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Bradford , Vermont
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May 20, 1981     Journal Opinion
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May 20, 1981-The Journal Opinion-Page 3 ury School Design given first reading is recommended in the year. These be funded by nioved to write a village trustees in the village street aining lighted, for the gel) job done through the years in David Ames, attending Vt. Reach. ---On May 11, K through 6 conducting an excellent and Tech in electronics --Notices were sent home grades attended a per- solvent program The 35 students from the Christian School will not be eating hot lunch at the Town Hall in the 1981-82 school year. The school chooses not to benefit from any federal monies in order to be exempt technology. Joseph Moore requested the use of the school library for an SAT preparation course for high school juniors and seniors to be held July 21 through August 19. The re.quest was referred to the from federal regulations. At principal with the suggestion this time, the additional 35 of using the kindergarten head of lunches served bring ad- program, spoke ditional income without ad- of federal ditional labor costs. this program. In correspondence, the following students have made and held in application for a scholarship: expenditure in the Randall Wheeler, to attend Vt program, if Tech. in electrical engineering; Mark Holmes, cam- attending the Culinary for the fine Institute of America; and regarding the 1981 swim formance of "The Wizard of program at Hall's Lake Oz" at the Blue Mountain sponsored by the Newbury School. and Bradford recreation --Three teachers and the committees principal attended a "gifted --April 4, soccer began and talented" course at sponsored by the Newbury Oxbow High School. This was Athletic Council, coached by a condensed version of a ER byL.F. BARNES For the wee folk ling children making making a eating favorite for a day is in a good a kitchen band. for the kids: ages can take a bit of cotton procession. will be to band is mostly except for the which it ac- instruments of common in the kitchen with a dash of Y spoon tapped pot-lid makes a together make spoons tapped child's ver- checkers shaken in a glass or plastic covered refrigerator dish add variety. The in- vention is endless. Now we need something to suggest the fun of a parade-- how about bats? Any simple hat that the children can make will be fine. It could be paper bags of the proper size, colored and turned up at the edge. Or an 8 by I0 inch piece of paper pleated at one side to make a cone, with decorations colored or pasted on it You could tape on real or paper feathers. Tape yarn to both sides of the hat and tie under the child's chin, so he can move exuberantly about without losing the hat. When everyone has an in- strument and a hat, you're ready to form a marching band. Pick a leader. All the children, and any willing adults, will follow him in finest marching style about the yard. Sing any familiar tune room. Richard Minshull requested the month of July for "rest and schooling," suggesting one week paid and three weeks unpaid vacation. The request was tabled. The board held the second reading of the financial procedural policy regarding the budget clerk. The treasurer reported a balance of $11,501.39 as of May 4. The board signed the authorization to borrow. Principal Edward Arnold reported the following" Current enrollment is 128 children in grades K through 6. Kindergarten enrollment for 1981-82 was held May 7 with 18 children registering. --Trooper Atherton of the Vt. State Police spoke to grades four through six on drugs, and to grades one through six on child molestation. --The Moo'se Mountain Morris Team Dancers presented a program to the school, sponsored by Rivers Ex-Haverhill worker sues WOO D S VILLE--Selectmen Chairman Richard Kinder said Haverhill will be liable for back wages if a former road crew employee wins his lawsuit against the town. Kinder said the suit was filed by John Thornton against the town, contending he was discharged without cause. John Moon. Johnson State course. Many auction cho00es WELLS RIVER--As the final bid of $130 and a skinned antiques season progresses it gets harder and harder to decide which auction or show to go to on weekends. To the Bennington area for the auction of dealer Tim Stevenson's wares? To Lyme, N.H. for the Marjorie Barry show and sale? To Lebanon for the Roberts auction? We opted to stay home Saturday, May 16 and go to the Clement auction of Wells