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May 20, 1981     Journal Opinion
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Page 4-The Journal Opinion-May 20, 1981 iiiiii , ,,,, , m , i THEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. Publisher of r Jwamal iOpini°n t $02-222-5281 %,  603-747-2016 v, pJ An Independent Newspaper I I Editorial J Legislative morality Every once in a while when abuses "I don't think it's morally right for of taxpayers' money is the topic you them to accept something they didn't hpr the one about the fellow who earn, but we can't enforce moral 00Letters to the Editor00 Foster Children Week To the Editor: It is ironical that Action for Foster Children Week (May 16 to May 24) traditionally falls between Mother's Day and Father's Day. Perhaps the juxtaposition of these events can serve to heighten our awareness of the needs of youngsters ,separated from their own families. There are many factors in our society that contribute to the physical and emotional problems which ultimately cause a child to be parted from his parents• We may not be able to solve these problems, but we do need to be working cooperatively to try to find solutions, and we do need to be able to offer all children stability and a caring home environment. A child whose emotional and physical needs are not met today has little chance of developing into tomorrow's responsible adult, let alone parent. Foster Care, nationwide, has been in the news with some well deserved criticisms. We all wish there was no need for foster care, ' but the reality is that there is a need. The Upper Valley Youth Services' answer to the criticisms is to work towards improving the quality of foster care by training prospective foster parents, offering 24 hour professional support to lowering the caseload of our social workers, and by working continually With natural parents. Upper Valley Youth Ser- vices is one of several com- munity-based agencies in this rural area which delivers service through the region's greatest resource--its people• The UVYS foster care net- work, the Opportunity Cen- ter's network of family day care providers, and the Children At Risk Program's network of parent aids for families of abused and neglected children all provide support and training to these informal community helpers. Our communities have benefitted from the increased skills and service resources of our neighbors to whom we have turned for help. We urge all citizens to volunteer their energies and talents to support the work of our social services agencies, public and private, and our dedicated foster parents. Let us work cooperatively with them to bring about better services for our foster children. Joanne H. Foulk Foster Care Coordinator Philip W. Bosh Associate Director Upper Valley Youth Services Hell on Wheels reunion To the Editor: For more than twenty seven years we have been trying to contact Veterans of the 2nd. Armored "Hell on Wheels" Division for our reunion each year, and each year we locate a few through "Letters to The Editor," etc. There are still many "Hell on Wheels" Vets who know nothing of our association and again we need your help, please. Our World War II Roster has been lost and we would like to tell them of our reunion which will be July 29 - August I, 1981, at Stouffirs Valley Forge Inn, King of Prussia, Pa• "Hell on Wheels" Vets may write to Russel S. Laminsin, President of 2nd. Armd. Div. Assn., 316 Bridge Street, Spring City, Pa., for in- formation• Thank you. Gabs Struggles Box 293 Waldron, AR 72958 OVEREATERS TO MEET BRADFORD--A meeting of Overeaters Anonymous is scheduled May 21 at 8 p.m• at Orange County Mental Health. Vermont Secretary of State James H. Douglas Town h'fe can proceed Now that the Governor has signed H.493 into law, all Vermonters can breathe a collective sigh of relief. Our justices of the peace, and all the acts they have done since February I, have now been validated by law, and town life can proceed nor- mally, as if no problem ever arose. If that sounds a little dramatic, just consider what would have happened if H•493 had never been adopted. All marriages, all tax appeals, all checklist revisions, and consequently all 1981 Vermont Town Meetings, would have been left in a gray area of uncertainty. All acts of Vermont justices of the peace, including their work on hoards of civil authority, between February I, 1981, and January 31, 1983, might well have been invalid, and without effect, because of a simple oversight during the election law reform process of 1980. By that oversight, many of Vermont's justices of the peace may have been automatically removed from office sometime after February I, 1981, because they failed to file a copy of their oath of office with the county clerk. Justices in Vermont are permitted to perform marriages, acknowledge oaths, and they usually constitute a majority of the board of civil authority. Most of their former judicial responsibilities were removed by an act of the General Assembly in 1974, but they still perform a vital service to their communities by supervising elections and performing other duties. The act that saves them from dispossession of office February 1, 1981, and certainties about actions moot justices after that they have taken an oral before acting as justices. extension of time for not filed a certified copy the county clerk, until July 1, The act also validates elec that elected too November, 1980. nin counties mistakenly preliminary census count constitutional maximum of ) elected• The Attorney ruled that, be used, a number not March of 1981. The act validates leaving things as they are, blessing of the General acts of all justices and authority Some say this year m General Assembly has caretaker session. The swift action taken by however, is a sign that Assembly is in full control and that it takes its