y will include preparation, under spon- can be seen in the light of the industry. I want to show that lengthens," says Jager. (pleaserntopge-10" sorship of the New Hampshire New Illustrations Historicalsociety. "Windsor Publications will Co-authors are he working very closely with distinguished historical the New Hampshire Historical writers Ronald & Grace Jager Society," Page notes. "They of the town of Washington, have unrivalled experience N.H. Their book, designed for and resources to produce a enjoyment by the general handsome, hard cover volume reader, will be ready early with numerous fl color and next year, according to the black and white illustrations. publisher, Windsor Many of the illustrations will Publications, Inc., of come from the Historical Woodland Hills, Calif. Society's own collection. Some "New Hampshire Historical have never been reproduced Society is enthusiastic about before," according to Page. this project because it meets the need for a first class, Four Themes illustrated, popular history of Outlinifi the concept of the the state," says Director John history, co-author Ronald Page. "There are sound Jager said the book will take a histories dealing with thematic view of New specialized aspects of New Hampshire's past. The four Hampshire's past. This new themes are "Land and history is intended for the Water," "Politics and ordinary reader who wants a People," "Eonomics and readable, well-illustrated & Industries" and "Mind and authoritative book.  Spirit." Explains Jager, "This "It's history to he enjoyed," approach avoids the one- adds Page. "Whether we're thing-after-an0ther view of natives or newcomers, I think history without sacrificing this book will deepen our essential chronology. " appreciation of New Hamp- It also makes possible some shire as a special place tolive, enlightening juxtapositions. "Ronald and Grace Jager "Land speculation in the 20th wrote an outstanding history century can be compared to of their own town of development projects of Gay. Washington. I'm delighted Benning Wentworth 200 years On May 3 " 9u" We Love Ya GARFIELD THE CAT POSTERS & POSTCARDS GREEN FROG GARDEN CENTER Bradford, VT (802) 222-5595 BRADFORD COMMUNITY THEATRE 'Nj0= '1HE PRODUCERS" . ;  , BRADFORD ACADEMY - - 0w;ng m.. rmy, MOVI FOR TN! FAMILY at 2:00 PM md 7:00 PM. 2:00 PM SHOWING $1.25 7=00 PM SHOWING $1.50 IRUS CARTOONS Coming ottractim on May 8 "I/WASION Of TI IIODY $NATUgill" AMBITIOUS PEOPLE Do you hove momwmmt er toachin o skills?... Are yw tired d worki fro' someone else?.., Ate you intereztod in Hdth & Ntitim?... would you liko on opportunity to be financially  & wod( port-tin? pol k. P ..,_y_ mu   n,aw to . zu =/e s, s,  Yr. gsgiZ -- We wlU edllmd mt ep lkle ftle hlwi. .. HOME IMi00kOVEMENT _ See pages 4 and 5 for advertisers offerin00 Home Improvement and gardening sales. 2500 SOUAREFOOT WAREHOUSE AVAILABLE FOR RENT-- 2,500 sq. ft. warehouse available, heated, Main St., Bradford, Vt. Call 802-222-4634 ]" PREFERRED HOMEOWNERS .................. from New Ham shire RATES IN LYME, ORFORD, AND PIERMONT. Here ore o few examldes, $40,000 HO .......... from $185.00 up to $206.00. $60,000 Home .......... from $ 243.00 up to $ 271.00. CALL US. WE WILL Be HAPPY TO OUOTE YOU A PRITo PROTCT YOUR HOME. LUCIEN L. BOURBEAU INSURANCE AGENCY FAIRLEE VBLMONT B02-3-9224 LOOK FOR OUR DELl AD ON PAGE 2A. Thru the Underpass Woodsville, N.H. PREFERRED HOMmNERS ,,om-V.;n,* RATES I N BRADFORD, FAIRLEE, STRAFFOR'D, 8, THETFORD. mm omo few *xampl,s, S40600 mm .......... from $146.00 UP to$i|2-00. $60,000 Home ..... from $214.00 ua to 1267.00, CALL US. WE WILL DE HAPPY TOQUO YOU A PRICE TO PROTECT YOUR I. .. LUCIEN L. BOURBEAU INSURANCE AGENCY FAlltLEE, VERMONT 02-333-q24 LANDSCAPING, PATIOS, PRUNING PROFESSIONAL DESIGN AND COMPLETION OUR FIRST VISIT IS FREE GREEN FROG GARDEN CENTER Bradford, VT (802) 222-5595 PUPPIES FOR SALE 5-AKC registered lassett Hound male pups. $130. each. CALL 802-222-4613 $i25 PAINT SPECIAL ON ANY CAR $150 FOR PICK-UP TRUCKS (includes paint materials ) BODY WORK EXTRA (8U2) 222-44 1 ( FREE ESTIMATES BRADFORD, VT 05033  Over 500 Varieties Vegetab[es_ SEEDS Flowers,--Ornamentals, indr, Outdoor. -ALWAYS SOMETHING DIFFERENT- GREEN FROG GARDEN CENTER Bradfo,VT (802) 222-555 --FOR RENT OR LEASE-- 1 PRIMEOFFICE. RETAIL SPACE Nowly mmod=e, mm,, graD. toor mty perking, Moin St., Bradford, Vt., , Rlms4mdde rent, 