River dealer Harley Kaiser's antiques. The old town hall here was packed with an- tiques, collectibles and other odds and ends. There were a few early country pieces -- just enough to draw some area dealers. And there was enough oak, too. This was not a well attended auction. Too many conflicting events? Perhaps. Never- theless the early pieces still brought strong final bids. A dry sink was knocked down for a high $330, while a pie safe with screened doors and side panels went to an area dealer for $280. A country dropleaf in red paint drew a but labeled pine washstand (a New Hampshire piece) c 1830- 40 brought $45. In oak, a pressback rocker brought $45, while a late oak armchair made $22.50. Another pressback rocker was sold for $'90, and a number of oak chests with mirrors sold for $75-$160 An oak serpentine chiffonier made $190. A sewing basket brought $38; refinished pine cottage chest $85; hitch weight, $7; four-poster quilt, $110; salmon-green patch quilt, $60; hat rack with bevelled glass mirror, $50; sewing basket with three bobbins, $15; wicker rocker (no arms), $45; 1930s mahogany bookcase with claw feet, $170; late shelf clock, $20 (no back); wicker plant stand (missing liner) $30; Victorian roughcut cottage stool, $30; spool towel rack, $30; Mission oak desk, $85; plankbottom chair with shaped seat and well turned legs, $32.50; Seth Thomas mantel clock, $37.50 and an oak dropleaf table, $22.50. OESU approves partial budget BRADFORD--The board of assessments from the school the Orange East Supervisory districts it serves--Thetford, Union (OESU) has approved a Vershire, W. Fairlee, Union 36 together Small as blocks or Wilson, New Hamp- of Historic Will be the (it could be Yankee Doodle); The town would also he and accompany it with the liable to pay unemployment partial budgetof$118,785.65. "music" from your now- :compensation to the state if The amount represents 18 famous Kitchen Band. Have Thernton wins the suit, Kinder per cent of OESU's budget that comes from regular fun ! said. director to speak in Haverhill speaker at a meeting of the of long-range planning for the renovation of the Ladd Street Haverhill Historical Society May 27 The Society is in the process Point of View on the Farm by FRA  HYDE be careful what they say in print. .said ,,.. the corn planter will be going here at is in print." It didn't work out that way. soil tulte rapidly, but the down- the earlier showers made the for planting on Wednesday. I went with Arthur down onto get a long hydraulic bose off the plow to have I seen so many nightcrawlers Though we're not fishermen, the made us feel we should somehow make (I once accompanied a friend to the golf up nightcrawlers by flashlight and thought than the fishing!) Grabbing a pan from had more crawlers than an avid fisherman time at the farm on the Lower Plain, I and returned it to the plow. When I all around and the only crawlers to i ones that had been run over in the road. of the night before forced them out and then when the ground dried sufficiently back in? Seeing so many worms on the top of believe statistics telling us how many and enriching a cubic foot of soil. "The Hoard's Dairyman" nearly 19 with a series of letters to the what could women wear to do farm work some wore their husband's cast- seemed to deal with where ;lathing of their own. pretty trivial stuff for .. after all, didn't they know one could m women's styles and sizes, hadn't they , Ward catalog? of those letters, but the other morning m a different fashion. ("Fashion" may be Word here!) As I looked at the collection of to go out in the uncertain weather, I jersey I wore a shrunken wool to son Bruce, and on top of that was .. and the blue jeans, were those passed them on to me? One ne of those long ago letters t I've written of new lambs, a foal and This week I'm happy to an- 12 of Aaron Paul to Chan and Debbie him to the life on our farm. CLEA R 14 VtAtS 0r IxPmmCi QII J  1-603-4411-3787 [AC, S &SUPPLIES. Auto 00les, iNC.". Main Street arre, Vermont 181 ermont D Schoolhouse in Haverhill Corner. The group acquired the historic building as a gift in 1980 from the Pythian Sisters and the Knights of Pythias. After having served as a school since its building in 1849, the building was used as the Knights of Pythias Hall since the 1920s. Ms. Wilson will focus her talk on funding. There will be a slide presentation showing what other communities in New Hampshire have ac- complished in preserving valuable historic buildings. Dr Edwin Blaisdell is chairman of the renovation committee. Questions and suggestions