protect the health and monters most seriously, broad public concern clear and apparent need act, and for that we grateful. signed up for state unemployment insurance during the winter and then had the checks mailed to him in Florida. That's the kind of thing legislators scream about when they're looking for ways to cut the budget. Now we hear about the Vermont legislator, Democratic Rep. Elaine Charboneau of Burlington, who o evn----00e o -- B00i. on i. • o.ce on y one o ----cr r '' i b W O 'll . oO receive expense benefits for three • .9 *,L'I:"'BL'i;. -' . If you'v'e ever watched a home, buy an automobde or LIE:IV:Rn: days she was absent because of m I I I I llll[l [I | fill 'tug-of-war', you'll have a replace a worn-out appliance. Thursday, May21 illness, much better understanding of And we haven't even touched BRADFORD: Oxhow School Beard, 7:30 Longtime family farms the confusion prevalent in on food, clothing, energy or NEWBURY: PlanningCommission,7:30p.nt. Charboneau, after the publicity today's money market. Money education. How unfair? How WELLSRIVER:Trustees, I:30p.m. collected $375 in legislative pay and expenses while she was vacationing on a Caribbean island 2,000 miles away. That, of course, is different. "Everybody else has done it," Charboneau said in her own defense. That, unfortunately, seems to be true of many other legislators who draw salary and expenses for days they are absent from the legislature. surrounding her case, said she would return the $129 in expense money she receive while out of the country, but still apparently intends to keep the $250 in salary for that week. Nice work if you can get it, but the next time you hear some legislator sounding off about welfare cheats or unemployment insurance fraud, consider the source. and home00/tes (Note: This is a preliminary list• Additions and corrections are welcome. Call 603-787-6315 or write Katharine Blaisdell, No. Haverhill, N. H. 03774.) 1763 Bayley: Jacob, Isaac, Isaac, Henry, Agnes mar. Frederic Cobb: Norman, Frederic ................. Newbury 1763 Johnson: Thomas, David, Edward, Louise mar. John Wheeler: Frances mar. Henry W. Keyes: Francis..Newbury 1769 Grant: Benjamin, Alanson, Sidney, David, Fred, Clyde ............................................ ..•.Lyme '1771 Peters: John, Andrew, Joseph, Arthur, J. Edward, Frank ............................................ Bradford 1774 Rogers: Josiah, Samuel, Oliver, Byron, Lloyd, • ven ;'. : .' ..: ; . : ,. ;: ............ ;i.i. ,. .Newbury ....... :, '= i# Ne]soni'WiflimJ0hn, John, S .'Font; James,    ; '" ..... J. Harold, Kennethand Bruce ......... '...).;. •. ..... Ryegate CJlor Vermont Green Gray: John, William, Mary'l,rl€iJam.sNelson: George, Hassall ................................... Ryegate 1775 McLaren: John, Alexander, James, Milo, J. Carroll, The state's Travel Advisory Council is considering a $1.3 million promotion campaign that may in- clude a new slogan to promote Ver- mont's tourist industry. That's a lot of green to spend promoting the Green Mountain State, but then the more tourists who visit, the more green stuff they leave in the state's cash registers, and it's all undoubtedly worth it. But what about that slogan? Lot's of Vermonters have adopted the "I LoVermont" bumper sticker,  but some think that's too close to New York state's successful "I Luv New York" slogan. The Travel Advisory Council hasn't asked us, but we've got a couple of candidates for a new license plate slogan that could rank up there with New Hampshire's "Live Free or Die." How about that old saying that's supposed to be the true test of a true Vermonter: "T'aint Where You're Born, It's Where You're Buried!" But maybe that's too long, and maybe even too discouraging. We could try "Loverly Vermont," plagiarizing Eliza Doolittle of "My Fair Lady," or even that somewhat mercenary suggestion that appeared elsewhere in print recently: "Keep Vermont Green--Spend Freely." Another cynical suggestion in view of the cold winters and soaring heating bills is "Vermont--Love It and Leave It." But that isn't calculated to bring in many tourist dollars either. But, seriously, a good slogan can be an important part of a promotion campaign to bring visitors to Ver- mont. "See and Ski Vermont," is a possibility that occurs to us. Another might he "Vermont--Land of Verdant ,Vistas," or simply "Color Vermont Green," Maybe you've got a suggestion for a state slogan. If so, send it along to the Travel Advisory Council at the capitol in Montpelier. Numerous State Agency appointments are open MONTPELIER--Want to as diverse as the Board of than the Governor• Appoin- serve your State in an official Libraries to the State Lottery tments not otherwise specified capacity? You can apply for a Commission, and covers the are made by the Governor. seat on one of the 42 boards, period of June through If you are interested in commissions or councils that October, 198L applying have openings during the next several months• Secretary of State James H. Douglas released a list of 127 vacancies in public advisory groups, attached to the various departments and agencies of Vermont state government. "These positions will be filled by Vermont citizens, whether -they are p¢ofessionais in a particular service or consumers wishing to become involved in a field of interest to them," said Douglas. "All a person needs to do is to submit a resume to the Governor's office to be con- sidered," he added. The list includes vacancies for appointment, In most cases, the positions send a letter listing your pay $30.00 plus expenses for experience and qualifications each dayworked, to Office of the Governor, "Whatever your specialty," Pavilion Office Building, i09 said Douglas, "there is State Street, Montpelier, probably an opening for you Vermont 05602. here. Why just sit home and Council on the Arts; French complain about