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May 20, 1981     Journal Opinion
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Page 8-The Journal Opinion-M/ly 20, 1981 Rochester balloons Wizard of Oz gets rave reviews 1 d an in by BETHNELSON standing ovation each Brill, Andy Willis, BMUS At the finish Vermont RUNNING OUT OF GAS.. but still the best mileage around. A balloon laun- ched by Kim Campanozzi landed in Thetford, Ver- mont and found by Don Rathburn of Bradford, Vermont. Don found the balloon while ad- ministering his duties with the Central Vermont Public Service Company. Several thousand of these balloons were launched by students of the Brookside Elementary School in Rochester, New York as part of a fund-raising project. The balloons left New York on May 14 and arrived in Vermont on May 15. A cluster of balloons were also reported found in South Newbury, Vermont from the same school. HERE'S THE GIFT YOU WON'T THROW AWAYJ!! YOUR OWN PERSONALIZED SOCIAL SECURITY CARD! BRADFORD NATIONAL BANK will provide you free of charge a beautiful plastic identification card showing your name and social security number. Visit any of our four full service community offices to sign up for yours. NO FUSS - NO OBLIGATION BRADFORD NATIONAL BANK BI::IADFC2::D, VERMONT Bradfocd 222-5231 F,idrkm 333-4379 TL 785-2112 Nvbury 868-5672 Deposits Insured To $100,000 Member Federal Deposit Insurance PCA 51 24 Color Portraits 95/$12.95 Depot/To00 Package AMES Briar Hill Road North Haverhill. N. Ha 2-8xt10"$ WELLS RIVER--"It couldn't have been better unless it had been done by professionals!". . "I came expecting a Dud but it was fantastic!" ... "It gives me the goosebumps," were some of the comments at the presentation of the "Wizard of Oz" at the Blue Mountain Union School on May 9, 10 and 11,. The culmination of two and a half months of the united efforts of directors, Joe Ford and Jean Davidson, (Mrs. Richard Davidson), the Home Ec. Department, the Art Department, teachers, community members, Industrial Arts teacher and students and office staff was as Joe Ford aptly put it in the WYKR interview "a magical night." The familiar story came to life with a cast of 87 and an orchestra of 16. Lisa Powers as Dorothy brought her own uniqueness to the part en- nabling the supporting characters to complete the fantasy "over the rainbow". Several people commented that Lisa "looked just like Judy Garland." Sheepdog (the creative costume made by Mary Hobbs) Tote played by Michael Hobbs amused the audience with his antics as Dorothy's sidekick. This part was an improvisation by Joe Ford, Michael and other cast members as the play has no dog. "I never saw anyone make such graceful falls" was remarked repeatedly about the scarecrow, Ruth Nelson, who also assisted with props, posters, program covers and hairdos. Todd Davis as the TinIan kept the audience entertained with his hatchet and lusty, "Dorothy". Butch Gandin convulsed everyone as the cowardly lion with a ribbon on his tail. "Rob" Buckley and Polly Whitehill brought Uncle Henry and Aunt Em to life with Scott Knight a realistic hired man. Kansas was located at one end of the gymnasium with the cyclone was created effectively by orchestral music and a special lighting effect with metal stencils of the house flying around the walls in a silhouette. Eerie was the word for the witches' scenes with Lois Eastman, Chris Frost and Myrtle Beck as the screaming hags. Again the music and lighting effects scared the youngsters and "gave goosebumps" to some of the elders. Munchkin land was in the center of the gym floor with flowers and mushrooms created by Elroy Towle and TIN MAN--Todd Davis gets made up for his role as the Tin Man in Blue Mountain Union School's production of "The Wizard of Oz." the entire elementary art department. Munchkin costumes were created by April Mangiapane, Diane Ide, and Sandy Roberts with the girls wearing pastel dresses with floral tops and shirts and knickers for the boys. The fearsome jitterbugs in black tights and red sequined leotards danced the leads almost to a "frazzle" when the beautiful sorceress (Tamara