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May 12, 1982     Journal Opinion
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Page S-The Journal Opinion-May 12, 1982 Task force offers bike t by MARK WHEELER 00TAT[0N ? safet00 promotion kit CONCORD-- If you are a resources for films, pare- member of an organization phlets and materials that are looking for a community available to your group and a • a't'Wl111" project, the New Hampshire program planning guide. The Woodsville High School Band and Chorus is at New Castle, Me. for the second half of their exchange concert. Lincoln Academy is our host school and is providing host families. The concert will be Saturday night• We hope this will be as successful as the concert at Woodsville. Student Council The Student Council has recently installed a new Coke machine in order to raise money for future plans such as a i'ield and a trip. The council is also planning to send books to Africa. In order to do this we need clear plastic, and plastic feed sacks to wrap the books in• If you have any of these, please bring them to the office at Woodsville High School. The books will be sent to a secondary school in Zambia: The Council is also planning an end-of-the-year day trip to Old Orchard Beach. We in- vited the Honor Society to go with us as guests. The Student Council is also wishing to have a field day as we did last year. There were such events as a water slide, obstacle course, and a cookout. We are also giving an award for the person who contributed most to Woodsville High School by doing such things as going to games and volunteering for various activities. Administration The office requests that all groups or businesses who are planning to offer scholarships for students of the 1982 WHS graduating class, please contact the office as soon as possible. The programs for commencement exercises are being sent to the printers very soon. Honor Society The National Honor Society collected about $800 during the recent Citizens for Scholar- ships house-to-house canvass. The group would like to thank area businesses and residents for their support• The Society will hold its annual induction ceremonies next Thursday in the* Com- munity Building. The guest speaker will be Steve Savage, the Police Chief of Haverhill. Families and friends are cordially invited to attend. Editorial Our government is proposing new acts to keep "vital" information secret from the public. This would be an addition to the laws already standing on the protection of military documents, trade documents and criminal in- vestigation documents. To cover up any more, I think, is a crime against the freedom of America• One of our biggest freedoms is that of examining our government and looking at it in a truthful light. In this time when ignorance is the norm we should Pot be killing one of the resources that directly feeds this frdom. Not only is keeping secret the press will end up governmental information printing more bias than fact. free and open important to our We must keep the freedom; it also will insure the documents which portray our truthfulness of our press. The country open so that press is the main reader of ignorance will die and government documents and if freedom and truth will those documents are kept flourish. Bicycle Safety Task Force has a package of materials to help you promote bicycle safety, so says Gary Guzouskas, Chairman, New Hampshire Bicycle Safety Task Force. The package incdes educational materials for grades kindergarten through sixth grade, a listing of Planetarium Workshop On April 4, 1982, a planetarium workshop was held at Oxbow High School in Bradford for gifted and talented students of the Northern School District. The leader of the workshop was Oxbow Astronomy instructor, Tom EstiU. According to Estill, the purpose of the workshop was" • . . to teach the students the operation and maintenance of the planetarium so that they will be able to help teachers next year in setting up and operating the planetarium and in allowing them (the students) the opportunity to develop tbeir own planetarium shows with assistance from their teachers. The students who par- ticipated in the workshop are: Bob Thompson, Grog Haas, Justin Richards, from Bradford Elementary School; Alfred Sidney, James Ham- mond, from Oxbow High School; Danny Chamkulaw, Erik