are welcome from area residents and may be directed to him at 787-6315 or to Society President Nancy Pompian at 989-5815. The meeting will he held at the Parish House in Haverhill Corner at 7:30 p.m. and the public is cordially invited. Newbury p:T. O. elects officers NEWBURY--Election of officers was held at last months Parent-Teachers Organization meeting. Florence Welch was elected president. Reelected vice president was Susan Spooncr. Marilyn Emerson was elected secretary and Jackie Bailey was reelected treasurer. A record hop for Newbury Elementary Children is planned for May 22. Newbury P.T.O. in con- junction with the Newbury Elementary School is now presenting good citizenship awards to Newbury Elementary students Those receiving Newbury's first good citizenship awards for the month of April from P.T.O. President Florence Welch were: 1st Grade-- Sam Haviland 2nd Grade -- Carol Emerson. 3rd Grade -- Martine Malanchuck. 4th Grade -- Steven Wilds. Grange news THETFORD--The regular meeting of Eclipse Grange was held on May 12 with W.M. Jane Stowell in the chair. Even though the weather was terrible, there was a very good attendance. An application was read, and turned over to a com- mittee. Balloting was done on one candidate, then the first and second degree's were done. There was a special meeting on May 19 to do the first and second degree's on two other candidates. This will enable them to take the third and fourth degree's on May 26, which is inspection night. The Worthy Master hopes that all officers will he present for inspection. Donations were made to the Vermont Achievement Center, The State Grange Center, and the State Grange Youth Leadership Fund. The Literary program was in charge of the Agriculture Comm. Chairman Dot Ehrlich. She had Mr. Jaccaci for guest speaker. He showed a film that was taken in southern New Hampshire, shewing the farm problems there, and how industry and developers are crowding out the small farmer. And this holds true in Vermont as well. It is something for everyone to think seriously about. Orange County Pomona will have inspection rehearsal on May 17 at Eclipse, at 7: 30 p.m. And May 18 at 8:15 p.m. will be inspection. serving Corinth and Topsham, and Oxbow High School serving Bradford-Newbury. John Fontana, who was reelected to his seventh term as superintendent, said the outlook for the rest of OESU's budget from federal and state sources "doesn't look good." These funds are for special education, compensatory education and similar programs which depend on legislative action which may not be completed until late this year. Rufus F. Amley of Newbury was reelected to his fourth term as assistant superin- tendent, Delores Drugach of Newbury was elected chairman, Judith Barton of Bradford was elected clerk and Daniel Perry of Bradford was elected vice chairman. The board rejected a request for a $6,000 microcomputer to facilitate administrative bookkeeping. 5th Grade -- Eric Benson. 6th Grade -- Kelly Hobbs. Awards will be presented on the first of each month for the previous month. Pictures were also taken by P.T.O. Secretary Marilyn Celebration of Ma00e Encounter RANDOLPH CENTER-- AI and Barbara Regaier and Father Des Colloran, the United States executive team of Worldwide Marriage Encounter, will he guests of the Vermont Marriage Encounter community May 23 at Vermont Technical College in Randolph Center. All couples who have made Emerson for use on the school a marriage encounter bulletin board, weekend are invited to bring Innocent plea made in murder N. HAVERHILL,--Stephen J. Sadvari has entered a plea of innocent to a first degree murder charge in the Feb. 26 stabbing of Patricia Keefe in Wentworth Feb. 26 The 31-year-old Dorchester handyman is being held without hail in Grafton County Jail. He also entered an innocent plea to charges of taking $5,000 worth of property from the residence of Robert Duncan, where the body of the 31-year-old Keefe was found. Sadvari is represented by court-appointed attorneys J. Peter Cyr and John Rolli. Furniture Reupholstering Earl Southworth Box 153 Fairlee, Vt. 05045 802-333-4677 their families and share in the day's festivities. The celebration will begin with a presentation at 10 a.m. and end with mass at 2 p.m. Special events have been planned for the children. Pack a picnic lunch. For further information, contact Frank and Judy Adamske in Colchester at 878- 8002. 'WELL DRILLING ROTARY HAMMER DRILLING. 