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May 12, 1982     Journal Opinion
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May 12, 1982
 

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11111 IIANPSlIIII Lyme Orfor4 Ple(mon! Haverhill Woodsvdle lovh VlIIIIOIIT Thllt ford l:Olrlee We,++ +olrlee Ilrodlo(d Cormth Topthom NlWbu(y Wtlh River Ilyegote Groton USp 598340 Number 19 Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont May 12, 1982 IS PLAYTIME,-- When eats start wandering through the woods, to find a snake curled and ready to strike. Both snake and eat ys after some playful frolic. PHOTO BY FRAN HYDE O Rate hikes Mt. Lakes eroup seeks hell00 on ..ve developer-abandoned roads by MARGARET BURKE WOODSVILLE-- Efforts to present road allows access to finance roadbuilding in two only seven lots of the Crest- sections of Haverhill's Mountain Lakes District were brought to the attention of the Haverhill board of selectmen at the Monday, May 3, selectmen's meeting. While the selectmen welcomed the efforts of a group of lot owners to upgrade some existing "roughed-in" roads to meet town standards (and thereby qualify for municipal maintenance), it balked at committing any town funds for Mountain Lakes road projects, including over $20,000 earmarked several years ago for that purpose. Diane Rappa, manager of Mountain Lakes, told the board that the commissioners of Mountain Lakes district had decided at a meetinb,,on April 24 that funds "from the Crestfield road account, amounting to $21,952.41, plus interest through July, should be released to open a road through the Cr,tfield sec- tion." Vermont towns to receive state aid this year -Appropriations 00mnp for education and roads field section, located off the first left turn on Briar Hill Road, coming from the direction of N. Haverhill. "People are interested in building there, and without a road several lots are wor- thless," Rappa said. "Our plan was to wait for that other money," responded board member John Fullerton, referring to up to $40,000 held in escrow since the bankruptcy of the Mountain Lakes developer. Rappa replied that she had inquired about the status of those funds, but that the judge in the case, "seems to have forgotten about it." While the approximately $22,000, controlled by the  board of selectmen but long designated for Crestfield road building, is not enough to $5,202 the town would have received Under the old plan. Vershire is expected to get $23,268 this year and $26,001 next year in highway main- tenance funds. Stratford Under the new state education aid plan the Town of Stratford will, receive $25,291 this year as compared to $12,317 the town would have received under the old plan. Stratford is expected to get $59,085 this year and $70,889 next year for highway maintenance funds from •the state. Groton will receive $124,983 this year as compared to $38,003 the town would have received under the old plan. Groton is expected to get $24,022 this year and $27,957 next year in highway main- tenance funds. Vershire Under the new state education aid plan the Town of Vershire will receive $37,354 this year as compared to Full agenda at Haverhill meeting Rappa explained that the complete a road fully up to asking for $100 for each lot to town standards, it is enough to be contributed by its owner to open up the area and make the a fund for upgrading the lots accessible, according to existing road. Rappa. Board member Susan F. Holden agreed to accompany Rappa and town road com- missioner James Boncher on an inspection tour of the area. Skiway .. Another section of the Mountain Lakes district, Skiway, consisting of 72 lots on the left side of the ski area, has a partially finished road on which work was stopped at the time of the developer's bankruptcy in 1975. There are ive session next year for highway $45,247 this year and 2,904 for the Yer- maintenance funds, next year for highway but for Thetford maintenance funds. at least Under the new state Groton results of the edncation aid plan the Town of Under the new state been worth Thetford will receive $229,869 education aid plan the Town of this year as compared to individual $79,026 the town would have the state received under the old plan. a con- . Thetford is expected to get :rease in the $52,308 this year and $61,677 allocated for next year for highway upkeep -- maintenance funds• expensive Topsham governments Under the new" state in our local education plan the Town of Topsham will receive $110,176 this year as compared to the 1982 $52,412 the town would have was a one received under the old plan. in the state's Topsham is expected to get COmbined with $51,508 this year and $80,946 state's next year for highway will maintenance funds. $22 Wells River state aid to Under the new state education aid plan the Village also passed of Wells River will receive by MARGARET BURKE million $91,838 this year as compared WOODSVILLE-- What turned amount of to $51,826 the village would out to be a rathe|' fullmeeting towns have received under the old of the Haverhill board of for state aid plan. selectmen on May 3 began maintenance Wells River is expected to routinely enough, with the get $2,594 this year andS2,748 board's acceptance of a is a list of next year for highway proposal made two weeks that our maintenance funds, before by Police Chief Stephen Vermont are Ryegate C. Savage. Under the new state The selectmen agreed with education aid plan the Town of Savage that a Friday night new state Ryegate will receive $230,184 cruiser patrol staffed by Han theTownof this year as compared to volunteer special officers