Cheney) saved them. The Oz Generals and ladies gave the cowardly lion a lively chase with spatulas and other im- plements. Wayne Richardson as Lord Growlie with his daughter, Gloria, played by Pare Hit- chcock, shimmered in green suit and gown and were prominent in obtaining the hoped for interview with the Great Oz. Gloria sang the lovely "Evening Star" ac- companied by Eric Cheney with the guitar and Mary Stevens on the flute. The Gt as a backdrop was truly impressive with lighting created by Elroy Towle and Ruth Nelson. The person of the Great Oz was kept a secret until opening night when A. Keith Ober superintendent awarded a "medal of bravery" to the cowardly lion, a diploma to scarecrow. Business tax exemptions urged in North Country CONCORD--Mrs. Greta Poulsen of Littleton has urged a House committee to vote favorably on a bill sponsored by her late husband, Sen. Andrew Poulsen, to revitalize the economy of the North Country. In her statement, presented to the House Ways and Means Committee by Senate aide Marshall Cobleigh, Mrs. Poulsen said the bill is "designed to promote economic revitalization by offering tax incentives to new Iasinesses ,in areas of high unemployment." Mrs. Poulsen, who is a candidate for the District 2 Senate seat of her late husband, said the bill is patterned after federal legislation introduced by Rep. Jack Kemp, (R-N.Y.). It provides for the designation of "enterprise zones" in areas of high unemployment. New businesses employing at least 25 persons would be en- couraged by substantial tax incentives to locate in these zones. Existing businesses in the zones would be offered the same incentives to expand. "The counties of Coos, Carroll and Grafton would be automatically established as enterprise zones," Mrs. Poulsen said. "Other zones would be designated by the director of the Division of Economic Development, with the ap- proval of an enterprise zone committee appointed by the governor, the president of the Senate and the speaker of the House," she added. "In the enterprise zones, the new businesses which qualify would be given a total exemption to the Business Profits Tax for the first year, ' an 80 per cent reduction in the second year, 60 per cent in the third, 40 per cent in the fourth and 20 per cent in the fifth. Ahy municipality which chose, by popular referen- dum, to offer local property taxes could reduce property taxes on the same sliding scale," she said. "This bill will stimulate the creation of new plants and the expansion of existing em- ployment opportunities in areas of our state which have been materially affected by a high rate of unemployment and a decline in the vitality of economic life. Through this legislation, we hope to allow young people in these areas to find work in their home towns, instead of having to move to areas of greater economic opportunity," Mrs. Poulsen I[5  said in her statement. 24 Beautiful Color Portraits ... professl0rBI In addition to the late Sen. portraRure offered in a great package 1 Poulsen, the bill is cospon- at a great pcice, sored by Sen. Laurier J Lamontagne of Berlin, Sen. No mlltlorl h for groupch Po our Raymond K. Conley of Center Sandwich, and Senate Cllm1.a=ajj,,= grClepO'-"-"==--"=---- President Robert Monier of (:nrTuny rEuIleo- Goffstown. I I I Ill II I evening. Other speaking parts were played by David Sulham as the First General, Glen Eastman as the Mayor of the Munchkins, David Bone, a Munchkin farmer, Jenny Rowe as an initially snoring private, Kelly Long as the Oz lady fortunate enough to be kicked by the cowardly lion, Dana Patneaude as Tibia the skeleton, Catherine Dimitruk as a girl and Brent Murray as a Munchkin. Acting in the play was ex- cellent, particularly by the leads. Lighting was provided by Professor Richard Portner of Lyndon State College and the Weathervane Theater of Littleton. Production stage managers were Andrew Dawley, Todd Darling. Assistant choreographer was Judy Haskell. William Randall, Todd Darling, Scott Murphy, David Hill, Jim Stevens, Danny Moyce were technical directors. Judy Murray and Sylvia Lefebvre. Members of the stage crew were Rachel