Benson, Jeffrey Brooks, from Newbury Elementary School; and from Union 36, Ditto Alden, Nicky D'Agotino, Jamie Chappella, Nathan Acker, and Rich Acker. FBLA Convention On Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, May 6, 7, and 8, some members of the Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) at Oxbow High School attended a state convention at Smuggler's Notch, in Stowe, Vt. The FBLA members competed, and took tests in the areas of accounting, shorthand, clerical duties, typing, and economics. The trip was paid for by money that was raised by the FBLA group. The FBLA sold Olympian owls and raffled off a digital clock-radio to raise funds. The Oxbow FBLA members traveled to Smuggler's Notch on a bus along with members of Thetford Academy FBLA. A Thetford bus left Oxbow at 6:15 a.m. on Thursday mor- ning and an Oxbow High School bus picked the students up at Smuggler's Notch on Saturday morning. Oxbow students who at- tended the convention were: Brenda Oliver, Tammy Sarazin, Lisa Farnham, Oxbw I Sdml Imdlml, VemeM ................. JUOY AUGUSTINE Staff ................... LISA FARNHAM MARISA FATHERLEY KATHERINE HARTLEY PETER HODG£ I.ILI[ KkSPRZ( TRA¢I OTTINA TOM K, kTHBUm4 BETHANNE WAIGHT IqmllmMmr ........... KRI$11N HERNLN Bethanne Wright, Kathy Colby, Annette Brooks, Gina Wheeler, Janice Emerson, and MaSherri Flye. Senior Acceptances As of May 1 the following students at Oxbow High School have been accepted to institutions of higher education. The students names are listed adjacent to the colleges and-or univer- sities to which they have been accepted• Karin Dwyer -- West Point, Cornell University. Barbara Carson -- Bates College. Leslie Kasprzak -- Syracuse University. Alan Jesseman -- Parson School of Design. Kris Herman -- Mount Holyoke, Tufts University. John Ertle -- Boston University. Ron Huntington -- Santa Fe. Louise Plante -- Boston University. Anne Ford -- Trinity College, Smith College. Howard Fenner -- Cham- plain College• Fred Allare -- St. Michaeis College, University of Ver- mont, University of Maine, Johnson State College. David Thurston -- New Hampshire Technical Institute. Mark Osgood -- Vermont Technical College. Richard Berkowski -- Vermont Technical College, Yvette Taylor -- New Hampshire Vocational- Technical College-Claremont. Alaln Lefebvre -- Lyndon State College. Kelley Blodgett -- Lyndon State College. Karen Welch -- New Hampshire Vocational- Technical College Berlin. John Grow -- Worchter Poly Technical College. The following student has been accepted into the Armed Forces and-or reserve. Physics Award Each year the American Association of Physics Teachers presents an award to the outstanding physics student. This year the award was given to senior Anna Novick. The award is based on academic performance, and physics teacher Greg Renner felt that Novick was deserving of the award. Novick will receive a certificate for her outstanding performance. The educational activities come in two packages, one for kindergarten through third grade and the 5thor for grades four through six. The ac- tivities can be done in five sessions of 20 minutes each or one session of one hour and forty minutes and are suitable for use by schools or com- munity groups. Around May I, the Task Force will make available the resource listing and educational materials to persons interested in starting local programs. If you are interested in receiving information, contact Gary Guzouskas, State Department of Education, 64 North Main Street, Concord, N.H. 03301. COMMUNITY HEALTH SERVICES E. CORINTH-- A Community Health Services Inc., Town Nurse will he at the E. Corinth Library on Wednesday, May 26 from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. The nurse will be checking hypertension, weight, and anemia. JOINING THE CUB SCOUTS-- Troopmaster George Kathter welcomes David Albee and Harry Hill to the Cub Pack. NEW SCOUTS-- Troopmaster George Karner of Troop 152 in Haverhill inducts David Allhee of N. Haverhill (left) and Harry Hill (right) into the Boy Robert Barkowski -- U.S. Scout troop. Navy (Reserve). t Group home read+" .for new residents I o BRADFORD---A group home Mental Heal(h Services ex- meals,- managing their own for adults who are mentally plained that the six residents affairs. ! retarded opened in Bradford will learn the basics of living The average stay of