receive $455,796 $I15,474 the town would have' who've been working with the compared to received under the old plan. Haverhill Police Department town would Ryegate is expected to get would provide needed police under the coverage throughout Wood- to get Newburv Trustees and $42,205 highway  for iELlmual The Ve Meeting is ex- on May 25 sville and along Route 10 up to Briar Hill Rd. in N. Haverhill this summer. Having consulted the Stoddard Insurance Agency, selectmen confirmed that the this year patrol, which will provide Year. by MARGARET BURKE valuable training to the two NEWBURY-- The village volunteer special officers, will new state trusfees met briefly May 5 and cost the town nothing beyond reviewed an "outline of the the price of the gas used by the $194,250 budget that will be presented cruiser. the to village voters at the annual Neighbors Since the Town of Haverhill is the owner of three lots, having taken them over in lieu of taxes, Rappa requested on behalf of SNO that the town contribute $300 to the road completion fund. She added that a local bank that owns a Skiway lot had already given its $105, and that its officers agreed with SNO that the new road would add to the value of the property. But that point, and the argument that construction no funds in escrow to pay for fostered by the road would the completion of the road, so increase the tax base of lot owners formed Skiway Haverhill, did not convince the Neighbors Organization, or selectmen to commit any SNO, which identified 20 lot money to SNO. lowners who say they would "We wo'hldn't like other build on their lots if the road developers coming to us and was completed, saying we're favoring Rappa said that SNO is Mountain Lakes," said board member John Fullerton. Another board member, A. Some Newburv Frank Steigler, added, "We area didn't want that land, we were not a willing buyer." residents still billed received general meeting on May 25. Mrs. Margaret Ohlmann of The trustees also prepared a North Haverhill then entered to get statement of projected the room--actually a large ,r and $81,838 Federal Revenue Sharing vault in the town office highway funding for fiscal 1982-83. The building on Court St.--and amount the trustees expect placed on the conference table the village to receive is $5,792. a brown grocery bag full of new state Although no final decision what she described as rub- the Town of has been made as to how these bish. ,294 funds are to be spent, the 'Tveowned my property 22 to trustees agreed to include an years and I've never had any would have article in the warning of the rubbish on it and I don't want annual meeting slating the to start now," Mrs. Ohlmann to get entire amount for the water told the selectmen. She ex- plained that the contents of the bag had been picked up off her land across from the mobile home of "my new neighbors," Dana Fullerton and children. When told by selectmen that by MARGARET BURKE NEWBURY-- Nine months (almost to the day) after his previous visit, a Vermont Public Service Board hearing examiner was back in Newbury M:a 5 to again try to determine if area residents are being improperly charged for telephone calls made within municipal limits. PSB hearing examiner Rexford Roberts told the Journal Opinion that the Wednesday evening hearing at Town Hall was a con- tinuation of the original case -- heard Aug. 6, 1981 -- in- vestigating improper billing by Continental and New England Telephone Com- panies. "I convened the hearing because I wanted to see if All in a night's work She went on to complain of consult the police copy; they the same party allowing a dog aren't even open when we are." The selectmen agreed to check on the current price of the set of lawbooks and a subscription to the sup- plement of ongoing revisions. Informed guesses by those present put the cost from $250 to $350. Other business It was announced that Laurant Fournier had agreed to serve on the committee to study municipal and fire department salaries. Who the other two committee mem- bers will be is not yet final, but the subject is slated for discussion at the May I0 selectmen's meeting. The selectmen refused a request by a part-time em- ployee of the town to be in- cluded in the employee in- surance plan. $12,656 In recent weeks, littering was not in their to suggestions for the use of the jurisdiction, Mrs. Ohlmann Would have expected revenue have range replied, "You're in charge of from painting the fire station the town, aren't you? In other to get to surveying the boundaries of towns they seem to have more and $19,512 the village, control. I just can't see it." and $91,259 department. highway Such an allocati would defray the cost of work already undertaken on the new state village water and sewage the Town of system. for in-town calls there has been any im- provement," Roberts said from his Montpelier office later last week. "This kind of a case does not lend itself to judicial order," he added. About 25 people attended the hearing, many of them members of the local ad- vocacy group Peoples Organization of the Wells River Valley (POWR Valley ). The two phone companies were represented by several officials and lawyers. Newbury residents who testified that they had been recently billed for in-town calls include Isabel Whitney, Melanie Collier and Wendy Block. Richard Hausman, also of Newbury, testified on behalf of his neighbors, Peter and Jacquiline Sinclair, who've experienced recent misbiilings, and in general about the phone companies' failure to properly implement their municipal calling plan. Hausman, a POWR Valley member, emphasized restitution