20 YEARS DRILLING EXPERIENCE C.OMPLE TE WP, TER SYST[/S INSTALLED FOR FREE ESTIMATE CALL OR WRITE The E. BENEDINI Webster Library I has large print WENTWORTH--The Webster IVlemoral Library has large- print copies of Reader's Social ) Digest and of the condensed " books. In addition, it is Laura Jean Farnsarth possible to obtain applications for free library service for engaged to Michael Nadeau individuals from Mrs Brown, librarian. FAIRLEE--Mr. and Mrs. School in 1980, and is em- These are furnished for the Douglas Farnsworth an- played by A. and D Pease blind and physically ban-nounce the engagement of Grain Co. of Burlington. Mr. dicapped by National Library their daughter, Laurie Jean, Nadeau graduated from Service, Washington, D.C. to Michael D. Nadeau, son of Oxbow High School in By taw, preference in the Mr. and Mrs Benoit Nadeau Bradford in 1979 and is a lending of books and equip- of Fairlee. student at St. Michael's merit is given to honorably Miss Farnsworth graduated College in Winooski. discharged armed force from Champlain Valley High veterans. People who are blind or have a visual or physical handicap, a reading disability or hearing loss can he eligible for this service. Among the items that can be borrowed are talking books on HAPPY FIRSTI--Michael discs or cassettes and a John Dunn of Woodsville cassette plaque, braille books, celebrated his first bir- headphones and pillow thday May 8. phones. Reading interests provided for are varied among them LICENSES REVOKED being mysteries, foreign CONCORD--Thomas A. language books, Western, Power, New Hampshire Bible and religion, westerns, director of motor vehicles, has current novels. announced the revocation of New books at the library the drivers licenses of Dana R. are: "Masquerade" by Aulis, 18, and Douglas R. Williams; Fire Starter, King's Lackey, 49, both of Lyme, for "Brain," Cook; "Why Joy," driving while intoxicated. Jennings; Lucy by Johanson. Variety Store Main St. Newbury, Vt. NEW HOURS: Starting Tuesday, May 19, 1981 Tuesday. Fdday 2:00pm - 8:00pm Saturday - 10:00 to 5:00pm NEW ITEMS COMING EVERY DAY!! Sharyn Ober to be AFS ' student in Columbia BRADFORD--The Oxbow her accomplishments since chapter of the American Field then have been an honor Service has announced the student at Oxbow, placement of Sharyn Ober, dance at Johnson State senior at Oxbow High School, College, playing Adelaide in in Calf, Colombia, South Oxbow's production of "Guys America. and Dolls", and working at the ! Colatina Exit to earn for college. Upon returniv Sharyn wiU be going to college in January. A requirement of all AFS students is to give a slide show of one's hometown and family. Because of the short time left before departure, Sharyn would appreciate donations of slides of the Bradford area. NEW ARRIVAL Mr. and Mrs. Jefferey J. Lyman of N. Haverhill are parents of a baby daughter, born May 11 at Gifford Memorial Hospital. The Evangelical Free Church believes: "In the bodily resurrection of the dead; of the believer to everlasting blessed- ness and joy with the Lord, of the unbeliever to judgment and everlasting conscious punishment." ' Preparation for a future life begins by an acceptance of Jesus Christ as personal Savior. YOU can hear more about ]esus Christ at: 1 Bradford Evangelical Free Ckurck " Ii % orlli I) .er ice I 1:00 I(OL"I'E 5 Sunday School 9:45 / " i,OWEI{ PI,AIN " " J Bill %%'ick, M. I)iv., Pastor /,tara' Ill . ..... 4 Sharyn Ober. Sharyn, the daughter of Hugh and Kathryn Ober, will fly from Miami, Fla., June 18 and will return in September. She will be staying with the Roherto Senjnaui family in Calf, one of Colombia's major cities located on the western coast in the Andes Mountains. The Obers have been active in AFS since its start in Bradford in 1977. Hugh and Kathryn are officers in the adult chapter. In 1978, Micheile, another daughter, spent one year in Illerkir- chberg, Germany in the German Alps. Michelle spoke no German at the time, but learned the language out of necessity. Because of this exposure she is now a language major at the University of New Mexico, scored the highest in a national German proficiency test and has won a scholarship to a German language camp for this summer. Her ambition is to be a translator at the American Embassy in Ger- many. As a junior, Sharyn was a six-month exchange student to Utica, Minn., in 1979. Some of G-3TX Series An extra large, deluxetwin burner gas grill that offers new advances in outdoor cooking control and versatility GIANT COOKING SURFACE Finest Outdoor Gas Grills on the Market ISB ..... F. McALLIsTER quality Jewelm W00dlle, N.H. 747-3482 WHY SETTLE FOR ANYTHING LESS THAN THE BEST BRADFORD OIL CO. Inc, Junction 