a on Feb. 24. Pete Trayers, on their own by doing it -- resident is one to two years, Residential Services Com'- caring for the home, cooking with three years being the dinator . at Orange County maximum. Live-in stafio-rn Diversified Oeeupatiou Class at Oxbow High 8ehoel worked six weeks ou the Orange County Mental Health group home. Asisting In the work were: (kneeling I-r) Joel Beckley, and Brett Sutherland. Standing (l-r) Lee Thurstun, Elbor Edsou, Bob Paten, Jerry Smith, Stuart Carkin, Dave Joelyn (instructor), and Connie PicknelL Orange County Mental Health Services, assist the people in the management of the household. The staff, Dave Himes, Group, Coordinator, Judy Claghorn and Joe Schroeder provide 24-hour-a- day coverage of the home. The house needed a great deal of work before the residents moved in. Several local people were in- strumental in getting the place ready. Ray Meerbergen of Bradford, helped supervise the work of the Diversified Occupation Class from Oxbow Vocational Center. They worked for six weeks sheetrocking, painting and wall papering. The DO students learn about all sorts of jobs in their class and their work on the house gave them a chance to perform actual tasks and to use precise measurements and mathematics. Most of all, they learned the importance of working as a crew. Asked about their work, the students first said "It was ftm,', and then added, "It felt good to see the work done". DO teacher Dave Jesling said the crew has received other requests for work since finishing the group home. Ray Meerbergon, who has been involved in community projects his entire life, has continued to help out around the group home. Carpenter, Ted Curto gave invaluable help, lending not only advice, but his tools as well, said a spokesman. An Open House is scheduled for early summer• A spokesman for OCMHS said ,that they were deeply ap- preciative of the help all these people gave to ready the home for the residents. SOON TO BE GOBBLERS-- Brian Carson of Bradford and Heather Miller of N. Haverhill eagerly watch the baby turkeys at Agway of N. Haverhill store. It seems :i more people are buying young turkeys and eventually the dinner table. -kSeason progresses On school " (continued from page 5) worse than our pitching. It's safe on an error and all three Last' After the game, coach of the Olympians didn't have too much to say. "We were lucky to win this one today. We obviously are a better team than they are, but we certainly didn't show it today. Our pitching was lousy. It was good that their fielding was =: BAG SALE  : TOPSHAM-- A Bag Sale will ,. be held in Topsham on ..... Saturday, May 15 from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 a.m. to benefit the United Presbyterian Church. DERBY WINNER-- Robbie Maccini took first place in the recent Pinewood Derby. FOLLOWING THEIR INDUCTION-- The two ne boy scout recruits, Allbee and Hill, are learning the new Boy Scout salute from their fellow Troop 152 members. PINEWOOD DERBY-- Pack 152 Cub Scouts inspect their wooden ears prior to their Pinewood Derby held April 26 at the VFW Hall in N. Haverhill. the only way we could have won today." On the bright side, Oxbow did manage to swing for 14 hits, including four singles by Teeter, bringing her batting average to a very lofty 724 mark. Marsha Carbee, playing another strong game at third base had three hits, including a triple. Angle Dobbins., Kris Herman and Annette Brooks each collected two singles in the win. Oxbow 7--U-32 5 BRADFORD-- Oxbow's baseball team, sailing along with a five game winning streak nearly got more than they bargained for, just beating winless U-32, 7-5 on a late inning rally. With the win, Oxbow stands alone at 6-0 in Division V play. Coach Jim Kelley, having to shift his pitching rotation, went with senior Bruce Jacobs, and Jacobs responded with more than Kelley could have hoped for. It was Jacob's first outing in more than two years, having injury problems at the start of his high school career. Jacobs was shakey in the first couple of innings, allowing four unearned runs, but in the end, it was his pit- china down the stretch that won it for the Olympians. While Jacobs was keeping the Olympians in the game with his pitching, the home team chipped away at the early deficit. Single runs in the second and fourth cut the lead to 4-2. Two more runs in