01 222-5711. ].M. Landscaping I  R,VERROAD I " ,m;l PIERMONT N H 03779 --'411ll- k ,' Now booking Spring landscape projects.,, A (;all anytime. (603)2. ROUND AND SOUARE DANCE- Every Saturday Night--Time: 8-11:00 P.M. | at Orfordviile Town Hall -. ] With "Fiddling Dick Wilson and the Country Folks." | Children under 12 free | 1% , man, Henry was photographed around 1862 With his wile ancl after playing croquet on the lawn of the original Smithsonian in Washington, D.C. Because the photo is old and faded, it is difficult to identifications, but a good guess is that the eldest daughter, Mary g behind Henry and his wife, Harriet, is at the far right. Historians rescue scientist from 19th century obscurity by MADELEINE JACOBS she corrected his spelling and published under the auspices veyor on a state road project Smithsonian News Service grammar and sometimes of the National Historical Any man who has ever destroyed the originals. She Publications and Records longed for fame might wish to also was fond of cutting Commission. The goal of these have a daughter in the mold of snippets of text from original projects is to preserve and Mary Anna Henry, who spent documents and drawings from recapture, through the words her spinsterhood as a his notebooks, which she and documents of the past, champion of her father's place laboriously pasted onto a many aspects of America's in history, master manuscript, cultural, social and political Her father was no less a Mary Henry never com- heritage. figure than Joseph Henry, the pleted her labor of love, but 90 Included on this list are first great American scientist years later a small group of Washington, Jefferson and after Benjamin Franklin, the researchers at the Franklin (chosen as a first Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution in statesman, not asa scientist). Smithsonian Institution and a Washington, D.C., are trying Unlike these men, Henry has pre-eminent member of the to rescue Joseph Henry from not been the subject of many American scientific com- relative obscurity, books or research, although he munity during most of the 19th The rescue is in the form of could well he considered "an century, a comprehensive 15-volume American success story," Working in the 1880s and project, The Papers of Joseph Reingold says. 1890s, she gathered together Henry, and in this effort, the Henry was born into a poor many of Henry's personal historians are not relying on family in 1797 in Mbany, N.Y. papers, scientific diaries and acts of filial devotion to tell His early education was correspondence and set out to Joseph Henry's story, sparse, although records show write his biography. This, she Rather, under the direction that he studied at the Albany hoped, would establish once of Dr. Nathan Reingold, an Academy between 1819 and and for all that it was her internationally known 1822, taking some time off to father, not the British scientist historian of science and earn money. Because of his Michael Faraday, who technology, the Smitbsonian lack of formal schooling, discovered the important group has tracked down Henry always considered principle of electrical in- nearly 100,000 documents by himself "principally self- duction--the process of Henry and his con- educated." converting magnetism into temporaries. By the time he was 30, he electricity. Joseph Henry is the only had been an apprentice to a Mary Henry zealously scientist on a list of silversmith and a wat- recopied many of her father's distinguished Americans chmaker, a schoolteacher, a documents; in the process, whose papers are being chemical assistant, a sur- Historians have been assembling the papers of Joseph Henry, an eminent 19th century physicist and the first Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. and a professor of mathematics and natural philosophy at Albany Academy. In 1832 he became a professor at the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) where he was an outstanding teacher of physical sciences and a pioneer in the field of elec- trical physics. In 1846, at the age of 49, Henry was selected as the first "Secretary," or chief executive, of the newly founded Smithsonian Institution. Henry, his wife, son and three daughters moved to Washington, then a provincial village of mar- shland and mosquitoes, where they lived in an apartment in the first Smithsonian building unth' his death in 1878. As