of all past mischarges and notification of rate payers in their phone bills of the companies' respon- sibility for the municipal calling plan and its misap- plication. PSB engineer Charles Larkin testified after being called by POWR Valley's lawyer, Michael Samson. Larkin's testimony was highly technical, concerning data bases which the two com- parties must share to ac- curately bill phone users in this area. Last August's hearing was prompted by petitions and letters initiated by POWR Valley directed to the PSB. While twice the number of people attended the original• hearing as last Wednesday's, some of those who testified at the first hearing have recently found in-town calls on their bills, including the Sinclairs and Larry and Wendy Block. The PSB hearing examiner Ne also learned Wednesday that W tOWT the problem is not restricted f to the Town of Newbury. o es open r Testim°ny 'was given that a Ryegate household, that of • lJ/7]. Carl and Jane Bayer, has been m _,.._e billed for calls made within LYME-- Town offices are now that town. open in the renovated It is now Roberts' task to basement of Lyme's library. The main entrance to the offices is at the back of the library building. The selectmen's office, town clerk and the Lyme Home Health Agency occupy space in the basement. The selec: tmen will hold their regular meeting there every Wed- nesday night starting at 7: 30. The selectmen's and town clerk's offices will be open from 9 a.m. to noon Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. The health agency hours are Tuesday and Thursday mornings, also from 9:00 to (please turn to page 10) to run free on her land and of their having an open flame on their own property which she judged to be a fire hazard. The issue of trash on the Ohlmann property, had been brought before the selectmen at their April 19 meeting by road commissioner James Boucher in executive (closed) session. Selectmen had gone to her house on April 26 to personally inspect the premises. Mrs. Ohlmann had not been at home at the time. Asked by selectman A. Frank Steigler if she had contacted the neighbor in question about her com- plaints, Mrs. Ohlman replied, "No, they don't have a phone." Steigler asked why she had not talked to them personally, and Mrs. Ohlmann replied, "I don't want to get involved." Selectmen advised Mrs. Ohlmann to call the police and sign a complaint if she has further problems of the nature she described. "If it happens one more time that'll be it," she an- swered. Funding The selectmen signed papers renewing a note for $350,000 and initiating another note for $200,000. Both sums are funds borrowed in an- ticipatien of taxes. The money is needed to meet current operating expenses, par- ticularly the cost of operating schools. Laws? The question of whether the town should purchase a set of the laws of New Hampshire was discussed briefly, and not for the first time. Selectman Susan Holden decried the lack of a copy of the R.S.A.'s, "It leaves us open to lawsuits every day and we can't always deliberate on the testimony and decide what, if any, ac- tions to recommend to the PSB. His "findings and conclusions of law," Roberts said, will be made known to the parties involvedthe two phone companies and POWR Valley--through their lawyers. The three parties then have I0 days (or more if they request it) in which to file objections to Roberts' findings or to ask to present oral arguments to the full PSB.. Examiner Roberts said tlt he should be ready to propose a decision on the case by around June 18. Patricia Klark, selectmen's assistant, noted, "We're barely able to recover lost taxes on those lots, which are sold by sealed bids." Board member Susan Holden's immediate response to the request was, "I think we'd like to sit on that one for a week." The selectmen did agree that Skiway owners have "the right and permission" to upgrade the road and, if it is found after a hearing to meet town standards, it would be "taken over" by the town and maintained. The SNO road project is coordinated by Rappa and by David Finch, a SNO member who lives in Connecticut. $1,700 has been raised for the fund since March, and the group has hired Patrick Boudreault to install culverts and do "rough ditching and gravelling," according to Rappa. The first phase of work on the Skiway road is expected to cost $5,000, she said, with another $5,000 required to complete the job. "The people just want to see something done, some interest shown about the roads," Rappa explained in a telephone interview on May 6. She continued, "They can't live there, can't build, they can't sell, and its been like this for three years." Ordinances Rappa also reported to the board on four would-be or- dinances that were approved by voters at the district's general meeting. The question of what steps must be taken before the ordinances have the force of law was discussed but not resolved. The two ordinances that Rappa maintained were of the greater importance both deal with keeping the- "four seasons recreational com- (please turn to page 10) 50% more in profits RUTLAND-- At its annual meeting of stockholders on Tuesday, May 4, company officials announced that profits for the Central Ver- mont Public Service Cor- poration had increased more than 50 percent during 1981. CVPS  officials said shareholders earnings had declined in previous years but according to the company's 1981 annual report, net income per share of commonstock had increased 63.3 percent last year. Net company income for CVPS was up 55.8 percent, according to the report. Jumping from $8.9 million to $13.9 million, net income