the fifth tied it for the Olympians. Huntington's single to left scored the tying run, and set the stage for the wining runs in the bottom of the sixth. Greg Garone started the inning off with a single, his second of the game. Dave Stever then walked, with Gary Hayward tearing the cover off the ball with a long triple to deep center field. Hayward was able to cross the plate moments later on a passed ball. Winning his first game in two years, Jacobs pitched well, striking out six, and allowing but six hits. "We needed a performance like that, commented coach Kelley. Bruce just hung in there and got tougher as the game went on. He kept us in the game until our hats started to do the job." Oxbow 12--Spauiding 1 MONTPELIER-- Oxbow's softball team won their seventh game in eight tries, downing highly regarded Spaulding 12-1 on the loser's field. Before the game, coach Paul Munn was worried about the game. "We've been playing poorly lately. Our pitching just hasn't been consistent. Our hitting has been fine, our fileidng super, but I'm not sre what's happening on the mound." Friday he didn't have to worry. Oxbow scored two, three, and seven* runs in the first three innings, to take any unnecessary pressure off the pitching corps of Janine Teeter and Rene Thurston. The first two Olympian hatters, Marsha Carbee and Angle Dobbins got on base via a single and walk. Both scampered home on starting pitcher Janine Teeter's double between the center and right fielder. In the second inning, Penny Cook walked, Doreen Smith singled, Marsha Carbee was crossed home plate on a single Blue Mtn. 4 by Dobbins and a sacrifice fly S. Royalton 8 by Teeter. Oxbow I0 Seven runs were accounted Thetford 15 for in the third inning on Lisbon7 singles by Tina Davidson, Littletoenl3 Wendy Cook, Angle Dobbins, . Oxbow 7 Kris Herman and a double by Blue Mtn. 2 Teeter, along with two walks and an error. From the fourth inning on, Oxbow had but one Softball (as of May baserunner, a single by Dobbins in the fifth inning. Oxbow Teeter, winning her sixth Thetford game of the year, allowed four Woodsville hits, walked five and struck Blue Mtn. out four batters. High School Sport's Records Baseball (as of May 7) WL Oxbow 6 I Thetford 4 2 Woodsville 3 I Blue Mtn. 3 2 Last Week's resultS Blue Mtn. 14 Thetford 12 S. Oxbow 24 Thetford 16 Littleton 8 Lisbon 11 Oxbow 12 Oxbow 12 Oxbow 15 MAJOR LEAGUE 1982 Connecticut Valley Little LeagUe Thursday, May 13 Topsham .................................. Bradford Green Hornets ....................... Newbury .................................. ..." •' East Corinth .................................... Monday, May 17 Thetford ............................. at Or ford ....................................... Bradford Green Hornets ..................... East Corinth .................................. Thursday, May 20 West Fairlee Bradford Blue Jays East Corinth .............................. Newbury ........................ at I Monday, May 24 Thetford ..... ' West Fairlee. Newbury ............................. Bradford Green Hornets ....................... Thursday, May 27 Or ford ..................................... Thetford ...................................... West Fairlee .................... at l Bradford Blue Jays ............................ Monday, May 31 Falrlee., Bradford Green Hornets Topsham West Falrlee ......................... at I MINOR LF00GUE 1982 Connecticut Valley Little LeIP e Friday, May 14 Thetford White .............................. a t Bradford Gray Newbury No. I ......................... Or ford ................................... Fairlee ................................... Tuesday, May 18 Bradford Yellow .......................... West Fairlee ................................ Newbury No.,2 ......................... Orford .................................... Thetford White .............................. at Friday, May 21 Newhury No. 1 .......................... Bradford Red ........................... West Fairlee Fairlee .................................. East Corinth Tuesday, May 25 Bradford Yellow Orford ................................. Thefferd Blue ............................ West Falrlee ............................. NeWbttry No. 1 " Friday, May 28 Newbury No. 1 .............................. Thetford Blue .......................... Bradford Gray ............. : .......... Fairlee ..................................... al East Corinth Page S-The Journal Opinion-May 12, 1982 Task force offers bike t by MARK WHEELER 00TAT[0N ? safet00 promotion kit CONCORD-- If you are a resources for films, pare- member of an organization phlets and materials that are looking for a community available to your group and a • a't'Wl111" project, the New Hampshire program planning guide. The Woodsville High School Band and Chorus is at New Castle, Me. for the second half of their exchange concert. Lincoln Academy is our host school and is providing host families. The concert will be Saturday night• We hope this will be as successful as the concert at Woodsville. Student Council The Student Council has recently installed a new Coke machine in order to raise money for future plans such as a i'ield and a trip. The council is also planning to send books to Africa. In order to do this we need clear plastic, and plastic feed sacks to wrap the books in• If you have any of these, please bring them to the office at Woodsville High School. The books will be sent to a secondary school in Zambia: The Council is also planning an end-of-the-year day trip to Old Orchard Beach. We in- vited the Honor Society to go with us as guests. The Student Council is also wishing to have a field day as we did last year. There were such events as a water slide, obstacle course, and a cookout. We are also giving an award for the person who contributed most to Woodsville High School by doing such things as going to games and volunteering for various activities. Administration The office requests that all groups or businesses who are planning to offer scholarships for students of the 1982 WHS graduating class, please contact the office as soon as possible. The programs for commencement exercises are being sent to the printers very soon. Honor Society The National Honor Society collected about $800 during the recent Citizens for Scholar- ships house-to-house canvass. The group would like to thank area businesses and residents for their support• The Society will hold its annual induction ceremonies next Thursday in the* Com- munity Building. The guest speaker will be Steve Savage, the Police Chief of Haverhill. Families and friends are cordially invited to attend. Editorial Our government is proposing new acts to keep "vital" information secret from the public. This would be an addition to the laws already standing on the protection of military documents, trade documents and criminal in- vestigation documents. To cover up any more, I think, is a crime against the freedom of America• One of our biggest freedoms is that of examining our government and looking at it in a truthful light. In this time when ignorance is the norm we should Pot be killing one of the resources that directly feeds this frdom. Not only is keeping secret the press will end up governmental information printing more bias than fact. free and open important to our We must keep the freedom; it also will insure the documents which portray our truthfulness of our press. The country open so that press is the main reader of ignorance will die and government documents and if freedom and truth will those documents are kept flourish. Bicycle Safety Task Force has a package of materials to help you promote bicycle safety, so says Gary Guzouskas, Chairman, New Hampshire Bicycle Safety Task Force. The package incdes educational materials for grades kindergarten through sixth grade, a listing of Planetarium Workshop On April 4, 1982, a planetarium workshop was held at Oxbow High School in Bradford for gifted and talented students of the Northern School District. The leader of the workshop was Oxbow Astronomy instructor, Tom EstiU. According to Estill, the purpose of the workshop was" • . . to teach the students the operation and maintenance of the planetarium so that they will be able to help teachers next year in setting up and operating the planetarium and in allowing them (the students) the opportunity to develop tbeir own planetarium shows with assistance from their teachers. The students who par- ticipated in the workshop are: Bob Thompson, Grog Haas, Justin Richards, from Bradford Elementary School; Alfred Sidney, James Ham- mond, from Oxbow High School; Danny Chamkulaw, Erik Benson, Jeffrey Brooks, from Newbury Elementary School; and from Union 