6 & 25 Bradford, VL Call 802-222-5251 Or 603-787-6391 [ IIIIIII [I II II ............. IiI ...... I I - May 20, 1981-The Journal Opinion-Page 3 ury School Design given first reading is recommended in the year. These be funded by nioved to write a village trustees in the village street aining lighted, for the gel) job done through the years in David Ames, attending Vt. Reach. ---On May 11, K through 6 conducting an excellent and Tech in electronics --Notices were sent home grades attended a per- solvent program The 35 students from the Christian School will not be eating hot lunch at the Town Hall in the 1981-82 school year. The school chooses not to benefit from any federal monies in order to be exempt technology. Joseph Moore requested the use of the school library for an SAT preparation course for high school juniors and seniors to be held July 21 through August 19. The re.quest was referred to the from federal regulations. At principal with the suggestion this time, the additional 35 of using the kindergarten head of lunches served bring ad- program, spoke ditional income without ad- of federal ditional labor costs. this program. In correspondence, the following students have made and held in application for a scholarship: expenditure in the Randall Wheeler, to attend Vt program, if Tech. in electrical engineering; Mark Holmes, cam- attending the Culinary for the fine Institute of America; and regarding the 1981 swim formance of "The Wizard of program at Hall's Lake Oz" at the Blue Mountain sponsored by the Newbury School. and Bradford recreation --Three teachers and the committees principal attended a "gifted --April 4, soccer began and talented" course at sponsored by the Newbury Oxbow High School. This was Athletic Council, coached by a condensed version of a ER byL.F. BARNES For the wee folk ling children making making a eating favorite for a day is in a good a kitchen band. for the kids: ages can take a bit of cotton procession. will be to band is mostly except for the which it ac- instruments of common in the kitchen with a dash of Y spoon tapped pot-lid makes a together make spoons tapped child's ver- checkers shaken in a glass or plastic covered refrigerator dish add variety. The in- vention is endless. Now we need something to suggest the fun of a parade-- how about bats? Any simple hat that the children can make will be fine. It could be paper bags of the proper size, colored and turned up at the edge. Or an 8 by I0 inch piece of paper pleated at one side to make a cone, with decorations colored or pasted on it You could tape on real or paper feathers. Tape yarn to both sides of the hat and tie under the child's chin, so he can move exuberantly about without losing the hat. When everyone has an in- strument and a hat, you're ready to form a marching band. Pick a leader. All the children, and any willing adults, will follow him in finest marching style about the yard. Sing any familiar tune room. Richard Minshull requested the month of July for "rest and schooling," suggesting one week paid and three weeks unpaid vacation. The request was tabled. The board held the second reading of the financial procedural policy regarding the budget clerk. The treasurer reported a balance of $11,501.39 as of May 4. The board signed the authorization to borrow. Principal Edward Arnold reported the following" Current enrollment is 128 children in grades K through 6. Kindergarten enrollment for 1981-82 was held May 7 with 18 children registering. --Trooper Atherton of the Vt. State Police spoke to grades four through six on drugs, and to grades one through six on child molestation. --The Moo'se Mountain Morris Team Dancers presented a program to the school, sponsored by Rivers Ex-Haverhill worker sues WOO D S VILLE--Selectmen Chairman Richard Kinder said Haverhill will be liable for back wages if a former road crew employee wins his lawsuit against the town. Kinder said the suit was filed by John Thornton against the town, contending he was discharged without cause. John Moon. Johnson State course. Many auction cho00es WELLS RIVER--As the final bid of $130 and a skinned antiques season progresses it gets harder and harder to decide which auction or show to go to on weekends. To the Bennington area for the auction of dealer Tim Stevenson's wares? To Lyme, N.H. for the Marjorie Barry show and sale? To Lebanon for the Roberts auction? We opted to stay home Saturday, May 16 and go to the Clement auction of Wells River dealer Harley Kaiser's antiques. The old town hall here was packed with an- tiques, collectibles and