for the company gave a 16.4 percent rate of return on common equity. Last year, the state's Public Service Board granted the utility two customer rate increases totaling 25 percent, although, less of an increase than the company had requested. The PSB had also . granted the company per- mission to increase its allowable rate of return from 14.5 to 16 percent. Last year's figures show the company exceeded its allowed rate of return by .4 percent. Rate Hikes Both rate hikes, granted by the PSB in December, are attributed to have caused company profits to soar. Early this year, on the heels of the granted rate hikes, (please turn to page 10) Bradford elementary board's budget up 20.8 percent But state aid juml00 even more BRADFORD-- The Bradford Academy and Graded School one-half kindergarten Academy and Graded School budget stood at $395,059. The positions at the school, District School Board has new recommended budget upgrading a half-time FTE completed a review of their asks for$477,352, professional position to full- proposed 1982-83 budget. The Th largest increase time; new budget recommended by reflected in the budget is in the -- moving the school's the school board is up $82,293 area of instruction which kindergarten next door to the or 20.8 percent larger than the includes salaries for personnel Bradford Armory. school's budget for 1981-82. at the elementary school. The -- an additional full-time However, thanks to a new new line item for instruction teaching position for the state education aid plan represents a $45,834 or 20.8 second and third grade ; passed by the state legislature percent increase over 1981-82. The school board has during their last session, the Transportation coats will dropped consideration of a Town of Bradford will receive increase by $10,005, costs for fourth structural change that $208,081 more than the town special education will in- would have raised a half-time would have received under the crease by $5,630, building library aide position to full- previous state education plan. maintenance costs will in-time with that person State figures show that crease by $5,391, and the becoming responsible for a Bradford now will be getting budget for the school prin- "gifted and talented" $455,796 in education aid this cipal's office will increase by program. year instead of $247,115. This $5,980, according to the recent Minutes of the school money will be divided between budget figures. \\;board's April 30 meeting show the Bradford Elementary The school board has ap- the school board came out School and Oxbow High School proved three organizational "strongly opposed" to a at the town's annual school changes at the school. They "gifted and talented" meeting this summer, are: program at the school. Last year's Bradford -- the elimination of one and  Oxbow board cautiou budget; teacher positions Kilomier failed, orincilml talked with  BRADFORD-- Personnel, The two projects area $1,125 budget limitations, and English Student Handbook energy costs were the major proposal submitted by social topics at last Thursday's studies department head Oxbow SchoolBoardmeeting. Martin Smit, and a $500 At the top of the list of proposal from history teacher matters discussed in openLarry Coffin for a project session, the school board converting old photographs to cautiously approved two slides. research and development Standardized projects. The word _Smit explained the hand- 'cautiously' appears because book, for which 600 copies the projects will cost an un- are planned, has been budgeted $1,500 --and concern for staying within the budget set by district voters earlier this year caused at least one hoard member, chairman Aroline Putnam, to vote steadfastly against funding the projects. "We were asked by the taxpayers to stay within our budget," said Putnam. "I believe these (research and development projects) are good things.., but I'm against them until we can get another look at our budget." At Putnam's request, the school board is expected to be presented with an updated ,budget statement by the district superintendent's office at their next scheduled meeting on May 27. developed standardizing English curriculum requirements for such things as term papers, lab reports, and business letters throughout the school. The books would he printed, bound and distributed to students who would be required by deposit to return them at the end of the year. Orange East District Superintendent John Fontana backed the projects saying, "You're talking about $1,500 dollars, but you don't often get the chance to strike off for kids to really improve their curriculum." Fontana in- dicated he felt $1,505 was a pretty good price. So did board member Dan Perry, who is usually out- spoken in favor of holding down the school's budget. "We have an obligation to the taxpayers but we also have an obligation to put out the best education possible for the best price." When a vote on the matter was finally called, Perry and fellow board members Judith Forward, Judith Barton, Sue Spooner and Joseph Rinaldi voted to support the projects; as a means of Putnam voted no. Personnel The question of the school's budget also loomed behind the major portion of discussion at the meeting regarding the status of a number of teacher positions at the school. Earlier this year a vine through 12th grade math- science teaching position at the school was vacated because the teacher in the position had resigned. School officials say enrollments in the course have decreased to a point at which a replacement is not actively being sought to fill the position. The school board has decided