36, Ditto Alden, Nicky D'Agotino, Jamie Chappella, Nathan Acker, and Rich Acker. FBLA Convention On Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, May 6, 7, and 8, some members of the Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) at Oxbow High School attended a state convention at Smuggler's Notch, in Stowe, Vt. The FBLA members competed, and took tests in the areas of accounting, shorthand, clerical duties, typing, and economics. The trip was paid for by money that was raised by the FBLA group. The FBLA sold Olympian owls and raffled off a digital clock-radio to raise funds. The Oxbow FBLA members traveled to Smuggler's Notch on a bus along with members of Thetford Academy FBLA. A Thetford bus left Oxbow at 6:15 a.m. on Thursday mor- ning and an Oxbow High School bus picked the students up at Smuggler's Notch on Saturday morning. Oxbow students who at- tended the convention were: Brenda Oliver, Tammy Sarazin, Lisa Farnham, Oxbw I Sdml Imdlml, VemeM ................. JUOY AUGUSTINE Staff ................... LISA FARNHAM MARISA FATHERLEY KATHERINE HARTLEY PETER HODG£ I.ILI[ KkSPRZ( TRA¢I OTTINA TOM K, kTHBUm4 BETHANNE WAIGHT IqmllmMmr ........... KRI$11N HERNLN Bethanne Wright, Kathy Colby, Annette Brooks, Gina Wheeler, Janice Emerson, and MaSherri Flye. Senior Acceptances As of May 1 the following students at Oxbow High School have been accepted to institutions of higher education. The students names are listed adjacent to the colleges and-or univer- sities to which they have been accepted• Karin Dwyer -- West Point, Cornell University. Barbara Carson -- Bates College. Leslie Kasprzak -- Syracuse University. Alan Jesseman -- Parson School of Design. Kris Herman -- Mount Holyoke, Tufts University. John Ertle -- Boston University. Ron Huntington -- Santa Fe. Louise Plante -- Boston University. Anne Ford -- Trinity College, Smith College. Howard Fenner -- Cham- plain College• Fred Allare -- St. Michaeis College, University of Ver- mont, University of Maine, Johnson State College. David Thurston -- New Hampshire Technical Institute. Mark Osgood -- Vermont Technical College. Richard Berkowski -- Vermont Technical College, Yvette Taylor -- New Hampshire Vocational- Technical College-Claremont. Alaln Lefebvre -- Lyndon State College. Kelley Blodgett -- Lyndon State College. Karen Welch -- New Hampshire Vocational- Technical College Berlin. John Grow -- Worchter Poly Technical College. The following student has been accepted into the Armed Forces and-or reserve. Physics Award Each year the American Association of Physics Teachers presents an award to the outstanding physics student. This year the award was given to senior Anna Novick. The award is based on academic performance, and physics teacher Greg Renner felt that Novick was deserving of the award. Novick will receive a certificate for her outstanding performance. The educational activities come in two packages, one for kindergarten through third grade and the 5thor for grades four through six. The ac- tivities can be done in five sessions of 20 minutes each or one session of one hour and forty minutes and are suitable for use by schools or com- munity groups. Around May I, the Task Force will make available the resource listing and educational materials to persons interested in starting local programs. If you are interested in receiving information, contact Gary Guzouskas, State Department of Education, 64 North Main Street, Concord, N.H. 03301. COMMUNITY HEALTH SERVICES E. CORINTH-- A Community Health Services Inc., Town Nurse will he at the E. Corinth Library on Wednesday, May 26 from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. The nurse will be checking hypertension, weight, and anemia. JOINING THE CUB SCOUTS-- Troopmaster George Kathter welcomes David Albee and Harry Hill to the Cub Pack. NEW SCOUTS-- Troopmaster George Karner of Troop 152 in Haverhill inducts David Allhee of N. Haverhill (left) and Harry Hill (right) into the Boy Robert Barkowski -- U.S. Scout troop. Navy (Reserve). t Group home read+" .for new residents I o BRADFORD---A group home Mental Heal(h Services ex- meals,- managing their own for adults who are mentally plained that the six residents affairs. ! retarded opened in Bradford will learn the basics of living The average stay of a on Feb. 24. Pete Trayers, on their own by doing it -- resident is