Dimitruk, Tim Nunn, Andy Willis, Greg Roberts, Mike Knight, Brenda Wilson, Betty Bogie, Karen Roberts and Beth Boomhower. Darlene Houghton and Wayne Richardson were business and ticket managers. Wayne Richardson and Mike Knight were responsible for posters, In an impressive finale, tickets and programs. William Dorothy, Toto and the Great Randall was in charge of Oz were ushered to a balloon publicity. (designed by Kelly Long and Richard Davidson, Richard Ruth Nelson)byOzmas (Jeff Frost, Duane Moyse, Tim Roberts). The play received a Nunn, Wade Dimick, Kermit custodians, Carmen Board-performance man, Terry Mason were in presented to charge of set construction, bouquet to Lisa Makeup was done by Pat chairs Randall, Judy Gandin, Loren names Brock, Richard Fraser, April JeanDavidson. Graham, Christine Frost, A ma Sandra Hatch. local, SIOP! sell those WHEN OVER 25000 READ IT IN THE SECOND AM radio with quartz digital clock and dual front speakers. (May be deleted for credit,) B Bigger than a Chevette, smaller than a Citation. C Complete list of 43 standard features: 1. Front-wheel drive 2. 1.8 Liter 4*cylinder transverse engine 3.4-speed manual overdrive transmission 4. Power-assisted front disc/rear drum brakes 5. Glass-betted rediat tires 6, Computer Command Control 7. Rack-and-pimon steering 8. MacPaerson-strut front suspension IL Push-button AM radio with dual front speakers (may be deleted for credit) tO, Quartz digital ClOCk (integral with radio} 1 t. Front stabilizer bar 12. Freedom II maintenance*free battery t3. Large capacity (14*gallon) fuel tank 14. Day/night inside resrview mirror 15, Side window detoggers 16. Electric rear window defogger 17. Tti-color, segmented tail lamps with amber turn signals (except wagon) iS. FIow-thru power ventilation system 19, Locking gas filler door with cap tlolder 20. Acoustical insulation 21. Accessible in-dash flip-down fuse panel 22. Remote trunklhatcttback/taiigate release 23. Body side moldings 24. Styled steel Rally wheels 25, Bumper rub strips 26. Rechnlng contoured front seats 27, Assist grip above each passenger door 28, Console with rear ashtray and coin holder 29, Plastisol* lower body stone-chip protection 30. ColoPkeyed seat and shoulder belts 31. Color-keyed carpeting 32. Extended front seat track 33, Column-mounted "Smart Switch 34. Cigarette tighter aexl ashtray lamp 35. Glove compartment lOCk 36. Styled outside rearview mirror 37.31 separate anti-corrosion-treatment areas 38. Resettable trig odometer 3S. Passenger guard door locks 40. Side-hft lack 41, Double-panel construchon in doors, hood and trunk lid 42. Strong, lightweight steel bumpers (except hatchback) 43. Audible disc brake wear sensors Di Defoggers, side and rear windows. COMPLETE FROM A TO Z E Economy. 4 ES v HIGHWAY/ F Front-wheel-drive traction for snow, mud or wet streets. G GM's Computer Command Control. H Head and hip room enough to seat four adults very comfortably. I Interior room of 4-door Sedan is superior to that of a Toyota Corolla or Corona, Datsun 210, Honda Accord or VW Rabbit. JI J.-C,a r translates iate?aMr with.  K i  Knee room enough to satisfy a 6'5" American. L Laser beams measure body fit to make sure every single Cavalier passes demanding tolerance tests. M i Models include a family sedan, slick hatchback, classy coupe and spacious wagon. N Newly developed 1.8 Liter 4-cylinder transverse engine. O Overdrive 4-speed manual transmission. Power front disc brakes, power ventilation system, PlastisoP lower body stone-chip protection, and a powerfully appealing Chew price. Q Quality'checks at the factory total more than 1,000. R Reclining front seats, Rally wheels and rack-and-pinion steering. ested, retested and ested again to become the most thoroughly tested new car in Chevy's history, Cavalier's helps provide a and is longer than Honda Accord. The trunk is superior in size to that of a Datsun 210, Honda Accord or Toyota Corolla Sedan and holds eight limited limited perforation from See your X "r parts. You re invited to test drive Cavalier at any one of more than Chew dealers. bring in a fri= eng inch by and engineering, *Use