to consult budget figures before making final determination on the fate (please turn to page 10) Y!! 11111 IIANPSlIIII Lyme Orfor4 Ple(mon! Haverhill Woodsvdle lovh VlIIIIOIIT Thllt ford l:Olrlee We,++ +olrlee Ilrodlo(d Cormth Topthom NlWbu(y Wtlh River Ilyegote Groton USp 598340 Number 19 Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont May 12, 1982 IS PLAYTIME,-- When eats start wandering through the woods, to find a snake curled and ready to strike. Both snake and eat ys after some playful frolic. PHOTO BY FRAN HYDE O Rate hikes Mt. Lakes eroup seeks hell00 on ..ve developer-abandoned roads by MARGARET BURKE WOODSVILLE-- Efforts to present road allows access to finance roadbuilding in two only seven lots of the Crest- sections of Haverhill's Mountain Lakes District were brought to the attention of the Haverhill board of selectmen at the Monday, May 3, selectmen's meeting. While the selectmen welcomed the efforts of a group of lot owners to upgrade some existing "roughed-in" roads to meet town standards (and thereby qualify for municipal maintenance), it balked at committing any town funds for Mountain Lakes road projects, including over $20,000 earmarked several years ago for that purpose. Diane Rappa, manager of Mountain Lakes, told the board that the commissioners of Mountain Lakes district had decided at a meetinb,,on April 24 that funds "from the Crestfield road account, amounting to $21,952.41, plus interest through July, should be released to open a road through the Cr,tfield sec- tion." Vermont towns to receive state aid this year -Appropriations 00mnp for education and roads field section, located off the first left turn on Briar Hill Road, coming from the direction of N. Haverhill. "People are interested in building there, and without a road several lots are wor- thless," Rappa said. "Our plan was to wait for that other money," responded board member John Fullerton, referring to up to $40,000 held in escrow since the bankruptcy of the Mountain Lakes developer. Rappa replied that she had inquired about the status of those funds, but that the judge in the case, "seems to have forgotten about it." While the approximately $22,000, controlled by the  board of selectmen but long designated for Crestfield road building, is not enough to $5,202 the town would have received Under the old plan. Vershire is expected to get $23,268 this year and $26,001 next year in highway main- tenance funds. Stratford Under the new state education aid plan the Town of Stratford will, receive $25,291 this year as compared to $12,317 the town would have received under the old plan. Stratford is expected to get $59,085 this year and $70,889 next year for highway maintenance funds from •the state. Groton will receive $124,983 this year as compared to $38,003 the town would have received under the old plan. Groton is expected to get $24,022 this year and $27,957 next year in highway main- tenance funds. Vershire Under the new state education aid plan the Town of Vershire will receive $37,354 this year as compared to Full agenda at Haverhill meeting Rappa explained that the complete a road fully up to asking for $100 for each lot to town standards, it is enough to be contributed by its owner to open up the area and make the a fund for upgrading the lots accessible, according to existing road. Rappa. Board member Susan F. Holden agreed to accompany Rappa and town road com- missioner James Boncher on an inspection tour of the area. Skiway .. Another section of the Mountain Lakes district, Skiway, consisting of 72 lots on the left side of the ski area, has a partially finished road on which work was stopped at the time of the developer's bankruptcy in 1975. There are ive session next year for highway $45,247 this year and 2,904 for the Yer- maintenance funds, next year for highway but for Thetford maintenance funds. at least Under the new state Groton results of the edncation aid plan the Town of Under the new state been worth Thetford will receive $229,869 education aid plan the Town of this year as compared to individual $79,026 the town would have the state received under the old plan. a con- . Thetford is expected to get :rease in the $52,308 this year and $61,677 allocated for next year for highway upkeep -- maintenance funds• expensive Topsham governments Under the new" state in our local education plan the Town of Topsham will receive $110,176 this year as compared to the 1982 $52,412 the town would have was a one received under the old plan. in the state's Topsham is expected to get COmbined with $51,508 this year and $80,946 state's next year for highway will maintenance funds. $22 Wells River state aid to Under the new state education aid plan the Village also passed of Wells River will receive by MARGARET BURKE million $91,838 this year as compared WOODSVILLE-- What turned amount of to $51,826 the village would out to be a rathe|' fullmeeting towns have received under the old of the Haverhill board of for state aid plan. selectmen on May 3 began maintenance Wells River is expected to routinely enough, with the get $2,594 this year andS2,748 board's acceptance of a is a list of next year for highway proposal made two weeks that our maintenance funds, before by Police Chief Stephen Vermont are Ryegate C. Savage. Under the new state The selectmen agreed with education aid plan the Town of Savage that a Friday night new state Ryegate will receive $230,184 cruiser patrol staffed by Han theTownof this year as compared to volunteer special officers receive $455,796 $I15,474 the town would have' who've been working with the compared to received under