one to two years, Residential Services Com'- caring for the home, cooking with three years being the dinator . at Orange County maximum. Live-in stafio-rn Diversified Oeeupatiou Class at Oxbow High 8ehoel worked six weeks ou the Orange County Mental Health group home. Asisting In the work were: (kneeling I-r) Joel Beckley, and Brett Sutherland. Standing (l-r) Lee Thurstun, Elbor Edsou, Bob Paten, Jerry Smith, Stuart Carkin, Dave Joelyn (instructor), and Connie PicknelL Orange County Mental Health Services, assist the people in the management of the household. The staff, Dave Himes, Group, Coordinator, Judy Claghorn and Joe Schroeder provide 24-hour-a- day coverage of the home. The house needed a great deal of work before the residents moved in. Several local people were in- strumental in getting the place ready. Ray Meerbergen of Bradford, helped supervise the work of the Diversified Occupation Class from Oxbow Vocational Center. They worked for six weeks sheetrocking, painting and wall papering. The DO students learn about all sorts of jobs in their class and their work on the house gave them a chance to perform actual tasks and to use precise measurements and mathematics. Most of all, they learned the importance of working as a crew. Asked about their work, the students first said "It was ftm,', and then added, "It felt good to see the work done". DO teacher Dave Jesling said the crew has received other requests for work since finishing the group home. Ray Meerbergon, who has been involved in community projects his entire life, has continued to help out around the group home. Carpenter, Ted Curto gave invaluable help, lending not only advice, but his tools as well, said a spokesman. An Open House is scheduled for early summer• A spokesman for OCMHS said ,that they were deeply ap- preciative of the help all these people gave to ready the home for the residents. SOON TO BE GOBBLERS-- Brian Carson of Bradford and Heather Miller of N. Haverhill eagerly watch the baby turkeys at Agway of N. Haverhill store. It seems :i more people are buying young turkeys and eventually the dinner table. -kSeason progresses On school " (continued from page 5) worse than our pitching. It's safe on an error and all three Last' After the game, coach of the Olympians didn't have too much to say. "We were lucky to win this one today. We obviously are a better team than they are, but we certainly didn't show it today. Our pitching was lousy. It was good that their fielding was =: BAG SALE  : TOPSHAM-- A Bag Sale will ,. be held in Topsham on ..... Saturday, May 15 from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 a.m. to benefit the United Presbyterian Church. DERBY WINNER-- Robbie Maccini took first place in the recent Pinewood Derby. FOLLOWING THEIR INDUCTION-- The two ne boy scout recruits, Allbee and Hill, are learning the new Boy Scout salute from their fellow Troop 152 members. PINEWOOD DERBY-- Pack 152 Cub Scouts inspect their wooden ears prior to their Pinewood Derby held April 26 at the VFW Hall in N. Haverhill. the only way we could have won today." On the bright side, Oxbow did manage to swing for 14 hits, including four singles by Teeter, bringing her batting average to a very lofty 724 mark. Marsha Carbee, playing another strong game at third base had three hits, including a triple. Angle Dobbins., Kris Herman and Annette Brooks each collected two singles in the win. Oxbow 7--U-32 5 BRADFORD-- Oxbow's baseball team, sailing along with a five game winning streak nearly got more than they bargained for, just beating winless U-32, 7-5 on a late inning rally. With the win, Oxbow stands alone at 6-0 in Division V play. Coach Jim Kelley, having to shift his pitching rotation, went with senior Bruce Jacobs, and Jacobs responded with more than Kelley could have hoped for. It was Jacob's first outing in more than two years, having injury problems at the start of his high school career. Jacobs was shakey in the first couple of innings, allowing four unearned runs, but in the end, it was his pit- china down the stretch that won it for the Olympians. While Jacobs was keeping the Olympians in the game with his pitching, the home team chipped away at the early deficit. Single runs in the second and fourth cut the lead to 4-2. Two more runs in the fifth tied it for the Olympians. Huntington's single to left scored