government, Cultural Commission; Beard when you can join up and see of Libraries; Governor,s that changes are made as you Commission on the Status of know they should be." Women; Certification Appeals Following is a list of Ver- Committee (Appointed by the mont Boards, Councils, and Commissioner of Education); Commissions on which Certification Review Board vacancies will occur during (Appointed by the Corn- the period from June 30 missioner of Education); through Octoher 31,1981. Advisory Council on Corn- Most of these appointments prehensive Health Education will he made by Gov. Snelling (Appointed by the Com- during the coming months, missioner of Education ) ; Title However, some appointments IV Education Advisory are made by persons other Council; Advisory Council for Merrill .............................................. Barnet 17777 Taplln: John, William, Isaac, William, Bertha mar. Frank Hutchinson: Leo ............................. Corinth 1780 Perkins: Isaac, George, Apeilos, Adna, Herbert .Lyres 1781 Hutchins: Jeremiah, Samuel, Hannah mar. Ira Gondall: Lucretia mar. John Carleton: Mary mar. Edward Woods: Katherine mar. Amos Binndin: Katherine mar. Paul Ginver ................................................ Bath 17837 Niles: Nathaniel... Margaret Eaton ..... West Fairies 1784 Bronson: Jonathan, David, Stephen, Myron, Win. Maurice, Howard .................................. Landaff 1785 Warden: William, James, William, Horace, Robert, David ............................................... Barnet 1786 Child: John, Dwight, John, Dwight, Elizabeth mar. Raymond Hoyt ........................................ Bath 17B7 Hurd: Tristram (Tresham), Sarah mar. Alexander McLeroy; Roy: Nathaniel, Joseph, Charles, Joseph and Bruce ............................................... Barnet 1789 Moulton: David, David, William, William, Norman ............................................ Corinth 1783 Eastman: Edmond, Edmond, Emerson, Eugene .................................................... Corinth 1797 Paddleferd: Philip, Philip, Curtis, Mary mar. Homer Smith: Howard: Dennis Paddleford Ward (descendant of Philip) .............................. Monroe 1799 Balch: Joshua, Samuel, West, Ralph ............ Lyme 18007 Way: Amos, Samuel, Emma mar. Willis Smith: Homer, Norman .................................... Monroe 1800? lang: Henry H., Martha mar. Henry S. Lang: Emma mar. Hbrace Reed: David, Clarence ................... Bath 1801 Mead: Nathan, Fanny mar. James Page: James, Norman, Page Brothers ............................. Benton 1802 Minor: Samuel, William, Jonas, George, Alden ...Bath 1811 Somers: Bartholemew, Nancy mar. James Russell: Agnes mar. Alexander Moore: James, Pauline mar. Lloyd Willis: David ........... ............................. Barnet 1818 Nelson: James and John, John F., William, James (nephew), Howard, Fremont and William .......... Ryegate 1820 Washburn, Libeus Jr., Allen, Carrie mar. Luther Whlttemore: Ruth and Pauline ....................... Lyme 1832 Evans : Robert, Joseph, Joseph, Arthur, • Robert .................... . ....................... Piermont 1837 Smith: Joseph, Jonathan, John, John, John..Newbury 1840 Cooley: Alonzo, Elra, Duran ................... Easton 1850 Keyes: Henry, Henry W., Henry W .......... Haverhill 1852 Franklin: Benjamin, LewiS, Arthur, Harry ..... Orford 1852 Miller: Madison, John, Sheldon .......... West Fairiee 18?? Godfrey: ... William, William ........... West Fairies 1854 Whitman: David, Levi, Horace, Stanley ..... Newbury 1861 Bailey: Austin, Arthur. Donald and Louise ....... Bath 1862 Paddleford: Comer B. Jr., Ellen mar. John Roy; sold to Paddlef0rd descendant R. Linfield Ward: R. Theodore ........................ • ....... ........ Monroe 1865 Chamberlin: George, Samuel, Edwin, Nelson .... Bath 1866 Carleton: William, Dudley, Arthur, Harold, Donald ............................................ N ewbury 1869 Armstrong: James, Julia mar. Charles Martin: Florence mar. Leon Brainerd: Harry ................ Corinth (Note: Please help us to make this list as complete as possible by sending additional names from any of the towns listed above, also Groton, Topsham, Fairlee, Thetford, Orford, Warren, Wentworth, and Lyman. Additions through 1882 will be accepted. Farms or homesites that have gone out of the family within the last five years may also be included, if they were in the family 100 years or more. Please send inforrrmtion as soon as possible, to be included in the next Over the River book.) Vocational-Technical Advisory Council; Board of Education; • Teachers Trustees Municipal Retirement Board of Retirement; Board of Trustees; Student Assistance Trustees State Retirement; Corporation; State Colleges Solid Waste and Air Quality Board of Trustees; Job Start (please turn topage 6) managers and dispensers of money on one side and users of money, which includes all of us, on the other side. Each in his own way slipping and sliding while grabbing at the rope, which for the sake of this column, we'll call the available supply of money. As if the rope wasn't short enough and slippery enough and the footing treacherous; take a lnok'at the referees! ! The Federal Reserve Board making constant adjustments to the, federal and state legislatorS adding to and revising their set of rules while in the background, trying to protect their own interests, virtually every nation in the world ex- pounding their interpretation of the rules by which the 'Money Game' should be played. Meanwhile, in home town America, this monetary tug- of-war is rapidly translated into unequal and often unfair competition for the consumer who wants to purchase a unequal? This column will attempt to bring into focus the problems associated with the acquisition of money by the consumer and, the mounting problems faced by financial institutions, industry and the business community. We intend to