the old plan. Haverhill Police Department town would Ryegate is expected to get would provide needed police under the coverage throughout Wood- to get Newburv Trustees and $42,205 highway  for iELlmual The Ve Meeting is ex- on May 25 sville and along Route 10 up to Briar Hill Rd. in N. Haverhill this summer. Having consulted the Stoddard Insurance Agency, selectmen confirmed that the this year patrol, which will provide Year. by MARGARET BURKE valuable training to the two NEWBURY-- The village volunteer special officers, will new state trusfees met briefly May 5 and cost the town nothing beyond reviewed an "outline of the the price of the gas used by the $194,250 budget that will be presented cruiser. the to village voters at the annual Neighbors Since the Town of Haverhill is the owner of three lots, having taken them over in lieu of taxes, Rappa requested on behalf of SNO that the town contribute $300 to the road completion fund. She added that a local bank that owns a Skiway lot had already given its $105, and that its officers agreed with SNO that the new road would add to the value of the property. But that point, and the argument that construction no funds in escrow to pay for fostered by the road would the completion of the road, so increase the tax base of lot owners formed Skiway Haverhill, did not convince the Neighbors Organization, or selectmen to commit any SNO, which identified 20 lot money to SNO. lowners who say they would "We wo'hldn't like other build on their lots if the road developers coming to us and was completed, saying we're favoring Rappa said that SNO is Mountain Lakes," said board member John Fullerton. Another board member, A. Some Newburv Frank Steigler, added, "We area didn't want that land, we were not a willing buyer." residents still billed received general meeting on May 25. Mrs. Margaret Ohlmann of The trustees also prepared a North Haverhill then entered to get statement of projected the room--actually a large ,r and $81,838 Federal Revenue Sharing vault in the town office highway funding for fiscal 1982-83. The building on Court St.--and amount the trustees expect placed on the conference table the village to receive is $5,792. a brown grocery bag full of new state Although no final decision what she described as rub- the Town of has been made as to how these bish. ,294 funds are to be spent, the 'Tveowned my property 22 to trustees agreed to include an years and I've never had any would have article in the warning of the rubbish on it and I don't want annual meeting slating the to start now," Mrs. Ohlmann to get entire amount for the water told the selectmen. She ex- plained that the contents of the bag had been picked up off her land across from the mobile home of "my new neighbors," Dana Fullerton and children. When told by selectmen that by MARGARET BURKE NEWBURY-- Nine months (almost to the day) after his previous visit, a Vermont Public Service Board hearing examiner was back in Newbury M:a 5 to again try to determine if area residents are being improperly charged for telephone calls made within municipal limits. PSB hearing examiner Rexford Roberts told the Journal Opinion that the Wednesday evening hearing at Town Hall was a con- tinuation of the original case -- heard Aug. 6, 1981 -- in- vestigating improper billing by Continental and New England Telephone Com- panies. "I convened the hearing because I wanted to see if All in a night's work She went on to complain of consult the police copy; they the same party allowing a dog aren't even open when we are." The selectmen agreed to check on the current price of the set of lawbooks and a subscription to the sup- plement of ongoing revisions. Informed guesses by those present put the cost from $250 to $350. Other business It was announced that Laurant Fournier had agreed to serve on the committee to study municipal and fire department salaries. Who the other two committee mem- bers will be is not yet final, but the subject is slated for discussion at the May I0 selectmen's meeting. The selectmen refused a request by a part-time em- ployee of the town to be in- cluded in the employee in- surance plan. $12,656 In recent weeks, littering was not in their to suggestions for the use of the jurisdiction, Mrs. Ohlmann Would have expected revenue have range replied, "You're in charge of from painting the fire station the town, aren't you? In other to get to surveying the boundaries of towns they seem to have more and $19,512 the village, control. I just can't see it." and $91,259 department. highway Such an allocati would defray the cost of work already undertaken on the new state village water and sewage the Town of system. for in-town calls there has been any im- provement," Roberts said from his Montpelier office later last week. "This kind of a case does not lend itself to judicial order," he added. About 25 people attended the hearing, many of them members of the local ad- vocacy group Peoples Organization of the Wells River Valley (POWR Valley ). The two phone companies were represented by several officials and lawyers. Newbury residents who testified that they had been recently billed for in-town calls include Isabel Whitney, Melanie Collier and Wendy Block. Richard Hausman, also of Newbury, testified on behalf of his neighbors, Peter and Jacquiline Sinclair, who've experienced recent misbiilings, and in general about the phone companies' failure to properly implement their municipal calling plan. Hausman, a POWR Valley member, emphasized restitution of all past mischarges and notification of rate payers in their phone bills of the companies' respon- sibility