the tying run, and set the stage for the wining runs in the bottom of the sixth. Greg Garone started the inning off with a single, his second of the game. Dave Stever then walked, with Gary Hayward tearing the cover off the ball with a long triple to deep center field. Hayward was able to cross the plate moments later on a passed ball. Winning his first game in two years, Jacobs pitched well, striking out six, and allowing but six hits. "We needed a performance like that, commented coach Kelley. Bruce just hung in there and got tougher as the game went on. He kept us in the game until our hats started to do the job." Oxbow 12--Spauiding 1 MONTPELIER-- Oxbow's softball team won their seventh game in eight tries, downing highly regarded Spaulding 12-1 on the loser's field. Before the game, coach Paul Munn was worried about the game. "We've been playing poorly lately. Our pitching just hasn't been consistent. Our hitting has been fine, our fileidng super, but I'm not sre what's happening on the mound." Friday he didn't have to worry. Oxbow scored two, three, and seven* runs in the first three innings, to take any unnecessary pressure off the pitching corps of Janine Teeter and Rene Thurston. The first two Olympian hatters, Marsha Carbee and Angle Dobbins got on base via a single and walk. Both scampered home on starting pitcher Janine Teeter's double between the center and right fielder. In the second inning, Penny Cook walked, Doreen Smith singled, Marsha Carbee was crossed home plate on a single Blue Mtn. 4 by Dobbins and a sacrifice fly S. Royalton 8 by Teeter. Oxbow I0 Seven runs were accounted Thetford 15 for in the third inning on Lisbon7 singles by Tina Davidson, Littletoenl3 Wendy Cook, Angle Dobbins, . Oxbow 7 Kris Herman and a double by Blue Mtn. 2 Teeter, along with two walks and an error. From the fourth inning on, Oxbow had but one Softball (as of May baserunner, a single by Dobbins in the fifth inning. Oxbow Teeter, winning her sixth Thetford game of the year, allowed four Woodsville hits, walked five and struck Blue Mtn. out four batters. High School Sport's Records Baseball (as of May 7) WL Oxbow 6 I Thetford 4 2 Woodsville 3 I Blue Mtn. 3 2 Last Week's resultS Blue Mtn. 14 Thetford 12 S. Oxbow 24 Thetford 16 Littleton 8 Lisbon 11 Oxbow 12 Oxbow 12 Oxbow 15 MAJOR LEAGUE 1982 Connecticut Valley Little LeagUe Thursday, May 13 Topsham .................................. Bradford Green Hornets ....................... Newbury .................................. ..." •' East Corinth .................................... Monday, May 17 Thetford ............................. at Or ford ....................................... Bradford Green Hornets ..................... East Corinth .................................. Thursday, May 20 West Fairlee Bradford Blue Jays East Corinth .............................. Newbury ........................ at I Monday, May 24 Thetford ..... ' West Fairlee. Newbury ............................. Bradford Green Hornets ....................... Thursday, May 27 Or ford ..................................... Thetford ...................................... West Fairlee .................... at l Bradford Blue Jays ............................ Monday, May 31 Falrlee., Bradford Green Hornets Topsham West Falrlee ......................... at I MINOR LF00GUE 1982 Connecticut Valley Little LeIP e Friday, May 14 Thetford White .............................. a t Bradford Gray Newbury No. I ......................... Or ford ................................... Fairlee ................................... Tuesday, May 18 Bradford Yellow .......................... West Fairlee ................................ Newbury No.,2 ......................... Orford .................................... Thetford White .............................. at Friday, May 21 Newhury No. 1 .......................... Bradford Red ........................... West Fairlee Fairlee .................................. East Corinth Tuesday, May 25 Bradford Yellow Orford ................................. Thefferd Blue ............................ West Falrlee ............................. NeWbttry No. 1 " Friday, May 28 Newbury No. 1 .............................. Thetford Blue .......................... Bradford Gray ............. : .......... Fairlee ..................................... al East Corinth