take a hard look at your money problems in a language that can be un- derstond. It is your money. No matter how it is fed into the economic pipeline. It is your money. No matter who believes eLe control of your dollars as they are bartered for goods and services. Who protects you, the consumer, and requires each institution to perform the services required under its charter? What do they do? What should they do? Our next column will begin a series that will hopefully answer your questions on how the various types of financial institutions receive and distribute your money. Democrats who oppose N. H. payroll tax listed CONCORD--Sen. Robert F. Preston, Democratic Leader of the New Hampshire Senate, responding on behalf of democratic Senators to news reports that pointed to a "Victory for Democrats" in passing a payroll tax in the House of Representatives, says he opposes the payroll tax as presented to the Senate. "The payroll tax is a punitive levy upon labor in- tensive industries. It unfairly imposes a tax upon business, small and large whether they make a profit or not. It has an adverse effect on the workingman and woman. Why should a business hire added employees at higher wages, if the more they pay an em- ployee the greater tax will have to be paid. Any such tax proposal holds low priority as a consideration to resolve our fiscal crisis," Preston said. "The New Hampshire economic climate has ex- perienced a healthy growth. In my opinion, the payroll tax could have a detrimental effect on both labor and management. I, therefore, will oppose the payroll tax and urge both democrats and republicans to do so• This is not a partisan issue," he added. The record shows that a substantial number of Republicans in the House were as responsible as the Democratic proponents of the tax, he said. Preston said Democratic senators opposed to the tax are as follows: Sen. Laurier Lamontagnem, Dist. 1; SOn. Richard Beyer, Dist. 13; Sen. Champagne, Dist. 2; Sen. Louis Gergeron, Dist. 6; Sen. Harold Rice, Dist. 15; Sen. Lessard, Dist. 21; Sen. Clesson J. Blaisdell, Dist. 10; Sen. Robert Stephen, Dist. 18; Sen. Preston, Dist. 2; Sen. Splaine, Dist. 2. SUMMER COURSES Registration for summer 'courses at the Community College of Vermont is scheduled June 1-15, from 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m., at 18 N. Main St., in Barre, or 5 State St. in Montpelier. Courses are of- fered in business, college readiness and many other subjects. Friday, May 22 WOODSVILL: Haverhill District Court, Monday, May 25 HAVERHILL: Selectmen, 7 p.m. FAIRLEE: Selectmen, 8 p.m. NEWBURY: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m. THETFORD: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m. THETFORD: Selectmen 7 p.m. E. CORINTH: Planning Commission, 7:30 Tuesday, May 25 GROTON: Zoning Board of Adjustment, 7 Wednesday, May 27 HAVERHILL: Haverhill. Cooperative meeting, 7:30 p.m. CALEn 20 WELLS RIVER: Senior citizens' luncheon Christ vestry, serving at noon. THETFORD: A Community Health Nurse will check hypertension, glaucomS Thetford Hill Church, 7-9 p.m. Thursday, May 21 BRADFORD: Overeaters' Anonymous O.C.M.H. Friday, May 22 BRADFORD: Senior citizens' luncheon Center, serving at 11:45 a.m. 222-4782. Saturday, May W. TOPSHAM: Talent Show, 7-91 midnight, at W. Topaham Community Topsham Tri-Village Fire Dept. S. RYEGATE: Baked Chicken Old newspapers reveal the past WENTWORTH -- Ken Mossholder recently acquired a number of items among which were many unopened newspapers of early dates: 1902, 1909, 1889, 1892. Knowing Bill Mertsch has great interest in antiquities, he gave him the copies. The paper is dry and crumbly, but Mertsch was able to copy a number of items. Among them from the Republic Journal, Littleton, Dec. 16, 1892--"Warren: Christmas will be observed here on the 24th. Miss Ava Upton had a finger amputated last week. Little Anna .Coolton is sick with the scarlet fever. School commenced Monday with the usual attendance. Fred Hall's store is begun and it is really astonishing how they are progressing. "Wentworth: J.D. Marston is building a store for Fred Hall in Warren. David Eaton gives good satisfaction at the depot. Lumbermen are anxiously awaiting snow. Mrs. POST MILLS: Rummage and Food Sale, a.m. - 2 p.m. Ladies' Benefit Society. ORFORD--Chicken pie supper, "Or ford Church vestry, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, May 24 WOODSVILLE: Flea Market, 10 a.m.-5 Belgium Booster Club. i Monday, May 25 NEWBURY: Volleyball for ages 13-adult, Town Hall. Sponsored by the Newbury Tuesday, May 26 BRADFORD: Senior citizens' luncheon Center, serving at 11:45 a.m. 222-4782. Wednesday, May 27 WELLS RIVER: Senior citizens' luncheon, Christ vestry, serving at noon. This is mailbox " BRADFORD--Among the numbers many things that springtime visible on brings to mind is spring cluding cleaning, and Postmaster H. optional. J. McDonald has a reminder All to include your mailbox in this certain annual spring rite. strength, Mailbox Improvement These Week, May 18 - 23, provides from the that perfect opportunity to clean, repair, reprint or replace your mailbox. "Neat, attractive mailboxes add to the overall appearance U. C, of the community and aid in on the delivery of mail," the Postmaster said. Boxes should be within easy of reach for letter carriers. On Congre[ rural routes, the carrier must (U.C.C.) have .access to the box without leaving his vehicle. Mailboxes the on rural and contract routes must be located on the right This band side of the road in the trustees, direction traveled by the upon carrier, the Postmaster said. "Rain or snow leaking into Wallace Brown is visiting her the mailbox could ruin the husband who is at the special letter; so box seams inebriates home in North should be tight to prevent the Grange ConWay. Miss E. G. Whitmore loss or damage of mail placed has gone to