for the municipal calling plan and its misap- plication. PSB engineer Charles Larkin testified after being called by POWR Valley's lawyer, Michael Samson. Larkin's testimony was highly technical, concerning data bases which the two com- parties must share to ac- curately bill phone users in this area. Last August's hearing was prompted by petitions and letters initiated by POWR Valley directed to the PSB. While twice the number of people attended the original• hearing as last Wednesday's, some of those who testified at the first hearing have recently found in-town calls on their bills, including the Sinclairs and Larry and Wendy Block. The PSB hearing examiner Ne also learned Wednesday that W tOWT the problem is not restricted f to the Town of Newbury. o es open r Testim°ny 'was given that a Ryegate household, that of • lJ/7]. Carl and Jane Bayer, has been m _,.._e billed for calls made within LYME-- Town offices are now that town. open in the renovated It is now Roberts' task to basement of Lyme's library. The main entrance to the offices is at the back of the library building. The selectmen's office, town clerk and the Lyme Home Health Agency occupy space in the basement. The selec: tmen will hold their regular meeting there every Wed- nesday night starting at 7: 30. The selectmen's and town clerk's offices will be open from 9 a.m. to noon Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. The health agency hours are Tuesday and Thursday mornings, also from 9:00 to (please turn to page 10) to run free on her land and of their having an open flame on their own property which she judged to be a fire hazard. The issue of trash on the Ohlmann property, had been brought before the selectmen at their April 19 meeting by road commissioner James Boucher in executive (closed) session. Selectmen had gone to her house on April 26 to personally inspect the premises. Mrs. Ohlmann had not been at home at the time. Asked by selectman A. Frank Steigler if she had contacted the neighbor in question about her com- plaints, Mrs. Ohlman replied, "No, they don't have a phone." Steigler asked why she had not talked to them personally, and Mrs. Ohlmann replied, "I don't want to get involved." Selectmen advised Mrs. Ohlmann to call the police and sign a complaint if she has further problems of the nature she described. "If it happens one more time that'll be it," she an- swered. Funding The selectmen signed papers renewing a note for $350,000 and initiating another note for $200,000. Both sums are funds borrowed in an- ticipatien of taxes. The money is needed to meet current operating expenses, par- ticularly the cost of operating schools. Laws? The question of whether the town should purchase a set of the laws of New Hampshire was discussed briefly, and not for the first time. Selectman Susan Holden decried the lack of a copy of the R.S.A.'s, "It leaves us open to lawsuits every day and we can't always deliberate on the testimony and decide what, if any, ac- tions to recommend to the PSB. His "findings and conclusions of law," Roberts said, will be made known to the parties involvedthe two phone companies and POWR Valley--through their lawyers. The three parties then have I0 days (or more if they request it) in which to file objections to Roberts' findings or to ask to present oral arguments to the full PSB.. Examiner Roberts said tlt he should be ready to propose a decision on the case by around June 18. Patricia Klark, selectmen's assistant, noted, "We're barely able to recover lost taxes on those lots, which are sold by sealed bids." Board member Susan Holden's immediate response to the request was, "I think we'd like to sit on that one for a week." The selectmen did agree that Skiway owners have "the right and permission" to upgrade the road and, if it is found after a hearing to meet town standards, it would be "taken over" by the town and maintained. The SNO road project is coordinated by Rappa and by David Finch, a SNO member who lives in Connecticut. $1,700 has been raised for the fund since March, and the group has hired Patrick Boudreault to install culverts and do "rough ditching and gravelling," according to Rappa. The first phase of work on the Skiway road is expected to cost $5,000, she said, with another $5,000 required to complete the job. "The people just want to see something done, some interest shown about the roads," Rappa explained in a telephone interview on May 6. She continued, "They can't live there, can't build, they can't sell, and its been like this for three years." Ordinances Rappa also reported to the board on four would-be or- dinances that were approved by voters at the district's general meeting. The question of what steps must be taken before the ordinances have the force of law was discussed but not resolved. The two ordinances that Rappa maintained were of the greater importance both deal with keeping the- "four seasons recreational com- (please turn to page 10) 50% more in profits RUTLAND-- At its annual meeting of stockholders on Tuesday, May 4, company officials announced that profits for the Central Ver- mont Public Service Cor- poration had increased more than 50 percent during 1981. CVPS  officials said shareholders earnings had declined in previous years but according to the company's 1981 annual report, net income per share of commonstock had increased 63.3 percent last year. Net company income for CVPS was up 55.8 percent, according to the report. Jumping from $8.9 million to $13.9 million, net income for the company gave a 16.4 percent rate of return on common equity. Last year, the state's Public Service