other odds and ends. There were a few early country pieces -- just enough to draw some area dealers. And there was enough oak, too. This was not a well attended auction. Too many conflicting events? Perhaps. Never- theless the early pieces still brought strong final bids. A dry sink was knocked down for a high $330, while a pie safe with screened doors and side panels went to an area dealer for $280. A country dropleaf in red paint drew a but labeled pine washstand (a New Hampshire piece) c 1830- 40 brought $45. In oak, a pressback rocker brought $45, while a late oak armchair made $22.50. Another pressback rocker was sold for $'90, and a number of oak chests with mirrors sold for $75-$160 An oak serpentine chiffonier made $190. A sewing basket brought $38; refinished pine cottage chest $85; hitch weight, $7; four-poster quilt, $110; salmon-green patch quilt, $60; hat rack with bevelled glass mirror, $50; sewing basket with three bobbins, $15; wicker rocker (no arms), $45; 1930s mahogany bookcase with claw feet, $170; late shelf clock, $20 (no back); wicker plant stand (missing liner) $30; Victorian roughcut cottage stool, $30; spool towel rack, $30; Mission oak desk, $85; plankbottom chair with shaped seat and well turned legs, $32.50; Seth Thomas mantel clock, $37.50 and an oak dropleaf table, $22.50. OESU approves partial budget BRADFORD--The board of assessments from the school the Orange East Supervisory districts it serves--Thetford, Union (OESU) has approved a Vershire, W. Fairlee, Union 36 together Small as blocks or Wilson, New Hamp- of Historic Will be the (it could be Yankee Doodle); The town would also he and accompany it with the liable to pay unemployment partial budgetof$118,785.65. "music" from your now- :compensation to the state if The amount represents 18 famous Kitchen Band. Have Thernton wins the suit, Kinder per cent of OESU's budget that comes from regular fun ! said. director to speak in Haverhill speaker at a meeting of the of long-range planning for the renovation of the Ladd Street Haverhill Historical Society May 27 The Society is in the process Point of View on the Farm by FRA  HYDE be careful what they say in print. .said ,,.. the corn planter will be going here at is in print." It didn't work out that way. soil tulte rapidly, but the down- the earlier showers made the for planting on Wednesday. I went with Arthur down onto get a long hydraulic bose off the plow to have I seen so many nightcrawlers Though we're not fishermen, the made us feel we should somehow make (I once accompanied a friend to the golf up nightcrawlers by flashlight and thought than the fishing!) Grabbing a pan from had more crawlers than an avid fisherman time at the farm on the Lower Plain, I and returned it to the plow. When I all around and the only crawlers to i ones that had been run over in the road. of the night before forced them out and then when the ground dried sufficiently back in? Seeing so many worms on the top of believe statistics telling us how many and enriching a cubic foot of soil. "The Hoard's Dairyman" nearly 19 with a series of letters to the what could women wear to do farm work some wore their husband's cast- seemed to deal with where ;lathing of their own. pretty trivial stuff for .. after all, didn't they know one could m women's styles and sizes, hadn't they , Ward catalog? of those letters, but the other morning m a different fashion. ("Fashion" may be Word here!) As I looked at the collection of to go out in the uncertain weather, I jersey I wore a shrunken wool to son Bruce, and on top of that was .. and the blue jeans, were those passed them on to me? One ne of those long ago letters t I've written of new lambs, a foal and This week I'm happy to an- 12 of Aaron Paul to Chan and Debbie him to the life on our farm. CLEA R 14 VtAtS 0r IxPmmCi QII J  1-603-4411-3787 [AC, S &SUPPLIES. Auto 00les, iNC.". Main Street arre, Vermont 181 ermont D Schoolhouse in Haverhill Corner. The group acquired the historic building as a gift in 1980 from the Pythian Sisters and the Knights of Pythias. After having served as a school since its building in 1849, the building was used as the Knights of Pythias Hall since the 1920s. Ms. Wilson will focus her talk on funding. There will be a slide presentation showing what other communities in New Hampshire have ac- complished in preserving valuable historic buildings. Dr Edwin Blaisdell is chairman of the renovation committee. Questions and suggestions are welcome from area residents and may be directed to him at 787-6315 or to Society President Nancy