Secretary of the Smithsonian, Henry spurred the development of many branches of science throughout the nation by enlisting the government's support of research. Under his direction, the Smitlmonian became a leading basic research organization. Indirectly, by shifting much of (please turn to page 6A) TODAY'S CHUCKLE "WOuldn't it be Wonderful if the designers of WOmen's bathing suite were put in Imrge of govern- 'ent budgets ? CI|CUUtTIMG INt NEW NAMININ| -- Lyme, Lyme Center, Orford, Orfordville, Piermont, Haverhill, Haverhill Center, Haverhill Comer, North Haverhill, East Haverhill, Pike, Woodsville, Both, Monroe, Lisbon, Londaff, Benton, LIPPL Warren, Glencbff, Wentworth VIM_BN[. Thet.frld,_ EBst__Th_effo,,hefford Hill, T hetf0rd Cente[, Noh_Thetford, Pot .Mills, Foirlee, West Fairlee, Bradford, "Bradford viiiage, Corinth East corinth, T0psham, West Topshom, Newhury Village, $outhNewbury, West Newbury, Wells River, Grotonl Ryegote Corner, test Ryegate, outh Ryegote, Peacham, uornet, West Spinet. THIS WEEK'S PRESS RUN 10,120 Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont " Aprii2g, 1982 = , i i i n m , i =1 00I:tTH EARTH NEWS is a registered trademark of THE MOTHER EARTH NEWS, tnc AND EASY-T0-BUILD )OD HOUSE! J 1977, Jack Henstridge built an expensive {$75,000, appraised value) home {also called firewood, cordwood, pilewood, stovewood, stackwall, $10,000, and he detailed the experiment for THE MOTHER EARTH 451. By merely stacking 9"-long sections of logs on their sides in a 6 "-long chunks for the interior walls), Jack and his wife construct- that's still braving the extra-cold winters common to Canada homestead. you've never heard of it, is one of the oldest types of construc- of. And it's a wonder more people haven't rediscovered this unusual building, since it offers a number of significant advantages over the .. such as: :ity. who can cut wood with a chain saw, and stack a neat cord, house. cost. Windfalls trees that are too badly bowed or twisted to be used in a log cabin, "waste" lumber.., in short, darn near any kind of wood can stackwood wall, as long as the wood is dry. ign. Because the finished wails are so thick--and because the log "reflect away" outside noises--the insides of cordwood structures are quiet resistance. The mortar in the wall tends to absorb the heat of combustion, impossible for a fire to spread. The mortar is largely self-healing. If a crack should develop, lime the break and calcify Once the wall is up, it's finished insideand out. harmony. The edifices are aesthetically pleasing and they blend into a natural background. drawback to stackwood construction is that the finished walls have poor primarily because lime mortar passes BTU like the proverbial tstridges have solved that problem, however, by making the walls fairly by "sandwiching" hunks of Styrofoam in the mortar. ; about the "house that Jack built", MOTHER's research staff decided architecture a try by building a stackwood dome greenhouse at our With the help of visitors to our summer seminars, the crew raised what is of our knowledge) the world's first such structure. We found this con- method to be labor-intensive but relatively low-cost, especially for folks who wood. In fact, our Eco-Village researchers were so impressed that the fast and easy technique when building part of the barn that houses on stackwood construction and on THE MOTHER EARTH NEWS magazine, e and address ancl ask for Reprint No. 1037: "Cordwood". Mail to Doing MORE . With LESS!, or in care of this paper. "IER EARTH NEWS, Inc. MOTORS D0 USED CARS & TRUCKS t, Johuslmry, Vermont 05819 Phone: (802) 748-2209 or 5105 Landscapino0000 RIVER ROAD PlERMONT. N.H. 03779 services for '1982' season. (603) 2"/2-5864 New Hampsliire hist, cpry to be published 'The first illustrated history they accepted the invitation to ago. The ascendancy of the intrusion of 'alien' cotton New Hampshire has a story Notable Institutions of New Hampshire is now in write this book" "alien' electronics industry textiles into an earlier milling that deepens -- not just The histo_L Y will include preparation, under spon- can be seen in the light of the industry. I want to show that lengthens," says Jager. (pleaserntopge-10" sorship of the New Hampshire New Illustrations Historicalsociety. "Windsor Publications will Co-authors are he working very closely with distinguished historical the New Hampshire