Chicago for the in the box," he said. A winter." Box numbers and house i Page 4-The Journal Opinion-May 20, 1981 iiiiii , ,,,, , m , i THEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. Publisher of r Jwamal iOpini°n t $02-222-5281 %,  603-747-2016 v, pJ An Independent Newspaper I I Editorial J Legislative morality Every once in a while when abuses "I don't think it's morally right for of taxpayers' money is the topic you them to accept something they didn't hpr the one about the fellow who earn, but we can't enforce moral 00Letters to the Editor00 Foster Children Week To the Editor: It is ironical that Action for Foster Children Week (May 16 to May 24) traditionally falls between Mother's Day and Father's Day. Perhaps the juxtaposition of these events can serve to heighten our awareness of the needs of youngsters ,separated from their own families. There are many factors in our society that contribute to the physical and emotional problems which ultimately cause a child to be parted from his parents• We may not be able to solve these problems, but we do need to be working cooperatively to try to find solutions, and we do need to be able to offer all children stability and a caring home environment. A child whose emotional and physical needs are not met today has little chance of developing into tomorrow's responsible adult, let alone parent. Foster Care, nationwide, has been in the news with some well deserved criticisms. We all wish there was no need for foster care, ' but the reality is that there is a need. The Upper Valley Youth Services' answer to the criticisms is to work towards improving the quality of foster care by training prospective foster parents, offering 24 hour professional support to lowering the caseload of our social workers, and by working continually With natural parents. Upper Valley Youth Ser- vices is one of several com- munity-based agencies in this rural area which delivers service through the region's greatest resource--its people• The UVYS foster care net- work, the Opportunity Cen- ter's network of family day care providers, and the Children At Risk Program's network of parent aids for families of abused and neglected children all provide support and training to these informal community helpers. Our communities have benefitted from the increased skills and service resources of our neighbors to whom we have turned for help. We urge all citizens to volunteer their energies and talents to support the work of our social services agencies, public and private, and our dedicated foster parents. Let us work cooperatively with them to bring about better services for our foster children. Joanne H. Foulk Foster Care Coordinator Philip W. Bosh Associate Director Upper Valley Youth Services Hell on Wheels reunion To the Editor: For more than twenty seven years we have been trying to contact Veterans of the 2nd. Armored "Hell on Wheels" Division for our reunion each year, and each year we locate a few through "Letters to The Editor," etc. There are still many "Hell on Wheels" Vets who know nothing of our association and again we need your help, please. Our World War II Roster has been lost and we would like to tell them of our reunion which will be July 29 - August I, 1981, at Stouffirs Valley Forge Inn, King of Prussia, Pa• "Hell on Wheels" Vets may write to Russel S. Laminsin, President of 2nd. Armd. Div. Assn., 316 Bridge Street, Spring City, Pa., for in- formation• Thank you. Gabs Struggles Box 293 Waldron, AR 72958 OVEREATERS TO MEET BRADFORD--A meeting of Overeaters Anonymous is scheduled May 21 at 8 p.m• at Orange County Mental Health. Vermont Secretary of State James H. Douglas Town h'fe can proceed Now that the Governor has signed H.493 into law, all Vermonters can breathe a collective sigh of relief. Our justices of the peace, and all the acts they have done since February I, have now been validated by law, and town life can proceed nor- mally, as if no problem ever arose. If that sounds a little dramatic, just consider what would have happened if H•493 had never been adopted. All marriages, all tax appeals, all checklist revisions, and consequently all 1981 Vermont Town Meetings, would have been left in a gray area of uncertainty. All acts of Vermont justices of the peace, including their work on hoards of civil authority, between February I, 1981, and January 31, 1983, might well have been invalid, and without effect, because of a simple oversight during the election law reform process of 1980. By that oversight, many of Vermont's justices of the peace may have been automatically removed from office sometime after February I, 1981, because they failed to file a copy of their oath of office with the county clerk. Justices in Vermont are permitted to perform marriages, acknowledge oaths, and they usually constitute a majority of the board of civil authority. Most of their former judicial responsibilities were removed by an act of the General Assembly in 1974, but they still perform a vital service to their communities by supervising elections and performing other duties. The act that saves them from dispossession of office February 1, 1981, and certainties about actions moot justices after that they have taken an oral before acting as justices. extension of time for not filed a certified copy the county clerk, until July 1, The act also validates elec that elected too November, 1980. nin counties mistakenly preliminary census count constitutional maximum of ) elected• The Attorney ruled that, be used, a number not March of 1981. The act validates leaving things as they are, blessing of the General acts of all justices and authority Some say this year m General Assembly has caretaker session. The swift action taken by however, is a sign that Assembly is in full control and that it takes its protect the health and monters most seriously, broad public concern