Pompian at 989-5815. The meeting will he held at the Parish House in Haverhill Corner at 7:30 p.m. and the public is cordially invited. Newbury p:T. O. elects officers NEWBURY--Election of officers was held at last months Parent-Teachers Organization meeting. Florence Welch was elected president. Reelected vice president was Susan Spooncr. Marilyn Emerson was elected secretary and Jackie Bailey was reelected treasurer. A record hop for Newbury Elementary Children is planned for May 22. Newbury P.T.O. in con- junction with the Newbury Elementary School is now presenting good citizenship awards to Newbury Elementary students Those receiving Newbury's first good citizenship awards for the month of April from P.T.O. President Florence Welch were: 1st Grade-- Sam Haviland 2nd Grade -- Carol Emerson. 3rd Grade -- Martine Malanchuck. 4th Grade -- Steven Wilds. Grange news THETFORD--The regular meeting of Eclipse Grange was held on May 12 with W.M. Jane Stowell in the chair. Even though the weather was terrible, there was a very good attendance. An application was read, and turned over to a com- mittee. Balloting was done on one candidate, then the first and second degree's were done. There was a special meeting on May 19 to do the first and second degree's on two other candidates. This will enable them to take the third and fourth degree's on May 26, which is inspection night. The Worthy Master hopes that all officers will he present for inspection. Donations were made to the Vermont Achievement Center, The State Grange Center, and the State Grange Youth Leadership Fund. The Literary program was in charge of the Agriculture Comm. Chairman Dot Ehrlich. She had Mr. Jaccaci for guest speaker. He showed a film that was taken in southern New Hampshire, shewing the farm problems there, and how industry and developers are crowding out the small farmer. And this holds true in Vermont as well. It is something for everyone to think seriously about. Orange County Pomona will have inspection rehearsal on May 17 at Eclipse, at 7: 30 p.m. And May 18 at 8:15 p.m. will be inspection. serving Corinth and Topsham, and Oxbow High School serving Bradford-Newbury. John Fontana, who was reelected to his seventh term as superintendent, said the outlook for the rest of OESU's budget from federal and state sources "doesn't look good." These funds are for special education, compensatory education and similar programs which depend on legislative action which may not be completed until late this year. Rufus F. Amley of Newbury was reelected to his fourth term as assistant superin- tendent, Delores Drugach of Newbury was elected chairman, Judith Barton of Bradford was elected clerk and Daniel Perry of Bradford was elected vice chairman. The board rejected a request for a $6,000 microcomputer to facilitate administrative bookkeeping. 5th Grade -- Eric Benson. 6th Grade -- Kelly Hobbs. Awards will be presented on the first of each month for the previous month. Pictures were also taken by P.T.O. Secretary Marilyn Celebration of Ma00e Encounter RANDOLPH CENTER-- AI and Barbara Regaier and Father Des Colloran, the United States executive team of Worldwide Marriage Encounter, will he guests of the Vermont Marriage Encounter community May 23 at Vermont Technical College in Randolph Center. All couples who have made Emerson for use on the school a marriage encounter bulletin board, weekend are invited to bring Innocent plea made in murder N. HAVERHILL,--Stephen J. Sadvari has entered a plea of innocent to a first degree murder charge in the Feb. 26 stabbing of Patricia Keefe in Wentworth Feb. 26 The 31-year-old Dorchester handyman is being held without hail in Grafton County Jail. He also entered an innocent plea to charges of taking $5,000 worth of property from the residence of Robert Duncan, where the body of the 31-year-old Keefe was found. Sadvari is represented by court-appointed attorneys J. Peter Cyr and John Rolli. Furniture Reupholstering Earl Southworth Box 153 Fairlee, Vt. 05045 802-333-4677 their families and share in the day's festivities. The celebration will begin with a presentation at 10 a.m. and end with mass at 2 p.m. Special events have been planned for the children. Pack a picnic lunch. For further information, contact Frank and Judy Adamske in Colchester at 878- 8002. 'WELL DRILLING ROTARY HAMMER DRILLING. 