estimated Your highway mileage THE COMPLEI'E CAR AT YOUR CHEVY DF.ALERS Page 8-The Journal Opinion-M/ly 20, 1981 Rochester balloons Wizard of Oz gets rave reviews 1 d an in by BETHNELSON standing ovation each Brill, Andy Willis, BMUS At the finish Vermont RUNNING OUT OF GAS.. but still the best mileage around. A balloon laun- ched by Kim Campanozzi landed in Thetford, Ver- mont and found by Don Rathburn of Bradford, Vermont. Don found the balloon while ad- ministering his duties with the Central Vermont Public Service Company. Several thousand of these balloons were launched by students of the Brookside Elementary School in Rochester, New York as part of a fund-raising project. The balloons left New York on May 14 and arrived in Vermont on May 15. A cluster of balloons were also reported found in South Newbury, Vermont from the same school. HERE'S THE GIFT YOU WON'T THROW AWAYJ!! YOUR OWN PERSONALIZED SOCIAL SECURITY CARD! BRADFORD NATIONAL BANK will provide you free of charge a beautiful plastic identification card showing your name and social security number. Visit any of our four full service community offices to sign up for yours. NO FUSS - NO OBLIGATION BRADFORD NATIONAL BANK BI::IADFC2::D, VERMONT Bradfocd 222-5231 F,idrkm 333-4379 TL 785-2112 Nvbury 868-5672 Deposits Insured To $100,000 Member Federal Deposit Insurance PCA 51 24 Color Portraits 95/$12.95 Depot/To00 Package AMES Briar Hill Road North Haverhill. N. Ha 2-8xt10"$ WELLS RIVER--"It couldn't have been better unless it had been done by professionals!". . "I came expecting a Dud but it was fantastic!" ... "It gives me the goosebumps," were some of the comments at the presentation of the "Wizard of Oz" at the Blue Mountain Union School on May 9, 10 and 11,. The culmination of two and a half months of the united efforts of directors, Joe Ford and Jean Davidson, (Mrs. Richard Davidson), the Home Ec. Department, the Art Department, teachers, community members, Industrial Arts teacher and students and office staff was as Joe Ford aptly put it in the WYKR interview "a magical night." The familiar story came to life with a cast of 87 and an orchestra of 16. Lisa Powers as Dorothy brought her own uniqueness to the part en- nabling the supporting characters to complete the fantasy "over the rainbow". Several people commented that Lisa "looked just like Judy Garland." Sheepdog (the creative costume made by Mary Hobbs) Tote played by Michael Hobbs amused the audience with his antics as Dorothy's sidekick. This part was an improvisation by Joe Ford, Michael and other cast members as the play has no dog. "I never saw anyone make such graceful falls" was remarked repeatedly about the scarecrow, Ruth Nelson, who also assisted with props, posters, program covers and hairdos. Todd Davis as the TinIan kept the audience entertained with his hatchet and lusty, "Dorothy". Butch Gandin convulsed everyone as the cowardly lion with a ribbon on his tail. "Rob" Buckley and Polly Whitehill brought Uncle Henry and Aunt Em to life with Scott Knight a realistic hired man. Kansas was located at one end of the gymnasium with the cyclone was created effectively by orchestral music and a special lighting effect with metal stencils of the house flying around the walls in a silhouette. Eerie was the word for the witches' scenes with Lois Eastman, Chris Frost and Myrtle Beck as the screaming hags. Again the music and lighting effects scared the youngsters and "gave goosebumps" to some of the elders. Munchkin land was in the center of the gym floor with flowers and mushrooms created by Elroy Towle and TIN MAN--Todd Davis gets made up for his role as the Tin Man in Blue Mountain Union School's production of "The Wizard of Oz." the entire elementary art department. Munchkin costumes were created by April Mangiapane, Diane Ide, and Sandy Roberts with the girls wearing pastel dresses with floral tops and shirts and knickers for the boys. The fearsome jitterbugs in black tights and red sequined leotards danced the leads almost to a "frazzle" when the beautiful sorceress (Tamara Cheney) saved them. The Oz Generals and ladies gave the cowardly lion