clear and apparent need act, and for that we grateful. signed up for state unemployment insurance during the winter and then had the checks mailed to him in Florida. That's the kind of thing legislators scream about when they're looking for ways to cut the budget. Now we hear about the Vermont legislator, Democratic Rep. Elaine Charboneau of Burlington, who o evn----00e o -- B00i. on i. • o.ce on y one o ----cr r '' i b W O 'll . oO receive expense benefits for three • .9 *,L'I:"'BL'i;. -' . If you'v'e ever watched a home, buy an automobde or LIE:IV:Rn: days she was absent because of m I I I I llll[l [I | fill 'tug-of-war', you'll have a replace a worn-out appliance. Thursday, May21 illness, much better understanding of And we haven't even touched BRADFORD: Oxhow School Beard, 7:30 Longtime family farms the confusion prevalent in on food, clothing, energy or NEWBURY: PlanningCommission,7:30p.nt. Charboneau, after the publicity today's money market. Money education. How unfair? How WELLSRIVER:Trustees, I:30p.m. collected $375 in legislative pay and expenses while she was vacationing on a Caribbean island 2,000 miles away. That, of course, is different. "Everybody else has done it," Charboneau said in her own defense. That, unfortunately, seems to be true of many other legislators who draw salary and expenses for days they are absent from the legislature. surrounding her case, said she would return the $129 in expense money she receive while out of the country, but still apparently intends to keep the $250 in salary for that week. Nice work if you can get it, but the next time you hear some legislator sounding off about welfare cheats or unemployment insurance fraud, consider the source. and home00/tes (Note: This is a preliminary list• Additions and corrections are welcome. Call 603-787-6315 or write Katharine Blaisdell, No. Haverhill, N. H. 03774.) 1763 Bayley: Jacob, Isaac, Isaac, Henry, Agnes mar. Frederic Cobb: Norman, Frederic ................. Newbury 1763 Johnson: Thomas, David, Edward, Louise mar. John Wheeler: Frances mar. Henry W. Keyes: Francis..Newbury 1769 Grant: Benjamin, Alanson, Sidney, David, Fred, Clyde ............................................ ..•.Lyme '1771 Peters: John, Andrew, Joseph, Arthur, J. Edward, Frank ............................................ Bradford 1774 Rogers: Josiah, Samuel, Oliver, Byron, Lloyd, • ven ;'. : .' ..: ; . : ,. ;: ............ ;i.i. ,. .Newbury ....... :, '= i# Ne]soni'WiflimJ0hn, John, S .'Font; James,    ; '" ..... J. Harold, Kennethand Bruce ......... '...).;. •. ..... Ryegate CJlor Vermont Green Gray: John, William, Mary'l,rl€iJam.sNelson: George, Hassall ................................... Ryegate 1775 McLaren: John, Alexander, James, Milo, J. Carroll, The state's Travel Advisory Council is considering a $1.3 million promotion campaign that may in- clude a new slogan to promote Ver- mont's tourist industry. That's a lot of green to spend promoting the Green Mountain State, but then the more tourists who visit, the more green stuff they leave in the state's cash registers, and it's all undoubtedly worth it. But what about that slogan? Lot's of Vermonters have adopted the "I LoVermont" bumper sticker,  but some think that's too close to New York state's successful "I Luv New York" slogan. The Travel Advisory Council hasn't asked us, but we've got a couple of candidates for a new license plate slogan that could rank up there with New Hampshire's "Live Free or Die." How about that old saying that's supposed to be the true test of a true Vermonter: "T'aint Where You're Born, It's Where You're Buried!" But maybe that's too long, and maybe even too discouraging. We could try "Loverly Vermont," plagiarizing Eliza Doolittle of "My Fair Lady," or even that somewhat mercenary suggestion that appeared elsewhere in print recently: "Keep Vermont Green--Spend Freely." Another cynical suggestion in view of the cold winters and soaring heating bills is "Vermont--Love It and Leave It." But that isn't calculated to bring in many tourist dollars either. But, seriously, a good slogan can be an important part of a promotion campaign to bring visitors to Ver- mont. "See and Ski Vermont," is a possibility that occurs to us. Another might he "Vermont--Land of Verdant ,Vistas," or simply "Color Vermont Green," Maybe you've got a suggestion for a state slogan. If so, send it along to the Travel Advisory Council at the capitol in Montpelier. Numerous State Agency appointments are open MONTPELIER--Want to as diverse as the Board of than the Governor• Appoin- serve your State in an official Libraries to the State Lottery tments not otherwise specified capacity? You can apply for a Commission, and covers the are made by the Governor. seat on one of the 42 boards, period of June through If you are interested in commissions or councils that October, 198L applying have openings during the next several months• Secretary of State James H. Douglas released a list of 127 vacancies in public advisory groups, attached to the various departments and agencies of Vermont state government. "These positions will be filled by Vermont citizens, whether -they are p¢ofessionais in a particular service or consumers wishing to become involved in a field of interest to them," said Douglas. "All a person needs to do is to submit a resume to the Governor's office to be con- sidered," he added. The list includes vacancies for appointment, In most cases, the positions send a letter listing your pay $30.00 plus expenses for experience and qualifications each dayworked, to Office of the Governor, "Whatever your specialty," Pavilion Office Building, i09 said Douglas, "there is State Street, Montpelier, probably an opening for you Vermont 05602. here. Why just sit home and Council on the Arts; French complain about government, Cultural Commission; Beard when you can join up and see of