20 YEARS DRILLING EXPERIENCE C.OMPLE TE WP, TER SYST[/S INSTALLED FOR FREE ESTIMATE CALL OR WRITE The E. BENEDINI Webster Library I has large print WENTWORTH--The Webster IVlemoral Library has large- print copies of Reader's Social ) Digest and of the condensed " books. In addition, it is Laura Jean Farnsarth possible to obtain applications for free library service for engaged to Michael Nadeau individuals from Mrs Brown, librarian. FAIRLEE--Mr. and Mrs. School in 1980, and is em- These are furnished for the Douglas Farnsworth an- played by A. and D Pease blind and physically ban-nounce the engagement of Grain Co. of Burlington. Mr. dicapped by National Library their daughter, Laurie Jean, Nadeau graduated from Service, Washington, D.C. to Michael D. Nadeau, son of Oxbow High School in By taw, preference in the Mr. and Mrs Benoit Nadeau Bradford in 1979 and is a lending of books and equip- of Fairlee. student at St. Michael's merit is given to honorably Miss Farnsworth graduated College in Winooski. discharged armed force from Champlain Valley High veterans. People who are blind or have a visual or physical handicap, a reading disability or hearing loss can he eligible for this service. Among the items that can be borrowed are talking books on HAPPY FIRSTI--Michael discs or cassettes and a John Dunn of Woodsville cassette plaque, braille books, celebrated his first bir- headphones and pillow thday May 8. phones. Reading interests provided for are varied among them LICENSES REVOKED being mysteries, foreign CONCORD--Thomas A. language books, Western, Power, New Hampshire Bible and religion, westerns, director of motor vehicles, has current novels. announced the revocation of New books at the library the drivers licenses of Dana R. are: "Masquerade" by Aulis, 18, and Douglas R. Williams; Fire Starter, King's Lackey, 49, both of Lyme, for "Brain," Cook; "Why Joy," driving while intoxicated. Jennings; Lucy by Johanson. Variety Store Main St. Newbury, Vt. NEW HOURS: Starting Tuesday, May 19, 1981 Tuesday. Fdday 2:00pm - 8:00pm Saturday - 10:00 to 5:00pm NEW ITEMS COMING EVERY DAY!! Sharyn Ober to be AFS ' student in Columbia BRADFORD--The Oxbow her accomplishments since chapter of the American Field then have been an honor Service has announced the student at Oxbow, placement of Sharyn Ober, dance at Johnson State senior at Oxbow High School, College, playing Adelaide in in Calf, Colombia, South Oxbow's production of "Guys America. and Dolls", and working at the ! Colatina Exit to earn for college. Upon returniv Sharyn wiU be going to college in January. A requirement of all AFS students is to give a slide show of one's hometown and family. Because of the short time left before departure, Sharyn would appreciate donations of slides of the Bradford area. NEW ARRIVAL Mr. and Mrs. Jefferey J. Lyman of N. Haverhill are parents of a baby daughter, born May 11 at Gifford Memorial Hospital. The Evangelical Free Church believes: "In the bodily resurrection of the dead; of the believer to everlasting blessed- ness and joy with the Lord, of the unbeliever to judgment and everlasting conscious punishment." ' Preparation for a future life begins by an acceptance of Jesus Christ as personal Savior. YOU can hear more about ]esus Christ at: 1 Bradford Evangelical Free Ckurck " Ii % orlli I) .er ice I 1:00 I(OL"I'E 5 Sunday School 9:45 / " i,OWEI{ PI,AIN " " J Bill %%'ick, M. I)iv., Pastor /,tara' Ill . ..... 4 Sharyn Ober. Sharyn, the daughter of Hugh and Kathryn Ober, will fly from Miami, Fla., June 18 and will return in September. She will be staying with the Roherto Senjnaui family in Calf, one of Colombia's major cities located on the western coast in the Andes Mountains. The Obers have been active in AFS since its start in Bradford in 1977. Hugh and Kathryn are officers in the adult chapter. In 1978, Micheile, another daughter, spent one year in Illerkir- chberg, Germany in the German Alps. Michelle spoke no German at the time, but learned the language out of necessity. Because of this exposure she is now a language major at the University of New Mexico, scored the highest in a national German proficiency test and has won a scholarship to a German language camp for this summer. Her ambition is to be a translator at the American Embassy in Ger- many. As a junior, Sharyn was a six-month exchange student to Utica, Minn., in 1979. Some of G-3TX Series An extra large, deluxetwin burner gas grill that offers new advances in outdoor cooking control and versatility GIANT COOKING SURFACE Finest Outdoor Gas Grills on the Market ISB ..... F. McALLIsTER quality Jewelm W00dlle, N.H. 747-3482 WHY SETTLE FOR ANYTHING LESS THAN THE BEST BRADFORD OIL CO. Inc, Junction 6 & 25 Bradford, VL Call 802-222-5251 Or 603-787-6391 [ IIIIIII [I II II ............. IiI ...... I I -