a lively chase with spatulas and other im- plements. Wayne Richardson as Lord Growlie with his daughter, Gloria, played by Pare Hit- chcock, shimmered in green suit and gown and were prominent in obtaining the hoped for interview with the Great Oz. Gloria sang the lovely "Evening Star" ac- companied by Eric Cheney with the guitar and Mary Stevens on the flute. The Gt as a backdrop was truly impressive with lighting created by Elroy Towle and Ruth Nelson. The person of the Great Oz was kept a secret until opening night when A. Keith Ober superintendent awarded a "medal of bravery" to the cowardly lion, a diploma to scarecrow. Business tax exemptions urged in North Country CONCORD--Mrs. Greta Poulsen of Littleton has urged a House committee to vote favorably on a bill sponsored by her late husband, Sen. Andrew Poulsen, to revitalize the economy of the North Country. In her statement, presented to the House Ways and Means Committee by Senate aide Marshall Cobleigh, Mrs. Poulsen said the bill is "designed to promote economic revitalization by offering tax incentives to new Iasinesses ,in areas of high unemployment." Mrs. Poulsen, who is a candidate for the District 2 Senate seat of her late husband, said the bill is patterned after federal legislation introduced by Rep. Jack Kemp, (R-N.Y.). It provides for the designation of "enterprise zones" in areas of high unemployment. New businesses employing at least 25 persons would be en- couraged by substantial tax incentives to locate in these zones. Existing businesses in the zones would be offered the same incentives to expand. "The counties of Coos, Carroll and Grafton would be automatically established as enterprise zones," Mrs. Poulsen said. "Other zones would be designated by the director of the Division of Economic Development, with the ap- proval of an enterprise zone committee appointed by the governor, the president of the Senate and the speaker of the House," she added. "In the enterprise zones, the new businesses which qualify would be given a total exemption to the Business Profits Tax for the first year, ' an 80 per cent reduction in the second year, 60 per cent in the third, 40 per cent in the fourth and 20 per cent in the fifth. Ahy municipality which chose, by popular referen- dum, to offer local property taxes could reduce property taxes on the same sliding scale," she said. "This bill will stimulate the creation of new plants and the expansion of existing em- ployment opportunities in areas of our state which have been materially affected by a high rate of unemployment and a decline in the vitality of economic life. Through this legislation, we hope to allow young people in these areas to find work in their home towns, instead of having to move to areas of greater economic opportunity," Mrs. Poulsen I[5  said in her statement. 24 Beautiful Color Portraits ... professl0rBI In addition to the late Sen. portraRure offered in a great package 1 Poulsen, the bill is cospon- at a great pcice, sored by Sen. Laurier J Lamontagne of Berlin, Sen. No mlltlorl h for groupch Po our Raymond K. Conley of Center Sandwich, and Senate Cllm1.a=ajj,,= grClepO'-"-"==--"=---- President Robert Monier of (:nrTuny rEuIleo- Goffstown. I I I Ill II I evening. Other speaking parts were played by David Sulham as the First General, Glen Eastman as the Mayor of the Munchkins, David Bone, a Munchkin farmer, Jenny Rowe as an initially snoring private, Kelly Long as the Oz lady fortunate enough to be kicked by the cowardly lion, Dana Patneaude as Tibia the skeleton, Catherine Dimitruk as a girl and Brent Murray as a Munchkin. Acting in the play was ex- cellent, particularly by the leads. Lighting was provided by Professor Richard Portner of Lyndon State College and the Weathervane Theater of Littleton. Production stage managers were Andrew Dawley, Todd Darling. Assistant choreographer was Judy Haskell. William Randall, Todd Darling, Scott Murphy, David Hill, Jim Stevens, Danny Moyce were technical directors. Judy Murray and Sylvia Lefebvre. Members of the stage crew were Rachel Dimitruk, Tim Nunn, Andy Willis, Greg Roberts, Mike Knight, Brenda