Libraries; Governor,s that changes are made as you Commission on the Status of know they should be." Women; Certification Appeals Following is a list of Ver- Committee (Appointed by the mont Boards, Councils, and Commissioner of Education); Commissions on which Certification Review Board vacancies will occur during (Appointed by the Corn- the period from June 30 missioner of Education); through Octoher 31,1981. Advisory Council on Corn- Most of these appointments prehensive Health Education will he made by Gov. Snelling (Appointed by the Com- during the coming months, missioner of Education ) ; Title However, some appointments IV Education Advisory are made by persons other Council; Advisory Council for Merrill .............................................. Barnet 17777 Taplln: John, William, Isaac, William, Bertha mar. Frank Hutchinson: Leo ............................. Corinth 1780 Perkins: Isaac, George, Apeilos, Adna, Herbert .Lyres 1781 Hutchins: Jeremiah, Samuel, Hannah mar. Ira Gondall: Lucretia mar. John Carleton: Mary mar. Edward Woods: Katherine mar. Amos Binndin: Katherine mar. Paul Ginver ................................................ Bath 17837 Niles: Nathaniel... Margaret Eaton ..... West Fairies 1784 Bronson: Jonathan, David, Stephen, Myron, Win. Maurice, Howard .................................. Landaff 1785 Warden: William, James, William, Horace, Robert, David ............................................... Barnet 1786 Child: John, Dwight, John, Dwight, Elizabeth mar. Raymond Hoyt ........................................ Bath 17B7 Hurd: Tristram (Tresham), Sarah mar. Alexander McLeroy; Roy: Nathaniel, Joseph, Charles, Joseph and Bruce ............................................... Barnet 1789 Moulton: David, David, William, William, Norman ............................................ Corinth 1783 Eastman: Edmond, Edmond, Emerson, Eugene .................................................... Corinth 1797 Paddleferd: Philip, Philip, Curtis, Mary mar. Homer Smith: Howard: Dennis Paddleford Ward (descendant of Philip) .............................. Monroe 1799 Balch: Joshua, Samuel, West, Ralph ............ Lyme 18007 Way: Amos, Samuel, Emma mar. Willis Smith: Homer, Norman .................................... Monroe 1800? lang: Henry H., Martha mar. Henry S. Lang: Emma mar. Hbrace Reed: David, Clarence ................... Bath 1801 Mead: Nathan, Fanny mar. James Page: James, Norman, Page Brothers ............................. Benton 1802 Minor: Samuel, William, Jonas, George, Alden ...Bath 1811 Somers: Bartholemew, Nancy mar. James Russell: Agnes mar. Alexander Moore: James, Pauline mar. Lloyd Willis: David ........... ............................. Barnet 1818 Nelson: James and John, John F., William, James (nephew), Howard, Fremont and William .......... Ryegate 1820 Washburn, Libeus Jr., Allen, Carrie mar. Luther Whlttemore: Ruth and Pauline ....................... Lyme 1832 Evans : Robert, Joseph, Joseph, Arthur, • Robert .................... . ....................... Piermont 1837 Smith: Joseph, Jonathan, John, John, John..Newbury 1840 Cooley: Alonzo, Elra, Duran ................... Easton 1850 Keyes: Henry, Henry W., Henry W .......... Haverhill 1852 Franklin: Benjamin, LewiS, Arthur, Harry ..... Orford 1852 Miller: Madison, John, Sheldon .......... West Fairiee 18?? Godfrey: ... William, William ........... West Fairies 1854 Whitman: David, Levi, Horace, Stanley ..... Newbury 1861 Bailey: Austin, Arthur. Donald and Louise ....... Bath 1862 Paddleford: Comer B. Jr., Ellen mar. John Roy; sold to Paddlef0rd descendant R. Linfield Ward: R. Theodore ........................ • ....... ........ Monroe 1865 Chamberlin: George, Samuel, Edwin, Nelson .... Bath 1866 Carleton: William, Dudley, Arthur, Harold, Donald ............................................ N ewbury 1869 Armstrong: James, Julia mar. Charles Martin: Florence mar. Leon Brainerd: Harry ................ Corinth (Note: Please help us to make this list as complete as possible by sending additional names from any of the towns listed above, also Groton, Topsham, Fairlee, Thetford, Orford, Warren, Wentworth, and Lyman. Additions through 1882 will be accepted. Farms or homesites that have gone out of the family within the last five years may also be included, if they were in the family 100 years or more. Please send inforrrmtion as soon as possible, to be included in the next Over the River book.) Vocational-Technical Advisory Council; Board of Education; • Teachers Trustees Municipal Retirement Board of Retirement; Board of Trustees; Student Assistance Trustees State Retirement; Corporation; State Colleges Solid Waste and Air Quality Board of Trustees; Job Start (please turn topage 6) managers and dispensers of money on one side and users of money, which includes all of us, on the other side. Each in his own way slipping and sliding while grabbing at the rope, which for the sake of this column, we'll call the available supply of money. As if the rope wasn't short enough and slippery enough and the footing treacherous; take a lnok'at the referees! ! The Federal Reserve Board making constant adjustments to the, federal and state legislatorS adding to and revising their set of rules while in the background, trying to protect their own interests, virtually every nation in the world ex- pounding their interpretation of the rules by which the 'Money Game' should be played. Meanwhile, in home town America, this monetary tug- of-war is rapidly translated into unequal and often unfair competition for the consumer who wants to purchase a unequal? This column will attempt to bring into focus the problems associated with the acquisition of money by the consumer and, the mounting problems faced by financial institutions, industry and the business community. We intend to take a hard look at your money problems in a language that can be