Historical writers Ronald & Grace Jager Society," Page notes. "They of the town of Washington, have unrivalled experience N.H. Their book, designed for and resources to produce a enjoyment by the general handsome, hard cover volume reader, will be ready early with numerous fl color and next year, according to the black and white illustrations. publisher, Windsor Many of the illustrations will Publications, Inc., of come from the Historical Woodland Hills, Calif. Society's own collection. Some "New Hampshire Historical have never been reproduced Society is enthusiastic about before," according to Page. this project because it meets the need for a first class, Four Themes illustrated, popular history of Outlinifi the concept of the the state," says Director John history, co-author Ronald Page. "There are sound Jager said the book will take a histories dealing with thematic view of New specialized aspects of New Hampshire's past. The four Hampshire's past. This new themes are "Land and history is intended for the Water," "Politics and ordinary reader who wants a People," "Eonomics and readable, well-illustrated & Industries" and "Mind and authoritative book.  Spirit." Explains Jager, "This "It's history to he enjoyed," approach avoids the one- adds Page. "Whether we're thing-after-an0ther view of natives or newcomers, I think history without sacrificing this book will deepen our essential chronology. " appreciation of New Hamp- It also makes possible some shire as a special place tolive, enlightening juxtapositions. "Ronald and Grace Jager "Land speculation in the 20th wrote an outstanding history century can be compared to of their own town of development projects of Gay. Washington. I'm delighted Benning Wentworth 200 years On May 3 " 9u" We Love Ya GARFIELD THE CAT POSTERS & POSTCARDS GREEN FROG GARDEN CENTER Bradford, VT (802) 222-5595 BRADFORD COMMUNITY THEATRE 'Nj0= '1HE PRODUCERS" . ;  , BRADFORD ACADEMY - - 0w;ng m.. rmy, MOVI FOR TN! FAMILY at 2:00 PM md 7:00 PM. 2:00 PM SHOWING $1.25 7=00 PM SHOWING $1.50 IRUS CARTOONS Coming ottractim on May 8 "I/WASION Of TI IIODY $NATUgill" AMBITIOUS PEOPLE Do you hove momwmmt er toachin o skills?... Are yw tired d worki fro' someone else?.., Ate you intereztod in Hdth & Ntitim?... would you liko on opportunity to be financially  & wod( port-tin? pol k. P ..,_y_ mu   n,aw to . zu =/e s, s,  Yr. gsgiZ -- We wlU edllmd mt ep lkle ftle hlwi. .. HOME IMi00kOVEMENT _ See pages 4 and 5 for advertisers offerin00 Home Improvement and gardening sales. 2500 SOUAREFOOT WAREHOUSE AVAILABLE FOR RENT-- 2,500 sq. ft. warehouse available, heated, Main St., Bradford, Vt. Call 802-222-4634 ]" PREFERRED HOMEOWNERS .................. from New Ham shire RATES IN LYME, ORFORD, AND PIERMONT. Here ore o few examldes, $40,000 HO .......... from $185.00 up to $206.00. $60,000 Home .......... from $ 243.00 up to $ 271.00. CALL US. WE WILL Be HAPPY TO OUOTE YOU A PRITo PROTCT YOUR HOME. LUCIEN L. BOURBEAU INSURANCE AGENCY FAIRLEE VBLMONT B02-3-9224 LOOK FOR OUR DELl AD ON PAGE 2A. Thru the Underpass Woodsville, N.H. PREFERRED HOMmNERS ,,om-V.;n,* RATES I N BRADFORD, FAIRLEE, STRAFFOR'D, 8, THETFORD. mm omo few *xampl,s, S40600 mm .......... from $146.00 UP to$i|2-00. $60,000 Home ..... from $214.00 ua to 1267.00, CALL US. WE WILL DE HAPPY TOQUO YOU A PRICE TO PROTECT YOUR I. .. LUCIEN L. BOURBEAU INSURANCE AGENCY FAlltLEE, VERMONT 02-333-q24 LANDSCAPING, PATIOS, PRUNING PROFESSIONAL DESIGN AND COMPLETION OUR FIRST VISIT IS FREE GREEN FROG GARDEN CENTER Bradford, VT (802) 222-5595 PUPPIES FOR SALE 5-AKC registered lassett Hound male pups. $130. each. CALL 802-222-4613 $i25 PAINT SPECIAL ON ANY CAR $150 FOR PICK-UP TRUCKS (includes paint materials ) BODY WORK EXTRA (8U2) 222-44 1 ( FREE ESTIMATES BRADFORD, VT 05033  Over 500 Varieties Vegetab[es_ SEEDS Flowers,--Ornamentals, indr, Outdoor. -ALWAYS SOMETHING DIFFERENT- GREEN FROG GARDEN CENTER Bradfo,VT (802) 222-555 --FOR RENT OR LEASE-- 1 PRIMEOFFICE. RETAIL SPACE Nowly mmod=e, mm,, graD. toor mty perking, Moin St., Bradford, Vt., , Rlms4mdde rent, 01 222-5711. ].M. Landscaping I  R,VERROAD I " ,m;l PIERMONT N H 03779 --'411ll- k ,' Now booking Spring landscape projects.,, A (;all anytime. (603)2. ROUND AND SOUARE DANCE- Every Saturday Night--Time: 8-11:00 P.M. | at Orfordviile Town Hall -. ] With "Fiddling Dick Wilson and the Country Folks." | Children under 12 free |