Wilson, Betty Bogie, Karen Roberts and Beth Boomhower. Darlene Houghton and Wayne Richardson were business and ticket managers. Wayne Richardson and Mike Knight were responsible for posters, In an impressive finale, tickets and programs. William Dorothy, Toto and the Great Randall was in charge of Oz were ushered to a balloon publicity. (designed by Kelly Long and Richard Davidson, Richard Ruth Nelson)byOzmas (Jeff Frost, Duane Moyse, Tim Roberts). The play received a Nunn, Wade Dimick, Kermit custodians, Carmen Board-performance man, Terry Mason were in presented to charge of set construction, bouquet to Lisa Makeup was done by Pat chairs Randall, Judy Gandin, Loren names Brock, Richard Fraser, April JeanDavidson. Graham, Christine Frost, A ma Sandra Hatch. local, SIOP! sell those WHEN OVER 25000 READ IT IN THE SECOND AM radio with quartz digital clock and dual front speakers. (May be deleted for credit,) B Bigger than a Chevette, smaller than a Citation. C Complete list of 43 standard features: 1. Front-wheel drive 2. 1.8 Liter 4*cylinder transverse engine 3.4-speed manual overdrive transmission 4. Power-assisted front disc/rear drum brakes 5. Glass-betted rediat tires 6, Computer Command Control 7. Rack-and-pimon steering 8. MacPaerson-strut front suspension IL Push-button AM radio with dual front speakers (may be deleted for credit) tO, Quartz digital ClOCk (integral with radio} 1 t. Front stabilizer bar 12. Freedom II maintenance*free battery t3. Large capacity (14*gallon) fuel tank 14. Day/night inside resrview mirror 15, Side window detoggers 16. Electric rear window defogger 17. Tti-color, segmented tail lamps with amber turn signals (except wagon) iS. FIow-thru power ventilation system 19, Locking gas filler door with cap tlolder 20. Acoustical insulation 21. Accessible in-dash flip-down fuse panel 22. Remote trunklhatcttback/taiigate release 23. Body side moldings 24. Styled steel Rally wheels 25, Bumper rub strips 26. Rechnlng contoured front seats 27, Assist grip above each passenger door 28, Console with rear ashtray and coin holder 29, Plastisol* lower body stone-chip protection 30. ColoPkeyed seat and shoulder belts 31. Color-keyed carpeting 32. Extended front seat track 33, Column-mounted "Smart Switch 34. Cigarette tighter aexl ashtray lamp 35. Glove compartment lOCk 36. Styled outside rearview mirror 37.31 separate anti-corrosion-treatment areas 38. Resettable trig odometer 3S. Passenger guard door locks 40. Side-hft lack 41, Double-panel construchon in doors, hood and trunk lid 42. Strong, lightweight steel bumpers (except hatchback) 43. Audible disc brake wear sensors Di Defoggers, side and rear windows. COMPLETE FROM A TO Z E Economy. 4 ES v HIGHWAY/ F Front-wheel-drive traction for snow, mud or wet streets. G GM's Computer Command Control. H Head and hip room enough to seat four adults very comfortably. I Interior room of 4-door Sedan is superior to that of a Toyota Corolla or Corona, Datsun 210, Honda Accord or VW Rabbit. JI J.-C,a r translates iate?aMr with.  K i  Knee room enough to satisfy a 6'5" American. L Laser beams measure body fit to make sure every single Cavalier passes demanding tolerance tests. M i Models include a family sedan, slick hatchback, classy coupe and spacious wagon. N Newly developed 1.8 Liter 4-cylinder transverse engine. O Overdrive 4-speed manual transmission. Power front disc brakes, power ventilation system, PlastisoP lower body stone-chip protection, and a powerfully appealing Chew price. Q Quality'checks at the factory total more than 1,000. R Reclining front seats, Rally wheels and rack-and-pinion steering. ested, retested and ested again to become the most thoroughly tested new car in Chevy's history, Cavalier's helps provide a and is longer than Honda Accord. The trunk is superior in size to that of a Datsun 210, Honda Accord or Toyota Corolla Sedan and holds eight limited limited perforation from See your X "r parts. You re invited to test drive Cavalier at any one of more than Chew dealers. bring in a fri= eng inch by and engineering, *Use estimated Your highway mileage THE COMPLEI'E CAR AT YOUR CHEVY DF.ALERS