Board granted the utility two customer rate increases totaling 25 percent, although, less of an increase than the company had requested. The PSB had also . granted the company per- mission to increase its allowable rate of return from 14.5 to 16 percent. Last year's figures show the company exceeded its allowed rate of return by .4 percent. Rate Hikes Both rate hikes, granted by the PSB in December, are attributed to have caused company profits to soar. Early this year, on the heels of the granted rate hikes, (please turn to page 10) Bradford elementary board's budget up 20.8 percent But state aid juml00 even more BRADFORD-- The Bradford Academy and Graded School one-half kindergarten Academy and Graded School budget stood at $395,059. The positions at the school, District School Board has new recommended budget upgrading a half-time FTE completed a review of their asks for$477,352, professional position to full- proposed 1982-83 budget. The Th largest increase time; new budget recommended by reflected in the budget is in the -- moving the school's the school board is up $82,293 area of instruction which kindergarten next door to the or 20.8 percent larger than the includes salaries for personnel Bradford Armory. school's budget for 1981-82. at the elementary school. The -- an additional full-time However, thanks to a new new line item for instruction teaching position for the state education aid plan represents a $45,834 or 20.8 second and third grade ; passed by the state legislature percent increase over 1981-82. The school board has during their last session, the Transportation coats will dropped consideration of a Town of Bradford will receive increase by $10,005, costs for fourth structural change that $208,081 more than the town special education will in- would have raised a half-time would have received under the crease by $5,630, building library aide position to full- previous state education plan. maintenance costs will in-time with that person State figures show that crease by $5,391, and the becoming responsible for a Bradford now will be getting budget for the school prin- "gifted and talented" $455,796 in education aid this cipal's office will increase by program. year instead of $247,115. This $5,980, according to the recent Minutes of the school money will be divided between budget figures. \\;board's April 30 meeting show the Bradford Elementary The school board has ap- the school board came out School and Oxbow High School proved three organizational "strongly opposed" to a at the town's annual school changes at the school. They "gifted and talented" meeting this summer, are: program at the school. Last year's Bradford -- the elimination of one and  Oxbow board cautiou budget; teacher positions Kilomier failed, orincilml talked with  BRADFORD-- Personnel, The two projects area $1,125 budget limitations, and English Student Handbook energy costs were the major proposal submitted by social topics at last Thursday's studies department head Oxbow SchoolBoardmeeting. Martin Smit, and a $500 At the top of the list of proposal from history teacher matters discussed in openLarry Coffin for a project session, the school board converting old photographs to cautiously approved two slides. research and development Standardized projects. The word _Smit explained the hand- 'cautiously' appears because book, for which 600 copies the projects will cost an un- are planned, has been budgeted $1,500 --and concern for staying within the budget set by district voters earlier this year caused at least one hoard member, chairman Aroline Putnam, to vote steadfastly against funding the projects. "We were asked by the taxpayers to stay within our budget," said Putnam. "I believe these (research and development projects) are good things.., but I'm against them until we can get another look at our budget." At Putnam's request, the school board is expected to be presented with an updated ,budget statement by the district superintendent's office at their next scheduled meeting on May 27. developed standardizing English curriculum requirements for such things as term papers, lab reports, and business letters throughout the school. The books would he printed, bound and distributed to students who would be required by deposit to return them at the end of the year. Orange East District Superintendent John Fontana backed the projects saying, "You're talking about $1,500 dollars, but you don't often get the chance to strike off for kids to really improve their curriculum." Fontana in- dicated he felt $1,505 was a pretty good price. So did board member Dan Perry, who is usually out- spoken in favor of holding down the school's budget. "We have an obligation to the taxpayers but we also have an obligation to put out the best education possible for the best price." When a vote on the matter was finally called, Perry and fellow board members Judith Forward, Judith Barton, Sue Spooner and Joseph Rinaldi voted to support the projects; as a means of Putnam voted no. Personnel The question of the school's budget also loomed behind the major portion of discussion at the meeting regarding the status of a number of teacher positions at the school. Earlier this year a vine through 12th grade math- science teaching position at the school was vacated because the teacher in the position had resigned. School officials say enrollments in the course have decreased to a point at which a replacement is not actively being sought to fill the position. The school board has decided to consult budget figures before making final determination on the fate (please turn to page 10) Y!!