un- derstond. It is your money. No matter how it is fed into the economic pipeline. It is your money. No matter who believes eLe control of your dollars as they are bartered for goods and services. Who protects you, the consumer, and requires each institution to perform the services required under its charter? What do they do? What should they do? Our next column will begin a series that will hopefully answer your questions on how the various types of financial institutions receive and distribute your money. Democrats who oppose N. H. payroll tax listed CONCORD--Sen. Robert F. Preston, Democratic Leader of the New Hampshire Senate, responding on behalf of democratic Senators to news reports that pointed to a "Victory for Democrats" in passing a payroll tax in the House of Representatives, says he opposes the payroll tax as presented to the Senate. "The payroll tax is a punitive levy upon labor in- tensive industries. It unfairly imposes a tax upon business, small and large whether they make a profit or not. It has an adverse effect on the workingman and woman. Why should a business hire added employees at higher wages, if the more they pay an em- ployee the greater tax will have to be paid. Any such tax proposal holds low priority as a consideration to resolve our fiscal crisis," Preston said. "The New Hampshire economic climate has ex- perienced a healthy growth. In my opinion, the payroll tax could have a detrimental effect on both labor and management. I, therefore, will oppose the payroll tax and urge both democrats and republicans to do so• This is not a partisan issue," he added. The record shows that a substantial number of Republicans in the House were as responsible as the Democratic proponents of the tax, he said. Preston said Democratic senators opposed to the tax are as follows: Sen. Laurier Lamontagnem, Dist. 1; SOn. Richard Beyer, Dist. 13; Sen. Champagne, Dist. 2; Sen. Louis Gergeron, Dist. 6; Sen. Harold Rice, Dist. 15; Sen. Lessard, Dist. 21; Sen. Clesson J. Blaisdell, Dist. 10; Sen. Robert Stephen, Dist. 18; Sen. Preston, Dist. 2; Sen. Splaine, Dist. 2. SUMMER COURSES Registration for summer 'courses at the Community College of Vermont is scheduled June 1-15, from 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m., at 18 N. Main St., in Barre, or 5 State St. in Montpelier. Courses are of- fered in business, college readiness and many other subjects. Friday, May 22 WOODSVILL: Haverhill District Court, Monday, May 25 HAVERHILL: Selectmen, 7 p.m. FAIRLEE: Selectmen, 8 p.m. NEWBURY: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m. THETFORD: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m. THETFORD: Selectmen 7 p.m. E. CORINTH: Planning Commission, 7:30 Tuesday, May 25 GROTON: Zoning Board of Adjustment, 7 Wednesday, May 27 HAVERHILL: Haverhill. Cooperative meeting, 7:30 p.m. CALEn 20 WELLS RIVER: Senior citizens' luncheon Christ vestry, serving at noon. THETFORD: A Community Health Nurse will check hypertension, glaucomS Thetford Hill Church, 7-9 p.m. Thursday, May 21 BRADFORD: Overeaters' Anonymous O.C.M.H. Friday, May 22 BRADFORD: Senior citizens' luncheon Center, serving at 11:45 a.m. 222-4782. Saturday, May W. TOPSHAM: Talent Show, 7-91 midnight, at W. Topaham Community Topsham Tri-Village Fire Dept. S. RYEGATE: Baked Chicken Old newspapers reveal the past WENTWORTH -- Ken Mossholder recently acquired a number of items among which were many unopened newspapers of early dates: 1902, 1909, 1889, 1892. Knowing Bill Mertsch has great interest in antiquities, he gave him the copies. The paper is dry and crumbly, but Mertsch was able to copy a number of items. Among them from the Republic Journal, Littleton, Dec. 16, 1892--"Warren: Christmas will be observed here on the 24th. Miss Ava Upton had a finger amputated last week. Little Anna .Coolton is sick with the scarlet fever. School commenced Monday with the usual attendance. Fred Hall's store is begun and it is really astonishing how they are progressing. "Wentworth: J.D. Marston is building a store for Fred Hall in Warren. David Eaton gives good satisfaction at the depot. Lumbermen are anxiously awaiting snow. Mrs. POST MILLS: Rummage and Food Sale, a.m. - 2 p.m. Ladies' Benefit Society. ORFORD--Chicken pie supper, "Or ford Church vestry, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, May 24 WOODSVILLE: Flea Market, 10 a.m.-5 Belgium Booster Club. i Monday, May 25 NEWBURY: Volleyball for ages 13-adult, Town Hall. Sponsored by the Newbury Tuesday, May 26 BRADFORD: Senior citizens' luncheon Center, serving at 11:45 a.m. 222-4782. Wednesday, May 27 WELLS RIVER: Senior citizens' luncheon, Christ vestry, serving at noon. This is mailbox " BRADFORD--Among the numbers many things that springtime visible on brings to mind is spring cluding cleaning, and Postmaster H. optional. J. McDonald has a reminder All to include your mailbox in this certain annual spring rite. strength, Mailbox Improvement These Week, May 18 - 23, provides from the that perfect opportunity to clean, repair, reprint or replace your mailbox. "Neat, attractive mailboxes add to the overall appearance U. C, of the community and aid in on the delivery of mail," the Postmaster said. Boxes should be within easy of reach for letter carriers. On Congre[ rural routes, the carrier must (U.C.C.) have .access to the box without leaving his vehicle. Mailboxes the on rural and contract routes must be located on the right This band side of the road in the trustees, direction traveled by the upon carrier, the Postmaster said. "Rain or snow leaking into Wallace Brown is visiting her the mailbox could ruin the husband who is at the special letter; so box seams inebriates home in North should be tight to prevent the Grange ConWay. Miss E. G. Whitmore loss or damage of mail placed has gone to Chicago for the in the box," he said. A winter." Box numbers and house i